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Full text of "Northern Watch (Thief River Falls, MN)"

MINNESOTA 

HISTORICAL 

SOCIETY 



START 



THIEF 

RII/ER FALLS 

NORTHERN 
WATCH 



JAN 3 T|lD 
1998 '"RU 


Title: 
(Thief River Falls) ^RTHERN WATCH 

8:1- 8:52 


lfl-<f-l<fiCj 


Inclusive 

Dacca: .lap 1 Dec 26 

1998 1998 


Orip.inala held by: M1IS _X_ Other 


Prepared by: 

Ecn << ^_ 


Date: 

May 13, 199 


For mat: 1 
1A 

2D X 1 


"NORTHERN fi'TCl!" 


Filmed by: 


l);iLu: 


Camera No. 1 


Itedueti'jn iiatio: Voltmeter: 


Nu . F.xpo.s . 1 


I'r^iin. Inspection by: Date: 


Density: 1 


.:. 


Tnrc.oC Roaoiution: O.K. 

/txn Reluct 


Lenr.tti: 1 



The Minnesota Historical Society has 
reproduced the material in this microfilm 
without any purpose of direct or indirect 
commercial advantage in order to preserve 
& to secure it for private study, scholar- 
ship and research. 

The material reproduced may be protected 
by copyright law. Any person engaging in 
further reproduction fo this material may 
be liable for infringement. 



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NORTHF 1 





Volume S. Number 1 




AROUND 
THE REGION 

Knthl Carbon 



Air quality an 
Issue for Ice arena 

Hallock - Kittson Centra) 
School Board .members infor- 
mally agreed to help Ihc hock- 
ey board wilh funding 10 solve 
an air quality problem nl the 
ice arena. 

The building is not meeting 
polution requirements. 

Inspectors have recommended 
the installation of Tour fans to 
improve the air quality. The 
zamboni, the machine that 
cleans the ice, is causing the 
air problem. 

Kittson County Enterprise 

Man In custody 
following chase 

Red Lake - An argument 
and shooting incident between 
cousins on the Red Lake Res- 
ervation recently resulted in a 
high speed chose and ended 
with a .collision between the 
suspect and a Red Lake Police 
Department squad car on 
Highway 89 near the reserva- 
tion. 

Frederick Dessjarlait, 18. 
of Red Lake, was arrested and 
is in custody at the Beltrami 

of assaulting a Red Lake 
police officer, fleeing a police 
officer in a motor vehicle, pos- 
session of- a stolen handgun, . 
possession of a loaded hand- 
gun and' possession of mari- 
juana. 77ie Pioneer 

Warm weather 
lures fishermen 

Roseau - This winter's 
unusually warm temperatures 
have had ice fishermen rush- 
ing to the lakes and so for, 
fishing has been described as 
fantastic by the owners of area 
sporting outlets. 

The lack of snow ls_giving 
anglers more freedom on 

■ where to fish, but they are Cau- 
tioned to be careful where diey 
drive. Roseau Times-Region 

New Flyer expands 

Crookston- New Flyer of 
America, o Crookston-based 
bus manufacturer, has pur- 
chased the ' old Coca-Cola 
building on Main Street. 

Currently the building is 
being used mostly as a wore- 
' house to store overflow and to 
store several New Flyer buses 
which arc normally parked 
outside. 

New Flyer Genera! Mana- 
ger Ross Watson said that the 
company will modify the inte- 
rior of Ihc building in the 
hopes of doing some final 
assembly on the buses by the 
summer of 1998. 

New Flyer is known as the 
world's for and away leader of 
low-floor transit buses. Cur- 
rently the Crookston plant has 
approximately a 130-wcek 
backlog of orders. Three shifts 
produce about 35 buses per 
week, and the staff was recent- 
ly expanded to approximately 
230 workers. 

Crookston Daily Times 

Snowmobile ride to 
raise money for MS 

Grygla - The Fourtown- 
Grygla Sportman's Club and 
the Roseau County Trailblaz- 
ers are teaming up for an 
event today. January 3. to raise 
money for multiple sclerosis. 
— Ridcrs'lrrihe "TrailblarerV 
Frostbite 250" were encour- 
aged to raise money through 

■ pledges wilh prices given out 
to top fund-raisers. Towns 
alone the route are Roseau. 
Fourtown, Washkish. Bnudettc 
and Warroad. „ , 

The Grygla Eagle 

(Continued On Page 2) 



'"Ka^it^eo^tt Tftetuteaat*.' a- 1Re?to*t<*l Tteevdfictjien-" 



324 Main Avenue North. Thief River Falls, MN 56701 



Nordics. Wolfpack reach title 



PAID 



Saturday, January 3, 1998 




NCTC announces fall 
quarter honor students 

.* rt : :.. u tv.rl . II,,;.. -.ml T .. 



Academic honor students al 
Northland Community and Techni- 
cal College for the fall quarter have 
been announced. The list include 
those wilh Highest Honors (3.75 to 
4.00 grade point average) and those 
with Academic Excellence (3.25 to 
3.74 GPA). 

Students on each of the academ- 
ic lists include the following: 

Highest Honors 
-. Tcri Morberg, Alvarado; Car- 
mdle Dcschenc, Pauline Haugcn. 
Philip Klopp. Philip Kuznia and 
James Whitlow. Argylc; Corey 
Christianson, Badger; Gndi Brouse 



Mento.. 

Also Melissa Bla/ck, Jill Knut- 
son, Loren Scramstad and Chris 
Sorcnson. Middle River: James 
Gould. Minneapolis; Brad Bauck, 
Moorhcad; Rachel Larson, Angela 
Manderfeld and Jennifer Maursiad, 
Ncwfoldcn; Kclsic Stciger and 
Damn Tougas, Oklec; Scott Kinney, 
Oslo; Kelly Chase. Park Rapids; 
and Trudy Shipley, Park River. ND; 

Also Daniel Hainan, Plymouth; 
David Casavan and Linda Shoe- 
maker, Red Lake Falls; Joseph Han- 
son, Kristi Higgins. Sherri Krugcr 
Dclorcs Paulson, 



Chief cooks Jerry Robinson, regular chef ot the Evergreen Eating 
Emporium, and lone GonsorowsW, who combined their consider- 
able talents and skill to come up with a great Christmas eve din- 
ner for the annual Community Christmas Eve dinner. They were 
among the 100 volunteers helping to bring about another suc- 
cessful event. 

Christmas Eve 
dinner another 
successful event 



Over 400 meals were served dur-, 
inglhc annual Christmas Eve dinner 
in Thief River Falls. 

Organizers had prepared for 
about 500 because of overwhelming 
response last year, but were pleased 
none-the-lcss with the response this 
year. Of Ihc 400 meals. 171 were 
delivered to residents who were 
unable to get out to the meal site, 
the. Evcrgri-cn Eating. Emporium, 
, ^c^ping^g^1>^"'wtm•^rrKnragB■ 
task were about 1 00 volunteers, 
including Chuck and Theresa 
Walrath who were the hosts. Dayton 
and Arlcne Silk who were in charge 
of the waiter stations, Rev. John 
Wollenzicn of Trinity Lutheran 
Church, who said grace, and lone 
Gonsorowski and Jerry Robinson, 
who were the chefs, ft went very 
well, said one organizer. 

The meal has become a commu- 
nity event open to the entire com- 
munity, and in ut-lcasl one case to 
visitors. A family with four chil- 
dren, ages five and under, were trav- 
eling through the area. They 
stopped on their journey in Thief 
River Falls because they were hun- 
gry. Because it appeared that every- 
thing was closed, they asked a 
police officer where they could get a 
good meal. The officer directed Ihc 
family to Ihc Evergreen Eating 
Emporium, It was the perfect gift, as 



and David Ries. Baudclte; Paula Sandra Holmgren. Salol; Li; 

Grieve. Beltrami; Steve Harper and "—"■- p ~"- ' ,c -" 

Daniel Jucttcn, Bemidii; Tera 
■ Berbcrich and Shelly Perreault. 
Brooks; Kevin Dybvik, Cloquet; 
Traccy Magsam. Misty Oscth and 
Melvin Shcllon. Crookston; 

Also Crystal Duncan. Devils 
Lake. ND; Robert Novak, East 
Grand Forks; Tanya Monson, Fer- 
tile; Roxannc Klinefelter, Frazce; 
Amy Coolcy. Grand Forks Air Force 
Base, ND; Deanna Kotrba. Shannon 
Sjulcstad and Leah Vigen. 
Goodridgc; Kristcn Kirkeby, Graf- 
ton. ND; Duanc Doepkc and Kristi 
Storey. Grand Forks. WD; Courtney 
Foldesi and Crystal Foss, Green- 
bush; Anthony Holthuscn and Julie 
Sundberg. Grygla; 

Also Celeste Wojcicchowski, 
Halma; Jamie Dinger. Hccla; Aaron 
Munson. Howard Lake; Linda 
Kasprowicz. Janet Slaathaug and 
Fayc Veer. Karlstad; Heather 



Hagcn. Kennedy; Bruce Schempp, 
Lanmorc, ND; Theresa Ringwclski. 
Little Falls; David Senn. Mcintosh; 
Kristin Caouctie-Johnson. Carol 
Morberg and Bradley Schcar. 



..- ny 

for a night not to cook, and the chil- 
dren had a good lime. The organizer 
said the family was very happy and 
the husband left a sizeable donation 
when they left. 

The event was a success also 
because of ihc contributions of 
many local businesses, including 
the following which donated food 
andolhcriiemsforlhcdinncnJJart/ : 
• Foodsr*Ntwthtrn-^»ftdrr»*«MTon -• 
Specialties. SupcrValu. Mctr 
Bakery. Amundgaards Sausage. 
Joppru's, Hugo's, Erf's. 

Bndgcman's, Midway Co., Falls 
Liquor, St. Hilaire Liquor. 
Pennington Main and Square, 
Gary's Rainbow Bakery. Home 
Sweet Home, Kmart. Pizza Hut, 
Lori*s Hallmark, TR Jobbing. North 
Border Wholesale, Pamida and 
Northwest Grain. 

Organizers estimated that they 
served 1 80 pounds of turkey, peeled 
200 pounds of potatoes, and used 30 
loaves of bread and 25 pounds of 
pork sausage for stuffing. 

An organizer said one of the vol- , 
untecrs had been very reluctant in 
the beginning, but at ihc end of the 
evening was excited about the ; 

cven1, ''•■ ;. consecutive years, the trust has 



Cassibo, South International Falls; 
Alccia Bemicr. St. Hilaire; Karen 
Klopp. Strandquist; Heather West- 
lunu. Slrathcona; and Ryan 
Gustafson, Thompson; 

Also Heather Anderson. Joan 
Bolar, Nicole Burns. Richard 
Dahlin Sr.. Richard Dahlin Jr., 
Rozclla Eggerud. Robhy Farbo, 
Matthew Gustafson, Michael Hal- 
vorson, Twyla Hicks. Mclanic John- 
son, Peter Mcvis. Sarah Mugaas. 
Tara Nesland, Sana Nunn. Eric 
Peterson, Pamela Poppcnhagcn. 
Benjamin Schmitz, Elisabeth Spil- 
dc. Dcbra Stage, Jaynac Stanina, Jill 
Stenbcrg and Brent Waalc. all Thief 
River Falls; 

Also Barbara Lundeen. Trail; 
Gregory Anderson, Underwood; 
Micah Ranum, Viking; Mary Jo 
Wcnsloff. Wannaska; Ryan Fenning. 
Nathan Labinc and Heather Locslie, 
Warren; Cole Young. Williams; and 
Samuel Amundson. Winger. 
Academic Excellence 

Thomas Vcldc. Alexandria; 
Amber Efta and Kevin Kuznia, 
Argylc; Kerry Close. Badger; 



Benjamin Hcrg. Darla Hoic and I.ori 
Nelson. Baclcy; Aaron Humcniuk, 
Baudettc; Daniel Saline. Baxter; 
Eric Wcrlingcr. Bismarck. ND; 
Wesley Maki. Brill; Kent Ucrgcrson 
and Kay Mcrcil. Brook.-; and Tanya 
Vonesh. Buxion. ND; 

Also Rachel Luther, Cassclliin. 
ND; Benjamin Dorman. Clear- 
brook; Scoit Sykes. Cloquct; Justin 
Abrahamson. Bcrnadelte Bcttin. 
Barbara Hulst. Heather Shcllon and 
Andrew Thomas. Crookston; Kevin 
Engcscth and Daniel Mois. Detroit 
Lakes; Travis Duncan, Devils Lake. 
ND; Lance Fredricfcson. Drayton. 
ND; John Decker, Duluth; Erie 
Carlson. Kelly Goldberg and 
Jennifer Smith. East Grand Forks; 

Also Erica Fisher and Came 
Stuhaug. Erskine; Steven Rehorst. 
Fargo. ND; Nathan Roller. Fcsscn- 
dcn. ND; Justin Bowser, Finlayson; 
Roger Bciswcngcr. Fisher; Teresa 
Olson. Fosston; Rachel Shaw, 
Fountain Hills; Jesse Lunscllcr. 
Gatzke; Jami Bicrklic. Jenny 
Johnson, Crystcllc Johnsrud. David 
Jones and Nicole Qualcy. Good- 
ridge; 

Also Thomas Drcwiekc. Gracc- 
ville: 'Kalhcrine Byrorr. Martin 
Freeman, Thomas Lanou, Thomas 
Ricgcr and Ryan Tollcfson. Grand 
Forks. ND; Lori Campbell and 
Nicole Kappcs. Grcenbusn; Jennifer 
Saurdiff, Grygla; Robyn Tharald- 
son. Gully; Steven Gustafson. Hal- 
lock; Joshua flothum, Halma; Maria 
Condil. Hatron. ND; Matthew Fitz- 
patrick. Humboldt; Kandis Graban-- 
ski. Inkstcr. ND; Douglas Bonficld. 
Andrea Johnson and Christine 
Oistad. Karlstad; 

(Continued on back page) 



pities in area share return 
of workers comp premiums 



returned funds to member cities, 
bringing the total dividend return 
for property/casualty to nearly $91 
million, or 31 percent of the premi- 
ums paid since 1987. Participants in 
the workers' comp program 
received $5.4 million in dividends 
in 1993. and $8.5 million in 1998. 

Many area cities benefited from 
die return of dividends; Argyle- 
received $9,218; Bagley received 
S18.257; Bcmidji S 88. 475; Brooks 

poo, ,„,„„ ... .— -- S550; Crookston $65,987; East 

unique risk management needs of Grand Forks. $53,034; Fertile 
cities. More man 750 cities through- $8,393; Goodridgc *3.(Bfi: 



Fewer employment-related 
insurance claims and continued 
sound investments allowed the 
League Of Minnesota Cities 
Insurance Trust (LMCtT) to return 
S12 million in dividends to its prop- 
erty/casualty program members 
again this year. Cities enrolled in the 
workers* compensation program 
also will receive dividends totaling 
$4 million. 

The LMC1T is a seir- insurance 
pool formed in 1980 to meet the 



out Minnesota purchase their liabil- 
ity, property and workers' compen- 
sation coverage from this insurance 
trust. And unlike private insurance 



$3,036; 
Goodridgc Area Fire department 
$1,546; Grccnbush $7,384; Grygla. 
$2,698; Gully $49; Hallock 
$12,206; Karlstad S5.458; 
Mahnomen S7.178; Middle River. 
S1.896; Ncwfoldcn $4,230; Oklce. 
$5,195; Plummcr. $4,404; Red Lake 



Falls. $13,195; Roseau S34.514; Si. 
Hilaire, S3.446; Stephen $11,701; 
Sirandquist S549; Thief River Falls 
$90,441: Trail $489; Viking, $965; 
Warren $19,255: Warroad $18,479. 

"This return shows, once again. - 
that Minnesota cities are always 
working toward good management 
of their taxpayers' dollars, ' said 
LMCIT Board Chairman and 
Moorhead Ciiy Manager Jim 
Antoncn. "With the successful 
efforts by cities to control their risks 
and losses, the trust has been able lo 
expand its coverage and save cities 
money." 

The amount of money individual 
cities receive is determined by Ihc 
total amount of premiums paid into 
the trust and the losses claimed for 
all of the years a city has participat- 
(Coniinucd on back page) 



Emporium, it was tne pcrtcci gin. us '•■■■■ 

Get bigger or get out is future of dairying 



(This is the fifth in u series of 
Northern Watch stories on the loss 
of dairy fanners anil the dairy situ- 
ation in northwest Minnesota.) 
by Marvin Lund in 
Northern Watch Editor 
"I guess we're just too stubborn 
to qui i." 

Roger Waller of Walter Bros, 
farm at Plummcr was talking about 
their decision to add more cows to 
their existing herd in an effort lo 
continue a viable dairy operation. In 
ihc face of milk prices that don't 
seem likely to increase, adding herd 
numbers is one of the few alterna- 
tives available to today's dairymen. 
Roger, his brother Ray and their 
families arc carrying on the dairy 
operation started by ihcir father. 
Herb Walter. 50 years ago. Now 80 
years young and living in Plummcr. 
Herb still participates in the farming 
operation by driving tractor when 
needed. 

Also active in the dairy arc 
Albert Fisher and Glenn Buckta. 
along with Roger's sons and a cou- 
ple of other part-time workers. 

"You might say there are five 
families trying to make a living 
from this opera- 
tion." Roger said. 
"One of the rca- 
wc decided 
to expand was 
dial- Albert- and . 
Glenn wanted to 
hours and I hey 
been excellent workers with 

The decision to expand may have 
been somewhat easier for the Walter 
Brothers than for a number of other 
dairymen for several reasons. They 
already had buill their herd to 160 
cows, which is wet! above \hc cur- 
rent slate average. They had good 




Walter Bros, of Plummer are among area dairymen who. have 
decided to expand their herds to gain the economy of scale nec- 
essary In today's dairy industry. They built this 82x144 curtain 
barn last fall to accommodate tho addition of another 100 cows to 




barn 

and willing workers available to 
help share the load. And they had 
made a number of adjustments in 
ihc way they handle feed and other 
phases of the dairy that would read- 
ily apply to a larger herd. 

Curtain Bam Built 

Just completed this fall was an 
82x144 cunain bam wilh capacity 
for 160 cows. The plan was to add 
100 cows for a tola! of 260. Some of 
these came from area dairymen who 
.had. decided to selljheirjierds. 
including about 25 laciating "cows 
and Ihc same number of springing 
heifers from Lylc Swanson of St. 
Hilaire and 30 cows from Dennis 
Klopp of Karlstad. The Walters' own 
herd will also provide some of ll"-- 
increased number. 

The new barn and additional cat- 
lie also necessitated ihc building ol 
a lagoon for manure handling and a 
planned expansion of ihc milking 



parlor from a double six to a double 
eight, permitting the milking of 16 
cows at a time. 

Roger said that the permitting 
process for the manure handling 
required a good deal of paperwork 
and a lot of worry as weather was 
turning cold in the late fall. By good 
fortune, however, the Minnesota 
Pollution Control Agency granted 
the permit soon enough to get the 
system operating before frcczc-up. 
10-Year Plan May Be Long 
"Atlhc time we decided- to-go- 
ahead wilh the expansion, we fig- 
ured it would be good for about 10 
years." Roger said. "But things are 
changing so fast in ihc industry now 
that wc may be faced with a similar 
expansion decision in half that 
lime." . - 

Roger and Ray seem determined 
to do their best to keep dairy owner- 
ship in the hands of the farmers, but 



their existing 160-cow herd. The silos at right In the photo are 
■now of little use In the Walter Bros, operation with corn silage 
and green chopped hay stored In bunkers where it can be 
accessedwith a tractor and loader. 

acknowledge thai it may be a diffi- 
cult task. 

"I'm afraid that dairying is likely 
to go the way of hog production, 
where the ownership will be in the 
hands of ihc feed companies and 



The dairy owner leases the cows and 
when the younger person has accu- 
mulated a sufficient number for a 
herd of his or her own. ihc dairyman 
helps by investing in the new herd. 
Without a program of this type it is 



other corporations and farmers will virtually impossible today for young 

just be hired to run the farms." people lo get a start in ihc business. 
Roper said "™ c arrangement has several pos- 

Wahcr said he had visited dairy itivc aspects. First, the young person 

operations in New York State which gets a chance to learn while earning 

isconsidcrcdiobclOycarsahcadof an income and building equity. . 

Minnesota in its approach lo dairy- Second, ihc dairy owner has an ( 

-ing. .He -said. the. chance 10. talk to employee (or employees) with an 

dairymen there provided several incentive to excel because ol a pcr- 

ncw ideas to be applied in their herd sonal interest in ihc herd. "lird. 

and some which he hopes will catch such vested employees spread the 



... in the area. 

Young Dairyman Program 
One is a 'young dairyman pro- 
gram where young people interested 
in dairying come to work on a dairy 
farm and are encouraged to buy 
-- herd. 



their o 



* pan of the h 



supervis 

Roger said ihai another change 
has been in spreading the work load 
by "farming out" phases of the oper- 
ation. For instance, the Walters no 
(Continued on back page) 

$ 



I'lijjr 



NOKTIIKRN WATCH 



Siiturilsiy, .Quinary \ I VJK 



i 

i 
j 

i 



S* 1 



Thief River Falls JCPenney 



& 




sas/aaMiss 



30%-60% OFF 

Original Prices On SELECT 

Women's, Men's And Children's 

CLOTHING AND SHOES!! 



STOCK-UP AND SAVE ^ 

Semi-Annual Lingerie Sale 

IP t 9 Bras, Panties, Daywear And Shapewear ^M,^ 

Underwear, Socks And Jeans 

For Boys And Girls 

• Men's Underwear 



Healthier lifestyles seminar Jan. 9 



At llie hcpnninp of (tie year, 
many people make a renewed oim- 
miimcnt to be healthier — but often 
those resolutions arc difficult to 
maintain. If you arc looking at real- 
istic way* to make healthier food 
and physical activity choices, con- 
sider attending this session. Mary 
Jenkins, extension educator from 
Kittson county, will present the 
topic. "It's All About You" on 
Fndav, January 9. at 1:30 p.m. in the 
courthouse meeting room in Thief 
River Fall*. 

Jenkins will focus on putting 
dietary guidelines and food guide 
pyramid into a personal, workable 
plan that fits with one's lifestyle. 



Making healthy dilutes are imjKH- 
(ant. hut they must fit each person's 
individual needs, schedule, and 
interests to be most effective. Die 
way to accomplish this is to be real- 
istic, adventurous, flexible, sensible, 
and active in what we cat and what 
we do. The presentation will include 
many down-to-canli tips and sug- 



habits. Spec 



duali/L your licjihli 
altcnimn will he 
i requirements and 
methods to assure adequate intake 
for various ages. 

This session is open to the gener- 
al public. I-'or more information call 
the I'enninRlon County Extension 
Office at 6B3-703O. 







1K9B 

'■Bl 



JCPenney- 

' t i love your Style- ^ 
Thief River Falls • 681-1845 



STORE HOURS: 
Monday - Friday 
9:304:00 
Thursday 9:30-0:00 
Saturday 9:30-5:30 
Sunday Noon-4,-00 . 



The Times 

The Center For 
Creative Pointing 

• Quick Service 

• Helpful Staff 

• Accessible Locution 

• Convenient Hours 

324 N. Main Avo. 

Thlof Rlvor Fnllo. MN 50701 

681-4450 




AROUND 
THE REGION 



MN DNR sweeps 
Lake of the Woods 

Baudrtte - Minnesota De- 
partment of Natural Resources 
conservation officers conducted 
d saturation work detail on Lake, 
of the Wood* over the weekend 
of December 20-21, contacting 
more than 1 ,500 anglers. 

Approximately 40 citations 



were issued for violations rang- 
ing from driving under the influ- 
ence (ATV's) and possession of 
marijuana, to fishing without a 
license or registration or bagging 
too many fish. Also, near 80 
"warnings were issued that week-" 
end, mostly for fish bouse viola- 
tions or for not having a fishing 
license in possession. 

The Northern Ught 





^tvju.uMiitiumuy^im 



Wouldn't It Be Nice 



To Hear Better, Not Only For The 
Holidays, But All Year Long!? 



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302 Third St. E. • 218-681-1193 • Thief River Falls, MN 56701 

MEMBER. ACADEMY OF DISPENSING AUDIOLOGISTS, CERTIFICATE OF CLINICAL 

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Life is filled 
with promises. 

We can help 
you keep them. 

Financial security shouldn't be a hope. 
Neltner should sending your Wds to col- 
lege, or living a comfortable retirement. 
Trials why, at Farm Bureau, we speclallre 
in helping individuals, couples and families 
achieve ihetr lllellme tlnanclal goals. 

And we can help you, too. 

Call your Farm Bureau Agent today and 
learn how promises made can be promis- 
es kepi. 

■uvmoBtsiDirou. working for rot/.' 




Page 4 



NORTHERN WATCH 



Saturday, January 3, 1998 



WEDDING RECEPTION & DANCE 



Shelly (Millard) & 
Walter "Scott" Suronen 

January 10, 1998 

2-5 p.m. Reception • 9 p.m. Dance 

V.F.W. Post - Thief River Falls 

All Friends And Relatives Welcome! 




v CLASSIFIEDS 




(218) 681-4450 



soupgoN 

Sherry LaCourskrc 



Today we'll have recipes lor 
«imc liphlcr dishes rather tluin ilwsc 
rich huliday foods - ii\ lime to pel 
back in normal eating after all the 
la-alv 

This is u .simple dish thai 
everyone will love - serve with a 
Milud l« make a meul: 

BARBECUE MUFFINS 

I (10 ounce) lube refrincraieil but- 
termilk biscuits 
1 pound ground beef 
1/2 cup ketchup 
.1 tablespoons brown sugar 
I tablespoon vinegar 
1/2 teaspoon chili ponder 
1 cup (4 ounces! shrrdilcd chedd.ir 
' eesc 
Separate biscuiis. Flatten into S- 
inch circles and press cjl'Ii intu hol- 
loin and up sides of greyed rtiulfin 
cup. Set aside. 

Brown beef anil drain. 
In bowl, mix ketchup, brown 
sugar, vinegar and chili powder. 
stirring until smooth. Add n> meat 
and mix well. 

mature 
prepared " cups, about 1/4 cup' for 
eacn. Sprinkle with cheese. Bake at 



.175" lor IH-21) minuies. until gold- 
en. Coot fur 5 minutes before 
removing lioin miil'lln tins. 

Here's u really (jukk mid easy 
wuv lo fit these favorites: 
PIZZA HURCERS 




I pound lean ground beef 
l/.l cup grated I'anncsanehi 
I tablespoon cluippcd onion 
I lablespoon tomato paste 
I teaspoon dried oreganti 
1/2 teaspoon sail 
1/4 teaspoon pepper 
4 I-lnglishimi Uins. split 



Mix 

nato p. 



per unci) just comfiii 

Toast muffins in broiler until 
lightly browned. 

Divide meat mixture on muffins 
and broil 4 inches from heal for 8- 
10 minutes, until meat is thoroughly 
cooked. Top with tomaio and cheese 
slices and return to broiler until 
cheese is melted. Sprinkle with 
orcgano if desired. 

Here's unolhcr tasty sandwich 
that makes u meal In Itself: 
BEEFSTROGANOFF 
SANDWICH 

2 pounds ground beef 
1/2 cup chopped onion 
1 teaspoon salt 
1/2 teaspoon garlic powder 
1/2 teaspoon pepper 

1 loaf French bread 

Butter or margarine, softened 

2 cups ( 1 6 ounces) sour cream 

2 tomatoes, seeded and diced 
1 large green pepper, diced 

3 cups (12 ounces) shredded ched- 
dar cheese 

Brown beef and onion. Drain, 
Add salt, garlic powder and pepper 
and .simmer. 

Cut bread in half lengthwise and 
buitcr both halves. Place on baking 
sheets. 

Remove meat mixture from heat 
and stir in sour cream. Spoon onto 
bread and sprinkle with tomatoes, 
green pepper and cheese. 

Bake tit 350" for 20 minutes or 
until cheese is melted (can bake 
longer for more crispy bread.) 



These muffins would be deli- 
cious for hmikfust (may he with 
cream cheese?) or served with a 
good soup: 

HAM AN!) CHKKSE MUFFINS 
2 cups self-rising flour' 
1/2 teaspoon soda 
1 cup milk 
1/2 cup mayonnaise 
1/2 cup finely chopped cooked ham 
1 /2 cup shredded cheddar cheese 

In large bowl, combine flour and 
soda. Combine remaining ingredi- 
ents and stir into dry ingredients just 
until moistened. 

Fill greased or muffin paper- 
lined cups two-thirds full. 

Bake at 425° for 16-18 minutes 
or until muffins test done. 
To substitute for cups of self-rising 
flour, place I 1/2 teaspoons of bak- 
ing powder and 1/2 teaspoon salt in 
each measuring cun and then fill 
with flour (remember, this recipe 
would take two cups done in that 
manner.) 

Serve those hlscults with this 
really easy soup (hut hos been 
cookinc In the crock pot all day: 
FORGOTTEN MINESTRONE 

I pound lean beef stew meat 

I (28 ounce) can tomatoes with liq- 
uid, cut up 
1 beef bouillon cube 

1 medium onion, chopped 

2 tablespoons minced dried parsley 
2 1/2 teaspoons salt 

1 1/2 teaspoons ground thyme 
1/2 teaspoon pepper 

1 medium zucchini, thinly sliced 

2 cups finely chopped cabbage 

1 (16 ounce) can garbanzo beans. 

drained 

1 cup uncooked small elbow or shell 

macaroni 



In slow cooker, combine beef, 
water, tomatoes, bouillon, onion, 
parsley, salt, thyme and pepper. 
Cover and cook on low for 7-9 
hours or until meat is tender. 

Add zucchini, cabbage, beans 
and macaroni and cook on high, 
covered, for 30-45 minutes, until 
vegetables arc tender. Sprinkle indi- 
vidual servings with Parmesan. 



Hartz bridge opens 
for snowmobile use 



Recent snowfall has made it pos- 
sible for officials to approve use of 
the new Hanz Park bndgc by snow- 
mobilcrs. Although the SnoDriftcrs 
snowmobile club had met all stipu- 
lations required before it could be 
open, the bridge couldn't be open to 
snowmobile traffic because of u 
lack of snow. 

Tom Wang of the SnoDriftcrs 
snowmobile club in Thief River 
Falls said as of January 1 snowmo- 
bilcrs can now use the Hartz Park 
bridge to cross the Red Lake river in 
Thief River Falls. Snowmobilcrs arc 
asked to use caution when 
approaching the bridge and observe 
the 15 mile per hour speed limit. 
Wong said tttc speed limit on the 
bridge will be strictly enforced. He 
also said that snowmobilcrs must 
stop for pedestrians using the 
bridge. 

use of the bridge became an 
issue earlier this fall when the des- 
ignated river crossing was deemed 
unsafe because of thin ice. The des- 
ignated route which crossed the 
nver between "First Street bridge 
and the rescrvpir dam in Thief River 
Falls remains closed to snowmobile 
traffic because or concerns about 
thin ice. The only option open to 
snowmobilcrs was a route at the 



north edge of Thief River Falls or 
across the new bridge. The new 
bridge was never intended for 
motorized traffic. After consider- 
able discussion with numerous 
interest groups, the city council 
approved use of the bridge by snow- 
mobilcrs as a temporary solution to 
-trie-problem and only if they met a 
number of stipulations. Those stipu- 
lations included a cover on [fie 
bridge surface and sides, fencing 
and signage. All of (he stipulations 
had to be met prior to use. 

Snowmobile ride 
for MS delayed to ' 
January 17 

Originally scheduled for' today 
(Saturday, January 3), the Trail- 
blazer Frostbite 250 snowmobile 



ride to raise funds for the Multiple 
Sclerosis Society of Minnesota tias 
been postponed to Saturday, 
January 17, 

The riders will leave from the 
Cenex convenience store in Roseau 
or the Fourtown store at Fourtown 
and ride to Roseau, Fourtown, 
Waskish, Baudette and Warroad. 



Final permit on Clearwater 
bank project issued 



St. Paul District of the U.S. 
Army Corps of Engineers has 
issued its final general permit on the 
bank stabilization project on the 
Clearwater river in Red Lake coun- 



Red Lake Watershed District 
made the permit application. Work 
to be done includes a combination 
of techniques including rip-rap 



placement and live growth planting 
to stabilize banks which have been 
eroding in several locations. 

The work is port of a continuing 
study on water quality in the 
Clearwater river. Some work on the 
project, such as the hauling of rip- 
rap materials, is being conducted 
this winter. 




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NORTHERN WATCH 



Page 5 




,„ npf.ll" 1 !" "'MS WHY 



Thicr River Falls - 
Rapac/. 37. furmeily ul 
died Monday. Dccembi' 
Northwest Medical Center 
River Falls. 



Church in Argylc. Uuriul w;i 
Rose Cemetery. 

A complete obituary will 
in Wednesday's edition i 
Times. 

George Ness, 88 

Cully • George Ness. KH. died 

Sunday. December " " 

Northwest Medic. ' ** 

Funeral services will be held at 
10 a.m. on Monday. January 12. 
1998 at the Lund Lutheran Church 
in Gully with the Reverend Boh 
Kelly officiating. Interment will be 
at Ihe Lund Lutheran Cemetery in 
Gully." •> ■. , 

Visitation will lie on Sunday. 
January ll-from 6 to K p.m. at the 
Cca.sc Family Funeral Home in 
Baglcy and for one hiuir prior to ser- 
vices at the church; 




We tniure Farm DwelUns*. 
Outbuilding* St Personal Property 



[Homeowner's Coverage 
For Dwelling) In Town 

Prompt Adjusting Service — 
Free Woodburnlng Inspections 



1' 



BRAY GENTILLY MUTUAL INS. CO. 

Locntlv Owned—Serving Policyholders Since 1900 
V P.O. Box 205, R. L Falls, HN 56750 253-2252 J 



Tyler - Howard H; 
died Monday December 29. 1997 at 
his daughter's home in Newport. 

Funeral services will be held 
today. Saturday. January 3. 1998 at 
2 p.m. at the Danehod Lutheran 
Church in Tyler. Burial will be in 
Hope Cemetery in Tyler. 

A complete obituary will appear 
in the next edition of ike "" 



e Tunc j. 



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Serving the investment needs of the 
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Thief River Falls, MN 56701 | 

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LETTERS 



Pane 6 



NORTHERN WATCH 



Saturday, January 3, 1998 



Saturday, January 3, 1998 



NORTHERN WATCH 



I'a K e 7 



lln.M- wln» ilcpcmlcJ 
ispntuium in pel M iinJ (in 
ool. Uuenim Jones nude n |v 
!c lor ihcin in p.irtidruic in >> v, 
•■port by scheduling 



bus 



of his 



dm cr 1r;i 



ling cl-is, 






jImui (.iiK'iiiui ill. ii miiili- 



ihmkiii 



iiih.iM-ihinidih ii. ilu: Thicl 

Mils 1\tlk\ltl.>ll I'llllllll.lllOll. 

\: ih.il ilieii (vtioJn: m.iilinps 
;oln .ihimm miplil he ihe 
;ipjvn|>ii.iti' s|\i,y in share iliem. 

Thai 1 ilmiiiilH oWVir Timr\ the 

HiK-t, nis lin '[-.i:l ol" 7Vr,- Twiry He 
vv;i\ im|sui.iiii in us young athletes, 
liui- .mil li.is hfen appropriately 
Tciiiciiil'i.Ti'il id the arena named for 
him. (Juetitm Jones deserves al least 
a Idler lo [he ediior. 
(.luenlin Jones 



,i!li the end of practice sessions, 
llieieby allowing one Miidcnl In 
practice his driving while giving a 
looiball I'l.iver. for instance, a ride 
in Ins Inline west of St. Hil.urc or 
soiiih Inward the airport, I'lummcr 



Apait: 



vil it 



MM (ibvio 



caret 



■ he 



children, ahoui Hit 



Jejits, 1 emphasize the 
because tmcirir 
in his tcachinj:. 
(Ic.uriimagi 
"I care abmii yo 



telling me I liad a fasi start bin w. 
n'l fast enough over a hundred yard- 
in tv competi 



had 



MifTkien! sliced a: 



eiiglli U 



half-niiler. hull lud: 
that far. So yueniin Junes made a 
pole vaullcr oiiLof me. In ihai eveni 
im short distance speed, relatively 
good ciuirdiiiaiion and streiiglh 
could be used 10 full advantage. As 
a teacher, ilia! was his objeciivc: lo 
ma\imi/e ihe sirengths of his slu- 



I : r 



ii kindergarten through grad- 
Irom Lincoln high school. I 
leather who cared more for 
lenis than did Quentin Jones. 



:aring leather, he 
wauled lo m.mnii/e the options, (lie 
opportunities for students so that 
they might fully participate in all 
thai Lincoln high school had lo 
offer. 

Once when my mother was hos- 
pitalized, the Jones family invited 
my father and me to their home for 
dinner, knowing, no doubt, that nei- 
ther my father nor ! knew the first 
thing ahoui cooking. They were a 
caring couple, never inflicting 
themselves on anyone but always 
open to be of help. They cared about 
people, about the community and 
about (he environment. 

Tindolph Park (is that what it is 
still called?) will always be for mc 
Jones Park. Qucniin Jones taught 
mc and hundreds of others how to 
vim iherc. He also firmly told 
t how not to teach their 
. He cared for our safe- 
ty and our enjoyment and he cared 
for the grounds, (caching us not to 
litter nor in any other way lo dimin- 
ish what we had in that- park. 
Humble us it was. it was the only 
place most of us had lo swim in 
safely, to play sand volleyball or 
[able tennis, to spend our summer 
days of youth with one another. 

Consummate. 1 think, means "to 
bring to completion." Quentin 
Jones' life has now been brought to 
completion, and a complete life it 
was. My only regret is that I don't 



it DorrUd|i 
m(Ml). 



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Important information 
from US WEST 



U S WEST Communications has petitioned the Minnesota Public Utilities Commission 
for approval of a new method for raising and lowering the prices of its services. Under, 
this new method, authorized by the Minnesota Legislature, prices and rates would no 
longer require approval by the Minnesota Public Utilities Commission in all cases. 
Instead, U S WEST would have the ability to raise and lower prices with less 
Commission oversight. 

For a period of three years, or unti! the year 200! , U S WEST would not be allowed lo 
raise the price of local telephone service and other price regulated services, such as. 
9-1-1 emergency services. U S WEST would, however, be allowed to raise or lower the 
price of optional local services, such as caller identification (Caller ID), Call Waiting and 
Call Forwarding, consistent with the plan. 

The Minnesota Public Utilities Commission would continue to have the authority to 
monitor service quality issues and investigate service complaints from consumers. 

The Public Utilities Commission will hold a series of public hearings to provide more 
details of the plan and to seek your input regarding this new pricing method. 

The schedule of public hearings is as follows: 



Minneapolis 

Monday, January 5. 1998 
l:0OPM 

Minneapolis City Mali 
Room 31 7 
350 South 5lh 
Minneapolis, MN 55415 

St. Paul 

Monday, January 5, 1998 

7.00 PM 

Minnesota Public Utilities 

Commission 

121 Seventh Place East, 

Suite 351) 

St. Paul. MN 55101 

Duluth 

Tuesday. Januarys I'J'JS 

7:00 I'M 

Duluth Cily Hall 

Cmincil Chambers 

3rd Hour 

-HI West First Slrcel 

Dululli. MN 55802 



Sauk Rapids 

Wednesday, January 7, 199S 
1:00 PM 

Sauk Rapids City Hall 
1 1 5 Second Avenue North 
Sauk Rapids, MN 56379 

Marshall 

Thursday, January 8, 1996 

7:00 PM 

Southwest State University 

Room CIO 1 7 

1501 Stale Street 

Marshall, MN 56258 

Rochester 

Friday, January 9, 1998 

3:00 PM 

Rochester Government 

Center 

Conference Room 104 

201 4lhSlrcctSE 

Rochester, MN 55901 



Moorhcad 

Tuesday, January 13, 1998 

7:00 PM 

Moorhcad City Hall 

Council chambers 

500 Center Avenue 

Moorhcad, MN 56560 



You may provide comments 
in writing to the Commission 
at the following address: 

Consumer Affairs Office 
Minnesota Public Utilities 
" Commission 
121 Seventh Place East. 
Suite 350 
St. Paul. MN 55101 

if you would like further 
information from US WEST 
about Its proposal, please 
call 1-800-247-0152. 
Customers using a TTY may 
call t-SOO-223-3131, 



llJ5VI/ESr@ 

life's better here' 



remember ever telling hint how. 
much he meant to me in my youth 
— ulial a superb teacher and exem- 
plar he was. However. I'm ci|iiallv 
certain thai he didn't live for our 
thanks. Mis unassuming joy was in 
the doing of the life he lived. He ran 
j great. Ioiij: race and now, I trust, 
the laurel is his. 

Sincerely. 

Lylc R. Uullu 

Vice I'rovost of Student AlVairs 

Wagner College 

Staicn Island. NY 

— ITRFSPORTSl — 



J DukgtSan • IMS 0'"» »' R°«< 
0:15/7:30pm. 

Monday, Jan. S 

■ BaikotUall ■ LHS gUli vs Manhnll 
County Control (Ml), 17:30 p.m. 

Toot day, Jan. G 

■ DoikoiMII ■ NCTC wom«n vs. MSU- 
Botrirwnu. 530 p m.i NCTC man vi. MSU 
BotUrwau, 7:30 p.m. 

— I AREA SPORTS} — 

Rad Lake County Central 

■ TirtscUy. Jan. 6 • boy* baifcttball vs. 
Mahnomen (at Oktoa): glrfi bukllbal vs. 
East Grand Fortu {at Plurnmai). 

Good rid go 

■ MofWay. Jan. 5 - boys baikotbait nl 
Kjltson County North. . . 

OryQla-Gatzka 

■ Tuesday. Jan.' ■ boys basketball at 
Marshall County Central, 

Goodri doo/Q ry g ta-Gatzko 

■ Monday, Jon. S ■ girls basketball vs. 
Roseau (at Goodndgo). 

Badger/Qroenbush-Mlddla River 

■ Tuesday. Jan. S - pjrls baikotban at 
Wanoad. 

Marshall County Central 

■ Saturday. Jan. 3 - girts baskotbad at 
Red Uko Fans. 

■ Monday, Jon, 5 ■ girls basketball at 
Thiol fiiver Fans. 

■ Tuesday. Jan. - boys basketball vs. 
Oiygla-Oatiko. 



EDITORIAL OPINIONS 



Thief River Falls, Minnesota 

John P. Mattson, Publisher 

Marvin Lundin, Editor 
David Hill, Associate Editor 

Engineer's Perspective 
On Santa Claus 

Shortly before Christmas someone deposited 
on our desk an essay on Santa Clans from an engi- 
neer's perspective. We haven't cheeked the caleula-' 
lions lo determine their correctness, but ihe 
hypothesis is interesting. Wo offer it here for adult 
post-Christmas reflection with the suggestion that 
it ma y nor he ap propriate rending or listening for 
young relievers: 

I. There are approximately two billion chil- 
dren (persons under-* 8) in the world. However, 
since Santa does not visit children of Muslim, 
Hindu. Jewish or Buddhist religions, this reduces 
the workload lor Christmas, night to 15ft of the 
total, or 378 million (according to the Population 
Reference Bureau). 

At an average (census) rate of 3.5 children per 
household, that comes to 108 million homes, pre- 
suming that there is at least one good child in each. 

II. Santa has about 31 hours of Christmas lo 
work with, thanks to the different time zones and 
the rotation of the earth, assuming he travels cast to 
west (which seems logical). This works out to 
967.7 visits per second. 

This is lo say that for each Christian household 
with a good child, Santa has around l/IOOOlhofa 
second lo park the sleigh, hop out, jump down the 
chimney, fill the stockings, distribute the remain- 
ing presents under the tree, eat whatever snacks 
have been left for him. gel back up the chimney, 
jump into the sleigh and get on to the next house. 

Assuming that each of these 108 million stops 
ts evenly distributed around the earth (which, of 
course, we know to be false, but will accept for the 
purposes of our calculations), wc are now talking 
about 0.78 miles per household; a total trip of 75.5 
million miles, noi counting bathroom stops or 
breaks. 

This means Santa's sleigh is moving at 650 
miles per second — 3,000 times ihe speed of sound. 
For purposes of comparison, the fastest man-made 
vehicle, ihe Ulysses space probe, moves at a pokey 
27.4 miles per second, and n conventional reindeer 
can run (ut best) 15 miles per hour. 

MI, Tli payload of the sleigh adds another 
interesting element. Assuming thai each child gets 
nothing more than a medium sized Lego set (two 
pounds), the sleigh is carrying over 500,000 tons, 
not counting Santa himself. 

On land, a conventional reindeer can pull no 
more than 300 pounds. Even granting that the "fly- 
ing" reindeer could pull 10 times the normal 
amount, the job can't be done with eight or even 
nine reindeer— Santa would need 360,000 of them. 

This increases the payload, not counting the 
weight of the sleigh, another 54,000 tons, or rough- 
ly seven times the weight of the Queen Elizabeth 
(the ship....not the monarch). 

IV. 600,000 tons traveling ut 650 miles per 
second creates enormous air resistance. This would 
heat up the reindeer in ihe same fashion as space- 
craft re-entering the earth's atmosphere. The lead 
pair of reindeer would absorb 14.3 qui mill ion 
joules of energy per second each. In short, they 
would burst into flames almost instantaneously, 
exposing the reindeer behind them and creating 



Editorial opinion published under this 
heading js Intended to stimulate thinking 
and discussion among our readers. Unless 
specified otherwise, the editorials are writ- 
ten by Editor Marvin Lundin and do not rep- 
■ resent opinion of other staff members/ - 
Opinions in Items from other publications -' 
may not coincide with the editor's own 
views but are offered for their general Inter- 
est. 



deafening sonic booms in their wake. The entire 
reindeer team would be vaporized "within 4.26 
thousandths of a second, or right about the time 
Santa reached the fifth house on his trip. 

Not lhai it mailers, however, since Sanla, as a 
result of accelerating from a dead stop to 650 miles 
per second in .001 second, would be subjected to 
centrifugal forces of 17.500 g's. A 250-pound 
Santa (which seems ludicrously slim) would be 
pinned to ihe back of the sleigh by 4,315,015 
pounds of force, instantly reducing him to a smear 
of goo. 

V. Therefore, if Simla did cxisvhe doesn't 



Yesterday — Computer 
Style 

Useful and amazing as computers arc, they can * 
also be frustrating and embarrassing, especially to 
those of us in the older generation who must adjust 
our thinking to use even a tiny pari of the existing 
technology. For youngsters, however, computers 
are as common playthings iis sleds and wagons 
were in our day. 

During the holidays wc were showing some 
family members around the newspaper shop, 
including the process by which wc now make our 
photos for newspaper printing. We scan the 35mm 
negatives into the computer, adjusl the levels of 
light and dark contrast; determine image size and 
photo cropping; add a border and print a screened 
picture on normal computer paper. 

In ihe demonsiration wc were having a little 
problem adjusting contrast. Kara, a few days short 
6T her eighth birthday, volunteered: "Did you click 
on the O.K.?" Well, wc hadn't done so. and thai 
was- Ihe problem. How did she know, in a program 
she had never seen? You tell me, but she didn't 
guess, she knew\ 

AH of which leads us to this little computer 
lament from the Minnesota Newspaper Assoc-" 
iation Bulletin, sung to the tune of the song entitled : 
"Yesterday." 

Yesterday, 

All those backups seemed a waste of pay. 
Now my database has gone away. 
Oh I believe in yesterday. 

Suddenly. 

There's not half the files there used to be. 
And there'ta millstone hanging over me. 
The system crashed so suddenly. 

I pushed something wrong; 
What it was I could not say. 
Now all my data's gone 
And I long for yesterday-ay-ay-ay. 

Yesterday, 

The need for backups seemed so far away. 
When rny data was all here to stay. 
Now I believe in yesterday. 

Happy New Year, all of you in computer land 
and in the real world. 



POLICIES 



Letters To The Editor: The staff of the Northern 
Watch encourages written responses to editorial com- 
ment or letters with original thoughts or ideas of gen- 
eral interest. Letters should be Intended for publica- 
tion In Northern Watch exclusively; letters sent to 
multiple publications will generally not be accepted. 
Right Is reserved to edit letters Tor length and clarity 
and to reject letters deemed to be promotional in 
nature or in poor taste. 

Letters Most Be Signed: All letters musfw 

' signedaridconiainonBddrcssorphoncnumberorthe 

writer so authenticity can be verified. Signatures 

must appear on letters published. The staff believes 



that there is greater credibility fn lepers signed In print^;' 
and will not withhold names of writen iVom publics- .. 

Responses -'invited: Letter* critical of fatflvidu- r 
als or other entities may be ihownto those Inbllvfdu- ■■■■ 
q[i or representatives or those ehtitlci In advance of ; 
publication with' an invitation by ncwapiper'itaff for., 
response in the same Issue sis tni - 

Corrections: If an error is maoo''ta ncwi'.or; 
advertising publication, the itolT.cncourajei leaocnt." 
.to call It to our immediate attentlon'by calling 681- ; -: 
44S0. Wo will attempt to correct' the-"" error or clarify ■-.■ 
the misunderstanding in the next Issue. ■::'-- 



LETTERS 



To The Editor 

The staled goal of the editorial 
page in the Watch is "to stimulate 
thinking and discussion among our 
readers." Lcl mc say that your edito- 
rial Electric Suppliers Say Deregu- 
lation Is Coming succeeded in liv- 
ing up lo that goal, 

You begin ihe editorial by saying 
the public needs lo know more 
about deregulation. I agree. You end 
the comment piece by saying, 
"Comumcrs should be involved in 
being sure their interests are protect- 
ed m any dcrcgulaii'm effort." 
Again, no argument here. I even 
believe it wise to benefit from the 
eight to 10 Mates lliat already have 
dercgulalcd their electric utilities. 



However, the "go slow" approach is 
often a code word for "let's see how 
lonf; wc can stall this thing." 

The industry executives at the 
meeting referred to coming changes 
as rcrcgulaiion. Simply staled inat 
means the WIRE part of the busi- 
ness will remain with the incumbenl 
utility. The deregulation or "choice" 
will come in whom you buy the 
electron from. 

You refer to nine (*>) issues that 
must be addressed before deregula- 
tion is considered. I wonder if the; 
stales where deregulation is the lawi 
have considered such tilings as rcli- : 
ability, universal access and safety, 
not to mcniion the oilier straw men 
listed. 



I'm only a bit past the mid point 
of life experience, but I'm hard 
pressed lo -recall an instance when 
consumers have been harmed when 
they have had a choice. On the issue 
of stranded cosl (wherever that 
notion came from), how docs the 
Times or any oilier business that has 
lo compete in a market handle that 

I hope your editorial inspired 
more thinking and discussion. 

Sincerely, 

Chuck Ricscn 
„ Viking. Minnesota 

(Editor's Note: Chuck Riesen is 
manager of PKM Electric Cooper- 
alive with offices in Warren.) 



Barley Day takes place 
in Grand Forks on Jan. 8 



Red River Valley Barley Hay 
will lake place Thursday. January B. 
at ihe Ramada Inn of Grand Forks, 
ND. with registration at H a.m. and 
Ihcprogram beginning at 9 a.m. 

There is no registration fee for 
ihe informational program and a 
free hot lunch will be provided, 
along with an assortment of refresh- 
ments from the brewing industry. 
The program will end at 3 p.m. with 
a hospitality lime and mixer. 

Special emphasis will be given lo 
Fusarium head Might or scab on 
barley. Impact on growers and 
industry, disease and management 
strategies for reducing the impact. 
and progress on developing scab 
tolerant barley varieties will be 
among the lopics discussed. 

Also addressed will be sampling 
techniques and accurate measure- 
ment of vomitoxin in barley— a 
topic of concern lo growers and 
users— as well as crop insurance as 
a way to help manage risk. 

Luncheon presentation will 
include a review of U.S. agricultur- 
al policy and programs by Bruce 
- Weber, associate admlnlstraior _ of - 
thc USDA Farm Service Agency, 
and siaius reports from the sponsors 
of Barley Day. 

Sponsors include the American 
Malting Barley Association, Minnc- 



Family and 
Friends' support 
group to meet 

Family and Friends Support 
Group will meet Monday anuary 5 
from 10 to 1 1:30 a.m. ni the com- 
munity room at Summcrficld 
Apartments in Warren. 

The video "Management in 
Caring for Residents with 
Alzheimer's" will be shown. The 
meeting is for family members or 
friends who provide care and sup- 
port to elderly persons. 



^WMwteJI?^^ 



sota Barley Research and 
Promotion Council and the North 
Dakota Barley Council. 

Local pianists in 
area young artists 
solo competition 

Nikolas Kot/. of Thief River 
Falls and Erin Melby of Oklce will 
be among young musicians in the 
region lo show [heir talents and 
compete Tor top honors at this year's 
Young Artists Solo Competition on 
Saturday. January 10. at Moorhcad 
State University in Moothead. 

High school instrumental stu- 
dents in grade 10-12 from Fergus 
Falls. Moorhcad, East Grand Forks. 
Fargo. Grand Forks and West Fargo 
in addition to Thief River Falls and 
Oklce will perform before judges at 
Roland Dillc Center for the Arts on 
thi- MSUcampus. 

The public is invited to attend 
the competition finals beginning at 
I p.m. in Fox Recital Hall. There is 
no admissionand a reception hon- 
oring ihe winners and oilier com- 
petitors will be held immediately" 
following ihe finals. 

Co-sponsors of ihe 1988 compe- 
tition are KCCM, the Minnesota 
public radio station in Moorhcad 
and the Fargo-Moorhcad 

Symphony Guild. "Three cash 
awards will be given and the lop 
performer will be offered a scholar- 
ship at any or the tiircc colleges in 
ihe F-M area and the opportunity 
for a solo performance witii the 
Fargo- Moorhcad Symphony during 
its family concert January 29. 

Leaders council 
meets January 5 

Penningion county 4-H leaders 
council will meet Monday, January 
5, at 8 p.m. in the courthouse meet- 
ingroominThicfRiverFalls.AlU- . 
H clubs in ihe county are encour- 
aged to have a representative in 
attendance. 

Ciovcrbuds will have their meet- 
ing on Tuesday, January 13. from 3 
to 4 p.m. at Challenger elementary 
school. 



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Thief River Falls, MN 567Q1 
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INTENTIONAL DUPLICATE PAGE 



Page 8 



NORTHERN WATCH 



TRF is 4-1 winner 
over Mesabi East 

■ McDonald's Classic hockey victory . 



Junior forwards Wade Chimin 
and Jarod Rcicrson stored Iwd 

Poals each Tliesday as Thief River 
alls beat Mesabi liast 4-I in Day : 
of ihc I997 McDonalds Classic 
high school hockey scries. 

It was the second straidit win lot 
the Prowlers, who Mruppjcd at lime, 
but edged Red Lake Vails 4-3 in 
overtime Monday lo snap a season- 
opening eight-game losing streak. 

"We played better." reported 
Thief River Falls coach Scull 
Bcrgland. "I would like lo think 
we're making progress." 

Chiodo scored the game's first 
two goals, providing the Prowlers 
with a 1-0 edge late in the firsl peri- 
od and a 2-0 advantage midway 
through the second period. 

Mesabi East, a combination of 
Aurora-Hoyt Lakes and Babbiit- 
Embarrass, chopped the difference 
to 2-1 on a goal by Adam Lacari al 
12:33 of the second period, bul the 
Prowlers regained their (wo-goal 
advantage a quick nine seconds 
laier on Rcierson s first goal of ihc 
nighi. 



Rei 



i 3:.1S i 



orcd aga 
trie* third period. 

"I thought everyone played a 
pretty respectable game," ottered 
Uerg'land. "Nobody played ptmrly. 
and iioIhxIv played speciaL'tilar" 

In ihc other Tuesday maich-ups al 
Crivoksion. iuisi Grand I'oiks heal 
Grafion .1-2 and Red Lake Kills 
edeed Crookslim 4-3 in overtime. - 

Monday games, which also 
included a }-2 Grafton overtime 
decision against Cnxikston and a 4- 
3 1-ast Grand Forks victory over 
Mesabi East, were played al East 
Grand Forks. 

Wednesday's final set of games. 

scheduled for the Thief River Falls 

Muck Olson Memorial Civic Center. 

will he reported in the Jan. 7 Times. 

Scoring 

Flrat period -TRF. Wado Chiodo |un). 

Second period ■ TRF. Chiedo (Jolt 
Flrilov). 7:14; WE. Adam Lflcnrl (Duitin 
Ocpjw.Koith RiQhe). 12:33. TRF. Jarod 
ntitrjcn (Attlm NoftW). 12:4?. 

Third period ■ TRF. Reierwn (Trevor 
Peterjon.Ch-odo). 338 

Goalie Mvoa ■ THF, M.ke Dower* 4-8- 
4-16; ME. Andy Paulson 15-12-7-34. 



»WiM: 



Fri., Sat, Sun., Jan. 2, 3 & 4 



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OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK! 



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WEDNESDAY „ — -Your Pint Spin It On U*t 

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THURSDAY—™— 

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Community Appreciation Pay* 
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Midnight to 8:00 AM. 

RDAY _____™_fYfrn» Rib and Wallaya Seaclala 

Hourly Dmwlngt To Tha Money Machine 4.-00 P.li - Ulanlght_ 



COMMUNITY 

APPRECIATION 

THURSDAY 

JANUARYS'" 

6:00 RM.-10:00 P.M. 

COODRIDGE, 

GRYGlA, GATZKE 



fatllrffttr FillsSh.Hk SJTylt<T»IkCi!lm-C>IICA5]H0aiTE5*t|M6»l-735S 
F.r»ustel.tolJfelto=l^0.l S M t ll..Mdfeail i A m MSUfEKHI6HWAYroUBCfelliai0AIHATl-»<)l)-5634ll6 



Clcarbrook-Gonvick and Badger/ 
Grcetibush-Middlc River pickca up 
wins Tuesday in ihc consolation 
semifinals of the 1997 Thief River 
Falls Russ Smith Northwest 
Holiday Classic boys high school 
basketball tournament. 

The Bears out-scored Siephcn- 
Argytc 87-66 and the Gators beat 
Fcrtile-Beltrami 63-52 to creale a 
Wednesday consolation final 
match-up. 

Stephen-Arsylc and Fcrtilc- 
Beltrami were ticketed for a seventh 
place match-up in the final round of 
the three-day, eight-team tourna- 
ment. Those results will be posted 
in ihc Jan. 7 Times. 

Clearbrook-Gonvick 87 

Stcphcn-Argylc 66 

Three Clearbrook-Gonvick scor- 
ers hit double figures and four oth- 
ers were just a basket away from 
joining them as the Bears' offense 
rolled past Sicphen-Argyle 87-66. 

Paul Gustafson scored 21 points. 
Scth Dorman 15 and Kevin 
Plctschett 1 1 for the winners, who 
led at the quarter stops 19-13. 41-26 
and 57-37. The two teams closed it 
out by combining for 59 fourth 
quarter points. 

Mike Wagner and Steve Crummy 
paced the Storm with 20 and 17 
points, respectively. 

There were -18 free throws shot in 
(he game, with Clearbrook-Gonvick 
going 13-for-22 at the line and 
Stcphcn-Argylc finishing 14-for- 

feorina 

1 2 3 4 T 

Stoptien-Aroylo 13 13 11 20 60 

Cl8B*rook-aonvick....10 22 10 3D 87 

S-A • Slovo Crummy 17. Rooeo 
Sottorhotm 2. Darin Adolphson 7. Kovin 
Mcloon2.AndyAa>uo6,AoronSioltmnn 1, 
Bant Slollman B, Jarod Honson 3. Miko 
Wognor 20. 

C-0 - Paul Gutio'con 21. Shano 
EnoebroUon 7, Kevin Plotscbolt 11, CoOo 
Hupon 8, Dunn Johnson B, Nail 
8. Setti Doiman 15. Jon Goilolo 

B/G-Middlc River 63 

Fertilc-Bcltrami 52 

Badgcr/Grcenbush-Middlc River 
doubled Fcnilc-Bcltrami 18-9 in 
the first quarter en route to a 63-52 

The Gators, whose offense was 
shut down by Tri-County in a 44-34 
quarterfinal loss the day before, 
nearly surpassed that point total in 
ihc first halfagainst ihc Falcons 
with a 30-18 lead. They were up 
43-29 through three quarters. 

Jeremy Vacura led Ihc Gators 
with 16 points, while Daryl 
Wockenfuss netted 1 2, Bret Bentow 
11 and Andy Schcnkcy 10. The 
Falcons got a 14-point game from 
Jason Franklin and 10 trom Mike 
Klabo. 



m Wo inn 




Icsring 

1 2 3 4 T 

B7G- Middle Bivor 18 12 13 20 C3 

Fortle-Bollraml 11 23 52 

B/Q.MH ■ Joromy Vncurn 10, Shano 
No lion 4, Adam Homos 2. Dnryl 
Wortonlusa 12, Brol Bentow 11. Andy 
Schonkay 10. Richard Wocfconiuas 2. 
DaviaTrujcnlntklG 

F.D ■ Tim Petry D. Mdk Uoore 3. Travis 
Kamro I.Jason Frnnklm 14. Josh Denson 
4. Paul Pago 7. Davo Wostnod 4, Mike 
Klabo 10. 



Saturday, January 3, 1998 



TRF Russ Smith Holiday Classic... 

Nordics, Wolfpack 
reach title contest 



Marshall County Central held off 
Tri-County 42-3H and Kittson 



Central pulled ; 



from Thief 



Marshall County Central shooter Jon Donarskl went over Trl- 
County defender Luke Freeman with this short jumper during the 
first semifinal game in the Thief River Falls Russ Smith Northwest 
Holiday Classic boys high school basketball tournament Tuesday. 
The Nordics beat the Wildcats 42-38. 



Bears, Gators post 
consolation round 
semifinal victories 



River Falls 65-52 Tuesday 
semifinals of llie 15th annual Thief 
River Falls Russ Smith Northwest 
Holiday Classic boys high school 
basketball tournament. 

Holh games were rematches from 
recent regular season encounters, 
with the Nordics reversing a 51-46 
loss U> the Wildcats, while the 
Wolfpack beat Hie Prowlers a sec- 
ond lime, although not as convinc- 
ing as a 73-47 first-tinic blow-out. 

file Nordics' score was identical 
to their Monday quarterfinal win 
over Fcrtile-Beltrami. 

Wednesday's finals (which will 
be reported in ihc Jan. 7 Times), pui 
ihc Nordics in the championship 
game for the first time since 1990 
and had ihc Wolfpack playing for 
their first title, although Kennedy 
won it in 1984 and was runner-up in 
1986 and 1987 before joining forces 
with Hallock lo form the Kittson 
Central cooperative. 

Marshall Co. Central 42 

Tri-County 38 

A game-long Marshall County 
Central lead disappeared midway 
through ihe fourth quarter, but the 
Nordics answered the challenge 
down the suxtch and surprised most 
observers by beating Tri-County 42- 
38. 

flic Nordics, who were shut out 
in Ihc first quarter the day before by 
Fertilc-Beltrami, jumped oul to a 5- 
opening minute lead against Tri- 
Couniy when Man Nelson hit a 3- 
point basket and Jon Donarski fin- 
ished off a fast break. 

Marshall County Central carried 
the lead through the quarter stops. 
16-10. 23-19 and 33-26. 

But a 12-2 fourth quarter Tri- 
County run overtook die Nordics, 
with Phil Kazmicrczak hanking in a 
shot from Ihc side lo put the 
Wildcats on top for ihe first time, 
36-35. with 4:05 to play. 

A drive by Tryg Spildc made it 
38-35 with 3:49 remaining. 

However, thai was the last points 
of the night given up by ihc 
Nordics. A single free throw by 
David Wilco* made it 38-36. ihen 
back-to-back Tri-County turnovers 
led to a pair of game-tying free 
throws by Caleb Holthusen and a 
go-ahead basket by Wilcox, who 
banked in a short jumper as he was 
being knocked to the floor with 46 
seconds on the clock. 

Wilcox missed the free throw that 
could have completed a three-point 
play, and Tri-County controlled the 
rebound. The Wildcats ran the clock 
down before Spildc headed down 
the lane on a spinning drive with 3.5 
seconds remaining. His shot car- 
omed off ihc rim, and Nelson was 
fouled on the rebound. His two free 
throws with 1.9 seconds showing 
finished off a game-clinching 7-0 
Marshall County Central run. 

Nelson finished with IS points lo 
lead all scorers. Spilde had 12 
points and Joel Hcllcrud 10 for the 
Wildcats. 

In a rough-and-tumble game fea- 
turing aggressive defense on both 
sides, shooting figures took a hit. 
The Nordics shot 30 percent from 
the field (13/44) and the Wildcats 
29 percent (15/51 ). Marshall 
County Central won with a I4-for- 



20 night at the free throw line. 
where Tri-County was a less-frc- 
qucnt 5-for-H visitor. The Wildcats 
finished with a 31-25 rebound edge, 
hut also had more turnovers. 1 l-H. 
(coring 

1 2 3 4 T 

MCC 10 7 10 42 

Tn-Counly 10 7 12 30 

MCC • Jon Donarskl 0. Caleb Holthjson 
2. Mart Nolson IB. Carroll Mnonor 2. 
Oaylon Eliolh 4, Grog Uoland 2, Ouwd 
Wilco* 0. 

T-C - Tryg SpikJo 12. Set" Olson 0, Paul 
Kajmierciak 3. Phil Kn/mlarcinH 4, Joel 
Hollorud 10. 

Kittson Central 65 

Thief River Falls 52 

Kittson Central lumed a two- 
point edge into a 10-poini gap dur- 
ing a two-minute fourth quarter run 
lhat carried the Wolfpack past host 
Thief River Falls 65-52. 

The Prowlers played well at die 
start. A game-opening lay-up by 
Matt Myers and a thrrc-poini play 
by Jeremy Swanson produced a 5-0 
first-minute lead, and a fast break 
lay-up by Mike Johnson beat the 
buzzer for a 17-10 spread at the 
close of the first quarter. 

But a 7-0 Kittson Central surge in 
the middle of the second quarter 
wiped out lhat Thief River Falls 
advanlagc. Two free throws by Josh 
Deere with 1:05 remaining in ihc 
half gave the Wolfpack their first 
lead of the night. 26-25. The 
Prowlers' Kyle Watcrwonh then 
banked in a short jumper off a drive, 
but Deere turned a long offensive 
rebound intoashon jumper with 1.5 
seconds showing to send Kittson 
Central into intermission with a 28- 
27 edge. 

A drive by Aaron Austin put ihe 
Wolfpack ahead 33-31 with 4:39 
left in the third quarter, and they 
never trailed again. It was 41-37 
heading into the final period, and a 
still-close 43-41 game when 
Swanson put in a rebound with 6:49 
on the clock. 

But that's when the Wolfpack 
took off as Austin scored on a drive. 
Dccrc sank two free throws, Austin 
added a 15-foot jumper, and Nathan 
Bowman connected from the side lo 
make it 51-41 with 4:17 to go. 

The Prowlers never recovered. 
getting no closer than nine points 
down the stretch. 

Austin, a 6-1 sophomore, turned 
in an impressive 26-point game. 
Jason Urbaniak added 1 1 points to 
the Wildcats' offense. Only double 
figure scorer for ihe Prowlers was 
Swanson, who had 10 points. 

Kittson Central burned Thief 
River Falls on the inside throughout 
ihc game en route to a 56 percent 
24*for-53 shooting performance. 
The Wolfpack added a l7-for-27 
free throw performance. The 
Prowlers shot 44 percent from the 
floor (22/50) and went 6-for-10 at 
the line. Thief River Falls out- 
rebounded Kittson Central 29-19. 
but also had more turnovers, 16-9. 

I 8 2 3 4 T ■ 

Kltlson Central 10 18 13 24 05 

Thiol Rh-or Falls 17 10 10 15 62 

KC - Josh Deoro 0. Nathan Bowman 8, 
Miko Oisonawskl 4, Scott Ertekaon 0, Milch 
Doors 3, Aaron Austin 20. Jason Urbaniak 
11, Alan Cartoon 1, 

THF - Miko Johnson 7. Kyto Watorworth 
D, Man Myers 8. Joromy Swanson 10. 
Justin Walselh 0, Casey Skjervon 2, Kelly 
Cola 0. Anthony Hendricks 0. 




Kittson Central defender Aaron Austin reached out and swatted 
away this shot from the side of the basket by Mett Myers of Thief 
River Falls during Tuesday's semifinal match-up In the Thief River 
Fells Russ Smith Northwest Holiday Classic boys high school bas- 
ketball tournament. Austin scored a gamo-high 26 points as the 
Wolfpack beat the defending champion Prowlers 65-52. 



Saturday, January 3, 1998 



Pane 9 



NORTHERN WATCH 




Aaron Janisch of Thief River Falls, plBced first in 
the Semi Pro 440 Fan division during the Break 



the Lake 100 at Lake Bronson last weekend. 



Corey Davidson of Holt hugs tho inside corner 
with Bill SlomlnskI of Valley City, ND, close on 
his shoulder during a race during the Break the 
Lake 100 at Lake Bronson last weekend. 
Davidson was declared the unofficial winner in 



the Pro 440 division, but was later disqualified 
after an l.S.R. ruling. The official results put Kirk 
Hibbert of Goodridge In first place In the Pro 440 
division. Above, Hibbert Is pictured just behind 
SlomlnskI. 




FARMERS UNION OIL CO, 

Thiol River Falls Goodridge 

681-3512 378-4146 



COOPERATIVE OIL ASSN. 

Thief River Falls Middle River 
681-1590 222-3311 



FARMERS UNION OIL CO. 

754-4300 
Lake Bronson, Main Office 

Karlstad Stralhcona 

436-2668 



RED LAKE COUNTY CO-OP 

698-4271 

Brooks. Main Office 

Sranch Stores: Rod Lako Falls, OkJee 

Mcintosh, Plummet. Mentor. Erskino 



BECAUSE OF LOCATION. SIZE OF fAClLITIES 
OH OTHER FACTORS. SOME ITEMS AND 
SERVICES ADVERTISED III TKtS AD MAY MOT 
BE AVAILABLE AT ALL PARTICIPATING 
COOPERATIVES. MERCHANDISE MAY BE 
ORDERED BUT PRICING MAV BE SOMEWHAT 
HIGHER IH THESE SPECIAL ORDERS. 



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294-6117 
Hwy. 89, Grygla 




The Classifieds - The Classifieds 



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rogo. S440/moniri, twailntjlo Jan, 15, 2- 
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qmot 8-ploi. Also nvailnbio, smnllor 3- 
bodroom hoimo w/rjarnrjo. S350/montti 
plus utilities, available Jan. 1. no pats, 
roloroncos and doposit roquirod Call 
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FOR RENT 
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SPACIOUS TWO-BEDROOM opart- 
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OFFICE SPACE 
FOR RENT 

302 Third St. East 
Thief River Falls, MN 

Call 218-436-2121 

Ask For Gwen! 



FOR RENT- Huol opartmonts, 1 or 2 bod- 
rooms in St. Hitalro. has apartments 
available tor ion! with rural dovolopment 
and HUD subsidy. Contact I ho Housing 
Authonty at 637-2431 lot eligibility re- 
quirements and lurthor Information or 
contact Bemara Huol at 218<9C4-5433. 
PBHp 



ofl.stroot parking, h-.., f~™. 

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STORAGE. BOATS. CARS, RV'S. etc, 
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leavo mossago. Otic 



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Approximately 1,000 
Square Feet, Handi- 
capped Accessible. 
Across From Hugo's. 

Call 681-4324 
Ram Building Systems 



IUMMERFIELD PLACE Ol Nowtoldon 
has a two-bodroom/Two-bnlh aparlmont 
availablo. P rival o onlrnnco. scroonod-m 
porch, air eonditionor. washor/dryor, dish- 
washor and moro. Hon! paid by tho man- 
agement Call 1 -BOO -504 -GOO 3 tor moro 

Information anoVor lour. Ft02t1c 

FORRENT-Motxlo homo, 2-bodroom, t- 
1/2 bnttt. (no pots). Countrysido ParH. 

881-1850 or 681-0033. P4l2p 

RETAIL/COMMERCIAL. SPACE lor ront, 
uptown location, t.700 sq. n. plus otor- 
ogo aroa, hoal and wator paid, call G81- 
3045. EMttc 




300 SQ. FT. OFFICE 

AND 
600 SQ. FT. OFFICE 

au or/ums m pmt 

1ST MO. FX££ WITH 
UASE AHB DEPOSIT!! 

200 Barzen Ave. N, TRF 

681-2038 or 

681-1973 



APARTMENTS FOR ronl In Okloo. roo- 
my, t- and 2-bodroom, car plug-Ins, laun- 
dry and satellite- availablo. good rofaionc- 
es. 706-4602. lOOtlc 



STORAGE UNITS 
FOR RENT IN TRF 

Colt For More Details 
218-681-1861 



TWO SMALL storos tor ront. primo loca- 
tion. 112 and 114 3rd Strool East. Also. 1- 
bodroom apartment (or ronl. 681-4357. 

05tlc 

ONE-. TWO- or throo-bodroom apart- 
:monts. brand now, tor rem at spedol win- 
Hor ratoa. 253-4352.. lOOtlc , 



FOR RENT- 448 aeros cropland. Silver- 
ton Township. Pennington County, not 

CAP, phono 681-4802. F213p 

FOR RENT- 2-bodroom npartmont/go- 
rago. 5375/monlh, roloroncos roquirod. 

681-4013 or 222-4031. IQOItc 

OFFICESPACE (or'ron!, npproilmatoly 
380 sq. II. tn now provisional building. 

661-1565. BSHc 

FOR IMMEDIATE Ront- 1- and 2-bod- 
' room apartments, few ront. costs Includo 
hoat and water. Call 631-4609. tOlttc 
SUMMERFtELD PLACE- Now In Thiol 
Rivor Falls. Booutitul spacious sonfef 
aparlmont, 55+, ono. ono plus don and 
two bedrooms stating at S545. Washor 
and dryer, balcony, call oniry system, 
heat paid by management, hoaiod under- 
ground parking availablo. Call lor a pri- 
vate tour, 1.800-504.6093, 215 Ninth 
Street East, Thiol Rivor Falls, Mlnnosola. 

FBEtlc 

APARTMENT FOR ronl obovo Aco Hard- 
ware for ono non-smokor, quloi person, 

coll 681-3664. oatle 

CHARMING TWO-BEDROOM opart- 
mont, availablo now. 5325 plus utilities, 
omplo parking, doposit, no pets, 681- 

3718. P413p 

FOR RENT- Two-oodroom, ihroo-bod- 
room moblio homes In TRF. will accopt 

HUD, 44B-4331. P4t2p 

FEB. 1, 2-bodroom mobile homo/ontry, 
S2G0.00/mo. plus utllltlos. no pots, do- 
poslt. roloronco. loose. 681-2863. P4l4p 



OFFICE FOR RENT 



Professional Building, parking at 
door. Available January 1, 1998. 
Call 681-1635 •9 a.m.- 5 p.m. 



SPACIOUS 3-BEDROOM apartment, all 
utilitloa paid, no pets, doposit, roloronco, 
1-yoor loaso, 681-2863. P4t2p 



FOR RENT- Nlco 2-bodroom trailer 
houso, roloroncos. Call oftor 5:00 p.m., 
687-2550. 1t1p 



m 



wmtfswmwsm 



@> The Times 

324 Main Avenue North 

Thief River Falls, MN 

(218) 681-4450 




RECREATIONAL 



IQUTBOARD S 



JAN. 5 THRU 11TH 

16' NORTHWOOD 
FISHERMAN DELUXE 

CONSOLE STEEBDiC BND I0BJED WITH FISHDiC FEATDBES 

40 H.P. ELECTRIC START 
REMOTE _ 
MOTOR - »1 



RORLZE 



UUtOQ3luS\ 





YOUR CHOICE $ 
SALE PRICED AT 




WITH IBM & TUT 
CUSTOM TRAILER 

While 

100 Units 

Last! 



21' NORTHWOOD EAGLE 
FISHING PONTOON 

LOADED WITH FISHING FEfiTulES / 

40 H.P. ELECTRIC START 

REMOTE MOTOR 
WITH TRIM & TILT 



HURRY, THEY WON'T LAST LONG. 

WE NOW HAVE 9 LOCATIONS TO SELL FROM 
YOUR NO HIDDEN COST DEALER! 




RECREATIONAL 



1-800-333-9486 • (218) 367-2033 
10 Miles South 01 Perham, MN 

Hwy 78, Ottertail, MN 

HOURS: Mon.-Sat. 8:30-5:30 • Sun. 9-4 

OPEN 7 DAYS 



Pa B e 10 






NORTHERN WATCH 



Saturday, Jiinuury 3, 1998 



Saturday, January 3, 1998 



The Classifieds - The Classifieds - The CLASsmED^^i^ 



Help Wanted 



WANTED- A part iim.i Youth Diroctor nl 
tho United Moinoclisl Church Apply in 
pofnon nl the church, or oil 601-4388. 



Help Wanted 



Help Wanted 



OUTDOORS- Our I 



1 Our i 



Tfll-VALLEY POSITIONS open. Hoo 

Sinn Socrntary. Tln'-.o 12-montri po; 
lions begin as soon as possible. Fi 
more information anil an application, coi 
Met Pat Noah m TnV.illoy. 216-28 
5832. Applications closo January '' 
1998 EOE'AAA 4l2e 



i Cross 



sting 






Mining, S2S-S30K. Ewellonl 
mg allowance. Tremendous 
t opportunities into super- 
vision ;>cna rosumo to: Hiring Coordina- 
lor, RR 2 Ooi 148A. Fergus Falls. MM 
56537 P4ttp 



FBV-COOK MON.-FRI.. S am 

school Days only. oupononco net 
but holplul. Call C81 -1470. P4I4p 



■3 pm 



HELP WANTED- Full- or pan-limo hair 
dresser Apply in person. Toi's SlurJio For 
Hair. 300 LnBroo Avo . TUF. 64lfc 
RADIOLOGIC TECHNOLOGIST- Casual 
oor.it ion available, tor oipononcod Goner- 
al Radiologic tech. Mammography dosir- 
ablo. To apply contact: Dakota Clinic HR. 
Dopl. 2 18-681 -47-57. lai 218-661-6782. 
-- - ~ . ltd. is on EEOMA Employ- 



'. 5l3c 



Oakwood Homes in Karlstad, Minnesota, 

is accepting applications for two- and three- 
bedroom townhouse openings. Rent is based 
on 30% of your monthly adjusted gross income. 
For applications and qualifications please con- 
tact Elaine Baker at 218-436-2588. AN EQUAL 
HOUSING OPPORTUNITY. ^ 





ASSISTANT DEPUTY 




REGISTRAR \ 


All 




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""'"'"'''"""'"'■ 



Help Wanted 



Help Wanted 



HELP WANTED- Computer Spoclali 
Responsible individual noodod for tho 
d^tV-lo-d.iy managomont 
I compulor ' 



Help Wanted 






I. Mift 



calional roquiromont ot an Associate Do- 
groo in inlormalion managomont or 
od liold Two (2) years ol oipononeo may 
Do substituted lor each year ol lormai 
training. Must Do ablo to work indopon- 
donlly. have oicolWnt communication 
skills and havo tho ability to Irain Individ- 
uals mill n variety ol skill levels. Musi bo 
ablo to Irnvol and work flexible hours 
wtion noodod. Contact Doe Deo Johnson. 
Chiot Financial Officer oi Nancy Cots. Di- 
roctor of Human Resources al 216-681- 
4949 for moro Informs lion and/or on om- 
ploymont application. EOE/ADA. Send 
application and resume lo: Occupational 
Dovoiopmont Center, Inc., Deo Deo John- 
son. Chlol Financial Oftlcor. PO Box 730, 
TWO* River Folia, MN 50701. 311c 



FOR SALE BY OWNER 




3-4 Bedroom. 3 Bath. 2400 sq. ft.. 2 Car Garage. 
Central Air. Enclosed Patio, Cedar Deck & Fence. 
Pleasant SE Thief River Falls Neighborhood. 



Call 218-681-2673 for appointment. 



HELP WANTED- Part-time Food Sorvico 

ardo position available. Experience pre- 
ferred. Hoalth insurance, tick, holiday 
and vacation pay Included. Apply to; Hu- 
man Resources Dopartmoni, Northwest 
Medical Cantor. 120 LoBroe Ave. S.. 
TRFoHs. MN 56701, 218-681-4240 X407. 
EOE. 211c 



HELP WANTED m 

long-lorm enra facility. Part- 
timo trayllno position opon. 
Contact Kathlaon Vi crock, 
Dietary Suporvlsor, al 
Karlstad Hoallhcaro Contor 
at 218-433-2181. KHC Is nn 
oqual opportunity employer, 



304Wttt>lngtonAn.Wnl 
(Cirfitirf,UrV5o7» 



■m 



furnvkm^m 



The Talcnl Bank It an electronic Job 
rciumo thai cmploycii and prhiaM 
cmploymcnl wjcnOci can mxeu. 
TJxy can review your quahJleallom 
- cducallon, skills, iwrk hiiiory - In 
rcLitlorahlp to their )ob opening*. II 
Interested, employers i*ill contact 
you directly. Call lor more Informa- 



AfBBwmmimm 



KELP WANTED: INSURANCE 

SALES ASSISTANT. 

Licensed In proportyfeosualty and Me and 

hoaim dosirod. Send reuime to #2941 

c /o Tho Tlmoi 324 Ualn Aim. N, 

Thiol Rhver Falls, MM 56701. 



FULL-TIME HOME based mental health 
counselor lo provtdo counseling, skills 
imlning and support to emotionally dis- 
turbed children and (hair families. Prafor 
candJaato witn mastors dogroa In bo- 
fiavtorul sdoncos or bocholors dogroo 
and exporlonco. Send rosumo and lotto r 
of application by 1/0/98 to: Tarry DoMars, 
Northwosl Medical Center, 120 LaBroo 
Avo. S., Thiol Rrvor Foils. MN 56701. 
218-681-4240X204. EOE. 2t1c 



BRAY-QENTILLY Mutual Insuranco 
Company. Rod Lako Fans. MN. Is looking 
(or a rosponsibJa individual lo manage 
Ino day-to-day oporotion ol tho company. 
Individual must posses oxcetlont human 
rotations,' communication and loader- 
ship/management skills as welt oi a pro- 
fessional prosonco. Position requires 
good working knowiodgo Of Iho insuranco 
industry in gononu with product knowl- 
edge ol linos provided by Iho company. 
Submit rosumo and salary roqutromonta 
to Broy-GontiHy Mutual Insuranco Co., 
PO Box 205. Rod Lako Fans, MN 56750. 
Doadtino lo submit rosumo Is January 15, 

IMS. 613c 

HELP WANTED- Parts person at North- 
ern Motors. Full benefit pactmgo, call 
Tom or Goran} ai Northern Motors. 218- 
631-4020. 111c 



♦ DENTAL ASSISKNT- 
PaMra, Musi be raffed IWIta 
Fats. (MN1293603) 
4EMBR0TDERY SEWING 

MACHINE OPERATOR- 
Pemanert.FuHima.ThielRivErFafe. 
(MN4315477) 

♦ DIESE MECHANIC -ftm, 
FuMrne. HalodL (MNS022143) 



OiMi on vrr ot M Mov* mtomuson si 



IN-HOME COUNSELOR 



50% time benefit position as In-Home Counselor for 
Lutheran Social Service of Minnesota available. Will pro- 
vide family-based in-home services to children at risk of 
out-of-home placement, and their families, as referred by 
Ro sea" County . Masters Degree in Human Services 
ntmired . Should possess training/education in individ- 
ual, marital and family therapy, Tiave knowledge of the 
family-based service concept and be able to work with 
families who have one or more children at-risk. Call 218- 
236-1494 for application form. Application deadline 
January 9, position available ASAP. 



HELP WANTED 

Looking For Motivated Individuals. Flexible Hours. 

DINING ROOM: Full- And Part-Time Shifts, For 
Waiters/Waitresses, Hostess And Banquet Servers. 
Will Train. Mature Individuals Welcome. 

KITCHEN: Part-Time In Salad Department And Part- 
Time Cook 

Pick Up Applications At The Front Desk Of The 
Best Western, Thief River Falls 



r DUCAT10NAL TECHNOLOGY Support 
Position- ImmodUto opening for a person 
with a bachelor's degree In Information 
Technology or Technology. M^naoomonL 
ResponsloUIUaa knduoo assisting with tho 
planning, design, setup and maintenance 
ol a local ansa network lor (he school tys- 
lom and serving as a resource to teech- 
ora and srudontt In tho Implementation ot 
technology as a tool for teaching and 
looming, Teaching degree preferred but 
not roquirod. Applications win be accept- 
ed until position Is tlllad. Please send era- 
donUal file, lottors ol recommondotlon, 
application letter and other pertinent m- 
tormalion as may be doomed necessary 
Apply lo Superintendent of Schools. Trt- 
County School, PO Box 178, Karlstad, 
MN 56732. -Hie 



OFFSET 
PRESSMAN 



FuMmt position ._ ... 

shop. Kno«isdot ot ihnMsd 

amusi 

Position Includes various other duties 

IrrvehMlnthepreductJefldpublcstlons. 

SalarKe comrasnsurm — *■ ' — 



- A ppfy At- * 

TheTimes 

324 Main Ave. N. • Thkit R»«r Fim, MN 
(216)681-4450 



Cxtra 
Cxtra 

Now Accepting 
Applications For 

Northern Watch ZSb^A^I,^ ^ -w T-tsossErai-^w- 

Carners ^JgfeiSk. VV^XCjHL 

Pick up An Application At 324 Main Avenue North 

•Carrier Delivery Routes Arc Independent Contractors. 




The Northern Watch 
is looking for carrier deliv- 
ery people for the 
Thief River Falls area.* 

Girls and boys of all ages 

are encouraged to apply. 

along with adults. 




Through 
THE TIMES' 

'reaumes.nwatch.com 

http://wvm.nwatch.com • Email: nwatchOnwatch.com 

j^The Times .W^gBC 



tg^jj& Commercial Print Shop 

m Main »n. H. - TWtl Biro Fill,. UK MTO1 - lilil IIHH - Fir lilSI MI-MSi 



® The Times • WSxiSH 



wwwjiwatch.ee 



CLASSIFIED ADS 

DEADLINES: Tho Tlmo* - Monday. 10:00 A.M.: Northern Watch - Wodnoadny, 3:00 P.M. 



Address 

City 



Mako Check Payable to The Times, P.O. Box 100, Thief River Falls, MN 5S701 

PLEASE BE SURE YOU HAVE CHECKED WHERE YOU WISH YOUR AD TO RUN 

YOUR BEST DEAL IS TO RUN IN BOTHI 

Q Chock or Monoy Ordor Enclosod 

□ BB MnslorCaid » . Explratior 

□ ^Evisaa.. ~ — ^-.„ E»plmlior 



\9\ 

REACHING OUT 
WORLDWIDE 

for Al Low A, $5.00 

O Times • Intornol 

□ Northern Waldi 

□ Both * Intornol 



Ea. Add'l. 10 Words 41.00 



BEST VALUE! 
PACKAGE DEAL 



h.-rii.i'.'^.'-ai 



WANTED 

ISD #628 IN PLUMMER IS INTERESTED IN HIRING 
AN INDIVIDUAL TO ASSIST SECONDARY CUSS- 
ROOM TEACHERS IN THE AREA OF MATH AND 
READING. THIS INDIVIDUAL NEEDS TO WORK 
EFFECTIVELY WITH OTHER TEACHERS AND BE 
ASSERTIVE WITH STUDENTS. THIS POSITION 
WILL RUN MONDAY-FRIDAY, 6-1/2 HOURS PER 
DAY. COMPENSATION WILL DEPEND UPON 
TRAINING AND EXPERIENCE. INTERESTED 
APPLICANTS MAY CONTACT THE PLUMMER 
SCHOOL BOX 7, PLUMMER, MN OR CALL 
218-465-4222. APPLICATION DEADLINE FOR THIS 
POSITION IS JANUARY 9, 1998 AT 4:00 P.M. 



Tho lollowlng position Is available in ISD #441. 
Newfoldon, Minnesota: 

WEIGHT ROOM / 
HALL SUPERVISION 

EFFECTIVE: January 12, 1998 

DUTIES: Provido lor supervision of Gtudonts In wolght room, 
and hall supervision during altar school acttvjtios. 

REQUIREMENTS: Praloronco givon to Individuals wilh 
training or background In strength training lacilltlos and/or 
formal educational supervision. 

Stading salary to bo nogotiotod basod on past oxporlonco. 

Individuals Interested should contact Bryan -Thy go son, Marshall 
County Central Principal, In person, or In writing, 310 Weat MN 
Ave., P.O. Box 169, Nowlolden, MN 567313. 

■Usiilul Camtf Central Put*c SchooU dot! not djcrtrtnun on the turn of rtc*. ccior, 
nabonil onon w. ntyon agt ct <U*t>ify In to enxikwnanl ct the pro*tilcn & ucrica*.' . 



HELP WANTED- Payroll CtorK. pan-limo. 
This Individual w;ll bo rosponsibto lor tho 
complolion ol stall payroll and rjonoral 
accouniing duties. Two (2) yoars ol com- 
puterized bookkooplng oiperionco 
anoVor completion ol post-socondary ac- 
counting training. Must have prolicloni 
knowtodgo ol spread shoot coltwnro, pro- 
forably Lotus or Eicol, This parson must 
bo motivated, organized and ablo lo work 
Indopendenlry. 20 hours per weak. Con- 
tact DoeDoa Johnson, Chlol Financial 
Otficor or Nancy Cota, Director ot Human 
Rosources ot 2IB-681-4049 lor moro In- 
formation and/or an employment applica- 
tion. EOE/ADA. Sond application and ro- 
sumo to: Occupational Dovalopmont 
Center. Inc., DeoDoo Johnson. Chiot Fi- 
nancial Oflicor. PO Box 730. Thief Rtvor 
Foils. MN 50701. 3t1c 



— DIETARY POSITION— 

Part-time day and every other week- 
end position In Dietary. Musi have a 
valid drivers license. If Interested 
apply In person or contact Liz 
Anderson at Marshall Manor Good 
Samaritan Center. 4 10 S. McKlnlcy. 
Warren. MN 56762. 21B-745-5282 
EOE/AA ^ 



OUTSIDE SALES In your oroo. Entry lov- 
el sales job. No ouporiooco nocossory. 
Base plus commission, bonetits and 
training. Fortuno 500 Company. Must bo 
over 21 yoars of age, bondabkr. good 
work history, ablo 10 work SO- GO 
hrs/wook, sporuminood and porsonoolo. 
If you am serious about making SG00- 
SDOO per week, fax a brief rosumo to 218- 
749-3618 or sond a brief rosumo lo: Di- 
rector of Personnel. PO Box 1107, Virgi- 
nia, mn 55702. erec 

Real Estate 

HAVE CASH buyers for land with now or 
extended CRP contracts. Fpr sale- 160 
acres In section 25. Kratku Township, 
Ponnlngton County, $50,000: 160 acres 
In section IB, Rolner Township, Penning- 
ton County, $40,000; 40 ocros with aM 
fbtar-up buildings, in sadlon 7, Lambon 
Township. Rod Lako County, $20,000: 
400 ocros In Huss Township, Roseau 
County, $200 per aero (will dhrtdo). Norm 
Anderson Realty. 1602 Easl Groonwood, 
Thief Rlvor Falls, MN 56701. phono 216- 
6S1-2320. fax 216-6131-0409, Sailing 
farms In NW Mlnnosota slnco 1969. 

eotlc 

FOR SALE' 3^odroom. don, 2 bath. 2- 



LAKESHORE HOME FOR SALE BY 
OWNER. At Sandy Shores east ol Long 
Pt, 4-year-old. 3-bodroom, 2-botri, yoor 
around Irving, many axtras, 218-783- . 

5601. 44tfc ■ | ■ 

COZY STARTER/RETIREMENT homo, 
noot 2-bedroam, 1-bath, mam floor laun- 
dry, MZ upstairs, dolachod garage, heat. 
od shop, shed, dual heat wlih hoat pump. 
nlca yard, neighborhood. Must soo. 
$40,000's. Ploaso leave a messago, 661- 

1413. Pet2p •_ 

COMMERCIAL/INDUSTRIAL PROPER- 
, TV avoiloblo- Commorclal building In 
Strandauist, lolal space ot 25,281 square 
foot which consists ol (2) large f reo span 
areas, one ol 0.604 square foot or 
B3'x108' and 1,800 square fool or 
3O"x60\ The rerhalnlng opoco Is dMdod 
Into (12) rooms with on ovorago of 900 
square feet In ooch, Iho Interior walls may 
be ctaslgnod to suit IndMduat mods. Tho 
building usas a luol oil central bollor with 
a cool bollor as a back-up unJL Tho build- 
ing Is In excellant condition and has re- 
cehred a Honoywolt onorgy audit within 
ma past 15) yoars and Is currently in op- 
eration. Handicapped accessible. Terms: 
Nogoliablo. For moro Information, ploaso 
contact: Dorothy Suomolo, Trl-County 
Schools, PO Box 176, Karlstad. MN 
56732.216-438-2261. F3I3C 



FOR SALE- 20 acres 8 milos south. 1 
mile wast of Arctic. 60x170 dairy bam, 
70x75 Hanson silo loafing shod, Wotls 
trees. Coll ownor,2iB-68i-3848. 7Btfc 



lUm-WAiJai-TEWl 



New Uatlnp Htmembct tho big bad 
wolf? TtM wind on blow and blow and you 
donl even hear II IrtJlds ifilj solidly bulll 
36'xSO' brick horns. Futures 4 targo bed- 
loorra, lorrral din 1 nn- J *^wV I W"0 'Mtt 
all lTClw ^Ji**V.ll V 60 W- n - 
home. ft *£\y W^^- 1 int lud Ino. 
dclxhed i\ii-flIIa0flT2u^«■ InjuHted 
shop. 40^70" quonjet, 34"x4ff steel build* 
ino. Alt on 10 bciull'ul acres, rust on tar 
road 1 1 miles from Thiol River Falls. 
J69.SOO .00 • Ownei/Anent 



10 Agra CRP Ptummer Area. 



320 Acres. 2G3 Tillable. Old Bidg. Site. 
Good Land. Only 56 Aces ol CRP. Kiatka 
BildgeAiea. IT9.300 




FOR SALE- Excellent building alio. 
120x180, on blacktop read, city wotor 
and sowar, 1 block from Oakland Park. 
$11,000. Call 681-304B. FSt29p 
WANTED- FARM OR RANCH! Must bo 
very prtvato or socludod, prefer dead ond 
road, noxt to Stolo or Fodoral land. Must 
havo buildings. Contact W. D. Brown, 
7S7B Dixie Hwy.. Bridgeport. Ml. 48722. 
ISLAND LAKE, noor Ungby, 3 lots, send 
shoreline, southern oxposuro on groat 
fishing lake, $25,900, coll Oustln at 218- 

224-2148. PffiSp ' 

LOTS FOR Sale- 100'x200' on Rnlny 

.Rlvor at Baudotto. MN. Coll 701-775- 

\7B15. I70tfo 



NORTHERN WATCH 



I'llRC 11 



The Classifieds - The Classifieds - The Classifieds - The Classifieds 



Custom Services 



Custom Services 



:M.'i:«;llli.4V 

Chapter 7: S300 



DIVORCE 



Uncontested: $250 

OMDAEJAWOFnCE 
1-800-450-6040 



y ELECTRIC 

• Residential * Agricultural 

• Commercial 

• Electric Heat 

TIM BERGERSON 
Oifn c r- Ope ra ( o r 

coll 681-4659 



Miscellaneous 

QUALITY REBUILT ENGINES Sinning 
nt 1795. 12 monm/12.000 rmlo warranty - 
wtaich. on robuiWablo coro. Installations 
nnd lowing nvailablo. Oon's Machmo 
Shop.Foaalnn.MN.00O--!46-l51B. 17ltC 
FOR SALE- Mund lirowood. call 681- 



ACKER BODY Shop- Framo straighten- 
ing, collision, glass, touch -up. 14 yoars 
ouperionco. From Roseau: G miles wost, 
1/4 milo south. 403-9445. FlOOtfc 



YOUR INDEPENDENT 
HERBAUFE DISTRIBUTOR 

mnomiasau 

218-597-2774 




Miscellaneous • 
for sale- Pianks. rxpr-tcr-ir-tc- 

from 0' to 20' tono. Alio, 3«10-8' that naw- 
mill buy, 21B-253-2936. FIHc 



FOR SALE- Eloctric motors. 1/4-h.p. to 
7-1/2 h.p. Soo us lor all your eloctric mo- 
tor noods. Fioot Supply, Coll 681-2850. 

47ttc 

OAS AND WOODBURNINO FIRE- 
PLACES and Stoves. Many brands avail- 
able, HEAT-N-GLO. KOZY HEAT. 
EARTH STOVE. NAPOLEON. MAJES- 
TIC, VERMONT CASTING. Also, maso- 
nary llroplacos. wood-oil furnaces. Guar- 
anteed LOWEST PRICES. Financing. 1- 
BQO-440^043. Mahnomon. S7tfe 

FIREWOOD- Oak. otm. whlto ash. pop- 
plo. callC81-7684 or 681-1063 evenings, 
wiildollvor. PF4t7p 



OUARANTEED LOWEST pricoa- Lap- 
tops and computers, all mafcos ond mod- 
els. Call today lor quoin, 2tB-280-2373. 

SSI. PF10t3p 

ELIMINATE HIQH HEATING costs with a 
Stain loss Stool outdoor woodbumlng lur- 
naco. Hoots muthplo buildings. Dig sav- 
tnrjs on oarly orders. Financing ovoilablo. 
GUARANTEED LOWEST PRICES. 1- 
600-446-4043, Mahnomon. 50tlc 




Call For Details 

SPECIAL FEEDER SALE: Every Wed. - 

SPECIAL PRESORT SALE: Tuesday, Jon. 13 

COW SALE: Tuesday, Jen. 20 

Doug Kilen - 218-681-7563 

West Fargo Livestock Market • 1-800-733-4620 



NORTHWEST POWER SYSTEMS 



NOW IN STOCK 
REBUILT EXCHANGE 

STARTERS 

AND 

^ALTERNATORS'' 

Northwest 
Power Systems, Inc. 

204 Atlantic Ave. N. • Thief River Falls, MN 56701 

wwwnorlhwost-powor-systom.com omal I: npsO nont1wost-powor-3ystem.com 

(218) 681^5282 •' 1-800-570-5282 



c 



SAVE 7% 



i 




S 6f$f>et1ormance revolution are 

'here at Pioneer. New traits and 

^■^technologies, elite crop genetics that 

' "if^" perform, and a professional sales force 

that delivers the products, services and 

. ■ technical support you need. 

Experience the revolution and 

#^SAVE 7% now through 
^ January 10, 1998 

p on all purchases of 

_ a Jjoneero brand products. 
^-.iij«ii^^Sterly savings also apply) 

,%^ 

i : '^' 
Via/E'7 The Perromtance RavolirUnn rram Pioneer... 

f? , HI Technology That Yields. 



GARY PURATH 
RED LAKE FALLS 
218-253-2600 

joe Mcmullen jim potucek 

rt. 1, plummer warren 

218-465-4286 218-745-4800 



/gg\ PIONEER. 



/Hi 



Portable Etnndmlll, 

Will Cut By Hour; 

BrJ. FI. Shares 

30" Dlo. to21<Ft. Long 

Your Place Or Mine 
<lUt 3m /Kill (JW{... 

253-2936 or 2009 



218' 



25 CROSSBRED Stock cows, poured. 

wormed and vaccinated. Brod black and 
< Charolals. March and Af/rll calving, 
i $565.00. 218-352-8508. 2t2p 



BAGLEY LIVESTOCK 
EXCHANGE, INC. 



SALES EVERY THURSDAY 



Cattle Sales 

Had nil cbixj ol B«l Cstta. llolllcU 
Slctn. Ycullnc IktlSInn & Hetlm. Slock 
Co*l. FalCWUtSIaUKlllcrCowft Bulls. 

• COMPUTERIZED RING SCALE 

• CAT-WALK 

• DRIVE-THRU UNLOADING 
■ FULL-SERVICE CAFE 

CATTLE SWLLON THURSDAY 



SPECIAL FEEDER 



PWrt5?T7TTTOW1 



THURS., JAN. ISTH 
11100 A.M. 



THURS., JAN. «ND 
11:00 A.M. 



THURS., JAN. I9TH 
11100 A.M. 



SPECIAL BRED 
STOCK COW & 

HEIEEBSAIE 

SAT^ JAN. iOTH 
l:oo RM. 



For More Information Call 
Market Phone: 218-694-3701 

FAX: 218-694-3700 
Highway 2 West, Bagley. MN 



Machinery 



WINDSHIELD REPAIR- Stone chips, 
small brooks, approx. 10% replacement 
cost. Most insuranco companios warvo 
deductible. For Iroo ostimatos colt 68t- 
4233. Andorson Wlndohlotd Ropalr. 

NM2-BHC . 

FOLTZ BUILDINGS. Your post Iromo 
building oxports. Insulated snops/oarao- 
os, eommorclol/industrlal, macrilnory 
storage, horse/cattle bams. Can 1-600- 

255-90B1. F15IIC 

COLLECTORS- WE still havo a low cop- 
los ol Tho Tlmos Contonnlal oditlon ovall- 
ablo. S1.00 per copy. Tho Tlmos. 324 
Main Avo. N„ Thiol River Fails, MN 

56701. 34lto 

MACINTOSH QUADRA 610, 6MB RAM, 
1G0MB HO. 14" Hl-Ros. monitor, 14,4 
modem, lots ol softwaro, roady lor Intor- 
nol. looks brand now, S600/o.b.o. Stylo- 
writer 2 Ink-jot printor. S100 w/computor. 
Call Joo at 964-5660 In tho evenings. 

IF4i7c 

1B97 CLOSEOUTS! 3 arch-typo stool 
buildings. Ovorstockod. Disconllnuod 
models, show closoouts. Novor assom- 
blod. 20x20. 25x60, 50x110. Ready lor 
Immodiulo delrvory. Call 1-600-222-6335. 
P4Hp » 



FOR SALE- J.D. LLA grain drill. 2-14" 
w/hitch. dry loniliror. grass sood attach- 
ment, markors, good shapo, always 
shoddod and kopt Insido, disks aro in 
good snapo. mud scrapers tike now. 
$2,300.00 Also, havo grass sood attach- 
ment tor 30' A350 J.D. grain drill, 
S400.00, phono 2IB-437-B340. 
Ill 01 c/F tOOttc 

pj HlhWJhisMW i iJ t f 

Welders «Chorry Pickers 

Bailory • Engino 

Chargors Stands 

• Hoi 4 Cc4d Washers 




Farm Miscellaneous 



* USED AG 

* PARTS 

* TR SALVAGE, ixc. 



*********** 



Hay, Feed and Seed 



FARMERS- II you havo hoy tor salo ad- 
vortlso It in tho Nonhom Watch. Poopto 
era looking lo buy. Tho TImos/Northom 
Watch. 324 Main Avo. North, Thiot Rlvor 
Fulls, MN 56701. 681-4450. Blto 
FIBST, 2ND. and 3rd crop alfalfa, big 
-round bales. Also, whoa!, barley straw, 

440-3945. PF417p 

FOR SALE- Big round bales ot timothy 
ond allalfa, roal Qood boo! cow hoy. can 
deliver, phono 601-3692, it no onswor 
loavo mossogo. tup 

Snowmobiles 

' WANT TO Buy- Older Arctic Col El Tlgro, 
'Mualbelngoodconditlon.Coll661-S40B. , 
loavo mossogo. PF4i3p 






1998 SKI-DOO's 

RIDE FREE TIL.': 

JULY 7, 1998 OR TAKE 

CASH DISCOUNT OF 

UP TO $1,000 ....;• 

ON ALL '98 & NEW 

'97 MODELS ^ 



20-50% OFF 

CLOTHING!! 



SALE-HKBI ime WRCOMB 

S & J 

SPORTS, INC. 

t-at»«H1t4'782-29M Groenbuah, MN 



FOR SALE- 1 900 650 Wildcat w/covor. In 
oxcallont condition, asking S1.500.00, 
216-330-1017 or 216-4G9-2017. P4t3p 
FOR SALE- 1906 Arctic Cat Cougar, 
1,400 milos, oxcallont condition. 218- 

204-6597. PSMP 

*85 ZR 560 EFI. many oxtras and nice *97 
ZR 560 EFI. t.400 mlloo. extras, very 

nlco. 216-661-6025. PF4l3p 

FOR SALE- 1976 Johnson 440, oloctric 
start snowmobile, oxcollont condition. 
216-478-3374. PF4ltp 



-.p- GREAT SAVINGS ON ARCTIC CAT.. 

' lklMllt*fe . SNOWMOBILES 




Snowmobiles 



Household Goods 



WANTED- Angus hoitors or young cows 
lo C.ilvo in Fob.. March or April. 563- 

7460 F2ttp 

FOR SALE- SO nice bool cows and 30 
bred hoifnrs. slan calving March 15. Con 
lood tor a low months. Good hay tor salo. 

218-700-5602. PF4t3p 

FOR SALE- 9 brod purobrod Angus hoit- 
ors. mainly Al. Pregnancy chocked, vac- 
cinated ond poured. Piicod reasonably. 
Contact Potor Solom at 2IB-C81-5206 

ovonmos or wookonds. PF4ttp 

10 EXCELLENT quality young t.400 lb. 
rcgistorod Polled Horotord cows, April 
calving, bangs vacclnalod, wormod. 
pourod ond vaccinated. 218-352-6500. 

2t2p 

n April. 



FOR SALE- 12 Crossbrod cows, duo lo 
aiart calving Fob. SOD), call 366-1340, 
Wa/road. P5tip 



FOR SALE- 1096 440 Z Arctic 

b>lo. Call 218-874-4371 ovoningi ona 

. wookends, ask tor Mortyn. P411p 

1B91 ARCTIC Cat 530 EXT. high m.loa. 
oxcollont condmon. $1,200. Also, t993 
500 EXT Z in vary good condition, 210- 

7S1-2B20. PF415p 

FOR SALE- 1997 Polans 440 XC. 2,000 
milos. oicollont condition, asking 
54 ,000.00/0. b.O. Call 681-3170 WOO- 
konds. 67tto 

Sporting Goods 

FOR SALE- New ond used goit cans. 
Wilcox. Red Lako Falls. 1-600-645-5081. 
56tlc 



RICK'S APPLIANCE 


A 


ll-VfinEipirkixr 


All (Soli nuinntml 
Pirti & 1 jbor 

Sinkt On Men) 
Mijor It null 


For S*rvki Cili: 
631-2283 or 1-800-360-2263 

In Hxne c Sixv Sctte 


FOR SALE- Full-sila 


bod with aro^sor. 



Wanted to Buy 



WANTED- 3-pl. bale lock, 216-440-4701. 

nip 

WANTED TO Bir/- B-9 fl. pool taoJo and 
loos ball gamo. Family Preservation Con- 
tor. 683-7180. PF4Hp 



S\g[s^Lo^^[aii 



AFFORDABLE 

USCD FURNITURE 

221 LaBreo Ave. N, 

THIEF RIVER FALLS 



WANT TO Buy- Furs and hides. Sundrud 
Furs. Fosston. 21B-435-6915. T5t95cJ 
F1011C 

Situation Wanted 



FOR SALE- Upright piano. Call Stophon, 
MN, 218-476-3335 altor 5:30 p.m. wook- 

days or loavo message. PF4t3p 

QUEEN-SIZE SOFA Blooper, noutrai col- 
or, klng-slio wolorbod, new hootor, 218- 
437-6234,218-437-6468. F2l3p 



JACOBSON'S 

SNOW REMOVAL 



Plooso Call. We Want Your Buslnoss. 
Coll 681-1511 ask for Adam 
or 681-1106 oilc for Curtis 



rCU CAN BEAT AN ESB; 
WU CAM BEAT A DRUM; 
YOU CAN7 B EAT OUR DEALS! 

Sutton's tttptt Hhnhust 

Bagley ' (218)694-6161 



FOR SALE- Floral print 6-tt. couch, good 
condition, asking 550.00, 449-4091 altor 

4:30 p.m. on weekdays. P4t2p 

16 OFFICE chairs, 2 lilo cabinets, 9 usod 
(ridges. 10 30-Inch oloctric siovos, 6 
round 6-fool folding tables. Quist's Trad- 
ing Post, downtown Crookston. P4t1p 



MONDAY/TUESDAY/FRIDAY, B a.m 

5 JO p.m. Northland Shoe Ropalr, 607 61 
SI. E. PF1219p 



FOR ALL YOUR 

Repair Needs 

* Chain Stvo • SnowmoMol 

• Snow BWwori • OutboarOs 

• Inooarda & 1.0. Drives • AH Smalt Engines 
• Lawn Mowt'i & fliflars 

NORM'S REPAIR 

• saiis a sf nvrcf • soooo snowmobiles 

1207H.DulUtri ThW Ht«f Falli 

0*1-33-40 



DON'S 

307 1ST ST. E., THF 

Aero— From Ptotlngton Sguarv 

yon.- nsjiiiAJt.n turn uu ooasmiaai 
m iAJt- n •jL>t4»pjL<aostota i ml 

SEWING & VACUUMS 

Solas A Sorvico • NEW & USED 

681-8664 



ATVs/Motorcycles 

'82 YAMAHA Wage- 920 motorcyclo, has 
a taring, radio, engine oil coolor. 24,500 
miles, $1,150.00. DAS Solos, 1-600-253- 

2009 or 218-253-2940. 1t1p 

FOR SALE- 1 996 PolorlsSOO Sportsman 
4x4, shall drtvo, 840 miles, 218-463- 

3468. Illp . 

WANTED FOR parts- 1962 Honda 70 3- 
whoelor lor parts. Phono 218-681-1133 
or 218-681-6039 and leave a messago 
tor Gary. 72tfo 



FOR SALE- Maytag washor end dryer, 
older green, works good, S250.00 sol, 
218481-1792. Illp 

. . Mobile Homes 

MOBILE HOMES for sale- 2-3 bedroom, 
washers, dryers, u/c, storage sheds, etc. 
Consider bart or/renting, 681-8183. 

P4t2p 

MOBILE HOME lor salo- 1969 Now 
Moon (standard], l2-ft.x56-tt., daytlmo 
call 523-3681, after 6 p.m. 674-7625. 
P4t3p 



Bray Township filing oatas lor offices ol 
Supervisor and Clorfc ore January 12 to 
January 26, 199B. Contuci Michael 

Brooks, aork. 964-5561. 212c 

NOTICE 
NORTH TOWNSHIP RESIDENTS 
Filing lor affuaavit ot eandldocy for iho ol- 
llco of Supervisor for a 3-yoar torm and 
Clark lor o 2-yoar term ere January 13 lo 
January 27, 1998. Please contoct Town- 
ship Clerk al 661-6048 evonlngs. 

Dobra Dlott 

Township Clork 

2t1c 



,^v 




■ QUALITY HOUSING 
lAFFORDABlLITY ^ 

> ON THE SPOT RNANCINOX 



. of Grand Forks 
1801 N. Washington SL 
Open 10-6 p.m. Mon.-SaL 



AKC ST. Bernard puppies, 2 moles/2 lo- 
malos, dry mouth and one smooth coot, 

21B-745-4S21 evenings. PF4t5p 

FOR SALE- Purobrod Beagle pups, S 
malos. 3 fomulos. $200/ooch. Roady to 
goat Christmas, 216-425-7641. P8l1p 



^>THEO MAR ft' 
<& KENNELS v?/ 

BOWWOE OF THE ACADEMY OF D06 
BROOmS. ST. PETEBSBURB. FL 

Tw Oinim ■ lM>g iW On*. Uma\ f« *X ton 
• Gang. Btawig tM rm » TW Ov 



MIForAflAppolntrntnt 

218-449-3575 



■■ FOR SALE- 14x70 3-bodroom mobile 
homo on I0ffx200' lot on Rainy Rrvor at 
Baudotlo.MN. Call 701-775-7615. I70tf0 
FOR SALE- 1966 14x60 Skyllno rmibilo 
homo with entry, sol up in Oaks mobile 
homo park, Rod Lake Falls, $2,000.00 or 
best orlor, 21B-6B1-2857, P4t2p 
FOR SALE- 14x70 Holly Park mobile 
home noods minor work. Call ownor, 218- 
681-3646. 7B1tC 

Want To Rent 



QtVE AWAY- Purobrod English Springer 
Spaniel puppies, Coll 798-5633. 

pF3tip/it3i ; 

BLACK LAB pups, 9 weeks old, mom 
groal huntor and good around kids, Iroo, 
218-874-8611. P4t3p 

Household Goods 



WANTED TO RENT: 
FARM LAND 



in trf area for 1998 and 
beyond. 218-280-2081 



Daycare 



LICENSED DAYCARE has oponings. 
Food program. Preschool education. 
Salo caring environment. Foncod yard, 
581-5063. 85tlc 



SEWING MACHINE 
REPAIR in your home or 
bring to Nnrvcrud Cleaners. 

Phone Earl at 

964-5763 or 681-3441 




- — — — — — 'CUT OUT AND SAVE- — — — — — — 

Call 964-5237 For... 

READY MIX CONCRETE, SAND & GRAVEL. 

We Have Heated Ready Mix For 

Year Around Jobs. 

k For Saurday DaKvery Ot Heaoy M«. C»S FrWay 

I RADIO DISPATCHED TRUCKS 

m NOMOTQOBIOORTOOSUAU.I 

I Concrete Inc. 



CONCHETE INC. 



St. Hllalre, MN 



r 



1>W 



NORTHKRN WATCH 



Sulurclsiy, .liiiiimrv t, I'WK 



Suturcliiy, Jiiniiiiry 3, I y 9H 



NORTHERN WATCH 



Pbrc 13 



77/e Classifieds - The Classifieds - The Classifieds 



The Classifieds 



"YOU BEND 'EM 

■WE'RE EQUIPPED TO 

REPAIR ANYTHING FROM 

FPAMES TO WINDSHIELDS 

GIVE US A CALL 

681-3952 

FREE ESTIMATES 



WE MEND 'EM' 




NORTHWEST AUTO BODY 



NEXT TO FLEET SUPPLY 



HWY I A 59 HIST 



ftiErfWER FAILS 



. ^-$s£d£<~: — : — 



OE4LS 



Automobiles 



Automobiles 



Automobiles 



Automobiles 



■94 PONTIAC Grand Am. 
noniir.il, S?.:>50 00, Gflt- 



MBS 
1996 PONTIAC GRAND AM 
1996 PONTIAC BOKNEVILLE 

1995 CHRYSLER LHS 

1995 OLDS. CUTLASS SUPREME 

4-DR. 
1995 FORD CONTOUR 
1995 CHEVY CAMARO, T-TOPS 

1991 PONTIAC BONNEVILLE 
1994 PONTIAC TRANS AM 350 
1993 CHRYSLER NEW YORKER 

1992 OLDSMOBiLE TORONADO 
199Z CHEVY LUMINA, 4-DR. 
1991 OLDS. CUTLASS SUPREME 

4-DR. 
1990 BUICK CENTURY 
1981 OLDS. DELTA 83 
1989 FORD MUSTANG 
1987 CHEVY NOVA 
1984 FORD LTD 



TRUCKS MP VANS 
1995 CHEVY S-10 BLAZER 
1995 CHEVY 4X4 REGULAR CAB 
1995 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE 
1995 CHEVY EXT. CAB 4WD 
1994 GMC PICKUP, 2WD 
1993 FORD EXPLORER 
1991 FORD EXPLORER 
1990 CHEVY S-10 BLAZER 4WD 
1987 FORD 2WD 
1977 CHEVY 4X4 
1985 CHEVY CONVERSION VAN 

G-20 




ANDERSON 

~ S 

Frands Anderson • 681-3600 MlaaiarP""' 00 
3rd St. & Horace Ave. Thief River Falls, MN 



OOCHECK THESE OUT! 



CABS 

tS:CH£Vim:.SA4.DB.t1.CMW 
I MOLDS CUTLASS SUPft . ?-DR . S.I» Ml 
1935 CHRYSLER CONCORDE 4-OR , «,DW W 
M9S5 DODGE ENTTIEPiD ES.40R . 33 000 VI 
1J94BOSSEVILLESE.4-DFI. 17,000 Ml. 
W PONT GRAND PRIX SE, COUPE, 

VOOSROOF.flED 
IM3 OLDS CUTLASS SUPREME. EL 

4-DR. £{.000 Ml. 
1992 BUCK REGAL CPE LOADED. 6S.0CO Ml' 
1 Ml BLNCK PARK AVE . DUAL POWER 

AND CLIMATE CONTROL 
1991 MERCURY COUGAR LS, J 1 COO Ml 

i m leuass i-DR , j-cyl, es.ooo w 

1SS3 CADILLAC SEVILLE. 53,000 Ml 



RON'S AUTO 

SALES 



AUTO ^HOSPITAL 

AUTO & TRUCK REPAIR 
ENGINE TRANS. OVERHAUL 

681-4629 



'92 CADILLAC Fleetwood FWD, 4 0. V 
U. gold *'1an lu.ilhUr intorior, vofy nico 
c.ir nl n low. low pneo. $0,900.00. D&S 
SiiFos. 21U-253-2D09 or 21B-253-2W0 



FOR SALE- 1S1U9 Cnovrolot pictiup, 30\> 
V-O. 5-spood. low itiilnM. AM FM aisinllo 
Matching loppcr. mini condition Citll 745- 

6235 .liter C 00 p m OHito 

1BB7 FORD Bronco II XLT 4>4. nuto . 
lochs, windows, n c , till, cruiso. s.rj V-0. 

CBi-saas/oaa-iMOfi. P4itp 

1891 F-250 4«4 OiOSOl. 5-5pood. nit. Mb. 
I20M turjriw.iy miloa. loodod. sfinrp truck. 

SI2.50O. 218-687-3901. PF4l1p 

FOR SALE- 1989 ForrJ Escort GT, 4-cy- 
Imdor. 5-spood O.D.. 00.000 milos, 

St.250 00, 21B-435-GB20. I11p 

FOR SALE- 1093 Ford Ranrjor, 4-eylirt- 
dor. 5-spood, 2-whool-dfivo. runs groat, 
IOO>nnico.cnl121B-745-4602. Illp 

1979 CHEV. MntiCu Classic. V-C. btuo, 
126,000 miles, dayiimo will 523-3601. fit- 
lot 6 pm. 874-762S, P413p 



■80 OLDSMOBILE Cullnss Clora. 4-Ooot. 

2.5 4 -lock ongmo, fjood luos. gray w/rod 
Interior, runs oraot. Qreat buy 51,250. 
DSS Salos. l-BOO-253-2009 or 21S-253- 
2940. Hip 



BIG 



COMPLETE MACHINE SHOP 

•Ww Grinding -Prawn! 
•Boring Testing 

• Crank Grinding • Bnl* Diumi 
•Rotors •HuchHore 

Hwy: SOW. 681-2223 T.R. Falls 



The Best Buys of the Season 
are happening right now at 

OLSONS AUTO REPAIR 
8 TOW SERVICE 

6T6 Davis Ave. •Thief River Falls 
681-4250 



1992 Chevy Blazer 4-Dr. 4x4 
1992 Ford Ranger Pldaip 4x4 
1991 Ohb Bravada 4-Or. Srnart Trx 



HcINTOSH 
MOTORS 



1997 CHEVY 1UMINA [OOOOU 
3-1 994 FORD HUMS 01 u tow 
1993 DODGE DJUOTA 4l4 15.000 Mi 
1993 CHRTS1ER MEW YORKER 

IMONsv, 
1993 CHRVSIER HEW YORKER 

SUOHloaM 
1991 OLDI CIERA SI Loaded, scrx u 
1995 KKUIHSUliMta, tola 
1995DODCE INTREPID 



36 Hon Can to (bout Iron! 

MnaiKuig Avouoow to Quouicd Btfyns. 



HcINTOSH 
MOTORS 

Hwy 2 E. • Mdnloth 

218-563-7778 



HAPPY NEW YEAR! 



-91 DODGE DYNASTY 

'89 CHEVY 5-SPEED, PICKUP, 

80,000 MILES 
'87 CADILLAC 
86 PLYMOUTH REUAHT 
'86 CHRYSLER HEW YORKER 
'84 CADILLAC 



Hwy. 59 N., T.R. Falls 
681-3960 • 681-7271 Homo 



'B4 HONDA Civic ISOO. 2-door hatch- 
back. 5-spood. bltio w/bluo Intorior, groat 
gas miloarjo, spocinl SI, 195. D&S Solos, 
t-B0O-253-2O0TJ or 218-253-2340. Hip 



1995 CHEVY S-1i 
has command sti 
allot 3 p.m. BStto 



FOR SALE- 1995 F-150 XLT 4x4. ox 
londod cab picJtup, 302. auto., 28.0O( 
mllos. loadod. 218-782-3104. PF4i7p 



1978 PONTIAC Bonnovillo, 4-rJoor, 
120.000 milos, air conditioning, hoodboll 
hoolor. good running. Call 218-478-2473. 

PF4l1p 

FOR SALE- 4x2 Chov,. 1B34, Suburban, 
full power, scats 9. oxcollani condition, 
681-2000. 102tfc 




1-800-994-0753 



BT FORD Exptoior. 4-door, 4.0 V-8. n.t.. 
B.C., 111!, cruiso and moio, whllo w/rod In- 
lorlor, llntad windows, 4x4, opoclol 
S7.850. D4S Salos. 1-8O0-253-2O09 or 

218-253-2940. 1t1p 

TONNEAU COVER and Lund bug shiold. 
Ins 1093-97 Ford Rangor pickup, oxcol- 
lont condition, 681-621Bovoninns. 2i1p 



FOR SALE- 1992 Morcury Topaz, 5- 
spood. n/c, DO. GOO ml loo. oxcoilont condi- 

Don, call 437-6314. Illp 

3 4t4p 

FOR SALE- '89 Cadillac Eldorado, 
sharp, oxconont condition. 4,5 onrjino. 
sorvico records availablo. 1 6SK, priced ai 
$5,500. Tako In trado '00 and nowor Arc- 
tic Cat snowmobilo, call 701-293-3255. 

P4t2p 

FOR SALE* 1093 Dodgo Dakota Club 
Cab 4x4, V-8. outo.. loadod. Call CB1- 
4303 days, ask tor Oruco. 681-0155 
ovflninns. PF4i7p 



198B OLDSMOBILE CullflSS Supromo, 
2-door, oroy. V-fl. aulomatlc . irons.. 
105,000 milos. $2,250. call 268-4660. 

P4t2p 

FOR SALE- IQ83 Chov. S-IO Btaior, 
4x4, 2.8 V-C, 52.050.00. Call 218-681- 

1050. P4t1p 

"89 PLYMOUTH Acclaim, 4-door, maroon 
w/rod doth Intorior, till, cruiso. nico car, 
good buy, only 52,450. DS5 Salos, 1- 
B00-2S3-Z009or21B-2S3-294Q. 1l1p 
1993 CHEVY S-10 Blaior 4x4 LT, loadod. 
66,000 mllos. Call 1st Amorican Bank. 

ask lor Ed, 745-4411. BSItc 

19BS PONTIAC 6000, 4-door. 2.8 V-C. 
tilt, cruiso. a.c, whllo w/bluo Intorior. sato 
prlcod $1,350. D&S Salos, 1-800-253- 

2009 or 218-253-2040. Illp 

1992 S-10 Blazar Sport, black/Qray intori- 
or. p.w., p-l-, OH. cruiso, auto.. 96.000 
mllos,$9.495.00,2ia-964-5C73. PF4l3p 

' Campers/ RVs 



QUALITY TRANSPORTATION FOR '98 AND BEYOND! 



■95 EAGLE VISION ESI 1 '92 GRAND MARQUIS LS I '95 FORD EXPLORER LIMITED 




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B7Chavy Or. Prix Con, 4k4,h,*— m 
D7Cfi«vy T«hc*,t- «-o— —.—.-. 
07 Chtvy Tshoa 20R Sport, «*>■. 
MOHC JaExLC4ib.>«..--.,«.-. 
5flFord4x4 XLT, — *»»«-«-*- 
cTchtvy Tahoa LT. **,.».***,>***., 
SdCnavySBLuer, xk.~-i.~k 
l^ChiivyJxTExL Cab Diosol 3llv. Z71. 
eycVa^4)tTExL , Cab Silverado, ««.v«. 
80*f5hov72WD, ExL Cab. Sllvorado.t*. 
MChavy TThMLTT^M u- .. .— . .-* 
2-95 Chavy Suburban LT,«h.uhu. 
sTchavy Ext Cab 2WO i m.v> mum <, 
S^ChavyJxTEjrt. CabZ71.«-vn— 
BOQMC Suburban, hi>w«>mwm 
BiJCnTlry"s^lTEj(L Cab 4x4, «-*— . 
04 Chivy 4x4 ExLCiib Silver ado, MV * 
04 QMC 4x4 Ext Cab. ■ K » H ..i« M 



SWANSON 
MOTORS 



m.\\,.m.>Mmw.\m 



OTBuIck USabra, •* « 
07 Chavy Cavalrar. a 



ilas^, iiiiias?!R!a,srKa 



07 Park Avanua, w~. — wm. i mi 
SO Bonnavllla SE, »»r- —.— .« 



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LARGEST SELECTION 
OFTHEYEAR 



04 Chavy Suburban, mm- >^«*«- 
94 Chavy 4x4 ExL Cab Silverado, *w.v> 
bTomc'su bur bThTC^T^ mm «~- M 
84 Chavy SBuuar, •-. n ***.*, m, 
oTchWsiTExtCat^VVa tTv. w . . 



oTpcmtTacfarand AM, - 
t>0D Bulcii Park Avanua. ■»> 
90 Chavy Lumlna.fMvtvu.. 
00 Pont lao Bonneville SE, b-^tm, ^m . 
B5 Old* Aurora, u™-.<w.«—co •«*!!,« 
eTcadlllao Savlll* SLS, o™-. -*. « w 
00 Pontiao Grand Prix, n^ «.■«■«.«*.• 
m' bldaC Ftrra; ««*«.««.*. 
02 Ponttao Grand Prix, *«*«.«.».■ 
02 Buck Park Avanua, aw. M .♦** » 
oTLauEuTtOC^Zrw^Mi.i 




Vponttac 

1-800-237-4407 



Cavalier, ND • (701) 265-8336 





1998 CHEVY BLAZER 11^ Omnr MVALO 4-DB. tWOEVYUMrJU4*R. 1808 CrffiVY1/2-T0II 4X4 1998 CHEWY 1/2-TOii lOBaCHmratTURE 

4-DR.4X4 4-c^..A t i D ,«rt:.c.i.i.t.nn.ct>. v-o.LMom.coru,.. 4300. Auto, *c,c.u™. ta.cn.. WORKTROCK VAJI - 



'24,995 



s 1 4,995 



-•"'17,795 '19,995 



'14,995 



■■'23.995J 



SAVE ON THESE PRE-OWNED VEHICLES 




For Yoiir Shi 

Your Hometown GM Dealei 



NORTHERN MOTORS, INC. 

Hwy. 1 & 59 W. Thief River Falls, IVUM 6S1-4S2Q 1 -SOO-9 5S-6QS 3 



IRE-BUILT ENGINES 


CALL. 218-435-6379 OR 1-800-443-1313 


VEHICLE fCMCHT 


ENM DIALLED 


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$1^)20.00 


2.0GM 60-eSCorO ..-r^^ m ^n'-"---.Sa03.OO 


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4.3 ln|. Chov. P/U .<--/J**5i55.-> .". -S078.0O 


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305 Chovy Corb ca -05 S87S.00 


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350 Chovy Corb 08-85 $875.00 


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305 Chov. P/U-Sub 86-94 $870.00 


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350 Chov. P/U-Sub 88-94 . $878.00 


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300 Ford P/U Corb $898.00 


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300 Ford P/U Inj $848.00 


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302 Ford P/U Corb $808.00 


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302 Ford P/U Inl. Thru 1001 $008.00 

351 W Ford P/U Corb $098.00 


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2.8 CoravarvVoyagor $1,280.00 


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3.0 Caravan/Voyagor Thru 19B9 ...S1. 678.00 


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3.8 QM 80-09 $978.00 


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SHOP THE CLASSIFIEDS & SAVEI 



LESS THAN 1% FINANCING 

ON ALL NEW BUICKS IN STOCK! 



I CHEVY CARS I NEW TRUCKS I 



1 tM CKEV. CAVALER RS, I-f>. AT. Un ViTiMti. 
1 M CHEV. VEKTUHE VAH, 4-0r, Rur AC. toWld. 

IK* CHEV. VEKTURE VAN, tOr, ChH Sett CO, 

La«M,Ok.Tul 
1 tM CHEV. MOrfTE CABLO ZM, 3 S V-fl. P. SuL CO. 

LokJmLVitiK 
1 HI CHEV. CAVAUEB, 2-B, AuO , Ax. CO, TB. 

CruM,Brtt«RM 
1M CHEV. CAVAUEfl, I-Or, S-SpJ. R Cm*. CO, 

BUcx 
1 m CHEV. CAVALCB, 2-Or, ka , CO, Air, TB, 

Cnist.GrMn 
IMO0^.lJJIOLA.P.fjmirtS«rtP.Wrrj^T» 

CruM,Dk.J)o>Cv**n 
1(91 CHEV. LUUHA, CO. P. Wrrttw. TB. Cam*. 

CtCtrrrirw 
ItN CHEV. 1IAU8U IS, V-t. AKJ, CO, LoKtod. 

Dk.C*rr*ofW 
1 nt CHEV. CAVAUEB, 4ft. P. Leeks. Au&, CO, Air, 

1»»CHCT.ICTR0,3Ik,l^JSt<l.W , tfrlR«) 
IHTCHEV. VENIUTIE VAN, 7-Pm, Cut. 1 CO. 



NEW BUICKS 



1MBUinRECUU.GS,5««tfitroKLU V-S, 

Cm. 1 CO, Lo*WGtiyLuT» 

BtoUWMMrGflr, 
ISM BUXX CEKPJRY CUSTOtL P. Drwri Swl 

loUod. Ou»l Tamp. OanW, Cm. A CO, 

UsKStncVR 
1IH BUCK CTrrrunYCUSTuii, OuU Two. Cored. 

r^am.LoocWTi>*jjiBt» 

ItN BUCK CEHTUHT CUST09, P, DrMrt SttL 

Dial TtYnp. Coned. LhorL BrtOi Wha 
IMKJKWCE)nilrrrCtHTC*LLoM«lT»Tp 

r^rnoLBonxautRid 
MM BUCK CENTURY, P. WVdjm P. Loch. Ti. 
"""'CrMu»dod.J*^unwi 
1M BUCK USABflE CUSTOH Pcmt DrWi 1 

Pm.S«LCD*Ci^LDirJ«S4ri»jn»r36pi 
l9MBUCKLiSABHEClrSTOII,P. DnwlFHi. 

Sm* C«Jt, LonM. 5fcmriH 
1 m BUCK USABRE CUSTOM, CM Cm, 

P. Drtar A Pm. Sua, LoxM Brtcnl VrhM 
1 »e BUCK USABHE CtrSTOIl Kfylm Eray, CO t 

Cm, LoaM, Beriuui Fled , 

im buck iiSAEMLairrm Auo. Lwicww 



ItN CHEV. En. CAB 5fl.VERAOO»ooi4il,5TO 

V4AjU.Z-7l,tdO]8U> 
ItN CHEV. EXI CAB SIVEHADO Moor III S700 

V-e.AiU,UM.Bt*CVMn 
IM CHEV. ETC CAB SIVERADO Wtxx «it 57W 

v-e.Ai»j,oryia»a! 

ItN CHEV. Elt CAB HIVERAM Mow 4it irtO 

V-fl,Au!l,rjlr.Copp«r 
ItN CHEV. Ell CAB £LVEHADOUoe(4it,S700 

V-a.Auki,OLCtrrm 
1IN CHEV. S-10 En. CAB Moat 4il DO, O V4 

AuB, LdktM. Ernerilj Gum 
l(H CHEV. EXI CAB SLVEnADO Moor 414,5703 

V-CtdpBut 
ItN CHEV. EXT. CAB EX-VEHADO Mow ill 5700 

V-4W* 
ItN CHEV. EXt CAB 5LVERA00 Moor 4x2, 5000 

VS.OLCmr» 
ItNCHEV. EXT. CAB SLVEHAM Woof «(, 

kwV-ftL^BWAiArrmwJ 
ItN CHEV. EXt CAB SIVEIUOO Mow <&, 

$CODVAAJo.[)tCtTm* 
ItN CHEV. EXT. CAB SLYBUDOMowtil, 

5TC0V4 Dk. Cimno'AuUrmocd 
1IN CHEV. EXT. CAB ttVBUDOMowtit, 

S71»V4Vbar,R«1 
ItN CHEV. REaCABW-T 411, 

STOOVlAj^PcADrtarmhi 
IJN CHEV. REG. CAB td.5C00V-ftAulx.Ta, 

Cniu.Air,Ct.C«irira 
1B7 CHEV. S-10 HEQ- CAB (it, Vft 5-SpS, TH 

CrmAK.Cri)iaid 
1D7 CHEV. S-10 BED. CAB ifl, tCfL S^pd, TB. 

Cfus*.AK,En»oM Often 
ItN CHEV. BLAIEfl 4«Xffl (it, CO. Lo*k< 

LMJiWK,OtCW* 
ItN CHEV. BLAZER WOOR tit, Htn, CO 1 Cm, 

lufwttU6iUrtSojtb»gt 
1 !N CHEV. BLAZER 4W0R (it, P. S«H r^ykm 

Er*j;C*.Cr«7j 
ItN CHEV. BLAZER *O00B (it, 

hmM DrMrt SmL LatrM. Latfar W, 
UpftjaB^OKk 
ItN CHEV. BLAZER WOOR tit, lo*W,Onp Bk 
IINCHEV. BLAZER «XXM (it, Loaxd. AffH RM 
IM CHEV. TAHOE «00R (it, Mj) BtoU AlM 
ItN CHEV.TAHOE (it, LcsM. DK CtepaAl ht* 
1»J CHEV. SUBLrRSAN tit. Sptt B«nd\ Cm. A 
CO, P. SuL Rur Air, LoUM Owty RM 



USED TRUCKS 



USED CARS 



MN CHEV LUUKA, 22.000 U, Wf*» 
1 1N OLOS ROYALE, 31000 U, Utroon 
IWP0rrrwCJLAWAM4*,&OTULVirtt 

■ IM OLDS ACMEVA. 4*. 3t rjCO U, VVMs 
1Mt BUCK CENTUTTT, 34JXO 14, Uiroon 
1tN FORD ASPRE, 2WC0H, Wl* 
IM CHEVT MOHTE CARLO LS, 24 JOO ML. Back 

' 1 MS BUCK USABRE CUSTOM, P. SttL TB, Cruot, 

Cm. P. VYntow. P, Loda, 31000 14, firm 
1M9 CHEW BOHTE CARLO LS, EOCCO 14, Red 
1«0LMNElJniL0»MMjn)l4,Umw 
1 »i BUCK CENTURY, 50.000 «, SanWont EWoa 
1 B5 BUCK CENTURV, 60 JMO U, lift EU 
ItM CHEVT LLW»UELW,4-ft,5lC00 M, VrTtt 
1WJ OLOS N ROYALE, 55,000 H, EU 

ItU BUCK USABRE laBTED, LexM. 4t JXO UL 
Jjdesttw Green 

1 K2 OLOS CUTLASS CtERA, (Or, Vft TOJCO 1A, 
Star 

IK FORD PROBE CL 4Cyt, S-Spd, HOi Wet, 
Shtr 

,m BUCK REOJU, T2JM0 UL.TJnj 

IM BUCK REOAL, 71.000 Ml,0i«| 

1M1 BUCK PARK AVE, loskd. 61CC0 14, 
SifiSCne Boge 

IM BUCK USABRE. HoMttot. WM> 

IMO BUCK USABRE CUSTOM, ICftCCO UL. 

1B0 CADILLAC SEDAN OiVtLLE. 7SJX0 U, HKa 

INJ CEO METRO, HfliUM, Red 

IMI BUCK USABRE, LMrJeft U*D01 

1K7 HONOA ACCORO. 20r. ^CyL, 5£al&* 



1BTCHEV. ASTRO AHD VAN,Z3JX0 ML Uaooi 
UN CHEV. BTtCAB SUfEHAOO Mkw (i( , 3S0. 

11.000 ML, BU 
1 1N CHEV. EXT CAB ftt SIVERADO, 1 1 flX) ML, 

Que 
IM CHEV. EXT CAB trt SIVERADO, IftOCO At. 

1 M CHEV S-1 EXt CAB , 4<y, frSpMd. 

!(,O00ML,THt 
TNt CHEV. S-tO EXt CAB , 44KA, Auto, 2JJX0 U, 

Ba> 
IBS CHEV. EXt CAB tit, 350, Auto, (TJXOUL, 

BWSM 
1>» FORD EXt CAB XU 351, Vft tlDCC UL Bxk 
imCH£VEnCABE4J/HUUMZ71tit, 

(TJXO ML, Ted 
IM CHEV. REO. CAB tit 3S0. VftAuto, 

t^OcoULOmn 
ins ale jaarrtor. tit, bmoo u, umen 

1 BS CHEV. BLAZER LT (it, Luther Irartr, 

SftOCOULBBX* 
1 1N CHEV. BLAZER (Or. (it, SftCCO ML BKk 
1W CHEV.BLAZER tOr. tit, tftOCO ML. Tea 
IBS CHEV. EXt CAB tit SlV,<},OCC ML. Green 
m LUUKA APV VAN, 370M ML GnerVSMr 
1 »5 CMEV. S-1 REO. CAB, KLOOO UL Purpkt 
IKS CHEV. REO, CAB SIVERADO (it, (1 fXO UL 



Red 
1H3 FORO EXT. CAB (.(, iHXO U, Shw 
IM ASTRO VAN, (7.0001*, EM 
IN) CHEV. S-1 EXT. CAB, 64.000 ML. Uaoon 
1WI CMC EXT. CAB til Vft S-Spd, «fO0 U, Red 
ftW CHEV. REO. CAB (it, NJXO UL. BtaSMr 
1 HI CODGE EXt CAB LONO BOX td, 31 1 Vft 

Auto, BUt 
ltllO(EV.EXtCAB(d.tajXXIU, EU 
1 MO CHEV. REO. CAB (it, Kol Wei EU 
IWCHEV.R£a CAB (d, 83.000 M, RedBUdl 
1NOCHEV.REaCABtd,11irjO0U,Wiee 
1M0 FORO PBL CAB (d, BSJCO U, Lbrwn 
INJ CHEV. REtt CAB (d.JC)L, Auto, BU 



THIBERT'S 



l-.SIII|.247-Clli:Vl24.Wl 



'** 



Pujjc 14 



NCTC announces fall quarter honor students 



K v NORTHKKN WATCH 



Saturday. Juimary 3, 19!>8 



He 



WilcttsV.1. 



iCi.minuedltompapc 1) 
.K.i Jamie Ke/ac. Kent; dim 
nh.iupt. Keltic River: Hrin 
ft-on. Lake Uronson; Kachael 

. J<.n.iih.in Milter and N.u 



Sliar 



i Y.illcs 
Net In 



. Red 1-iU- I'.. 



Ki- 



Mi; 



I..111 



islcr; Michael 



rnghv; Daniel F.vjc. 
Ir.'ii.mi; I'.ml.i Relief, Mahnomen; 
Jennifer Marim. Mayvilte. ND; 
I'miii Hrua, Hcih Pries and Tern' 
Vt.lhuaien. Mcintosh: 

AKo Alan Laine. Meadowland"; 
J.i ted Andeltc and Gcraldine Good, 
Mentor: Todd Gihhoii. Milnor. ND; 
Trover Magner. Ncwfoldcn: Jeffrey 
Kieelicr. Nicollet; Melissa Assclin. 
Hrie Kcinbold. Lisa Stoneousc and 
Nicole Stoneousc. Oklcc; Jcihro 
Kloi/ and Shelly White. Park 
Rapids; Corey Nelson, I'ark River, 
ND: Kavna Benson and Tonva Holt. 
Pelican Rapids; 

Also trie Schctllcr, Pcquol 



Janice Aamodi. Christina HjIcii, 
Paula Hovda. Michael Jenmiicv 
Michael Malison. knsiolU-i 
Muga.is. Knsliiie SLittetv and S.ulie 
Tcinpte. Roseau: Karen Johnson, 
Salol; Valerie hkie, Shevlm; Debr.i 
Holmgren and Caini Sorenson. St 
Hihirc; Jason Bring and Jcieim 
Larson. Strandiiviist; ami Niculi'iie 
Westlvnid, Strathcona; 

Also Ryan llcndickson. Chris- 
topher ijrown. Aniliony Hn: 



. Sarah Kolan 
■I'teM. Daniel Mapes. 
:k. Darren NeKuti. 
.ird.Jolin Olson Jr.. i 



Jcie 



l.dhocreer. Mic 



eitline. Ju- 



Sleiuhan 
i Wal 



.aan^-Kclly Clark. Ko%% Cle'vcn. 
Paul Donarski. Stephanie DuKose. 
Angela Frkkson. Jordan (ioldcv 
hem'. t ; .llcn Groo. Hrica NaclunJ. 
David Halsa. Vickie Halsa. Kelly 
Hjinson, Michelle Haugcii. Jennifer* 
Her/berg. Lisa Hovel. Michael 
Jacobs, Jammi Jenkins. Chad 



. Welch and Jusim Wood, all 
Duel River Falls; 

Also l.uatie Hanson. Trail; Erin 
Holthiisen and Michael Olson. 
Viking: Monica Hands and 
Matthew Malonc. Wadena; Jason 
Berg. Jon Carpenter and Amanda 
Carson. Walhalla. ND; Michael 
Itlair and Jerry Lindcr. Warren: 



Tere 



m. Jack Mar 



Warroad; William 
Heiiiein. Waubun; Theodore 
Klamm. Webster; Lanca Haug.cn, 
Winger: and Slierri Hodgkins. 
Winnipeg. Man.. Canada. 



Insurance pool returns $12 million to cities 




(Continued frontpage 1) 
ed. The longer a city has participat- 
ed and the more successful il has 
been at avoiding losses, the greater 
tfie city 'x dividend. 

According to Antoncn, the divi- 
dends arc a result of several factors. 
the most significant' being cities' 
efforts to control and reduce losses. 
Rates arc set at a level so that pre- 
miums, plus investment income, 
will cover losses and expenses even 
if losses are more than projected. If 
losses arc equal to or less than pro- 
jected, that safety margin can be 
returned to members. Cities' success 
in reducing the number of emptoy- 
mcnt-relatcd liability claims is a big 
factor in nuking greater dividends 
possible. As insurance trust mem- 
bers, cities participate in loss con- 
irol seminars, receive loss control 
information monthly, and arc visited 
by loss control representatives to 
help Ihcm minimize risks and avoid 
problems that lead to claims. 

The LMCIT board this month 
also approved a 15 percent reduc- 
tion in workers' 'comp premium 
rales, and broadened the coverage 
under the property insurance pro- 
gram. Cities can take advantage of a 
new liquor liability option and addi- 
tional coverage for flood and other 
water damage. 

Anionen said cities can generally 
expect future dividends based on 
initial predictions, but cautioned 
members against relying on returns 
when planning for budget. While 
the trust will always work to keep 
losses and expenses down, he said, ■ 
there arc too many factors that 
potentially can cause increases, in 
future losses. But because of the 
LMCIT. Minnesota cities know they 
will have coverage available at a 



stable, prcdictahlc cost. 

The LMCITwasoneof the I" 
self- insurance pools for cities in 
country. Cities have unique cov 
age needs thai the private insurance Leagi 



needs or problems develop. LMCIT 
modifies coverage of develops new 
coverage to meet those needs. 
"" LMCIT is a service of the 
of Minnesota Cities. 



Curtain barn completed last fall at the Walter 
Bros, dairy farm near Plummer provides hous- 
ing, feed and wator for about 160 dairy cows. 
S undo ww hulls are used for bedding and a total 
mixed ration is fed two or three times a day in 



the central feed bunk pictured above. A lagoon 
monuro system was also installed. Ray and 
Roger Walter aro increasing their dairy herd by 
100 cows to a total of about 260 and plan to 
expand their milking parlor to 16 units. 



industry doesn't' address well, organization of 8I5 cities across the 
LMCIT's coverage is specifically stale, 
designed for cities, and as new 

National Guard Top Gun event is January 12 



Get bigger or get out appears to be dairy future 

(r«ntinni-il fnim rv«.i- n omin us :iL-asliemn. He handles the Dahlcn owns and operates 



Thief River Falls unit of the 
National Guard is sponsoring its 
third annual Top Gun competition 
for high school juniors and seniors 
on Monday, January 1 2. beginning 
at 6 p.m. in the armory in Thief 
River Falls. 

There is no charge to participate 
in the event and a number of pn/es 
and trophies will be awarded. Grand 
prize is a .22 caliber rifle. 

Competitors will use air rifles 
and air pistols that the Army nation- 
al Guard uses in preparation for its 
own marksmanship events. Local 
guardsmen will conduct the compe- 
tition and be on hand to discuss the 
various equipment and training 



devices to be on display, including 
the Bradley Fighting Vehicle and 
the HUMMV. 

Students under the age of 18 
must present a signed parental con- 
sent fonu prior to participation. The 
forms are available at the annory or 
can be received hy mail if requested 
by calling 218-681-0924. >. 

Door prizes donated by various 
Thief River Falls business places 
will be presented during the evening 
and a pop and pizza party for all 
participants will follow- the compe- 
tition. Students arc asked to register 
ahead of time to ensure enough pop 
and pizza will be available. 




Crew chief of tha B1B aircraft pictured aboVewai one of the mil- 
itary duties of M/Sgt. Edwin; H. Hanson Jr., son of Edwin Hv' 
Hanson Sr. and Martens Hanson of Thief River Falls. Sgt Hanson 
retired from the U.S. Air Force Jan. 1, 1998, after 22 years and 181 
days of service. 



(Continued from page I) 
longer raise their own heifers. 
which gives them more lime to con- 
centrate on the milking herd. 

At three weeks of age, heifer 
calves on the Walter farm arc sent to 
the farm of former dairyman Jim 
Haggc at Brooks. He raises them to 
about 10 months of age, when they 
are transferred to the Don Konick- 
son farm, just down the road from 
the Wallers' place. 

Konlcksoru Raise Heifers 

The Konicksons sold their 80 
.cows and all young slock at an auc- 
tion on Halloween in 1996. Two 
days later they started taking all of 
the tic stall equipment out of the 
bam and putting in pens. Today Don 
is raising about 160 heifers for half 
a dozen area dairymen and expects 
the number to reach 200 in a few 
weeks. 

He takes in calves at about two 
months of age from Warren Malwitz 
of Red Lake Falls and Bob Schind- 
Icr of Thief River Falls. Older 
calves come from Leonard Gcske of 
Thief River Falls, Gary Bakkcn of 
Angus (formerly of Warroad). Tom 
Willett and Walter Bros, of 
■ Plummer. When Greg Zak of Angus 
runs out of room at his farm, his 
heifers also*eomc-to.the.Konickson 
farm, 

"I take care of them just like they 
were my own," Konickson said. He 
raises hay on his farm and for the 
first time in many years also raises 



grain as a cash crop. He handles tin 
breeding for the heifers in his care 
with the owners doing the sire selec- 
tion. The owners will generally 
return the heifers to their herds 
about a month before calving to 
acclimate them prior to going into 
production. 

All of the dairymen who have 
heifers at the Konickson farm use 
the same veterinary service, which 
adds to the uniformity of vaccina- 
tions and other herd health work. 

"We're fortunate." Roger Waller 
said, "to have experienced dairy 
people in the area who can provide 
this type of service to us. I expect 
wc will sec more of this kind of 
sharing the load in the future." 
Dahlcn Herd Sold 

Another dairy farmer who decid- 
ed having more cows' on the farm 
wasn't the direction he wanted to go 
is Kelly Dahlcn of Goodridgc. List 
May the Dahlcns leased their 30- 
cow herd to a Fosston producer on a 
lease- purchase arrangement. They 
later leased out 15 heifers to the 
same farmer and still have some 
young stock on the form. 

Kelly said that after 20 years dur- 
ing which dairy provided the main 
family income, he was finding 
expenses continuing to climb while 
income wasn't keeping pace. He 
said it took some time to make the 
decision to give up the cattle, but he 
hasn't, missed thcm'as much as he 
had thought he might. 



Dahlcn owns and operates 
do/er and said it hasn't been diffi- 
cult to gel work off the farm. So far 
he has tound it to he as profitable as 
his dairying was, and it gives him 
time to be involved in tnc school 
activities of his four children. His 
wife has also been working off the 
farm for the past year. 

Hay Sales Profitable 

Not having cattle frees more land 
for cash grain crops. Dahlcn said, 
and at $90 a ion for alfalfa hay, he 
has found it just as profitable to 
send it down the road as run it 
through his cattle. 

"I've always believed in the small 
family farm and the small towns," 
he satd. "I don't think the trend for 
everything to get bigger is good for 
the country. It's my opinion that the 
federal government will regret 
squeezing out the small producers." 
Questions The Market 

While joining the trend to get 
bigger for survival, Roger Walter 
also has questions about the market, ■ 
how it is controlled and how farm- 
ers can take a greater role in deter- 
mining their own destiny. 

"I've been to a number of meet- 
ing's where the talk is about how 
important dairy fanning is." he said. 
"And I can't help -but wonder, if 
we're so valuable, why arc they 
working so hard to get nd of us?" 

Next: Some views of dairying 
from the processing end of the busi- 
ness. 




DECEMBER 

13-14 Pine Lake, MN (Lake Race) 
27-28 Lake Branson, MN (Lake Race) 

JANUARY 

10-12 Thief River Falls (Crosscountry 
, NSTAR 500) 
Red Lake Falls (Diehard 100) 
17-18 Grand Forks, ND (Sno Cross) 



7-8 Warren, MN (Sno Cross) 

14 Cavalier, ND (Cross Country) 

21-22 Strathcona, MN (Cross Country) 



A Phono Numbor Will Do S«l Up Al 
OnJOf For "n*i To CJi'l In You' Rogittf 
EflcfiRoco'iDiroctor. 



ISR AHitalcd And Run ISH Rules Wilh North Star Aula Additions. 

Call With Questions. (218) 681-2544 or 681-5779 



Race results listed 



75 c 



NORTHE' 



"W" "W Tnorti 



Volume 8. Number 2 



"7to^t6ccte<i£- "??£c*ute4&t<z-' 4. ^&?&ut<a6 '%ec<A4/Kzj!ien.' 



324 Main Avenue North, Thief River Falls, MN 56701 



LCC bench comes through „ — ^ ,_j»a 

SKIT" I "'*vi -, 



Saturday, January 10, 1998 




AROUND 
THE REGION 



Birth statistics in 
Kittson County 
same as last year 

Hullock - Kiltson County 
reported the same number of 
births in 1997 as 1996. 
According to statistics from 
the Kiltson Couniy Court 
Administrator's office there 
were 23 births in the county in 
1997. In 1996. 23 babies were 
born in the county. 

Deaths decreased wilh 6H 
in 1997 compared with 76 in 
1996. The number of mar- 
riages, 23 in 1997, decreased 
by one over 1996, Kittson 
County Enterprise 

RLF back within 
budget 

Red Lake Fulls - Nice 
weather in November and 
December put the snow 
removal costs for the city of 
Red Lake Falts back within 
budget. 

The city of Red Lake Falls 
operates on a January 1 to 
January I budget. According 
to City Administrator Dan 
Johanneck the budget look a 
beating last January. February 



' m itw aiv tn Tjat bc L ' a ose vttnr 

mild weather in November 
and December, the city ended 
1997 in fine shape. 

The city of Red Lak&Fnlls 
has a truck and payloadcV for 
plowing and removing snow 
and a tractor with blower that 
is used Tor blowing snow from 
the sidewalks. 77ie Gazette 

Crookston High 
School to hold 
Mr. CHS pageant 

Crookston - Eight contes- 
tants will vie for the title at 
Crookston High School's first 
Mr. CHS pageant on Jonuary 
12. 

"Men in Black" is the 
theme for the event which will 
include a talent competition. 
Prior to the show, each contcs- 
lonl will be judged on n per- 
sonal interview. The winners 
will be selected by a panel of 
judges from the school and" 
community. / 

The Mr. CHS Contest is 
being sponsored by the CHS 
Student Counccl as a fund- 
raiser for the 1998 Junior- 
Senior Prom. Cmotston Daily 
Times 

El Nino dance 
"brings snow, gains 
national attention 

Roseau • In Ihe spirit of a 
rain dance, the Roseau County 
Trailhluzcrs held an E! Nino 
dnnec on Sunday, December 
28 at one of the club's covered 
shelters along the Canadian 
border in hopes lhat it would 
bring much needed snow. 

The event was unusual 
enough to aiiract the attention 
of the Grand Forks Herald 
and Minneapolis Star Tribune 
and was later picked up by 
Paul Harvey and CNN. giving 
ihe event nniional exposure. 
V\e Tribune 

Sheriff fires chief 
deputy of 25 years 

Bemidjl- Sheriff DccWay 
nc Rognstad fifed Chief Dep- 
uiy Dill Cross Monday. Cross 
had been wilh the Ilclirami 
Couniy Sheriffs Depariincnl 
for nearly 25 years. 

Citing 'the Data Privacy 
Act, couniy officials won't say 
what Cross is allcccd lo have 



allceci 
he disi 



sal. 



Cross has retain 

ncy and is expected lo appeal 
ihe decision. The Pioneer 

(Continued On Page 2) 



Lincoln SnoFest 
Coronation Fri. 



Un.k'i ilu iliirinc "Womlcdtil 
Tunijiht." I.iiniilii lii).'li xihiml \iu 

ill-Ill M-tl.llO lull *p.iriMll lis .1111111. il 

SnolV-i week MumJ.iy ilmuith 
h nl.i). ).inu..t> IMC Ci.ion.ni.iii 
nl tin: Sih'IVm km;: .m.l iniccn will 
Like phuc |-r:.l.i>. J.jnu.uy Id. ,il 2 
pin in II* m.Iiin>1 .iiiiliMrium wnh 
■lie put-K i'im-liI in .illcnd 

(_. inilsil.il!> lur Sri.iK-M rny.illy 

lute K-cii c let i cd li imcIi pMi!c 

jiuJ pmniN !.!».! d ilifii 1-imin.ilnm 
will In: ;in.iiniii1.i!td liy tl.iss mem 
her |ijiiio|i.iiinii in h.uiner in.ikinj;. 
dic^-up iljyv (Mnic .Hitr.d.in^e ->nd 
I'liliun -.lit". 

indid.Hi.'" lur kmj; 



■ -r.ii 



i-'(j 



vine. 



Scum 

J.mii". and Wanda li.mk. and Knci 
MiCtr.Ky. dauehia nl Dennis and 
Hljir.e MtCitary. 

Juniurs— RnM>y HaUen. -un nl 
V..I U.iUen. .ir.d Ml I'.imrk. daugh- 
ter <>t Sieve and Kjlhy I'anek: 
- .Stiphtiimiie"-.\d.iiii H.ivil.ind. 
Min «l Jiiii and Alitia Havil.ind. and 
i-mily Mugaav dauyhler itf Deb- 



.irjli M.,Mr,.i.. and IX.vid Mii^aav 

f-'riMuncn-Jinh (ii^licftn/. 
"un nl l'...ncl.i Giy "kicu.it/ and 
Klin Stliiieidtl. daiifhiCI nl David 
and Sue Svlincidei 

Ci[ri|H.-[iliiiii in Sniik-M ejine 
,illend.u:ie .ittu.dly hc^m" lumclil 
iSalurd.!)) wild ihe (inl" l).i*keihall 
tame apm-l Itcnndji .ind m.iunuc" 
wilh boys, hockey Tuesday. Januaiy 
1.1. ,ijMir."l Warroad and pit" has.' 
kclball the same nipfii ae.ain"t 
Dclioil Like". Allcndar.tc will he 
Liken between 7 asid X pin al c.ith 
of ihcc event". 

I)iC""-up day" will dcjrin on 
Monday. Jjnujry 12. wnh Monday 
a>. Color Day. Tuc"day a" No Jeans 
Day. VYcdnc"day a" I'ajjinj Day. 
Tlii[i"day as Han in llicAir Pay and 
Friday av Spirit Day wuh seniors in 
while, juninrv in blatk. suphnmnrc" 
in pjy and licshmcn in hlee. Dies" 
on t-'riday will nut counl in ihe 
point" ojnipctiiitin for Sr.ofeM loy- 
ally. 

Banner making will take place 
(Coniinucd on back pace) 




Welfare employees 
agree to contract 



Pennington County Commissioners recently picture was taken: (from left, front row) Ken 

approved morganizatlon of the board. Serving as Olson, county auditor. Skip Swanson, Bob 

chairman this year will be Oliver "Skip" Carlson; {back row) Don Jenson, commissioner, 

Swanson. Serving as vice-chairman will be Bob Bud Comstock, commissioner Charles Naplln, 

Carlson. The board met last Tuesday when this commissioner, and Dave Olin, county attorney. 

Grandfather of snowmobiling 
is author of Breaking Trail 



One day before a strike deadline, 
agreement was reached between 
Pennington County and Social 
Service employee members of the 
American Federation of Slate. 
County, and Municipal Employees, 
Minnesota Council 65. Local 3452. 
Valarie llelfncr. union president, 
said a majority of union members 
voted lo accept a three-year propos- 
al ending l'J l )9 from ihe couniy on 
January 7. It. was a compromise on 
both ends, Hcffncrsaid. 

,, The county board met on 
Tuesday and probably won't con- 
sider the recommendation to 

_^pr4jv<ulicjsiecjiienl4inii.l iuuouxl 



taken by the local and strike autho- 
rization was granted December 9, 
Following a 10-day cooling off peri- 
od the 25 union members were 
granted the right to slrike. Their 
window of opportunity to strike 
would end January 8. one day after 
an agreement was reached. 

The couniy social service 
employees were working under the 
1 9!)6 contract. They had been nego- 
tiating with the couniy board since 
last January. Twcniy-fivc employ- 
ees arc included in Ihe union. 

The main issue was salary. 
Hcffncr said employee union mem- 
~bcrs-3grcc<l io a.2-7.peaa:iit increase 



in pay for the first year and m 
the lust two years. 



cfor 



Affectionately known in the 
industry as ihe "grandfather of 
snowmobiling," Edgar Hcltccn has 
written an autobiography which is 
scheduled for official release 
Wednesday, January 14. and is 
expected to be in book stores in 
about two weeks. Hcttccn, who now 
lives in Grand Rapids, is acknowl- 
edged as the founder of Polaris 
Industries in Roseau and Arctic- Cat, 
Inc. in Thief River Falls. 

Jay Lemkc of Mahtomedi, who 
did the "ghostwriting" for the 296- 
page book, has provided the follow- 
ing resume of its contents: 

It's been 53 years since Edgar 
hcttcen wiped his hands on a greasy 
1 jvneuat and set up a one-man fix-n 
■sfibp 'fn' the 'dark corners ofVcar 
garage in Roseau. Minnesota — the 



only place he could afford. It's been 
42 years since his liny, struggling 
business, Polaris Industries, built a 
"motor loboggan" and 36 years 
since Hcltccn said good-bye. only to 
begin another snowmobile compa-. 
ny. Arctic Enterprises. 

The rest is history, Polaris and 
Arctic have cone on to cam billions, 
and winter nas taken on a whole 
new meaning for the world. All 
thanks to Hcttccn and his snowmo- 
bile. 

In his autobiography. Breaking 
Tra'/. Hcttccn details now it al] hap- 
pened. He wriies of his childhood, 
growing up in a farm family speak- 
ing Swedish, and then learning 
English in a one-room schoolhouse 
foui^'mi)e9'fro"rrVhom6.-Ho-tc4li-or 
the hard, early days at Polaris, when 



money was as elusive as a rainbow, 
"Times were tough," Hcltccn 
writes. "When ihe end of the week 
rolled around, too often thctc wasn't 
enough money. I'd stare at what we 
had and sigh heavily, knowing what 
was in come. Wc would gather 
around the till, a little box. The 
money would be taken out and 
placed on a lablc. I'd scoop il up and 
pass it around, dividing it evenly 
among the employees. Sometimes it 
hardly fed the family." 

And he writes of the day in 1955 
when hispannerand broiher-in-law. 
David Johnson, buill a snow 
machine while Edgar was away. 

"Rudimentary snow machines 

had been around since the turn ofthe 

century, but you didn't give ihcm 

(Continued on Page 9) 



19-year-old buys Rex Cafe in Middle River 




Nineteen-year-old BaLInda Burred is the new owner of the Rex 
Cafe In Middle River as of January 1, 1998. She and friends spent 
the New Yoar holiday cleaning and painting the cafe. The daugh- 
ter of Randy and Susan Burroil and a 1997 graduate of Marshall 
County Central, BaLinda already has five years of restaurant expe- 
rience. 



by Kathl Carlson 
Northtrn Watch Reporter 

While most 19-year-old girls, 
were deciding what color to wear 
on New Year's eve, BaLinda 
Burrcll was deciding what color 
she would paint the rest rooms of 
her newly acquired business. 

As of January I. BaLinda -is the 
new proprietress of the Rex Cafe in 
Middle River. 

A 1 997 graduate of Marshall 
County Central, she is the daughter 
of Randy and Susan Burrcll Of 
Middle River and has an older sis- 
ter, Beth, married to Scott Mooncy 
and living in Hatlon, ND. 

For one so young, BaLinda has 
a considerable amount of experi- 
ence in the restaurant business. 
She's worked at the Rex Cafe for 
five years. 

It was about a year ago when the 
cafe's former owner, Gloria Barber. 
mentioned that she might be inter- 
ested in selling the business, and it 
was around that time that BaLinda 
wus participating in a classroom 
exercise that required the students 
to plan the next several years of 
their lives. 

BaLinda had always planned to 
go to college to become a lawyer, 
but when slic started figuring out 
what the education woufd cost and 
how long it would take, college and 
law became less " appealing. 
Because she enjoyed the restaurant 
business, her mom encouraged her 
to study hotel and restaurant man- 
agement. 

BaLinda said that her decision 
to buy the cafe was "on the spurof 
the moment." and her choice was 
met with mixed responses from 
others. 



"My dad didn't like it." she said. 
"He really wonted mc lo go to 
school." The previous owner's hus- 
band laughed when he heard of her 
plans, not taking her seriously 
because of her age. Even BaLinda 
wasn't completely sure at first, "I 
kept changing my mind, but I 
ulwavs went back to it." 

Since she made the commit- 
ment, however. BaLinda said lhat 
her parents have been "vcrv sup- 
portive." She's fairly certain lhat 
her dad will help her with repairs 
and that mom will help out. loo. 
when business is really busy — like 
Goose Festival. 

During her high school career. 
BaLinda participated in a variety of 
sports and activities until her senior 
year when she worked at the cafe in 
Newfoldcn after school four 
evenings a week and at the Rcx'in 
Middle River on the weekends. 
Tuesday was her only night off. 

Living with her cat in the 
upstairs apanment in the building 
that houses her cafe. BaLinda will 
never be far from her business. She 
moved into the apartment in June 
and after that time performed many 
of the managerial duties — order- 
ing, scheduling, etc. — that pre- 
pared her to take over the business. 

She will employ about eight 
part-time employees. BaLinda 
plans to work from 6:30 a.m. to 
around 4 p.m. on weekdays and 
more on the weekends when it's 
more difficult to find help. She said 
she "will work as much as I need lo 
— to make it go." 

The cafe hours will be from 6:30 
a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday through 
Thursday. 6:30 a.m. lo 8 p.m. on 
Fridays. ^ a.m. in 9 p.m. on 



Saturdays and from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. 
on Sundays. When activities in 
town warrant it, closing time will 
be flexible and hours will be 
extended, 

The establishment has been 
known as the Rex Cafe since 1927, 
and the name will remain the same. 
BaLinda says, "It would be a 
shame to change it after such a long 
time." 

The menu includes the regular 
short order items and a daily spe- 
cial — a meat and potatoes meal or 
hotdish. On Fridays the cafe will 
offer a Mexican entree. While 
prices will remain the same, 
BaLinda plans to offer a "bigger 
burger" and nossibly make some 
other menu enanges as time goes 
by. 

BaLinda bakes fresh buns every 
morning except Saturday and rolls 
"for the ladies at the hank" on 
Fridays. She and another employee 
share the other baking rcsponsibli- 
tics which include pics, cookies 
and bars. The baked items arc very 
popular, and BaLinda comments 
that it's difficult to keep up and lhat 
she would like to set up a regular 
schedule to assure that baked goods 
are always available. She recog- 
nizes, however, that it "will take 
time to iron some of these things 
out." 

As with all small town cafes, 
"regulars" arc the mainstay of the 
business and their patronage is 
much appreciated, especially dur- 
ing the slower winter months. 
During hunting season, business is 
brisk, and. of course, Goose 
Festival are a very busy days. With 
trails nearby, snowmobilcrs frc- 
(Conlinued on Page 9) 



Milk Processors seek to add value to product 

Price volatility is a sign that the law of supply and demand is working 



'■ndusirv i 



(This is the sixth in i 
Northern Watch stories 
of dairy farmers and a i 
the future i >f the dairy 
northwest Minnesota.) 

by Marvin I.undin 
Northern Wutch Editor 
Processors who purchase milk 
from dairy 




according to several employees of 
Land O'Lakes. Inc.. owner of ihe 
Bridgcman's fluid milk processing 
plant in Thief River Falls and a lead- 
ing processor of many dairy prod- 
ucts in numerous other locations. 

And while processors in reality 
don't have a lot of discretion over 
what they pay for milk, ihcy work 
hard lo add value lo Ihe product 
before il reaches Ihe retailers and 
consumers in order to maximize 
their investment in lhat pure hav:. 

ii ihis "Ciies a 



opted lo "ell I heir hctiK luive 



plained that the price Ihey received 
for milk did not keep pace wilh the 
prices they had to pay for costs of 
equipment, facilities and daily liv- 
ing. In several cases processor* have 
been portrayed as working against 
the dairymen and intentionally 
keeping prices low. Alter all. why 
shouldn't a product as nutritional 
and necessary as milk lie accorded a 
higher value? 

Supply And Demand 

According lo processor icpic-cn- 

liitivc*. market force" nationally .uul 

inlcrnalinnally as ucll a- locally 

control price through demand lor 



product, availahilily of supply and 
even political circumstances. This 
area, for example, could benefit 
from the proximity of the Winnipeg 



hours — or updating with 
l which will do ihe job 



ropoh 



if 






i.tdi.in la 

cc market How permitted, 
n aliempiing lo remain prof- 
ile in the dairy industry, pmccs- 
< along with producers must find 
nprovc efficiency. In both 



«. ihi: 



often i 



volvo 
"eruical i 



n through a parlor 
i plain io spread the com of 
;nsivc equipment over more 



or hours- 
cquipmcnl v 

faster and/or with less human atten- 
tion or physical labor. 

Can't Control Price 
Terry Nagle of the corporate 
communications department of 
Land 0'I.akcs in Minneapolis says 
that while the processor may have 
some flexibility in purchasing, it 
can't control price. If there is a price 
variation from the "going rale." it 
will usually he only pennies per 
hundredweight on either side. The 
re.iMin is the intense cnmpciition 
(Continued on Kick page) 




I»a K f 14 



NORTI-IKKN WATCH "h 



Saturday. .Iiinuary .1, 1998 



NCTC announces fall quarter honor students 



' He. 



. Kent; t'li 






Hiv 



1-ri 



.ake Itrouson: Kachael 
Vii.iili.m Miller and Naomi 

-ki. Lancaster; Michael 

II,-. Lcuv-bv. Daniel livje. 

i.l. I'juI.i Keller, Mahnomen; 

et M.itim. Mavville. Nil. 
Hiua, Hcih Pries and Terry 

.i.itcii. Mcltno> 



. Al.m l..i 



c. Meado*. 



mis; 



l.ucd Aiidene and C.eraldmc Good. 
Mentor; Todd Gibbon. Milm<r. NP. 
Iicver Macuer. Ncwfolden; Jcffrev 
Kiecker. Nicollet; Melissa Assclm. 
l ; nc Reinbold. Lisa Sloncouse ana 
Nicole Sioneousc. Oklce. Jcihro 
Kloi/ and Shells While. Park 
K.ipuls; Cores Nelson. Park River. 
' ND. Ravna Hensan ami Tonva Holt. 
I'ehc.i: 



. Jason Hmi: 
. Sir;mtltittiit. 



West 1 1: 

Also Kv.ni 
loplier Brown, 
man. Kclls C 
l'.iu! Doii.irvki, 
Angela 1tk'1.m 



.ilk. Kos- 
Stephanie 
m. JttlJ.lt: 



A Is. 



Sehel 



ll.md HaNa. Vickie tl.ika, KclK 
Hanson. Michelle llamicn. Jotimfei 
Her/berg. Lisa Hovel. Midwl 
J.iei-hs. Jaiiimi Jenkins. fli.nl 



Insurance pool returns $12 million to cities 




. Webster; 1 
. ami She 



(Continued frompage I) 
1 In- Ionizer a citv has participat- 
tiul tlic'morc successful it lias 
i at avoiding losses. the greater 
:tiv\ dividend, 
uvordunz to Anionen. the di 
k aie a result ol' several faeti 
mijjt significant being 



.oiiirol 



e set a 



1 mi that pre- 



age needs lliat the private in 
industry doesn't address 
LMClf's coverage is spei 
designed for cities, and ; 



:eloi„eelu/se, 
LMCIT is a ser 
of .Minnesota 
.itionol HISeilic 



tclup. LMCIT 
■ .ehipsucw 



Curtain barn completod last foil ot tho Walter the contral food bunk pictured above. A lagoon 

Bros, dairy farm near Plummer provides hous- manure system was also installed. Ray and 

ing, food and wator for about 160 dairy cows. Roger Walter are increasing their dairy herd by 

Sunflower hulls are used far bedding and a total 100 cows to a total of about 260 and plan to 

mixed ration is fed two or three times a day in expand their milking parlor to 16 units, 

Get bigger or get out appears to be dairy future 



National Guard Top Gun event is January 12 



(Contin 



longer 



ii page I ) 



Mil o 



s and expciis 



le more than projected. If. 
losses are equal to or less than pro-' 
iccied. that safety margin can he 
returned to members. Cities' success 
in reducing the number of employ- 
ment-related liability claims is a big 
factor in making greater dividends 
possible. As insurance trust mem- 
bers, cities participate in loss con- 
trol seminars, receive loss control 
informal ion monthly, and are visited 
by loss control representatives to 
help them minimize risks and avoid 
problems that lead lu claims. 

The LMCIT board this month 
also approved a 15 percent reduc- 
tion in workers' comp premium 
rales, and broadened the coverage 
under the property insurance pro- 
gram. Cities can lake advantage of a 
new liquor liability option and addi- 
tional coverage for Hood and other 
water damage. 

Antoneirsaid cities can generally 
expect future dividends based on 
initial predictions, but cautioned 
members against relying on returns 
when planning for budget. While 
the trust will always work to keep 
losses and expenses down, he said, 
there are loo many factors that 
potentially can cause increases in 
future losses. But because of the 
LMCIT. Minnesota cities know ihey 
will have coverage available at a 



Thief River Falls unit o! the 
National Guard is sponsoring its 
third annual Top Gun competition 
for high school juniors and seniors 
on Monday, January 12. beginning 
at 6 p.m. in the armorv in Thief ■ 
River halls. 

There is no charge lo participate 
in the event and a number of prizes 
and trophies will be awarded. Grand 
prize is a .22 caliber rifle. 

Competitors will use air rifles 
and air pistols that the Army nation- 
al Guard uses in preparation for its 
own marksmanship events. Local 
guardsmen will conduct the compe- 
tition and be on hand to discuss the 
various equipment and training 



devices lo be on display, including 
the Bradley Fighting Vehicle and 
the HUMMV. 

Students under the age of IS 
must present a signed parental con- 
sent form prior to participation. 'Hie 
forms are available at the armory or 
can be received by mail if requested 
by calling 218-6SI.(W24. 

Door prizes donated hv various 
Thief River Falls business places 
will be presented during the evening 
and a pop and pizza party for all 
participants will follow the compe- 
tition. Students are asked to register 
ahead of time to ensure enough pop 
and pizza will be available. 




Crew chief of the B1B aircraft pictured above wai one of the mil- 
itary duties of M/Sgt. Edwin. H. Hanson Jr., son of Edwin Hv 
Hanson Sr. and Marlene Hanson of Thief River Falls. Sgt. Hanson 
retired from the U.S. Air Force Jan. 1, 1998, after 22 years and 181 
days of service. 



cli gives them more time to con- 
centrate on the milking herd. 

At three weeks of age, heifer 
calves on the Waller farm arc sent to 
the farm of former dairyman Jim 
Magge at Hiooks. Me raises them to 
about Id months of age. when they 
are transferred to the Dim Koniek- 
son farm, just down the road from 
the Walters' place. 

Konlcksons Rnlsi* Heifers 

The Konicksons sold their SI) 
cows and all young stock at an auc- 
tion on Halloween in l"%. Two 
days later they staned taking all of 
the lie stall equipment out of the 
bam and putting in pens. Today lion 
is raising about Kit) heifers for half 
a dozen area dairymen and expects 
Ihe number to reach 200 in a few 
weeks. 

He takes in calves at about two 
months of age from Warren Malwitz 
of Red Lake Falls and Bob Schind- 
Icr of Thief River Falls. Older 
calves come from Leonard Gcskc of 
Thief River Falls. Gary Bakken of 
Angus (.formerly of Warroad). Tom 
Willctt and Walter Bros, of 
Plummer. When Greg Zak of Angus 
. runs out of room at his farm, his 
heifers also-come- tothc Kunickson 
' farm. 

"I take care of them just like they 
were my own." Konickson said. He 
raises hay on his farm and forthe 
first lime in many years also raises 



crop. He 

breeding for the heifers in his care 
with the owners doing the sire selec- 
tion. The owners will generally 
relum the heifers to their herds 
about a month before calving lo 
acclimate them prior lo going into 
production. 

All of the dairymen who have 
heifers at the Konickson farm use 
the same veterinary sen-ice. which 
adds lo ihe uniformity of vaccina- 
tions and other herd health work. 

"We're fortunate." Roger Walter 
said, "lo have experienced dairy- 
people in the arca.who can provide 
this type of service to us. i expect 
we will see more of this kind of 
sharing Ihe load in the future." 
Dunlin Herd Sold 

Another dairy fanner who decid- 
ed having more cows on the farm 
wasn't the direction lie wanted lo go 
is Kelly Dahlcu of Coodridgc. Last 
May ihe Dahlens leased their .ID- 
cow herd ui a Fosston producer on a 
lease-purchase arrangement. Tlicy 
later leased out 15 heifers to the 
same farmer and still have some 
young slock on the farm. 

Kelly said lhat after 20 years dur- 
ing which dairy provided the main 
family income, he was finding 
expenses continuing lo climb while 
income wasn't keeping pace. He 
said it look some time to make the 
decision to give up the cattle, but he 
hasn't missed them as much as he 
had thought he might. 



Dahlci 



cull to ge: 



md oper 
I said il hasn't been diffi- 
work off the farm. So far 

i ml il to be as profitable as 

his dairying was. and it gives him 
lime to be involved in ihe school 
activities of his four children. His 
wife has also been working off the 
farm for ihe past year. 

Hay Sales I'mflluble 

Not having cattle frees more land 
for cash grain crops, Dahlen said, 
and ai $90 a ton for alfalfa hay, he 
has found it just as profitable lo 
scud it down the road as run il 
through hiscaitle. 

"I've always believed in the small 
family fann and the small towns." 
he said. "I don'i think the trend for 
everything lo get bigger is good for 
ihe country. It's my opinion lhai the 
federal government will regret 
squeezing out the small producers." 
Questions The Market 

While joining the trend to get 
lugger for survival, Roger Waller 
also has questions about the market, 
how it is controlled and how farm- 
ers can take a greater role in deter- 
mining their own destiny. 

"I've been to a number of meet- 
ings where the talk is about how 
important dairy farming is." he sakL 
"And I enn't help but wonder, if 
we're so valuable, why arc they 
working so hard to gel rid of us'.'" 

Ncxl: Some views of dairying 
from the processing end of the busi- 




Penningtori Sfauace Pennington M: 
w Tffl HU *«ex 



NORTH STAR RACING SERIES 



North Star Series 




FIVE POINT CLASSES 



• PRO 440 LIQUID 

(Guaranteed Sl,0O0Ptus7m Of Entry pea) 

• SPORT 440 FAN 

(Guaranteed SSOO Plut 70% Of Entry Fta) 

• 600 SINGLE PIPE 

(Guaranteed VS0 Pita 70% Of Entry pea) 



■k 500 CLASS POKPaybact), 

• PRO 440 LIQUID 
WOMEN'S 

(Guaranteed SSOO Plus 7096 0] 'Entry pea) ' 



* MASTERS 440 LIQUID 

(Guaranteed S2S0 Plus 7(796 Of Entry pea) 

• JUNIOR 340 FAN 

(Trophy Only) 



RACE SCHEDULE 



DECEMBER 

13-14 Pine Lake, MN (Lake Race) 
27-28 Lake Bronson, MN (Lake Race) 

JANUARY 

10-12 Thief River Falls (Cross Country 
NSTAR 500) 
Red Lake Falls (Diehard 100) 
17-18 Grand Forks, ND (Sno Cross) 

FEBRUARY 

7-8 Warren, MN (Sno Cross) 

14 Cavalier, ND (Cross Country) 

21-22 Strathcona, MN (Cross Country) 



i 



January 10 & 11 
(218) 681-2544 

V ..wdl bo 20-30 ptaeas 



ALL RACERS WILL HAVE TO BE PRE-REGISTERED 
AT LEAST THE NIGHT BEFORE RACE DAY 



ISR Affiliated And Run ISR Rules With North Star Rule Additions. 

Call With Questions. (218) 681-2544 or 681-5779 



CARVER 
PERFORMANCE 

ft REPAIR 



"ufifflACTiirm 



E-ZFill 



ni<r RfHrftif j, miv 







681-HOME1W3) 



*EE2l 



218-6M-4S77 



HAMM'S 
REPAIR 



nwnjmirtn 
21S-7H6-S132 



FTMC 



m 



pi|)MMWI • ToHFrMl-U!-M7-U«T 



Arctic 

Power 

Generators 



ERL'S 



CeOGfewr 



^aSiMlUiMji&s 



(218) 7Di-3°ag 



(701) 352-1401 . 

■^8 Luaaawf 



|DhT|iikj.'WSWM 

218-681-4450 






IIIie "Cantcm 

ItitUEijnt 
21X-6X1-X21I 



Baker's 

9G4-S331 
1-800-500-4 103 




701-775-7338 



Hardware 

7f»l Rtwr FaBi, MN 



OIMI W5HB8 

HUBERTS 

. OUTOOOR 

.POWER 



SP0RI8, DiC. 



(!18)782-2SM 



TJ0S?«I*. 



<&%?_ 



Ai^n^iR 



I 

i 



Race results listed 



75 c 



NORTH E 




Volume 8, Number 2 



"'7£tx>ijui&*e<i£ "TfCtUttte^ata- 'a. "i^ej&xtuzi. 7tecttoifr<ifi e/t -' 



324 Main Avenue North, Thief River Falls, MN 56701 



LCC bench comes through ,,—..■ J . j^- 
"^Wi if 



Saturday, January 10, 1998 




AROUND 
THE REGION 



Birtfrstatistics in 
Kittson County 
same as last year 

Hallock - Kittson County 
reported the same number of 
births in IW7 as 1996. 
According lo statistics from 
the Kittson County Court 
Administrator's office there 
were 23 births in the county in 
iy*J7. In 1<W<. 23 babies were 
bom in the county. 

Deaths decreased with 68 
in 1997 compared with 76 in 
1996. The number of mar- 
riages. 23 in 1997. decreased 
by one over 1996. Kiltsim 
County Enterprise 

RLF back within 

budget 

Red Luke Fulls • Nice 
weather in November and 
December put the snow 
removal costs for the city of 
Red Lake Falls back within 
budget. 

The city of Red Lake Falls 
operates on a January 1 to 
January 1 budget. According 
to City Administrator Dan^. 
Johanncck the budget took a 
beating l ast January. February 
' Wilt Wait hybut bWaose of rttc" 
mild weather in November 
and December, the city ended 
1997 in fine shape. 

The city of Red Lake Falls 
has a truck and payloadcr for 
plowing and removing snow 
and a tractor with blower lhat 
is used for blowing snow from . 
the sidewalks. The Gazette 

Crookston High 
School to hold 
Mr. CHS pageant 

Crookston - Eight contes- 
tants will vie for the title at 
-Crookston High School's first 
Mr. CHS pageant on January 



lite 



"Men in Black" 
theme for the eveni which will 
include a talent competition. 
Prior to the show, each contes- 
tant will be judged on a per- 
sonal interview. Tlie winners 
will he selected by a panel of 
judges from the school and 
community. / 

The Mr. CHS Contest is 
being sponsored by the CHS 
Student Counccl as a fund- 
raiser for the I99K Junior- 
Senior Prom. Cnwhtnn Daily 

El Nino dance 
brings snow, gains 
national attention 

Roseau - In the spirit of a 
rain dance. Ihe Roseau County 
Trailbla/crs held an Bl Nino 
dance on Sunday. December 
28 at one of the club's covered 
shelters along the Canadian 
border in hopes lhat it would 
bring much needed snow. 

The event was unusual 
enough lo attract Ihe attention 
of the Grand Parks Hrmlil 
and Miimeapitlix Star Tribune 
and was later nicked up by 
Paul Harvey and CNN. giving 
the event national exposure. 
The Tribune 

Sheriff fires chief 
deputy of 25 years 

Bcmidji - Sheriff IH-cWiy- 

ne Rognslad liieil Chief Ucp- 
■ uiy ..BiTl-Ooji-Momliiy.. C."rn>s_ 
had been with tin- (tcllrami 
County Sheriff's neparlioenl 
for nearly 25 years. 

Citing Ihe Data Privacy 
Act. county officials won't say 
what Cross is alleged 10 have 
done to cause the ilisi 



Crow 
ncy and i' 



ici! ai 



•xpectctl If 
. he t'uxi 



Lincoln SnoFest 
Coronation Fri. 



Cm 



lake pU 
pin. in t 
ihe puhh 



l- Schneider 
iipcm 



-Josh C 
:!.i Clrssk! 
-. daufho 

Sin 



>l .iihIiii.ii 
lo .mend 
r Snol-L-si 



il* .iileiulance and 



foll.r 



lag: 



James and Waiul.i hank. 'and E-rica 
MtCcirv. d.iughtei, ol Dennis ami 
Hlaine McCearv. 

JuiiH.is-Kobhv llakken. son ol 
Val llakken. am! Jill P.inek. daugh- 
ter ol Steve and Kaihv I'anck; 

Sophoimiic>--Ad.' 
sonolJimamlAhcia 
l-niily Mugaas. daughter ol Deb- 



.ally be 
iSatuidav) <.wih the i:u 
gamcapiiiMllemidjia 
wiili buys hockey Tues 
13. against Warnud ami ( 
ketball Ihe same night 
Detioil I -ikes. Ancndaiicc 
taken between 7 ami K p 
it Ibese events. 

Diess-up days will begin on 
Monday. January 12, wiili Monday 
as Color Day. Tuesday as No Jeans 
Day, Wednesday as i'.ijaina Day. 
Thuisday as Hair in the Air Day and 
Friday as Spirit Day with seniors in 
white, juniors in black, sophomores 
in gray and Ireshinen in blue. Dress 
on Friday will mu count in the 
|Miints competition lor Snnfcsl roy- 




Ponnington County Commissioners recently 
approved reorganization of tho board. Serving os 
chairman this your will bo Oliver "Skip" 
Swanson. Serving as vice-chairman will bo Bob 
Carlson. The board met lost Tuesday whon this 






ainier making will take placi 
(Continued on hack page) 



plcturo was taken: (from loft, front row) Ken 
Olson, county auditor. Skip Swanson, Bob 
Carlson; (back row) Don Jonson, commissioner. 
Bud Comstock, commissioner Charles Noplfn, 
commissioner! and Davo Olin, county attorn ay. 



Grandfather of snowmobiling 



Welfare employees j S author of Breaking Trail 
agree to contract 



I'enniiigton County and Social 



Serv 



neiiibe 



1 the 



American 'Federation of Slate. 
County, and Municipal F.inployecs. 
Minnesota Council 65. Local 3-152. 
Valariellelfncr. union president, 
said a majority of union members 
voted to acccrjl a ihrce-year propos- 
al ending 19'W from the county on 
January 7, It was a compromise on 
both ends. Hellner saiiT 



iputuvcohcaiueemem until iti-next 
meeting on Tuesday. January 20. 



anted the right to strike. Their 
window of opportunity to strike 
would end January K, niic day after 
an agreement was reached. 

The county social service 
employees were working under the 
1996 contract. They had been nego- 
tiating with the county hoard since 
last January. Twenty-Use employ- 
ees are included in the union. 

The .main issue was salary. 

Hel'fncr said employee union mem- 

-.-bcrs.ajyccd to a.2.7-peitctil increase 

in pay for the first-year and more for 

the last \\ 



Affectionately known in the 
industry as the "grandfather of 
snowmobiling." Edgar Hettecn has 
written an autobiography which is 
scheduled for official release 
Wednesday. January U. and is 
expected to he in book siorcs in 
about two weeks. Hettecn, who now 
lives in Grand Rapids, is acknowl- 
edged as the founder of Polaris 
Industries in Roseau and Arctic Cat. 
Inc. in Thief River Falls. 

■Jay Lemke of Mahlomcdi. who 
did the "ghostwriting" for the 290- 
page book, has provided the follow- 
ing resume of its contents: 

"Il's been 53 years since Edgar 

hcltcen wiped his hands on a greasy 

.. vcrcoat and set up a one-man fix-it 

sluip'in'lhc'dark corners ofa-enf 

' garage in Roseau. Minnesota — the 



only place he could afford. It's been 
42 years since his liny, struggling 
business, Polaris Industries, built a 
"motor toboggan" and 36 years 
since Hettecn said good-bye, only to 
begin another snowmobile compa- 
ny, Arctic Enterprises. 

The rest is history. Polaris and 
Arctic have gone on to earn billions, 
and winter has taken on a whole 
new meaning for the world. All 
thanks to Hcltcen and his snowmo- 
bile. 

In his autobiography. Hreaking 
Trail, Hettecn details how it all hap- 
pened. He writes of his childhood, 
growing up in a fann family spea! 
ing Swedish, and then learn ir 
English in a one-room sehoolhou 
four- miles •from- home. Ho -foil 
the hard, early days at Polaris. v» 



was as elusive as a rainbow, 
les were tough." Hettecn 
"When the end of the week 
round, loo often the; 



,'. I'd si 



: at what w 



weak- 
ling 

■of 



rolled 

eni.ugh i . 

had and sigh heavily, knowing what 
was to come. We would gather 
around the till, a little hov The 
money would be taken out and 
placed on a table. I'd scoop il up and 
pass il around, dividing il evenly 
among ihe employees. Sometimes it 
hardlv fed the family." 

And he writes of the day in 1955 
when his partner and brother-in-law, 
David Johnson, buill a snow 
machine while Edgar was awav. 

"Rudimentary snow machines 
had been around since the turn oflhe 
century, but you didn't give them 
(Continued on Page ')) 



19-year-old buys Rex Cafe in Middle River 




Ninotoen-yoor-old BaLinda Burroll is the now owner of tho Rex 
Cafo in Middle River as of January 1. 1998. Sho and friends spent 
the Now Year holiday cleaning and painting the cafe. Tho daugh- 
ter of Randy and Susan Burroll and a 1997 graduate of Marshall 
County Contral, BaLinda already has five years of rostourant oxpe- 
rienco. 



by Knthl Carlson 

Northern Watch Reporter 

While most 19-year-old giiK 

were deciding what color to wear 

on New Year's eve. BaLinda 

Burrcll was deciding what color 

she would paint the test rooms of 

her newly acquired business. 

As of January I. BaLinda is the 



A 1997 graduate Ol Marshall 
County Central. >hc is the daughter 
of Kaudy and Susan Burrcll of 
Middle River and has an older sis- 
ler. Belli, m.imcd to Seolt Mnoncy 
and living in Hallon. ND. 

For one so young. BaLinda has 
u considerable amount of experi- 
ence in the rcsiaurant hu>iocsv 
She's worked at the Rex Cafe tor 
five years, 

Il was about a year ago when ibe 
cafe's former owner. Gloria Barber, 
mentioned lhat she might be inter- 
ested in selling the business, and it 
wa> around that time that BaLinda 
was participating in a classroom 
cuercisc that required the students 
to plan ihe-neM .several ycurs of 
their lives. 

Bal.ind.ijud always planned lo 
go id college in become a lawyer. 
but when she started figuring out 
what I he education would cost and 
how long it would take, college and 
law bee .line less appealing. 
Because sin: enjoyed the restaurant 
business, her mom encouraged her 
lo study hoiel and icsiaurar-i man- 
agement. 

n,il.inil.i s.nd that her decision 
10 bus Ibe cale was "un the spur of 
the inoilienl." and her cIioilc was 

t wiih mixed responses fiom 



oilier 



"My dad didn't like il." she said. 
"He really wanted me to go lo 
school." The previous owner's hus- 
band laughed when he heard of her 
plans, nul taking her seriously 
because of Her age. Even BaLinda 
wasn't completely sure at first. *1 
kept changing my mind, hut I 
always went back to it." 

Since she made the commii- 
menl. however. BaLinda said that 
her parents have been "very sup- 
portive." She's fairly certain thai 
her d.id will help her wjih repairs 
and lhat mom will help out. too. 
when business is really busy— like 
Goose Felt val. 

During her high school career. 
BaLinda panicip.iicd in a variety of 
sports and activ Hies until her senior 
year when she worked al Ihe cafe in 
Newfolden after school four 
evenings a week and at the Re* in 
Middle River on the weekends. 
Tuesday was her only night off. 

Living with 'her eat in the 
upsiaiis ap.irtinc.nl in the building 
that houses her cafe. BaLinda will 
never he far fiom her business. She 
moved into the apartment in June' 
and after that time performed many 
of ihe managerial duties — order- 
ing, scheduling, etc.— Ibai pre- 
pared her io lake over the business. 

She will employ about eight 
part-time employees, BaLinda 
plans io woik from (*:M) a.m. to 
around -1 pan. on weekday and 
more on ilie weekends when it's 
more difficult io find help. She. said 
she "will work as much as I need io 
— io make it go," 

The cafe hours w c trom (.:.'» 

am. lo M pin Mond.iv throueh 
Thursday. (...HI am id K p in. mi 
I-'r,d.ivs, 7 .un. lo ') pin on 



Saturday s .md from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. 
on Sundays. When activities in 
lown warrant il. dosing time will 
be flexible and hours will be 
extended. 

The establishment has been 
known as the Rex Cafe since 1927. 
and ibe name will remain ihe same. 
BaLinda says, "It would he a 
shame lo change il after such a long 
time." 

The menu include* the regular 
slum order uems and u daily spe- 
cial — a meat and potatoes meal or 
butdish. On l-'ridays the cafe will 
ntfer a Mexican entree. While 
prices will remain the same. 
BaLinda plans to olfer a "bigger 
buiger' and possibly make some 
oilier menu changes as time goes . 
by. 

HaLinda bakes fresh buns every 
iniuiiiiig except Saturday and rolls 
"for the ladies at Ihe hank" on 
Fridays. She and another employee 
share the oilier baking responsible 
lies which include pics, cookies 
and bars. Tlie baked items are very 
popular, and BaLinda comments 
that-ii s ditficull to keep up and thai 
she would like to set up a regular 
schedule to assure lhat baked goods 
ate always available. She iccog- 
ni/cs. however, iliat U "will take 
lime lo iron some ol ibese things 

As uiib .ill small town cafes. 
"regulars' are ihe mainstay of ihe 
business and their patronage is 
much appreciated, especially dur-. 
mg the slower winter months. 
Dunne, burning season, business is 
brisk." .md. ol course. Goose 
l-'esiiv.il are a very busy days. Wuh 
trails iie.uhs. sriimmohilers lie- 
tCoiii.mis-dor. Page')) 



Milk Processors seek to add value to product 

Price volatility is a sign that the law of supply and demand is working 



tm.\ i\ the u 

Northern Witch 

of ilnirv farmers iiml a view tmvani Bridge 
the future of the dairy imliiMry in ' " 

liiiilhttesiMimiesotrt.l 

by Marvin I.undin 
Northern Wntch Editor 
Pioccssors who purchase milk 
'■■"■7 



« ^eries of according to several emplovces ol plained lhat the price Ihey received product 
i ,i/i the loss t-aiul O'Likes. Inc.. owner of the lor n 



„,_ .... milk did noi keep pace with the 

Iluid milk processing prices ihey had to pay for costs of 

Tltiel River balls aml.ale 



. ... hours — or updating w.. 

equipment which will do [he job 



-ing pi.-c 



And whih 



oihcr 



realm 



:i|iiipmcnf. facilities and daily 
ng. In several cases ptoce.ssots have 
ccn portrayed as working againsi 
le dairvmen and intentionally 



been 

tin 




don't have a lot of discretion over keeping prices low. All 

what Ihey pay for milk, they work shouldn't a product as nuti 

hard to add value to the product and necessary as milk be ace. 

before il reaches the retailers and higher value'.' • 

consumers in order lo maximize Supply And Demand 

their investment in that purchase. According io pioccsso 

opted to sell iheii bents have com ninirol price through d< 



rum the prosimiK ol die Winnipeg 
neiiuiu.luan area .l-piotective 
'ai'.uhan lands wcic removed and 
i Iree market llow pennitted. 

lu altempiing to iciiiaiii prof- 
table in ihe dairy industry, process- 
ors along will) producers must find 
vays io improve efficiency. In both 
ireas ihis often involves achieving 



' and/or 



.vith [ 



-s hum 



.physical labor. 

-... — Cun't Control Price . 

Terry Nagle of the corporate 
communications department of 
Land O'Lakes in Minneapolis says 
thai while the processor may have 
some flexibility in* purchasing, il 
nl price. If there is a price 



ULlfls 



milk run through a 
i-io spread ihe c. 



ii from ihe ' 



" il 



haekpagei 



INTENTIONAL DUPLICATE PAGE 



Page 2 



NORTHERN WATCH 



Saturday, January 10, 1998 



Siitiinliiy, January III, 199K , 



NORTHERN WATCH 



I":i(.c3 




81 J/ino (Blows (frown (Prices 
jit (Purely 's Shoe Store 



SAVE 30% 

on 

BARBO 

WINTER BOOTS 

For Women 



SAVE 25% 

on all 

FILA 

ATHLETIC SHOES 



SOREL BOOTS. 

YouhS, Men's, 

Women's 

CLEARANCE 

PRICED 



SAVE 25% 

on 

REGENCE & BLONDO 

WINTER BOOTS 

Women's & Men's 



SAVE 25% 

on all 

adidas 

ATHLETIC SHOES 



NIKE COATS 

Women's & Men's 

Reduc ed 30% -40% 

WIND PANTS 

Reduced 20% 



SAVE 25% 

on 
TROTTER BOOTS 

Many Styles 



Huge ,. $^a 
Selection. '+. *JW^ 

NIKE **. -^2- 

ATHLETIC SHOES 
Reduced 20%-50% 



Applications for 
energy assistance 
being accepted 

Applications fw the 1WH energy 
assistance program arc now hcinc. 
accepted by Northwest Community 
Action at Budgcr from hoiwehtilds 
in Kittson. Ukc of the W.hhIs. fWt 
Marshall and Roseau counties. 

Fuel assistance eligibility is 
based on household income, si/e 
and assets. Three-month income lor 
households of various sizes include 
the following One person. $3,536; 
tun. $.1.62.1; three. S5.712: lour. 
S6.7W; live. S7.KS7: and six. 
SH.975. 

For an application or additional 
information on eligibility call 
Northwest Community Action ai 



Large Selection 
SUPPERS 

Reduced 

25% 



LARGEST SELECTION OF SHEEPSKIN FOOTWEAR IN THE AREA! 

EMU RIDGE • AUSSIE DOGS • MINNETONKA • KOOLABURRA « Bf 'fiL J r 4 

All REDUCED-.UGG$AsLawAs $99.99 (t^Up^is^) 

Natoml& Fleece $ 59.99 tfourOKia-hil <* si**) 



-& 



SAVE $20 TO $50 ON WORK & HUNTING BOOTS 

FROM: • ROCKY • RED WING • WOLVERINE • H & H 

• JOHN DEERE • DANNER • LAKE OF THE WOODS 

LARGEST SELECTION OF BOOTS IN THE AREA! 



SAVE AN 
EXTRA $5.00 

on SALE RACKS 
DOWNSTAIRS 



SAVE 

on Selected Styles of 

DR. MARTENS 

AIR WAIR 



SAVE 10% 

on 

NIKE & adidas 

BACK PACKS 

& SPORTS BAGS 



2IS-528-325H.ApplieaiiH 
taken until May l.-l'WS. 



vill be 




I Many Additional Styles, 

Paper Stock and Ink 

Choices .Are Available! 

Prices Will Vary! 



The Times 

324 Main Ave. North 
Thief River Falls, MN 

I «ffi 681-4450 



\ "^"^l— ■ 


k AROUND 
r THE REGION 

Kulhl Carlton 



Norman County 
Historical Society 
receives gift 

Ada - Norman County 
Historical Society members are 
Calling a recent 520,000 gift 
another Angel Strike. 

The gift was given in memo- 
ry Kenneth and Helen Ward by a 
party In Oklahoma that asked 
that their names be withheld. 
The laic Words had long lime 
ties in Ada and Norman County. 

The gif^ will be used to help 
cover the damages to the muse- 
um and its contents caused by 
the 1997 sprini " ' " 
County Index 



Sisters open ski 
trails to public 

Crookston • Sisters of Mount 
St. Benedict in Crookston were 
presented a certificate of appre- 
ciation recently by Wellness 
Works Tor opening the ski trails 
on their private property. 

Orange signs guide skiers 
through the trails, and skiers can 
chose between the short loop. 
Challenge Loop and River Loop. 
Skiing the course takes between 
60 and 90 minutes, depending on 
the ability of the skier. 
Crookston Daily Times 



EREMY HAUGEI 

j9ic &■ 3ce dream 
JSencfit 

Friday, January 16 
2-7:30 P.M. 
GOODRIDGE COMMUNI- 
TY CENTER 



The Blenders return for 
concert at Lincoln H.S. 



high school choirs. 




209-LoBraoAvo. No., ThiefRiwFolIi ' 
21B-O81-2608 ■ 1-800-S1 1-5759 



mmmmm.m-M-Mi 
nm-m-M'W-m-wml 
smmMM-n-sm 



COSMETICS 



Tfo Cosmetic Iftat's 
More Ifmttfl Cover-Zip. 



!% 



■ Facials, Glamour Makc-Ovcrs And Color Logic 
! Consultations Arc Always FREE.' 

<© 681-6750 



Patti Osowski 

MARY KAY DIRECTOR 




SATURDAY 9:00-5:30 

SUNDAY 12-5 
MONDAY 9:00-5:30 
TUESDAY 9:00-5:30 



Bjorkman's 

QUITTING BUSINESS SALE! 



OFF 




SALE 
PRICES 



EVERYTHING GOES 



Bjorkman's 

DOWNTOWN THIEF RIVER FALLS 




quartet will be making a return 
engagement at the Lincoln auditori- 
um Saturday. January 17, at 7:30 
p.m. 

Tickets at SIO each ore available 
in advance at Kesar Music and from 
Lincoln choir members. Admission 
at the door will be SI2. The concert 
is a fund-raiser, for the concert choir 
trip to New York City this spring. 

Last year the group presented a 
re-scheduled concert nere after the 
originally-scheduled concert was 
canceled due to the ice storm and 
power outage which struck the area. 
"We feel the community and 
area ore now more aware of who 
these guys ore and how well they 
perform, ' noted Darcy Reese, vocal 
music instructor at Lincoln. "We 
hope more people will turn out for a 
really unique musical experience.'' 
"Singing human voices arc the 
most powerful and passionate 
instruments anywhere, states a 
background information sheet on 
the group. "These four funky young 
guys from Fargo. ND, prove again 
now potent and sophisticated that 
human instrument really is. With a 
vocal virtuosity that spans many 
music traditions, The Blenders cre- 
ate a genuine sound or their own." 
Darren Rust, who sings boss in 
the group, explained its philosophy 
this way: "We've been influenced 
by just about every musical style 
around, from jazz and classical 
music to pop, rock, doo wop, hip 
hop and, of course, a cappclla. 
music. As long as it packs an effect, 
we'll sing it and blend it to make 
music everyone can relate to. That's 



Darren and Allan Rust, Ryan Lance 
and Tim Kaspcr have been using 
their voices to blend these varying 
musical influences into a style that 
has become uniquely their own. 

Extensive touring has helped 
forge The Blenders musical style 
ana has included guest appearances 
with Jay Lcno, Howie Mandcl and 
others. The group was consecutive 
winners in 1994 and 1995 of the 
Contemporary Artist of the Year 
award from ihe National Associa- 
tion of Campus Activities. 

Skaters plan 
Exhibition 
Sunday Jan. 18 

Skaters from the Thief River 

Falls area will demonstrate pro- 



grams they will perform i 
Exh 

_..5p.rr 
Olson Memorial Civ 



mpctiti 
Sunday performance January 
from 3:45 lo 5:15 p.m. at the Huck 



exhibition 

ary 18 

cHuck 

Center in 

ThicrRiverFatls. 

Individual skaters will present 
their routines in freestyle, artistic 
and dance divisions and the Novice 
and Intermediate precision lines 
will also show their programs. 

Participants arc primarily mem- 
bers of the Thier River Falls 
Skating Club. The Junior Advanced 
class from the Thief River Falls 
recreational skating program has 
also been invited to demonstrate 
skills learned during its class ses- 
sions. 

Photos of the precision lines and 
a number of the individual skaters 
will be published in the Wednesday. 
January 14 issue of Tltc Times. 

Social Security 
rep here Jan. 20 

A representative of the Grand 
Forks Social Security office will be 
at the Heritage Community Center 
.in Thief River Falls Tuesday. 
January 20; from 9:30 a.m. to 2 
p.m. 

Applications for benefits are not 
completed during the town visits. 
Such business can be completed by 
telephone loll-free at I-K00-772- 
1213. This is a national toll-free 
number and docs not ring in Grand 
Forks. 



DEATHS 



II he held 
y II) .it 10 
ran Church 
i Sylvester 



Agnes Olson, 76 

Thief Hi vit Kills- ApnesOlMiii. 
7ft. died Wednesday. January 7. 
I'WSal lliikola Heartland Hospital 
inFaign.NI). 

today. Saturday.* Jan 
a.m. at Kedceiiier l.i 
with Reverend Ma 
officiating. Ilurial 
Greenwood Cemetery. 

Visitation was held on Friday 
from 4 in 'J p.m. at the Green 
Funeral Home with a 7 p.m. prayer 
service and lor one hour prior lo ser- 
vices at the church on Saturday. 

A complete obituary will appear 
in Wednesday's edition o[ The 

Helen 
McKercher, 84 

St. Hilairc - Helen McKercher. 
84. dicdTucsday. January 6. I'WK in 
New Mexico. 

Helen requested lliat no funeral 
service be held. Friends arc asked 
instead to celebrate her life with 
smiles, memories and song. 

A complete obituary will appear 
in Ihe next issue of The Times. 

John Bendel, 84 

Red Lake Falls • John Bendel. 
84. died Wednesday. January 7. 
1998 at Rivervicw hospital in 



(.'rookston. 

Mass of Christian Burial will he 
held at 10: M) a.m. today. Saturday. 
January 1(1 at St. Joseph's Catholic 
Church in Red Lake Falls with 
Father Gary LaMoinc officiating. 
Ilurial will he held at St. Josephs 
Catholic Chyrdi Cemetery in the 
spring. 

Visiialion was held Friday from 
5 to 8 p.m. with a 7 p.m. prayer ser- 
vice at Pcuerson Funeral Home in 
Red Lake Falls and for one hour 
prior to services at the church on 
Saturday. 

A complete obituary will appear 
in Wednesday's edition of The 
Times. 

Evelyn Nelson, 93 

Thief River Falls - Evelyn 

Nelson. 93. died Thursday, January 
S. I99H in Thief River Falls. 

Funeral arrangements arc pend- 
ing at the Green Funeral Home. 

A complete obituary will appear 
in the next issue of 77ie Times. 

Anna King, 96 

Thler River Fulls • Anna King. 
%. died Friday. January 9. 1998 at 
the CNC Unit of Northwest Medical 
Center in Thief River Falls. 

Funeral arrangements arc pend- 
ing at Green Funeral Home. 

A complete ohiluary will appear 
in Wednesday's edition of The 
Times. 



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105 3rd St. East 

Thief River Falls, MN 56701 

218-681-8380 

1-800-284-6705 

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TRF students 
perform in UND 
honor band, choir 

Four Lincoln High School stu- 
dents have been .selected Id perform 
at Ihe University of Norih Dakota 
Honor Band and Choir Festival, 
January I ft- IS. 

Sludents performing in the honor 
hand include Brad Dekkcts. trum- 
pet, and Kristin I-anga.is. clarinet. 
Sludents performing in the honor 
choir include Katie Christianson. 
soprano, and Paul Dchneii. bass. 

The festival is in its 1 3th year 
and features some of the finest high 
school choir and band members in 
the region who auditioned in' 
October, Under the co-direelion of 
Dr, Gordon Brock. UND Director 
of Bands, and Dr. James Kodde. 
UND Director of Choral Studies, 
the festival features a concert per- 
formance at the Grand Forks 
Chester Frit/ auditorium on 
Sunday. January IH. after an inten- 
sive weekend of rehearsal and prac- 




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STORE HOURS: 

Monday - Friday 
■ 9:30-6:00 
Thursday 9:30-8:00 
Saturday 9:30-5:30 
Sunday Noon-4:00 




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SUDSCRlFnON RATES 
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The Times 

324 Main Avenue North 

P.O. Bo* 100 

Thief River Fall-.. MN 56701-0100 

Telephone: (218) 681-4450 

Pax: (218) 631-4455 

e-mail: n watch <Snwatch.com 

hnp-JI ww w.n watch, com 




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I'URC 4 



NORTHERN WATCH 



Saturday, Jnnuury 1(1, 1!)!)8 



Saturday, January III, 1«!M 



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January 17 
7:30 RM. 

LINCOLN HIGH 

SCHOOL M 
AUDITORIUM i * 

Thief River Falls | | 

Ticket Price: 
$10.00 Advance Sale 

Tickets 
$12.00 At The Door 

Available at 

Kezar Music, Thief River Falls' 

And From 

Lincoln High School 

Choir Students. 



Winter Bargains 

Save Now at RadioShack! 




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Thiol Rlwor Foils 

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A Radio Shack • Dealer 



SOUFCpN 

Sherry LaCourilcre 



It certainly Is one-dish meal 
weather. Hen: urc a bunch of dif- 
ferent casseroles and .soups for 
you to try - start one this week- 
end. Next week I'll try to remem- 
ber to j»!ve you Mime really cowl 
bread recipes to go with these 
dishes: 

Here's u simple soup that is 
definitely a meal in itself: 
POOR MAN'S SOUI' 

1 pound dried Great Northern beans 
3 carrots, sliced 

3 celery ribs, sliced 

2 medium onions, chopped 
2 cloves garlic, minced 

2 hay leaves 

I (14 1/2 ounce) can tomatoes with 
liquid, cut up 

1 teaspoon dried basil 
1/2 teaspoon pepper 

2 tablespoons olive oil 

Place beans in Dutch oven and 
cover with water. Bring to a boil 
and cook for 2 minutes. Remove 
from heat, cover and let stand for 1 
hour. 

Drain and rjn.se beans and return 
to Dutch oven. Add 6 cups water, 
carrots, celery, onions, garlic, bay 
leaves, tomatoes, basil and pepper. 
Bring to a boil, reduce heat, and 
simmer, covered, for I 1/2 hours or 
until beans arc tender. 

Discard bay leaves, add oil and 
heat through. 



'wild rice casserole 

4-5 cups diced cooked chicken 

1 cup chopped celery 

2 tablespoons butler 

2 cans (10 3/4 ounces each) cream 

of mushroom soup 
2 cups chicken broth 
1 (4 1/2 ounce) jar sliced 

mushrooms, drained 
1 small onion, chopped 
1 cup uncooked wild rice, rinsed 

and drained 
1/4 teaspoon poultry seasoning 



.1/4 cup chopped or pieces cashews 
l-'.esh parsley 

In skillel. brown chicken and cel- 
ery in butter. 

In large bowl, combine soup ami 
broth until smooth. Add inush- 
iiHiins, onion, rice, poultry season- 
ing and chicken mixture. 

Pour into greased 9\ 1.1 inch bak- 
ing dish, cover and bake 1 hour at 
350 degrees. Uncover and bake 30 
minutes more. Stir. 

Sprinkle with cashews and return 
to oveinfor 15 minutes or until rice 
is lender. Garnish with parsley. 

Use those tasty, crunchy 
canned onions that (he family 
lutes In this quick dish: 

MONTEREY SPAGHETTI 

4 ounces spaghetti, broken into 2 
nch pieces . 



ice) cups. 



I egg 

1 <K out . . 
1/4 cup grated parmesan 
1/4 teaspoon garlic powder 

2 cuns (8 ounces)shrcdded 

Monterey Jack cheese 
I (10 ounce) package fro/en 
chopped spinach, thawed und 
drained 

French- fried 



ns. divided 
spastic ■ 



:cording to 



Cook 
package. 

Meantime, in medium bowl, heat 
egg. Add sour cream, parmesan and 
garlic powder. Drain spaghciti und 
add to egg mixture, along with 
Monterey Jack cheese, spinach and 
halfoflhc onions. 

Place in greased 2 quart baking 
dish, cover and bake 30 minutes at 
350 degrees, until heated through. 

Top with remaining onions and 
return to oven for 5 minutes or until 
onions arc golden. 

Here's one that will give you all 
your minerals and vitamins and 
taste Rood too - a cood way to get 
the kids to cat their vccrIcs: 

VEGETABLE CASSEROLE 



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Thief River Falls, MN 56701 

PHONE 681-3983 or 

Toll Free 1-800-768-1869 

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HWY. 1 & 59 W. THIEF RIVER FALLS, MN GB1-4820 



I cup sliced turnips 
I cups diced carrois 
1 cup diced potatoes 
1 cup i'ro/cn peas 
I cup diced parsnips 
I cup shredded cabbage 
Salt and pepper to taste 

1 (H ounce) can cut green beans 

2 tablespoons chopped onion 
1(12 ounce) package fresh pork 

sausage links 
1 (10 .1/4 ounces) can cream of 

mushroom soup 

In greased 9x13 inch glass bak- 
ing dish, layer turnips, carrots, pota- 
locs, peas, parsnips and cabbage, 
seasoning layers with salt and pep- 
per. 

Drain beans, reserving liquid, 
Place beans over cabbage and sprin- 
kle with sail and pepper. Top with 

Brown sausage and drain. Place 
over onion. 

Combine soup and bean liquid 
and pour over sausage. Cover and 
bake at 350 degrees for 1 hour. Turn 
sausage over and bake, uncovered. 
30 minutes more or until vegetables 

What a wonderful dish to come 
home to after a hard day at work: 
SLOW COOKER 
VEGETABLE SOUP 

I pound boneless round steak, cut 
into 1/2 inch cubes 

1 (14 1/2 ounce) can diced 

tomatoes, undraincd 

3 cups water 

2 medium potatoes, peeled and 

cubed 

2 medium onions, diced 

3 celery ribs, sliced 

2 carrots, sliced 

3 beef bouillon cubes 
1/2 teaspoon basil 
1/2 teaspoon orcgano 
1/2 teaspoon salt 

1/4 teaspoon pepper 

1 1/2 cups frozen mixed vegetables 

Combine first 12 ingredients in 
slow cooker. Cover and cook on 
high for 6 hours. 

Add vegetables, cover and cook 
on high 2 hours longer or until meat 
and vegetables arc tender. 

Yum • doesn't this sound like 
just the thins for (hat next cold 

QUICK CORN CHOWDER 

1 bacon strip, diced 
t medium onion, diced 

1 (14 1/2 ounces) can chicken broth 

2 cups water 

2 large potatoes, peeled and diced 

1/2 teaspoon salt 

1/4 teaspoon pepper 

1 (15 ounce) can whole kernel com. 

drained 
1 cup milk (divided) 
1/4 cup flour 

In large saucepan, cook bacon 
until crisp. Drain on paper towels. 

Saute Union in bacon drippings 
until tender. Add broth, water and 
potatoes and bring to a boil. Reduce 
heat, cover and simmer for 15 min- 
utes or until potatoes arc tender. 

Add salt and pepper, mixing 
well. Add com and 3/4 cup of the 
milk. 

Combine flour and remaining 
milk until smooth. Add to soup, 
Bring to a boil, cook and stir for 2 
minutes. Garnish with bacon and 
parsley, if desired. 

Racers compete 
in snowmobile 
races in region 

Local and well-known snowmo- 
bile racers competed in a number of 
races last weekend. 

In Walker at ihc Heartland 
Racing Association race, Chad 
Dyrdahl of Bagley finished first in 
the Pro 440 division, Jeremy Fylc 
of Nisswa second, and Lynn Kadlec 
of Cedar, third. All three were rid- 
ing Arctic Cat 440 ZRs. 

At ihc Can-Am Racing Circuit 
Portage La Prairie [ce Breaker, Bill 
Slominski or Valley City, ND, 

E laced first in the Pro 440 division, 
'avttf Stcnlund or Red Rock, 
Ontario, who won the ISOC 500 
lost year placed second. Slominski 
also won the Pro Open. Jesse Stregc 
of Lancaster, finished second in that 
division. 

At the MRP Ice race in Sauk 
Center, there were a number or area 
racers competing. In ihc Pro Stock 
440 division, the following results 
were recorded: I) Greg Kugland, 
Mcnmonic, WI, Polaris; 2) Todd 
Wolff. Annandalc, Ski-Doo; 3) 
Daniel Skallci. Eagen, Arctic; 4) 
Dale Lindbcck, White Bear Lake. 
Arctic; 5) Corey Davidson. Holt, 
Polaris. 

In the Pro 440 Champ division 
the following results were recorded: 

1 ) Mike Huule. Wyoming, Ski-Doo; 

2) Dan Sturgeon, . Fnrmington, 
Arctic; 3) Greg Rugland. 
Mcnmonic, WI, Polaris: 4) Willy 
Jensen, Rochester, Polaris; 5) Todd 

' Wolff, Annandalc. Ski-Doo; 6) Jim 
Adams, Rochester. Ski-Doo; 7) 
Corey Davidson, Holt, Polaris; 8) 
Dan Hckscl, Watenown. Arctic; 9) 
Malt Schccr. Plymouth. Polaris. 

Aaron Jnnisch of Thief River 
Fallls, placed fiflh in Ihc Pro Stock 
440 Fan division. In the Womens 
440L Pro, Debbie Revering of 
Fergus Falls. Polaris, finished first. 
Vol Schlabcn or Detroit Lakes fin- 
ished sixth. 



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Puri- (. 




NORTHERN WATCH 



Saturday, January 10, 1998 




I northernI" 



EDITORIAL OPINIONS 



About 200 people attended a wolf Informational discuss what to do about tha wolf population In 

meeting at Northland Community and Technical anticipation of it being removed from the endan- 

Collego In Thief River Falls Monday, tt was one of gered species list In 1993. Many were In favor of 

12 meetings being held throughout the state to reducing the numbers of wolves. 



LETTERS 



To The Editor: 

Keep your dog* 
5] where arc unt.' 

There are l»i> tilings lhai arc 
required to make (itHKl neighbors. 
One is in have a good fence between 
the properties and ihc second is to 
keep your dog at home. 

At a wolf meeting last Monday in 
Thief River Falls, story after story 
of hardships and close encounters 
with wolves was told to Minnesota 
D/MR and U.S. Fish and Wildlife 
Service personnel. The DNR wonts 
to have the U.S.F.W.S. hand over 
jurisdiction for wolf management 
from federal to state. 

One hardship loss was from a 
livestock breeder who recently lost 
a pregnant cow to wolves and was 
sent a check for SJ0O from the state 
ust compensation. The owner 
dthccowforSI.500ifit 
died from any means except for a 
wolf kill. The owner was required 
by the insurance company to collect 
from the state or federal agencies 
involved with protecting the wolf. If 
a neighbor's dog came on your prop- 
erty and killed 50 chickens, would 
you be satisfied with payment for 



with a radio collar and which was 
known as "Number 51" was shot 
,:juid killed by someone and a 



S25.OO0 reward is being offered, 
home or Wolf That dollar amount was set by the 



rile who set the value for a 

rcgi stereo pregnant 



> ($25,000 



hadin 



lercd I 

;S400). 

The experts at this wolf meeting 
(the DNR) gave a slide show pre- 
sentation staling that there arc over 
2.000 wolves in Minnesota and that 
Alaska (five times higher than 
Minnesota) has about 7.000 wolves. 

In Montana last winter, hundreds 
of buffalo left Yellowstone National 
Park in search of food because the 
park was becoming ovcrpopulated. 
The governor of Montana ordered 
the stale DNR and ranchers to shoot 
any and all buffalo outside of the 
park. ...and they did. ...hundreds. 
Wolves were also introduced to 
Yellowstone and a district court fed- 
eral judge has ruled that these 
wolves may also be removed when 
outside the park boundaries. 

The DNR acknowledged the deer 
' population is down significantly and. 
these wolves must seek food else- 
where, i.e. livestock, poultry and 
pets. They also agreed thai the wolf 
can adapt quickly to human envi- 
ronment such as towns {and garbage 

There is 14 million acres of pub- 
lic land in Minnesota. This is an 
adequate. amount of acreage for 
wolves to live. There ,is no reason to 



accept wolves on private property. If 
wolves want to over- populate, then 
they must be brought back to man- 
aged levels by hunting and trapping. 
If these wolves arc to be protected, 
then there also should be adequate 
compensation for the damages the 
wolves cause. 

I guess if I would have to put it in 
a nutshell, these slate and federal 
agencies which want to protect ihc 
wolves can keep their damn dogs in 
their yard or put up a fence to keep 
them in. Anything outside the 
boundary lines could end up like 
"Number 51." 

Sincerely. 

Dave Zavoral 

Grygla, Minnesota 

To The Editor: 

Thanks to Stan Sjobcrg we now 
have a new Channel 41 on our cable 
system. This is a God-send to those- 
of us who are tired of the same 
biased liberal agenda. 

I would extend an invitation to 
any and all who arc interested in an 
unfiltcrcd news program to tunc in 
to Channel 41. 

Tony Snow's Sunday Fox news is 
excellent also. 

Cordially. 

Wes Johnson 

Thief River Falls 




BnMDSErO 

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Thief River Falls, Minnesota 

John P. Mattson, Publisher 

Marvin Lundin, Editor 
David ma, Associate Editor 

Tfinber Wolf Issue Begs 
•or Compromises 

Among many wildlife issues which polarize 
the public in cither side of a question, ihc timber 
wolf (Eastern Gray Wolf) issue is one in which 
people arc adamant about their stands on the far 
ends of the spectrum. For the most part, the view- 
point differs in proportion to the person's proximi- 
ty to the animals. 

The preservationist sees the timber wolf as a 
remaining proud symbol of wild freedom, an elu- 
sive, reclusive and magnificent animal with pierc- 
ing and intelligent eyes, posing majestically 
against- snow-covered evergreens, loping effort- 
lessly across a frozen lake or piercing the night 
with howls that instinctively raise the hair on the 
back of the listener's neck. 

The annihilator sees the same species as a 
skulking, cruel, opportunistic coward that preys on 
the defenseless, feeds before its prey is dead, wan- 
tonly kills more than it eats, poses a threat to 
domestic livestock, pets and even humans, and is 
most accurately pictured defiantly snarling through 
a gory muzzle while standing over a writhing 
fawn, sheep or calf. 

To some extent at least, both views arc accu- 
rate and the difficulty lies in convincing one group 
to recognize that the other's view is valid. It would 
be interesting to hear the comments from the metro 
area and southern Minnesota in comparison to the 
views expressed Monday at the meeting held at 
Northland Community and Technical College on a 
state wolf management plan. We suspect they 
would be substantially different. Those who talk 
ihc talk have a different viewpoint than those who 
walk the walk. 

Until the gray wolf is delisted (isn't that an 
interesting corruption of ihc language?) from the 
Federal Endangered Species List, the controversy 
is purely academic. The federal government is offi- 
cially in control of the wolfs fate and the private 
citizen — excepting those willing tg risk the poten- 
tial severe penalties under ihe law — has no influ- 
ence in wolf management. 

In this issue, at least so far, the Minnesota 
Department of Natural Resources remains blame- 
less. It has no control over the gray wolf situation 
in Minnesota — a situation which has seen the wolf 
population grow from on estimated 350 to 700 in 
Ihc laic 1960s to an estimated 2,000 to 2,200 now. 
The wolfs range has continued to expand west and 
south and now includes some 35,000 square miles. 
A breeding population presently exists within 60 
miles of the Twin Cities metropolitan area, accord- 
ing to information presented at Monday ^meeting. 
In its formation of a roundtablc to gather opin- 
ion and perhaps reach some acceptable consensus 
among widely divergent opinions>thc DNR is on 
(he right track. What it must now do is balance the 
membership of that group among interest areas so 
that compromise and planning can be realistic and 
acceptable. What it must avoid is the recent wet- 
land study scenario where "agriculture" was one 
interest area and each environmental group had 
status as a separate entity rather than also a com- 
bined interest area. This arrangement stacked the 
deck and precluded any realistic opportunity for 
compromise. - 

Wolf management may in itself be a mis- 
nomer, for wolves are independent enough to man- 



Editorial opinion published under this 
heeding Is intended to stimulate thinking 
and discussion among our readors. Unless 
specified otherwise, the editorials are writ- 
ten by Editor Marvin Lundin and do hot rep- 
resent opinion of other staff members. 
Opinions In Items from other publications 
may not coincide with the editor's own 
views but are offered for their general Inter- 
est. 

age themselves, Wolf control may be a better term, 
for it can apply to allowable population numbers 
statewide and location of that population within 
the state. 

It is generally conceded that most support for 
a large wolf population will come from the metro- 
politan area where there are none. That could be 
rectified. Live-trapped wolves could be released in 
such original wolf range as Edina or Minnctonka 
or Wayzata or Shoreview. There is a good white- 
tail deer population in the metro area and an over- 
population of Canada geese that could use a little 
natural predalion. Metro sports fans deprived of an 
outdoor baseball stadium and starved for entertain- 
ment may be satiated by the spectacle of a puck of 
wolves hamstringing a struggling pregnant doe in 
the median of 1-94 or 35W and ripping out and 
devouring its unborn fawn. 

Such possibilities, however, arc impractical 
and merely wishful thinking, Any similar ideas 
would be immediately dismissed as foolish, as 
indeed they are. 'Therefore metro attitudes will not 
have a chance to be changed by such graphic real- 
ity up close and personal, and it will require per- 
suasive testimony from those who experience the 
presence of wolves on a first hand basts to sway 
that opinion. 

Few would argue with any sincerity that there 
is no place for wolves on ihc planet or even in parts 
of Minnesota. Many would argue, that the place is 
not among domestic livestock or poultry. And 
more than a few — law or no law — will not tolerate 
such incursions on their property and will take 
whatever effective measures are necessary to 
assure that they do not recur. 

We think that state department of natural 
resources personnel believe there are loo many 
wolves in the. state and we also think the depart- 
ment likely has a mercenary interest in them. Deer 
hunters in Minnesota gay hefty license fees to take 
one deer each and harvest 60,000 to 80,000 deer 
annually in a couple of weeks within the wolf 
range. Wolves provide no income to the depart- 
ment at all and — at an average of 15 to 18 deer 
each annually — deplete the saleable resource by 
30,000 to.40,000 deer per year. Proposal of a wolf 
season with a substantial license fee and a lottery 
for selection of licensees is predictable. 

Our view is that selective control of wolf pop- 
ulations in problem areas can most effectively be 
''accomplished by trapping rather than hunting. 
Removing wolf populations entirely from agricul- 
tural areas of the state is not at all improper in our 
view, and should be a goal of uny management 
plan. 

Lacking such removal, the process for deter- 
mination and payment of adequate claims for 
depredation losses must be vastly improved. In the 
total scheme of things, the dollar amount of such 
claims to the slate is ridiculously small, but the 
potential for goodwill and fair play among victim- 
ized farmers is tremendously large. For that matter, 
such improvement should take place as soon as 
legislatively possible and not wait for delisting of 
the wolf from the Endangered Species List. 

Compromise will be the key to formulating an 
acceptable wolf management plan, for Minnesota. 
Much remains to be said on the question and we 
look forward to interesting times in thenext couple 
. of years as the details an; assembled, '"^ 



POLICIES 



LtUen lb The Editor: ThciuuT of the Northern 
: WjUcb encourages written responses to editorial com- ■ 
menl or letters with original thought* or Ideas of gen- 
eral Interest. Letters ihould be intended for publics- ' 
don la Northern Watch, exclusively; letters sent to 
multiple publication* will generally not be accepted. 
Right Is reserved to edit letters for length and clarity 
and to reject letter* deemed to be promotional in 
nature or In poor tauc, 

. Letter* Muit Be Signedt All letters must be 
tigoed and contain an address or phone number of the 
writer so aiubenddty can be verified. Signatures 
moat appear on letters published. The stall believes - 



that there is greater credibility in letters signed in print 
'. and will not withhold names of writers from public*- 
don. " . ■ 

■ Responses Invited: Letters cridcal of iwSviou- 
■ sis or other entitles may be shown to those' Individu- 
als of representatives of these entities Id advance of 
publication with an invitation by newspaper Man* for 
response in the same Issue as the'origmsl letter. * 

Corrections! If. an- error (s made In-news ot 
advertising publication, the tuff encourages readers 
to call it n> our irnroediste ouendoaby calling 681- 
«30. We will aneropt to correct the error or clarify 
the misunderstanding in the next Iwue. 



LETTERS 



To The Editor: 

Milk's the one for me! 

This letter is in regard to the 
small dairy operations that arc going 
out of business. I realize that limes 
arc tough for dairy formers and 
every Monday there arc more and 
more cattle being sold in Winger, 
Bacley and Long Prairie. 

But as a dairy farmer's wife, I 
think that we all have lo remember 
why we milk. We know we don't do 
it because of the hours — it's not 9 
a.m. to 5 p.m., it's more like 5 a.m. 
to 9 p.m. The pay isn't every Friday 
ai 11 a.m., it's when the cows "come 
in." And we're not out snowcaiting 
on a warm winter day. we're letting 
ihc cows out so wc can clean the 



The reasons that wc arc dairy 
farmers arc that qui parents were 
and [heir, parents were, and wc 
thought it was an O.K. way to be 
brought up and make a little honest 
hard-earned money. 

I have noticed similarities in the 
small dairy farmers going out of 
business to ihc small grain formers 
that were forced out of business IS 
years ago. The difference is FHA or 
Land O'Lakcs. Do vou want to run 
your farm or have someone tell you 

It's hard to start an operation on 
your own, but you can. My husband 
was fortunate to be able to start 'his 
own 20-cow dairy at the age of 22 
with no middleman. We have three 
children and both have full-time 



jobs out of ihe home. 

What I want lo say to the area 
dairy farmers is that big is not 
always better and if big is what you 
want, what do you think you start 
out with? 

I guess the "view" now is for 
everyone lo sec a huge dairy opera- 
lion, a thing of ihc present.. ..the 
future... Well, if anyone wants to 
view a small dairy operation past, 
present and future ours has been in 
effect for four years and will still be 
in effect for the next 40 years to 
come. No increase! No decrease! 

Sincerely. 

Shelly Carlson 

Rocky Ridge Holsieins 

Ncwlalilcn. Minnesota 



Saturday, January 10, V) l )H 



t A 



'■-I , 



NORTHERN WATCH 



I-HRC 7 




After receiving $150 donation from Norwest Bank for performing 
during their Christmas Party, Sunrise Singers donated the* money 
to the AI Krauso Greenhouse. The check presentation from 
Norwest Bank representative Carol Johnson to Diane Marshall 
was mado during n rehearsal of Sunrise Singers: (seated, from 
loft) JoAnna Swantek, Gibby Trontvet, Kelly Bendlckson, David 
Christonsen; (row one) Ben Worker, Abble Houske, Nathan Olson, 
Miriah Johnson, Tyler Bosh, Police Officer James Fulton, Diane 



Marshal), Eighth grade geography teacher and organizer for AI 
Krauso Greenhouse fundraiser, Carol Johnson, Jeni Halverson, 
Jon Swanson, Mamie Schafer, Chris Leach, and Marcla Knuttila; 
Iback row) Ann Marben, Cole Holthusen, Kelly Smeby, Danny 
Christensen, Tiffany Sorenson, Matthew Dlmlch, Jenny Undqulst, 
John MIckelson, Alicia Vigness, Brent Fulton, Michelle Johnson, 
Philip Hoks, Kelsey Christensen, and Adam Knott. Not pictured Is 
Dane Frolland. 



Singers donate funds to Greenhouse project 



Money donated to ihc Sunrise 
Singers, Eighth Grade Girls 
Ensemble and Eighth Grade Boys 
Ensemble, following a Christmas 
I'arty performance for Norwest 
Dank, will he added to funds being 
collected lo help keep u dream alive 
— AI Krausc's Greenhouse. 

The. choir groups were invited to 

[imvide entertainment for Norwest 
lank during its Christmas Pan at 
the Elks this holiday season. Ms. 
Marcia Knuttila, director, explained 
thai before' they could respond, 
liccausc they do want to perform 
when invited, she needed to check 
the students' busy schedules. After 
discussion, the students agreed they 
could perform during the party. The 
logistics or gelling ihc sound system 
from Franklin to the Elk's, however, 
also posed another problem. That 



problem was solved when two par- 
ents volunteered lo help. Donna 
Bosh with her "shaggin wagon", 
mother of Tyler Bosh, a member of 
Sunrise Singers and Eighth Grade 
Boys Ensemble, and Olticcr James 
Fulton, father of Brent Fulton, 
another member of Sunrise Singers 
and Ihc Eighth Grade Boys 
Ensemble, came to the rescue. The 
choirs gratefully accepted the offer 
of Officer Fulton, and politely 
thanked "Mother Bosh' and 
explained that they did not wish to 
abuse her "mobile wagon master" 
wilh so much equipment. 

"I ihought the besi pari of this 
experience was two-fold. First, I 
recognized Ihc community's 
involvement lo education. Second, 
the students, along with their very 
dedicated parents, were willing and 



committed to honor this very special 
invitation to perform." said Ms. 
Knuttila. 

Next, a most wonderful surprise 
enhanced this positive experience. 
On Thursday, December IS. during 
Eighth Grade Chorus. Ms. Knuttila. 
known to tier students as Ms. K, 
opened an envelope sent from 
Norwest Bank addressed to Ms. 
Knuttila and Sunrise Singers. Inside 
was a check in the amount of S 150. 
"After wc recovered from this excit- 
ing news." said Ms. Knuttila. "we 
called Norwest Bank immediately 
to thank them for their thoughtful 

Jcncrosity. I then learned that Carol 
ohnson, consumer hanking manag- 
er, was responsible for this generous 
financial gesture." 

"The Best part of this perfor- 
mance experience," said Ms. 



Knuttila. "wafthat the students 
wanted to share this financial gift. 
'Tlicy agreed that this generous 
donation should Ik given in memo- 
ry of Mr. Alan Krausc to help fund 
his greenhouse at Franklin Middle 
School" 

"Yes. there is an old African 
proverb which stales: 'It takes an 
cniirc village to educate a child.' 
But I think the reward and return on 
this community involvement and 
investment in the education process 
of your youth is so apparent in our 
Thief River Fulls parents and their 
children. Our youth know ihc true 
value and understand Ihc concept or 
sharing, caring and giving because 
they have learned it ttrsl hand from 
Ihcir supportive, dedicated, nurtur- 
ing, loving parents," said Ms. 
Knuttila. 



Advisory group proposes changes to planning law 



Advisory Council on Community- 
Based Planning has released a draft 
of the council's 31 recommenda- 
tions lo the Minnesota Legislature. 
Community-based planning is 
' the new local planning framework 
sei up by u 19'/7 slate law. It brings 
together citizens and officials to 
plan for future challenges such as 
land use and population change. 
Some statewide goals for local plan- 
ning address Ihc long-term well- 
being of the state as a whole. 

"Community-based planning is a 
big opportunity for Minncsolans to 
make good things lumpen Tor their 
communities," said Senator Steve 
Morse, co-chair of the advisory 



council. "The modest changes wc 
arc proposing reflect the comments 
we heard from more than 1 ,000 peo- 
ple at our public meetings across the 
State." 

The 1997 law provided stale 
money and technical help for creat- 
ing local plans. Minnesota Planning 
will coordinate this resistance and 
will provide state review of local 
plans, through a project called 
Common Ground. 

The law also created an 18-mcm- 
bcr advisory council lo study possi- 
ble improvements in the new frame- 
work. The council held 24 public 
meetings in 12 communities around 
the stale in fall 1997 lo gather com- 
ments and ideas. 



In "Public Review Draft: 
Community Based Planning 
Recommendations," the council 
proposes: 

• continuing its own role and 
adding members lo represent local 
government and northern 
Minnesota; 

• revising or clarifying some of 
the statewide goals for key areas 
such as conservation, economic 
development, transportation and 
housing; 

• adding a new goal to address 
property rights; 

• expanding Ihc pilot projects to 
better test and refine the planning 
process and the state review of local 
plans; 



• crcaling a resource center on 
local planning — coordinating 
[raining, materials and expertise 
from various sources. 

"Wc want to ensure that commu- 
nity-based planning works well for 
all communities throughout the 
state," said Marcia Farinacci, 
deputy director of Minnesota 
.Planning and advisory council. 
1 member. 

To read the report or learn more 
about community-based planning, 
view the Minnesota Planning web 
site at www.mnplanjlatc.mn.us, or 
call ihc Common Ground staff at 
612-296-6550. 



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LOCAL NUMBER ACCESS 




Northland Community Band raised nearly SI, 000 
toward its trip to the International Music Festival 
In the Opera House in Sydney, Australia, through 
the raffle of this queen size quilt created and 
donated by Barb Geer (pictured at left), a flutist 
in the band and owner of Grand Central Graphics 
at Middle River. Winner of the quilt was Marge 
Houtkooper of Clearbrook-Gonvick. Barb and her 



daughter Brlanna will be making the trip to 
Australia, as will Marge and her husband 
Richard. Band director Les Torgerson (pictured at 
right) expressed his appreciation to Northern 
State Bank and First National Bank for display- 
ing the quilt and selling tickets. About 45 people 
from this area are registered to make the trip to 
Australia June 29-JuIy 12. 



Tri-Valley council receives $180,000 grant 



Tri-Vallcy Opportunity Council. 
based in CronkMnn. has received u 
SI 80,000 gun! Irom the Olio 
Bremer Foundation. 

The SIHO.(XK) grant will be used 
to install insul.net) entrances on 
temporary htiusiny being used by 
families who Inst their tin rues in llie 
flood. 

The Ottii Bremer Foundation is a 
private charitable foundation estab- 
lished in 19+1 by Olio Bremer. lis 
giving is concentrated on programs 
thai benefit communities in 



Minnesota, North Dakota, and Foundation and employ 

northwestern Wisconsin served by Bremer First American banks, agen- 

Brcmcr Financial Corporation, cies and trusts, 
which is owned by ihc Oito Bremer 

Franklin parent advisory 
meet set January 20 

January meeting of the parent in ihc school's media center. All 

advisory group at Franklin middle parents of middle school students 

school in Tnicf River Falls will take arc encouraged to participate, 
place Tuesday. January 20, ai 7 p.m. 



19-year-old buys 
Rex Cafe in 
Middle River 

(Continued from Page I) 
qucnt the cafe as do tcsl drivers 
from Arctic Cat and Polaris. 

While the cafe was closed on 
New Year's day, there was plenty 
of activity going on. BaLinda was 
busy preparing a can of paint for 
the men s rent room. Long-lime 
friend, Krislic Larson, was paint- 
ing the frame of a mirror, and 
another friend and co-worker, 
Sadie Vcselka, 1 was painting the 
ladies' rest room. 

BaLinda laughingly commented 
thai now ihat she and her friends 
were old enough to do what they 
warned on New Year's Eve, they 
instead had rung in the New Year 
with her parents and then worked 
in llie cafe until 4 a.m. 

They enjoyed themselves, how- 
ever. At one point during the 
evening ihcy drove into Thief 
River Falls and enjoyed a pi/za. 
Even the work sounded like fun as 
BaLinda and her cohorts chuckled 
as ihey told of how when they 
removed the ceiling tiles and paint- 
ed them, they didn t mark or num- 
ber them. They had quite a time 
figuring out where the tiles went 
when it came time to put them 
back up. 

When asked if she had always 
been so level-headed and sensible, 
BaLinda's friends quickly nodded 
in assent. BaLinda simply said she 
haii always had a "work first* atti- 
tude— a rare quality for someone 
her ape. 

Still, this attractive young 
woman did not appear to be the 
"all work and no play" dull type. 
BaLinda's smile is radiant, her wil 
quick and her sparkling eyes hold a 
hint of mischicvousness. 

Age aside — with her strong 
work ethic and positive and sensi- 
ble attitude, she has what it takes to 
be successful at business. Good 
luck, BaLinda! 



Grandfather of snowmobiling is author of Breaking Trail 



(Continued from Page 1) 
much thought. They were built in 
parages wiih pans from a junkyard. 
Some worked, some didn't, but none 
had any practical sale value. Why 
was Davtd wasting his lime like 
this? Our factory built farm equip- 
ment...." 

Hettccn, who quickly came to 
love the snowmobile, tells of the 
struggle with a faction of his board 
of directors, who thought the 
machine to be a. rope around the 
company's neck, and who urged 
Hellccn lo slop such foolishness. In 
the book, he devotes a chapter lo his 
harrowing 21-day adventure on 
three Sno-Travclcrs from Bethel,. 
Alaska on ihc Bering Sea coast lo. 
Fairbanks, some 1,200 miles away_. 

The idea began to hold u certain 
fascination for me," Hellccn writes. 
"The more 1 thought about it, the 
more my blood raced. What an 
adventure— to a place I loved, to try 
something that might help the sput- 



tering snowmobile industry.. ..If we 
really could make the trip, it would 
prove lo the world that wc were not 
some rag-lag company building a 
goofy machine. It could move us 
ahead by years." 

It did; Hellccn estimates by a 
least five years. But he would not 
reap the benefits at Polaris, He'd had 
enough in-fighting, and several 
months later, after a number of odd 
jobs in Alaska, Hettccn opened up 
Arctic Enterprises in Thief River 
Falls, Minnesota. He did it in an old 
seed warehouse. Again, there would 
be struggles before success. 

"With no discretionary money, 
all of it going into the business, my 
famity moved into the seed build- 
ing.... We moved upstairs, where 
there were two rooms. I put up a 
divider and made them, three, then 
added a stove in the -small est one. 
They were cramped quarters, bui we 
lived between those concrete walls 
for 14 months. I was something wc 



had to do for the business." 

At Arctic, hellccn would build 
ihc first U.S. snowmobile with an 
engine in from. While testing that 
machine on Ruth Glacier in Alaska, 
he was marooned for four days,- 
nearly losing his life. 

,"By Thursday, we'd finished the 
corned' beef hash," he writes. 
"Hungry and with little sleep, our 
brains grew punchy and our bodies 
felt like empty husks. My stomach 
flipped upside down, empty and 
tired. Moreover, ihc bright sun and 
its reflection off the snow was burn- 
ing us up. The weather was what 
pilots call severe clear. Our faces 
lurncd red— it hurt miserably — and 
wc knew it'd only get worse." 

All in all. the book is about 
He Keen's persistence in the face of 
overwhelming criticism as he built 
Polaris and Arctic Cal. It's about tin- 
kering, designing and inventing. It's 
abui him making and losing more 
than SI million several times. It's 



'about him starting over at age 60, 
building a wheelchair company and 
then co-founding ASV, a firm con- 
structing all -terrain, rubber-tracked 
work machines and now one of the 
holiest companies on the stock mar- 
ket. 

lSucc ess comes from many dif- 
ferent places," Hettccn writes. "It 
1 comesjrom tenacity, it comes from 
perseverance, and believing in your- 
self. Those* ingredients are shown in 
every person who has achieved his 
dreams. Even though I once took an 
aptitude test that told me I wasn't 

food at anything, I didn't believe it. 
knew I was capable and didn't lis- 
ten to anyone telling me different." 
Breaking Trail, published by 
Focus Publishing in Bcrrudji, will be 
hardbound and priced at $24.95 
(S33.50 in Canada). Orders for the 
book also may be placed by calling 
1 -888-786-5866. Cost will be 
$24.95 plus $4.95 for shipping and 
handling. 



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Mustangs beat East Grand Forks g irls 48-33 

RLCC bench comes through 



Slrnng play ulf llic lie nth helped 
Kai l-ike County Central overcome 
tnul trouble Tuesday as ihc 
Mustangs beat Eiasi Grand Finks 46- 
.1') in a girls high school basketball 
game al Hummer. 

Top Ked Lake County Central 
scorer Angic Cticrvcstad picked up 
Mn tiuick fouls and sat out much of 
the lirsl half. Fouls also stowed 
Katie O'Neill. Hut Tricia Willeit, 
tirika Vcillcson and Ttacy Roslen all 
sieppcd in to Till the void for the 
Mustangs, who were playing for the 
first lime since Dec. 1H when they 
wrapped up a title-winning perfor- 
mance at the Northland Community 
and Technical College Invitational. 

"I was really pleased with our 



bench." said Red Lake County 
Cenir.il coach Rick Koivisto. "We 
had Mime kids who Mcppcd in and ' 
did a really nice job." 

Defense paved the way as Red 
l-ike County Central posted narrow 
quarter leads of 12-10, 23-20 and 
32-26. 

"We played really well on 
defense," noted Koivisto. 

"Offensively, it was typical of being 
olffor two weeks," 

Clicrvcstad, despite limited play- 
ing lime. Mill managed to score a 
team-high 12 points. Katie Rasch of 
the Green Wave led all scorers with 
17 points. 

Red Lake County Central shot 3H 
percent from the field (14/37) and 



went Ififiif 2'Jatlhc Irce throw line 
Fast Grand Forks shot only 27 per- 
cent from the Moor (I.V-IH) and 
made II of 20 ftec throws The 
Green W.iu- Finished wnh.a 2')-2S 
rebound advantage. The Mtisianp 
turned the hall over 2 1 times. 

It was the sixth win in nine starts 
for the Mustangs. 

fearing 

I 2 3 4 T 

East Gran* Forks, 10 10 G 13 33 

RICC 12 11 9 14 40 

EOF ■ Kails naseti 17. Kaloy (JuJgo fl, 
Jill Etfhausor S. Em.ly Bydal 5, Dnru«lto 
Malonoy 4. 

RLCC - Erika Votlloian 2, Jonni 
Morlnvlllo 1, Katio O'Neill 5. Gylvi.i 
Hlkjornan B. Tricia Willoll 3. Franco* 
Hilgoman 0. Tracy Roslen G, Angio 
Chorvostad 12. 



Gators edge Warroad 51 -50 



Tiffany Hagen's free throw with 
three seconds left lifted the Badger/ 
Grccnbush-Middle River girls high 
.school basketball past Warroad 51- 
50 Tuesday. 

Dadger/Grcenbush-Middlc River 
trailed 15-13 at the end of the first 
quarter, went ahead 28-25 at half- 
time and had a 38-32 third quarter 
lead. 

Down three with two minutes to 

El ay. Badgcr/Greenbush-Middle 
ivcT battled back, wrestling the 
lead away from Warroad with a free 
throw by Hagcn and a three-point 
play hy Melissa Smith lhal made it 
50-48. Wanoad's Lisa Fry answered 
with a pair of free throws for a tic, 
and the Gators held (he ball for a 
final shot. 

Hagen look the ball lo the basket 
on a drive and drew a foul with 
three seconds on the clock. She 
missed the first free throw throw, 



Pioneers start 1-5 
in nonconference 
basketball games 



hut hit the second for the win. 

"That was a good win," said 
Badgcr/Grecnbush-Middlc River 
coach Tom Ncibaucr. "They 
•fWarroad) have a good team. 
They've got a lot of good athletes. 
and they're big." 

Hagen finished wiih 15 points, 
Slcfanic Sparhy had 14 and Smith 
had 12 for the Gators, who were 
playing for the first time since Dee. 
18. Fry and Jessica Johnson had 16 
points apiece for Warroad. while 
Heather Evans netted 11. 

Badgcr/Grecnbush-Middlc River 
shot 37 percent from the field 
(19/52) and 50 pcrccni'at the free 
throw line (11/22). Warroad. 6-for- 
12 at the free throw line, stayed 
closed by going 6-for-7 on 3-point 
ai tempts. 

"Those 3-poinlers were killing 
us," said Ncibaucr. "We'd lake a 
lead, and they would hit the three. 



And it was their bigger kids who 
were hilling them." 

Defensive efforts turned in by 
Hagen, Tina Sikorski and Mcrn 
Reese at the guard positions played 
a key role in trie Badgcr/Grecnbush- 
Middlc River win, explained 
Ncibaucr. "Our guard play was the 
difference," he said. "They came up 
with some big steals lhal led lo bas- 
kets." 

Hagen and Smith combined for 
all 13 Badge r/Grccnhush- Middle 
River fourth quarter points as the 
Gators improved lo 7-2. 

1 2 3 4 T 

B/Q-MkWlO Rlvoi 13 IS 10 13 51 

Warroad 15 10 7 10 SO 

B/O'MR ■ Menl Rooso 2. Stolonlo 
Spartjy 14, Tiffany Hagon 15, Kara Supor2, 
Tina SlkortU 2. Mollaoa Smlin 12. Kolioy 
Fotdoti 4. 

' Warroad • Tiftany Ettling 3. Holly Pnhlon 
4, Hoathor Evans 11, Joisica Johnson 10, 
UiaFry 10. 



of Minot Stale Univcrsiiy- 
Bottincau with 30 seconds lo go 
lhal was followed by a Northland 
Community and Technical College 
turnover produced a 68-64 men's 
basketball victory for the visiting 
Lumberjacks Tuesday. 

It was (he final nonconference 
tune-up for the Pioneers, who were 
reluming from a 2 l/2 : week holiday 
break. Northland look a 1-5 record 
into the opening weekend of ihc 
1997-98 Minnesota Community 
College Conference schedule that 
included Northern Division gomes 
at Mcsabi Friday night and at 
Vermilion Saturday afternoon. 

"We lost a tough game, and those 
hurt." said Northland coach Ted 
Kruc after the loss to Boilincau - 
the Pioneers' first game since Dec. 
1 3. "But I was really happy with Ihc 
way we played. If wc play like that, 
we II win some games this year." 

Northland trailed 36-33 at half- 
time. They stayed close, though, 
and had a 64-63 lead before 
Dawson hit from long range. A 
time-out call lo set up a final play 
went awry when the Pioneers lost 
the in-bounds pass. Two Boilincau 
free throws then wrapped it up. 

"Offensively wc were a little 
rusty." admitted Krizc. "but wc 
played a pretty decent defensive 
game." 

■ Dwight Goodwin scored a game- 
high 21 points for the Pioneers. 

Northland was 24-for-68 from 
the field (35 percent) and 13-for-20 
at the free throw line. Bottineau 
went 24-for-63 from the floor (38 
percent and !4-for-28 at the line. 
The Lumberjacks, who beat the 
Pioneers 86-65 at Bottineau Dec. 9, 
finished with a 49-46 rebound edge 
and topped the turnover charts 10-4. 

Heading into the weekend 
games, Central Lakes and Mcsabi 
were both 1-0 in the Northern 
Division, with Vermilion sitting ot 
1-1, while Hibbing and Rainy River 
were both 0-1. Fergus Falls and 
Northland were opening their 
MCCC schedule by swapping 
Friday- Saturday dates with the 
Ironmcn and Norsemen. Overall, 
the start of the week showed Fergus 
Falls at 6-0, Vermilion 7-2. Central 
Lakes and Mcsabi 6-4, Hibbing 3-5, 
Rainy River 2-6, and Northland 1- 
4. 



MSU-B - Brandon Horti 2, Koonan 
Korudiak 7. Randy Deptoioi □. Kovtn SI. 
Clair 0. Bon Tonooson fl, Gary Dawion 10. 
Shawn KoUot D. Chrti EdwaiJa 7. Mark 
Thompion 10. 

Northland - Nle Thompson 5, Owtght 
Goodwin 21, Josh Whlttock 11, MoMn 
Whltnoy Jr. 4, Joromy Larson 0, Soan 
Qnjjgoman 5, ChakaAU 0. 

TRF freshman boys 
split against Central 

Nate Sorvig scored 24 points and 
Ben Myers had 15 as the Thier 
River Falls boys freshman A high 
school basketball learn improved its 
record to 5-1 Tuesday with a 53-30 
win over Grand Forks Central. 

Thief River Falls B team fell lo 
0-3 with a 44-20 loss. Jay Rislov 
led the B learn in scoring with 7 



Balance lifts NCTC 
by Bottineau 75-53 



Balanced scoring was featured as 
the Northland Community and 
Technical College women's basket- 
ball team resumed play after a holi- 
day break with a 75-53 Tuesday win 
over Minot State University- 
Bottineau. 

The Pioneers' spread -the -wealth 
attack included Naomi Wilcbski 
with 15 points, Jenny Johnson 13, 
Jamckka Lucas and Paula Hovda 12 
each, and Darlcnc Nelson 11. 

Up 37-30 nt intermission. 
Northland opened the second half 
with a 15-2 run as they climbed 
above .500 for the first time this 
season at 4-3 heading into their 
1997-98 Minnesota Community 
College Conference Northern 
Division-opening weekend that 
included a Friday night game at 
Mcsabi and a Saturday afternoon 
contest at Vermilion. 

"Coming off the long break, wc 
were a little rusty in the first half," 
acknowledged Northland <oach 
Rick Nikunen. The second half wc 
settled down and executed well." 

Fifteen of the Pioneers' 17 



turnovers came in the first half. 
They were ll-for-17 at the free 
throw line and finished wiih a 43-32 
rebound edge. 

It was the second Northland win 
in the homc-and-home scries this 
season, with the Pioneers winning 
64-44 at Bottineau Dec. 9. 

The visiting Lumberjacks, who 
had a quiet 2-for-6 free throw game, 
were led by Kelly Warren with 12 
points. 

Coming of! the holiday break, 
Northern Division nonconference 
records included Fergus Falls at 3- 1 , 
Vermilion 4-4, Northland 3-3, 
Central Lakes and Mcsabi 2-5. 
Itasca 1-4, Hibbing and Rainy River 



0-6. 



Scoring 



MSU-B - Liu Johnson S, Parti Jo Fuchs 
11. Karla Chrlstenum 11. Hoathor Anson 4, 
Boeky KjolboMon 2. Kolh/ Wairon 12. 
Choryt Folrlng 8. 

Northland - Jamakka Lucas 12. Pnuta 
Hovda 12, Jonny Johnson 13, Naomi 
Wik)baW1S. Dartono Nolson H.Mockomlo- 
Matwltz e, Tammy NonVy 6. 



MCC boys post win 
over Grygla-Gatzke 



A 19-point, 12-rc bound perfor- 
mance by Jon Donorski sparked 
Marshall County Central post 
Grygla-Gatzke 76-60 Tuesday in 
boys high school basketball at 
Newfoldcn. 

Donarski had plenty of offensive 
support from teammates Greg 
Ucland with IS points, Caleb 
Hollhuscn with 15 and Malt Nelson 
13 as the Nordics, coming off a run- 
ner-up finish in Ihc Thief River 
Falls Russ Smith Northwest 
Holiday Classic, improved to .7-3. 
And they did it without starting 
guard Garrett Magncr, who missed 
the game because of illness. 

"One of our strengths is that 
we've got three kids who can play 
the No. 1 guard." explained 
Marshall County Central head 
coach Ron Ueland, "but Ganctt is 
kind of the inspirational leader. Wc 
were a little concerned how the oth- 
ers would handle it without him in 
there." 

It took the Nordics a few minutes 
to adjust as they fell behind 1 6- 14 at 
ihc close of the first quarter before 
(joinjj ahead 32-29 at halftimc, then 
opening up a 53-42 third quarter 
advantage, 

"Wc shot free throws really well 
for a stretch," noted Ucland. "Wc 
just slowly built on the lead." 

Alex Anderson scored 18 points, 
Andrew Sundbcrg 16 and Philip 
Bratcng 13 for Grygla-Gatzke. 

It was Ihc fifth straight setback 
for the Eagles, who had lost a pair 
of overtime games, dropped a one- 
point decision and twice fell by 
three-point margins. 

"We didn't play that bud a ball 
game," offered Grygla-Gatzke 
coach Vcrn Johnson. "They 
(Nordics) played really well, u 
seemed like every lime wc made a 



run at them, they answered." 

Marshall County Central was 26- 
for-63 from the field (41 percent) 
and I6-for-23 at the free throw line. 
Grygla-Gatzke struggled with 21- 
for-6I shooting from the floor (34 

Screen!) to go along wiih a 13-for- 
6 free throw night. The Nordics 
had a 45-33 rebound advantage to 
make up for a 14-8 high figure in 
the turnover department. 
Startup 

1 2 3 A T . 

Giygta-OaUko ifl 13 13 IS go 

MCC 14 10 21 23 76 

Q.Q.- Aim Anderson 10, AntJrow 

Sundborg 10, Joddah Hollo O, Carroll 

Anderson 4, Philip Bralong 13. 

MCC • Jon Donarski IE), Colob 

Holthuson 15, Man Nolion 13, Dayton 

Eliot I) 1, Qrog Unland 15. Crnlg 

Wawnynlak 5. David Wilcox S. 

— ITRFSPORTSl — 

Saturday, Jan. 10 

■ Baskoibail - NCTC woman at 
VormUon. 1 p.m.; NCTC mon nl Vormilton. 3 
p.m.: LHS girts vs. Bomid|l (A/8), 0/7:30 p.m. 

■ Wro oiling - LHS at Fomlo-Be-Hwro. 
Plno-lo-Pralrto Invitational, 11 a.m. 

TUoadny, Jan. 13 

■ Hockay - LHS vs. Warroad (A/B), 5:15/ 
7:30 p.m. 

■ Baskoibail - LHS boys at Moortwnd 
(A/D), 5:45/7:30 p.m.; LHS QlrlB vs. Dotroil 
Lakes (A/0). 0/7:30 p.m. 

Wodnoaday. Jan. 14 

■ Basketball • NCTC mon at UNDLaka 
Region, 7:30 p.m. 

Thursday, Jan. 15 

■ Basketball - LHS boys ot Ciookston 

(A/B). 0/7 M p.m. 

Friday, Jan. IS 

■ Swimming ■ LHS boys at Crookslon 
Invitational, 5 p.m. 

■ Baskoibail -NCTC womon vs. Hibbing. 
p.m.; LHS plrti vs. Fergus Falls (A/B). 
0/7:30 p.m.: NCTC man vs. Hibbing. O p.m. 

Saturday, Jan. 17 

■ NCTC womon vs. Ramy River. 1 p.m.: 
NCTC mon vs. Ramy River, 3 p.m. 

■ Hockoy ■ LHS ot Roseau (A/B). 
5:15/7:30 p.m. 




Josh Stinson of the Prowlers struggled in an effort to got out from 
underneath David Kurz of the Falcons during their 152-pound 
match in Thursday's Thief Rivor Foils vs. Fortilo-Beltrami high 
school wrestling meet. Stinson rallied for a 9-7 overtime win, The 
Falcons won the match 54-20. 

TRF forfeits add up 
vs. Fertile-Beltrami 

■ Falcons win wrestling dual 



On the mat, the two teams split. 
But on the scoreboard. Fcrtilc- 
Bcllrami was ah easy 54-20 winner 
over host Thief River Falls 
Thursday in a high school wrestling 
dual that was made lopsided by the 
shorthanded Prowlers' five open 
weights. 

The Falcons did give six points 
back on a double-forfeit at 145 
pounds, but that still made far a 24- 
point difference on the score sheet. 

Thief River Falls coach John 
Betyea cringed at the thought of 
giving away that many points. "We 
should never have five open 
weights," he said. "Wc really have 
two, but we've got some injuries and 
illness that look some kids out of the 
line-up. 

In the eight matches that did take 
place, Thief River Falls won the 
first four encounters with eighth 
graders Beau Abrahamson (103) 
Jon Swanson (135) and Philip 
Hcrmanson (140), plus senior Josh 
Stinson at 152 - to pull within 30-20 
on the scoreboard. 

But Fcnilc-Bcltrami won the last 
four - all by pins - to pull away. 

"First half of the match was going 
pretty welt." acknowledged Bclycu. 
''My younger kids arc improving. 



Bui Fertile is louf-h in Ihc upper 
weights. I was hoping lo do a little 
better than wc did. but I knew they 
would be tough." 

Stinson's 9-7 overtime decision 
over David Kurz was Ihc most 
entertaining match of the night. 
Stinson was ahead 6-5 after two 
periods, but needed to break away 
for an escape with 13 seconds left in 
regulation time to gain a 7-7 lie. 
Fifty seconds into overtime he 
ended the match with a takedown. 

"That was a crowd-pleascr," 
noted Betyea. "If I could, I'd have 
one of those every night. Those are 
the kind of matches that bring the 
people back." 

The loss dropped the Prowlers' 
record to 0-5. 

Fortllo-Boltrnml54,TnF20 

103 - Boau Abiahomson (TRF) del. Gnrth 
Poiorson g-4: 112 - Josh Awondor (F-B) by 
lortoii: 118 • Ene LindOorg [F-B) By forfeit; 
12S ■ Garrott Peterson (F-8) by forfeit; 130 - 
Kylo Stromstad (F-B) by lortelt; 135 - Jon 
Swanson (TRF) dot. Tyiol Smith 10-1; 140 ■ 
Phlto Hormanson (TRF) dot. Tony Page FM: 
I4S': {foobfe-lorfW:'15I - Josh Stinson 
(TRF) dol. David Kura 0-7 (ot): ISO - Cody ' 
Ranz (F-B) pinned Jeremy Housko 4:40: 171 
- Luko Rude (F-B) pinned Bob Slnrtz. 3. OS; 
IBB - Ryan Biodon (F-B) pinned Cody 
Copeau 1 27; hwy - Mart Horgoshlmor (F-B) 
pinnod Robert Spry 3:20, 



Goodridge drops 
56-54 decision to 
Kittson Co. North 

Goodridge boys kicked off the 
I'WH portion of their IW-98 high 
school basketball season the same 
way they played most of the early- 
season games - wiih a down-lo-lhc- 
wire finish. This lime ihc Huskies 
came out on the short end of a'56- 
54 Monday contest against Kittson 
County North. 

Goodridge started strong, leading 
hy as many as 14 points early. The 
Huskies were up 33-27 al halftimc. 
hut fell behind 41-39 in the third 
quarter. It stayed close down the 
stretch, with the Cougars' Jeremy 
Hostrup hitting a 14-footcr with 
nine seconds left to put his team 
ahead 55-54. 

The Huskies turned it over on the 
ensuing possession, and a Kittson 
County North free throw finished 
the scoring. 

"Wc fell apart defensively in the 
second half.' explained Goodridge 
coach Eric Mic kelson. "And we 
turned the hall over loo many 
times." 

Effectively working the ball 
inside. Goodridge shot a head-turn- 
ing 71 percent Jrom the field lo go 
along with I0-for-15 free throw 
shooting and a 25-17 rebound 
advantage. But 18 turnovers limited 
the Huskies to just 31 shots (they 
made 22). 

Kitlson Counly North percent- 
ages were much lower, but Ihc 
Cougars had more attempts - 21- 
for-50 from the floor (42 percent) 
and !2-for-21 at the line. They 
lumed it over 13 limes. 

Hostrup and Kris Hokanson 
scored 18 points each for the 
Cougars. The Huskies' Jim Schecf 
led all scorers with 22 points, while 
Ben Hanson had 19. 

1 2 3 4 T 

Goodndge 20 13 1S 54 

Kittson Co North IS 12 14 15 50 

Goodridge - Bon Hanson 10. Jareo 
Eldettwa 0, Jim School 22. Josh Gallagher 
4, Chad Johnson 1. 



Gators handle Nordics 



Tiffany Hngcn scored 16 points, 
while Missy Smith cumc up with a 
14-point, ll-rcbound performance 
to lead Badgcr/Grecnbush-Middlc 
River to a 57-29 Thursday night 
girls high school basketball win 
over Marshall County Central. 

Trie Gators jumped out to a 14-4 
first quarter lead and had a 33-10 
"halftimc cushion. It was. 43-21 
through three quarters. 

"Wc played a good first half." 
reported Badgcr/Grecnbush-Middlc 
River coach . Tom Neibauer. 
"Defensively wc shut them down, 
and we played a good floor game (3 
firsl half turnovers). Wc look the 
press off and went to a zone in the 
second half." 

The result put the Gators at 8-2 
for the year and dropped ihc visiting 
Nordics to 1-8. 

Badgcr/Grecnbush-Middlc River 
was a busy 25-for-67 from the field 
(37 percent) and 7-for-l2 al Ihc free 
throw line, where Marshall County 
Central went 4-for-l2. The Nordics 
were just ll-for-45 from the field 
(24 percent). 

"they put a lot of pressure on us 
in the first half," noted Marshall 
Counly Central coach Alice Dahl, 
whose team has struggled with 
turnover problems much of the year. 

The Nordics did not have a dou- 



ble figure scorer. Nine rebounds by 
Mandi Blawat was one of ihc lop 
Marshall Counly Central efforts of 
the night. 

Scoring 

1 2 3 4 T 

MCC 4 II 8 20 

0'G-Mlddto Rivor 14 19 10 14 57 

MCC - Holly Augusiino 1, ChiKOIna 
Hngon 4, Torn Davidson 2, Krlitl Kilon 7, 
Emfy Kragnoss 2, Mikl Walorworth 0. Mandl 
Biawnl 4. Laura Myhror 3, 

B/G-MR - MoW Rooso 1, Torn Sehonkoy 
2, Slolanio Sparby 4, Kara Kutnia 4, Kara 
Super 2, Tinn Sikorski 2. Missy Smith 14. 
Dail Sovdo 4, Kolsoy Foldosi 0. Titlany 
Hogon 10. 

TRF wrestlers meet 
Fertile-Beltrami JV 

Fertilc-Behrami won seven of 
Ihc II matches against Thier River 
Falls Thursday in junior varsity 
high school wrestling 

Match Roiulla 
flryco Olson (F-B) pinnod Ty Lahren 
2:53; Jason Bakko (F-B) pinned Miko Stnrtl 
1:!0; Craig Kollm (F-B) pinnod Joromy Uan 
1 :35; Joromy Anderson (TRF) pinnod Justin 
Larson 2:54: Sholdon Ek (F-B) del. Carson . 
Comttock 0-3; Nnlo Lain on (TRF) pinnod 
Trhvis Sviois 2:12; Bryeo Olson (F-B) : 
pinnod Mike Strut* :3«: Jason Bakko (F-B) 
pinned Ty Lnhron 2:07: Miko Hoigoshimor 
(F-B) pinned Joromy Llan 4:17; Colt 
Boineron (TRF) dol. Juslm Larson 2-1; Maik 
Cnappollo (TRF) pinnod Crolg Koilin 4:24. 



RLCC rally falls short 
in loss to Mahnomen 



Red Lake Counly Centra! 

chopped a 22-point third quarter 
deficit to an eight-point spread in 
the fourth quarter, bui the Mustangs 
couldn't complete the comeback, 
losing a 61-48 boys high school 
basketball match-up at Oklec. 

Mahnomen shot 61 percent from 
Ihc field en route to a 34- 18 halftimc 
advantage and carried a 42-31 lead 
into ihc final quarter. The winners 
wound up with a 50 percent 21-for- 
42 shooting night from the field for 
the night. 

"Mahnomen played really well. 
said Red Lake Counly Central 
coach Chris McLean. "They came 
out and shot the ball really well in 
the first half. I wasn't displeased 
wiih our defense; they were just hit- 
ting their shots. Wc gol a lot of good 
. shots, loo. bui the ball just wouldn't 



go in for us." 

The Mustangs shot only 35 per- 
cent from the floor and had a auiei 
2-for-4 night at the free throw line, 
where Matinomcn was I2-for-16. 

Dan Pierce of Mahnomen and 
Mark Lorcnson of Red Lake County 
Central shared game-high scoring 
honors wiih 19 points each. 

It was Ihc first outing since Dec. 
19 for Ihc Mustangs. wTio fell lo 3- 



6. 


■ Selurday. Jon. 17- boys baskoibail vs. 








Marshall County Control 


1 2 3 4 T 


■ Monday, Jan. 12 - girts basketball vs. 


Mnhnomen 13 15 8 10 01 


Goodrtdgo/G rygla-Qatik o . 


RLCC '2 O 13 17 48 


■ Tuesday, Jan. 13- boys boskOtbait vs 


Mahnomen - Grog Ltobl 5. Ben 


Badger/GioonbusnMiOdle River. 


Qaumann 6, Nathan Dovenos 4. Josh 


■ Thursday. Jan, 15 - girts baskoioall el 


Thorpe 10. Scott Foiguson 4. Dan Pioree 






■ Friday. Jan. 10 ■ boys bajkolball vs 


RLCC - David Fo< 5. Maik Loronson ID. 




Nick W.ildal G, Mntl B|ert.lio 10. Mall HruBy 


■ Saturday. Jon. 17 - g.rls bajkolball al 


4. Danny Payment 4. 


SlophenArgyle. 



GALAXYI 

StiQffllMES 

FBI. a SAT. 7 & 9 PJUL; SUN. -THURS. S PJA 

TUES. flARCA/JVWGifT 

DISNEY'S 

FLUBBER 

THE ABSENT MINDED PROFESSOR 

ROBIN 
WILLIAMS 

E3\... 

GALAXYII 

SHOWT1MES 
FrU 4 SAT. 7 1 9 Pit; SUN. -THWS. 8 PJU. 
TUES. BARGAIN NIGHT 
A FILM BY WES CRAVEN 

David AlOUEIIE PSStEUT 
NmCuintu I *>■<* 

CouiitHtT Cm 

SUiLH MlCHllIJ 

Gtiui 



■«*WI««lllli«lM 



r TIUP TO SHOOTING STAR CASINO 
EVERY THURSDAY - PAY $18 - GET S25 BACK 
TVip Leaves at 9 a.m. 

JAN. 26th k 27th 

WINNIPEG GAMING OVERNIGHT 

PAY S1J0 - GET $185 BACK CANADIAN COIN 

Includes Room, Meals, & Much More! 



UPCOMING BUS TOURS 



MAKE YOUR PLANS NOW FOR 1998! 

FEB: FESTIVAL de VOYAGER in WINNIPEG 

■1 Davs/1 Night 
MAR: BKANSON FAN FESTIVAL 

(i Days/5 NighLs 
MAY; WINNIPEG GAMING TOUR 

4 Dayj/3 Nights 



Rosa Homstad 0. Adam Wilobskl 4. Miko 
Peterson 1, Jeromy Hoslrup 1B. Conrad 
Olsonowski 

Football Coaches 
Clinic is slated at 
Northland Jan. 24 

List of guest speakers is in place 
for the I Sin annual football coaches 
clinic, scheduled to be held 
Saturday, Jan. 24, at Northland 
Community and Technical College 
in Thief River Foils, 

Dwight Lundecn, head coach al 
Becker High School, who also 
serves on the Minnesota State High 
School League Board of Directors, 
will be the feature speaker. 

Others scheduled to address the 
group include high school coaches 
Sieve Willman. Badgcr/Grecnbush- 
Middlc River: Ron Johnson. 
Clearbrook-Gonvick; John Oil, 
Robbinsdalc Armstrong; Dave 
Hcnnings. East Grand Forks; Russ 
Hcnncgar, Moorhcad; Mark 
Kroulik, Stephen-Argylc; Sieve 
Radniccki, Norman County East; 
Jeff Mumm. Thief River Falls; and 
members of the Detroit Lakes staff, 
In addition, Don Willoughby and 
Terry WiscuV from -the Northland 
staff will have prcscnia lions. 

Registration material is available 
at Northland. Cost of the clinic is 
S 1 5 for an individual coach, or S50 
for an eniirc coaching siaff. if paid 
by Jan. 15. The individual cost will 
be $30 after Jan. 15. 

For additional information, or for 
registration material, contact clinic 
coordinator Rick Nelson at 218- 
681-0725. 

— HAREASFORTCl — 

Rod Lako county Contra! 

■ Tuesday, Jan. 13 ■ girls basketball al 
Boodridge/Giyoto -Gatiko. 

■ Thursday, Jan. IS - glrla baskoibail vs. 
Fosston (at Oklee). 

■ Friday, Jan. 10 - boya basketball al 
Cloarbrook-Gonviek. ' 

Goodridge 

■ Tuesday. Jan. 13 • boya baskotbail al 
Tri-County, 

■ Friday. Jon, 10 - boys basketball vs. 
Rod lake Foils. 

■ Saturday. Jon, 17 - boys basketball vs, 
Warron-Atverado-Oslo (at NCTC). 

Grygla-Gatzke 

■ Saturday. Jan. to ■ boys baskoibail at 
Rod Lake Falls. 

■ Tuesday, Jan. 13 ■ boys baskoibail at 
Wnrtoad. 

■ Saturday, Jen. 17 ■ boys baskoibail at 
Badgor/Groenbush-Mtddlo River 

G oodrl dga/G ry gla -Gatiko 

■ Monday, Jan. 12 - girts basketball at 
Marshall County Central. 

■ Tuesday. Jan. 13 - girts baskoibail vs. 
Rod Lnko County Control (al Grygta). 

■ Thursday, Jon. 15 ■ girts basketball at 
Warroad. 

Badse'r/Greenbuib-Mlddle Rivor 

■ Monday. Jan. 12 ■ girts basketball vs. 
Kittson County North. 

■ Tuesday. Jan. 13 - boys baskoibail at 
Marshall County Central. 

H Thursday. Jan. 15 • girls boskoibon at 
Warron-Arvarado-Osio. 

■ Friday, Jan. 10 - boys basketball vs. 




SLOTS • BLACKJACK 
FINE DINING 

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK! 



DAILY SPECIALS 



-Prima Rib Kid Wtlloy* Spidsli 
„B/noo - 1:00 ■ ».f» PM. 



„Sr. ClUnn Day - 8.-30 A.U. ■ 2.-00 PM 



Fnc Video Pokor Toumammnt 7:00 PM. 
.-Vow Fin t Spin It On Oil 



TOURSDAVC.. 
FRIDAY 



_Ste»Jr Spocfete And 



Community Appreciation Day* 
,,.., ,'"r*niiM« Pay Jackpots 



WdnlghttoaOQAM. 
„Prlma Rib and Walhya Spadala 



Hourly DnmtnQ* To TTw Money Machine 4tf0 PM. - USdnlght 



COMMUNITY 

APPRECIATION 

THURSDAY 

JANUARY 15™ 

6:MP.M.-10:0ORM. 

winger, er5kine 
and Mcintosh 



ForTMrf B«r Fjlls Staltle Semee To Tke &5tn« -Ijll CASIHO EirKE55 At (218) 6ai-ra5S „..„„„„„ 
ftrB.sT».rlnl»mU«iftrTtaMn)OutsB.H<TttfB!er Fl n, to M 5»rERHI6BWAYT(lUKCfelH0CI)*CH«l-B(M-56Mll6 



CASIII0 HOURS • T«(Sd.iy8.'30AM.-IOOA.M. I 
(218)681-4062 • 1-800-881-0712 -t 




*S^' "'I ^itz<iii(ilV- (>orf } 'm 



Wc would liVr In Hunk everyone lor Ihe many jcIs ol kindncn 
v*c received during; thiv trying lime. Petrupt you slopped by lo 
viiil, telephoned or scnl i Idler lo Belly durinj; her illncu. 
Perhaps you hroui;rii over food, sent i lovely c*rrj, or sat qui- 
clly in i chjir, Pethjp* you <cnl (lowers or t luncul spray. If 
so wc saw il Ihere. Perhaps you spoke the kindest words. As 
any friend tould say, Perhaps you were no) there at all, lust 
thought of us lhat day. Whalcver you did lo comfort Betty or 
console our hearts, We thank you so much whalcver Ihc pail. 



-_£ 



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The Bright LIghti 

Sunbox Light Therapy 

Country Health 

HOME MEDICAL EQUIPMENT SERVICES 




I'llRC 12 



Saturday, January 1(1, 1998 



Saturday, January 10, 1998 



(210)681-8214 
1-800-649.&878 



322 UBfoo Avo N . TMtot Ftoo. Foils. MN 



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HEADACHES? FREE REPORT REVEALS AN 
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SERVICE IS OUR BUSINESS 



♦ Starter, Generator ♦ Fan & Blower 
& Alternator Repair Motors 

♦ Car Service Work ♦ Brake Work 

♦ Tune Up ♦ Air Conditioning 



BILL'S SERVICE 



681-8207 

30S Knight Av*. North 
- - Thtol River Falla 



IMPORTANT NOTICE TO 
LES'S SANITATION CUSTOMERS 

In 1 997, Iho Minnesota Legislature eliminated the SCORE 
tax (6.5% tax on Municipal Solid Wasto Sarvico) and the solid 
waste generator assessment ($2.00 per household, 60 cents 
per cubic yard of capacity) and combined them into one solid 
waste management tax that begins January 1 , 1998. This sub- 
stitute tax pays for programs currently funded by the two dif- 
ferent, state feos. Both Senator LeBoy Stumpf end 
Representative Mike Ftnseth voted yes on this tax- 
Under the new system: • Residential waste generators pay 
a 9.75% tax on the sales price for mixed municipal solid waste 
management services. ■ Commercial waste generators pay a 
17% tax on the sales price for waste management services. . 
-For questions' related lo programs funded by the new 
Minnesota solid waste management tax, call the Minnesota 
Offlco of Environmental Assistance (OEAJ at 612-215-0206 or 
800-657-3843. 



CELLULARONE® 

Is On The Move... 



You Can Enjoy A Motorola 
Flip Phone Free When Yon 
Sign dp For An. Annual 
Contract And Also 
Receive In-Coming Calls 
FREE For 6 Months/3,000 
Minutes. 

Check Out Our New 
Location And Visit With 
Our Communications 
Representatives 



Renee SchllTor Tkishla Gndmnndson 

Supervalu Hwy. 59 South 

Thief River Falls, MN 




When asked to 
wisely. Choose 



decide, choose 
Dakota Clinic 



as your primary 

healthcare 

provider. 





When it's time to choose a participating healthcare provider, choose Dakota Clinic You can rely on their 
network of specialists - if you need a surgeon, an obstetrician or a good family doctor, you'll know there 
are skilled providers accessible to care for you and your family. Wellness and illness care within one 
convenient network - that's Dakota Clinic's idea of complete healthcare! 

For information on managed care services, call Toll Free I -800-437-4054 extension #8592 or the Dakota 

Clinic nearest you. 



Cossclton 
■t-17-i-Wi 
lames I own 

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DAKOTA CLINIC 

Managing Vour Healthcare Today & Tomorrow 

Difcou Clinic. Lid. • 1 702 South 'University Drive. Fargo - 701 -2B0-J30O 
TOLL FREE 800^37-4054 



Fosston 

■135-1212 

Frmee 

33-1-7205/1 -HOO-22.1- «WH 

" Lake Pork 

ITS-VXi M -HOO-23-1-*WK» 

Meruhfja 

Soi-IBI 

Park Rapids 

7J2-3J2 r . 

Thief River Falls 

(jHI-17^7/I-H0O-'iW-.ill» - 

Walker 

M7-'M« 



Second period goals 
carry Pirates by TRF 

' 'Ilircc tccond period giiali carried 
CriHikstnnjpast visiting Thief River 
Kills 4-2 Thursday in high school 
hotkey. 

An Eric Rouland goal with juM 
](> seconds left in the first period 
pulled Thief River Falls into a 1-1 
tic alter Crtwksion's Andy Fee had 
opened the scoring, but the Pirates 
.scored in the first and final minute 
of ihe second period lo take charge 
of the scoreboard. 

Ryan Kleven scored just 45 sec- 
onds into the second period. Chris 
Myrold found the net at 5:14 and 
Joe Curhin made it a three-goal 
margin at 14:29. 

The Prowlers' Treavor Peterson 
scored the only goal of ihc third 
period. 

"Wc played well in the first and 
third periods, but we didn't show up 
for the second Lprtiod." said Thief 

fj{t'*p I'tillc f-nlirh ^i-nlt llf-rulrinrl 



NORTHERN WATCH 



Page 13 



minder Joe Reese had a .13-s.tvc 
night, the Prowlers still bad i rouble 
pulling their shots on net. pointed 
out iicrgland. 

The loss dropped the Prowlers lo 
2-10. They will host Warroad 
Tuesday. 

Scoring 
Flret parted - Crooktton. Andy Foo Mm 

Cofbln-Mata Yooao'1. 050: TRF (Eiic 
Roulnnd (Adam Nordin-Kylo Andorson). 






14* 

S«cond p«rlc 

Kloven (Yeagor-Corbln), .45, Crookston, 
Chili Myroid (Todd ChantHm). 114. 
Crookston. Cart>in|MyroldFeo). 1423. 

Third period . TRF, Trontt* PatorDOn 
[Andononj.aOO, 

Goalie **ve«- TRF- MJioDowara 2-11- 
0-22: Crookston. Jo* Roaje 1G-B-1S-13 



River Falls coach Scott Iicrgland. 
"Wc didn't do the things wc needed 
to do to win the hockey game." 

Thief River Falls goalie Mike 
Dowers stopped 22 shots, with half 
of those saves coming'in the second 
period. Although Crooksion net- 



TRF hockey JV wins 
2-1 overtime contest 

Dusty Mclby scored both Thief 
River Falls goals Thursday in a 2- 1 
junior varsity high school hockey 
win over Crookston that went into 



O'Neill leads RLCC 
to win over Eagles 



Katie O'Neill scored 23 points 
and had .8 steals Thursday to lead 
Red Lake County Central to a 62-42 
girls high school basketball win 
over East Grand Forks Sacred 
Heart. 

Jcnni Morinvillc scored all 14 of 
her points in the first half in helping 
put the visiting Mustangs up 34-21 



The two teams played to a 14-14 
first quarter tic, but a 10-0 Red Lake 
County Central run midway through 
the second quarter broke it open. 
The Mustangs led 47-29 at the end 
of the third quarter. 

Red Lake County Central center 
Angie Chervcstnd, a 6-0 senior, had 
a single-digit scoring game for the 
first time since her sophomore sea- 
son, but she complemented her 9 
points with 10 rebounds as the 
Mustangs beat the Eagles on the 
boards 33-18. 

. The winners were 27-for-65 from 
the field (42pcrceni)and7-foM2 at 
Ihc free throw line. Sacred Heart 
struggled with 14-for-47 shooting 



from the field (30 percent), bul did 
have a perfect 10- for- 10 game at the 
line. They also had more turnovers, 
27-21. 
Red Lake County Central is 7-3, 

1 2 3 4 T 

RLCC 14 20 13 15 62 

EOF Seerod Moan 14 7 a 13 42 

RLCC • Enku Votlloson 2. Hoothor 
Sehielon 4, Jonnl Morlnvillo 14, Kolla 
O'Neill 23. SyMa Hilgeman 4, Tilda Willen 
1, Tracy Roiltn 5. Angie ChorvoiladO, 

EGF5H - Laura Anderson G. Christy 
Peterson 11, Suwn Rolandson 7. Qiritsy 
Benson 14. Lindsay Vloan 4. 

Thief River Falls is 
wjnner over W-A-0 

Thief River Falls freshmen boys 
improved their record to 6-1 
Thursday with a 60-54 high school 
basketball win over Warren- 
Alvarado-Oslo. 

Ben Myers scored 22 points, 
while Naic Sorvig and Brian Loc 
both had 12 for the winners. 



TRF ARENA SCHEDULES 



Huek Olion Memorial Civic Cantor 
Saturday, Jan. 10-7:30 ajn. TRFAHA 
Bantam A Invitational; 11 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. 
Jr. Advanced; 1 p.m. TBFAHA Bantam A 
Invitational; 4:30-0 p.m. DMFS: 030 p.m. 
TRFAHA Bnniam A Invitational. 

Sunday, Jan. It - 7:304:5 a.m. DMFS; 
9:45 a.m. TRFAHA Bantam A Invitational: 
1t;30 a.m. TRFAHA Pee-Wee A Invitational; 
1:15 p.m. TRFAHA Bantam A Invitational; 
3:15 p.m. TRFAHA Poo-Woo A InvltattonaJ; 
5:15 p.m. TBFAHA Bantam A Invitational; 7 
p.m. city league hockey [RutJo Construction 
vs. Budget); B;45 p.m. dry laaQue hockey 
(Silver Bullets va. Wannberga Inc.), 

Monday, Jan. 12 - 0-7:30 a.m. DMFS; B 
a.m. - 12:00 public skating; 12:30-1:45 p.m. 
public stealing; 2-3 p.m. Sharon Oregon 
3:30-0:30 p.m. high achool; 7 p.m. Bantam B 
vs. Rod Loko Falls; 0:45-10:15 p.m. 

- Tuesday. Jan. 13 - 6-7:30 a.m. DMFS; 
a.m. - t2.U0 public skating: 12:30-3 p.m. 
public stating; 3:30-4 p.m. SI, Jr. ASVoneod; 
4-4:30 p.m. S2. S3. Jr. AoVanced; 5:15 p.m. 
Prowtora JV va. Wnrroad; 7:30 p.m. Prowlers 
va. Warroad. 



Old Arena 

Saturday, Jan. 10 - 7:30 a.m. TRFAHA 
Pea-Wee A Invitational: 11 a.m. - 12.30 p.m. 
public stating; 1 p.m. TRFAHA Poe-Wee A 
Invitational; 430-6 pjn. public staling; 6:30 
p.m. TRFAHA Poo-Woe A Invitational. ' 

Sunday, Jan. 11 • 9:45 OJn. TRFAHA 
.Pea-Wee A InvtiatkmaJ; 12-1 pm Hani Red 
vs. Blue: 1:15-2:19 p.m. Ham Qold vs. 
Oreen; 2:30-3:30 p.m. McDonalds va. 
Bridgomon; 3:45-4:49 p.m. PUza Hut vs. 
Popal; 5-0:15 p.m. public stating; 630-730 
p.m. Warner rental; 7:45-0:49 p.m. rental; D- 

Monday, Jan. 12- 8;45o.m. - 3 p.m. high 
school broomban; 3:49-4:45 p.m. TRFAHA 
Level 0; 54 p.m. TRFAHA Level 5; 8-7 p.m. 
TRFAHA Level 4; 7:15-7:45 p.m. Bl. B3. B9; 
7:454:15 p.m. B2. B4, BO: 6:15-9:15 p.m. 
Bantam A; 930-10:30 p.m. gilts hockey. 

Tueiday, Jan. 13 - 0:30-7:45 a.m. Poo- 
Woo A and Poo-Wee B Blue; 3:45-4:35 p.m. 
TRFAHA Level 2; 4:35-5:25 p.m. TRFAHA 
Lovel 1; 5:40-0:40 p.m. TRFAHA Level 3; 7- 
8 p.m. rental; 0:15-0:15 p.m. rental; 830- 
1030 p.m. rental. 



/~GR#WOJRA (MTinaw 




Wi Insure Farm DvMingt, 
Ombtifldjngi & Personal Property 

I Homeowner 'a Coverage j ' 
For Dwellings In Town | 

Pnrmtf A#irtlr£ Servta -~ > 
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BRAY GENTILLY MUTUAL INS. CO. 

Locally Owned — Scruing Policyholders Since 1900 
P.O. Box 205, R. L Folb, MN 56750 253-2252 ^ 



ATTENTION SHAREHOLDERS 
Of ARCTIC CAT And POLARIS 




Selling 



213 LaBrcc Ave. North, Suite 203 

Thief River Falls, MN 56701 

218-681-3983 or S00-7G8-18G9 

MrmbrrSIPC 




Alternative crop 
workshops set 
in area towns 

To proviJc guidelines for some 
of the alternative crops being con- 
sidered far l'J9H production, a 
scries of workshops lias been sched- 
uled throughout inc six-county area 
of the Northern L ilcs Extension 
Cluster. 

Discussed at the workshops will 
be canola. Held peas, hullerfoats, 
buckwheat and sunflowers with a 
review of soybeans also planned. 
Crop contracts will ulso be dis- 
cussed. 

Workshop schedule is as fol- 
lows: 

Tuesday, January 13, 9:30 a.m.. 
Goodridge Senior Citizen's Center 
and 1:30 p.m.. Plummcr Senior 
Citizens Center; 

Wednesday, January 14. '9:30 
a.m., Kittson county courthouse in 
Hallock and 1:30 p.m., Ncwfoldcn 
Community Center; 

Thursday, January 15.9:30 a.m.. 
Badger Community Center and 
1 :30 p.m., Williams Senior Citizen's 
Center, 

Area crop producers arc seeking 
economic answers id declining 
small grain yields and prices by 
turning to alternative crops. The 
workshops arc being presented by 
extension educators Hans Kundcl of 
Red Lake county, Curtis Nyegaard 
of Kiltson county and Ray Thomp- 
son of Marshall county. 

All programs arc open to the 
public and free of charge. Producers 
are encouraged to attend the work- 
shop session most convenient for 
them. 

Changes in ISOC 
snowmobile race 
schedules set 



The Classifieds - The Classifieds - - The Classifieds 



3 



The 



Aspen Equipment/Long 
rucking Hot Country 200 



Haul Trucking Hot Country 
Giant Snow- Cross Race has a new 
date — February 21-22. 1998. The 
Albertvillc date has been taken up 
by the First Annual Polar Days 200 
Bemidji. MN ice race with a four 
mile course January 17-18. It will 
be located at the waterfront park 
next lo Paul Dunyan and Babe the 
Blue Ox in Bemidji. 

The Polar Days 200 will kick off 
Bcmidjt's nine-day celebration of 
Winter Polar Days, 



WANTED- Young dog about two months 
old with cardo dog background II poaal< 

bio, 21B-37B-4223. l(3p 

AKC ST. Barnard pupplos. 2 malos/Z lo- 
malos. dry mouth and coo smooth coat, 
21B-74S-4521 ovoninoa. PF4t5p 
GIVE AWAY- Purobrod Enallsh Springer 
Spanlal pupplos. Call 796-5633. 

PRttip/iai 

BLACK LAB pups. wooka old, mom 
groat hunter and good around kids, (too, 

218-874-8611, P4t3p ■ 

FOR SALE- AKC registered Purobrod 
Qoldon Rotrlovor pupplos, $125.00, 
ovaltablo 1-25-98. Call evenings, 218- 

762-5B3S. PS11 Op 

AKC SIBERIAN Husky pupploo, many 
colors, oxcollont quality and condition, 
S125-S150, 701-847^023. Colo Crook. 

P4t5p 

QOINO FAST- Chosapoako Bay Lab 
cross pupplos, only ihroo toft, two males, 
onofomalo, 681-4181. 2t4p 



LAB PUPPIES, 3 yotlow. 6 black, solo 
Oils wook only, provon hunting bnck- 

ground. call 370-4001. 2i4c 

RED HUMP parakoats. coekauol, brawn 
volvot, gioy. bolga chlnehiHas. brooder 
hodgohogs and Emu, 210-435-6431. 
1PP 



FOH SALE- AKC main yotlow Ub pup- 
plos, S175.00 oach, coll 210-745-5024. 

Angus. MN. P4t5p 

LUTIrtO COCKATIELS, hand lod. vary 
tamo, SQO.OO lor tho pair. 874-B635. 

P4tSp 

AKC GERMAN Sdophord pupplos, born 
Nov. 27. 2-molos, 2-lomnlos rorrviinlng, 
block with markings, SI75-J200, 21B- 
637-6041. P4tEp 



Hay, Feed and Seed 

FARMERS- II you novo hay lor sola ad- 

wonts o It In ttio Nonhom Wotcn. Poopto 
looking to buy. Tho Tlmos/Northom 



FOR SALE- First and socond curr/ng al- 
falfa hay, round bnlos, 210-796-5711 or 

796-5422. PF4t3p 

FOR SALE- Big round balos mliorj hay, 
grass hay and oats Straw, plastic twino, 
no rain. 218-376-4438. Goodrldgo. MN. 

P4I5P 

FIRST, 2ND and 3rd crop altalla. big 
round balos. Also, whoot, bartoy straw. 

449-3945. PF417p 

HAY FOR Solo- First and second crop al- 
falfa mix, 600 pound sizo balos, all at 
homo. Can Jitl Holt 01601-2189. 2t4p 
FOR QALE-Cortflod stondor borloy, cor- 
Ullod 2375, Sharp. Vordo and Ruas 
whoot. Call 218-674-3713. PflllOp 
FOR SALE-, Small squaro oats. straw 
balos, plastic twino. stored Insldo, 51 .00 

oach, 218-266-4666. P4l6p 

FOR SALE- 2nd cutting alfalfa, squaro 
balos, protion 18.6. food valuo ot 144, 

218-306-2650. PF4t9p 

FOR SALE- Small and lotgo round balos 
food hay and mil od. 1,6001 and 1,200*, 

222-3780. PF4t9p 

LARGE ROUND ollallo grass mlxad hay 
balos and largo round straw balos. 563- 

2302. P416p 

HAY FOR Solo- ISO big round grois hay 
bales. Call 218-661-3816 ovonlngs. 
POtlOp 



Household Goods 



DON'S 

307 1ST ST. E., TRF 

Acrott From Pennington Bquan 

ikx .nua.1 *Jt • u tif I4«: oasorwiuo* 
FmiAM-iirjt'1-tMrji.'aoHBMtiim 

SEWING & VACUUMS 

SalOS 8. Service. • NEW A USED 

681-8664 



FOH SALE- Matching couch and rockor 
rocllnor, eountry bluo mil. rocontly pro- 
losaionaiiy cloanod. 512500. 2ts-4G6- 
2961. IF215p 



SEWING MACHINE 
REPAIR in your home or 
bring to Narvcrud Cleaners. 

Phone Eorl at r- 

964-5763 or 681-3441 



□UEEK'SIZE SOFA sloopoi, nouiro) col- 
or, hlng-slio watorbod, now hoator, 210- 
437.8234.21B-437-6460. F2T3p 



RICK'S APPLIANCE 




Fitlorj A«U»rt(rf 
ScnktOaMM 
MiJocBruidi 



For 5*rrlc* CtD: 
681-2263 or 1-8 00-3 60-2263 

In Wom» or SteoSffKJO 



FOR SALE- Entertainment ci 
$50.00: TV. $200.00; DS5, $150.00. 
drossor w'mlrtor. $100.00, 7-ploco table. 

$250.00.601-2520. P4l5p 

FOR SALE- Upright piano. Can Stophon. 
MN. 218-47B-3335 nltor 5:30 p.m. wook- 
daysorloavomossago. PF4t3p 



Household Goods 



HJUC4AfBEATi«£fIS; 
YOU UN BEAT A DRW 
YOU CANT BEAT OUR DOISI 

Sutton's Carpet Wmhmt 

Bagloy ■ (21B) 694-6161 




wl i,i,r:tt.W'il n ij<ut 'itttid. m 
221 LaBm Ave. N.mftWJi FAILS 



"CASH FOR OlDSr 



. '■junegoxes-,,poi> machines^, 
r ewhierri-'v- dft'NMMcHwei ■ 
=, t'qtis n/\vofi\iem%pwp,i- 



r h AWCRVSING CLOCKS* SfflrVS - , 
,A,70 P MAIK-BIKES - SCHWNNiSltNGpiyS ■ 

fM ; pwtHis - pep/it em* ms. 
^:,MV *£LATEl> nSHMOAUWUG ' 



THIS IS A PAID ADVERTISEMENT 



Used Cars for 
as Low as $5! 



TWO DAYS ONLY!! 

Friday-Saturday, January 16-17, 1998 



Hallock, MN - C & M 
Ford Salon on Highway 
75 North la at It ogalnl 
Thoy will altampt to 
roduco thoir usod car 
Invontory by 50% In two 
days. 

This ulllmato usod 
vohlclo ovonl will tako 
place Friday and 
Saturday. Jan. 16-17. 
10:00 a.m. lo 7:00 p.m. 

Owner Paul 

Btomqulst oxplolnod lhat 
ulnco It's boon six 
monlha olnco Iho last 
nolo, C & M Ford's usod 
vohiclo inventory has 
Incroasod to lovols 
boyond thoir capacity. 
"It's timo to bring back 
our ultlmato usod 
vohiclo ovonl and 
roduco our supply ol 



usod cars so lhat wo 
can continue to bring in 
(rash trados." oxptalnod 

Mr. Blomquist. 

For two days, Friday 
and Saturday, C & W 
Ford will offer thoir ontlro 
Invontory of usod 
vohlclos at substantial 
prico reductions. "I havo 
boon told lo roduco a 
vohiclo to S15, S10, 
ovort $5! Wo havo many 
quality cars and trucks 
lnthoS3,000toSl2,000 
rango too. Wo will bo 
reducing tho so vohlclos 
dramatically," oxplolnod 
Brad Hammos, usod car 
manager. 

This Innovative 

approach lo liquidating 
used vohlclos should 
mako it oasy and quick 



(or anybody to got a 
groat car at a low price 
without any hasslo," 
Brad Hpmmos polntod 
out. 

"Wo havo throo 
different banks and 
lonrJIng companios 

avallablo Just for this 
bvont, all with 

commitments for somo 
oxcoptional Intorosl 

rates. Wo con also bo 
vory lloxiblo on terms 
and approvals." 

C &M Ford will 
display half tho vohlclos 
beginning at 10:00 a.m. 
Friday, Jan. 16, to give 
pooplo tho chance to 
look thorn ovor. At 11:00 
a.m.. tho markod down 
sale prico will bo placod 
on tho window of each 



vohiclo. Whoovor Is 
sitting In Iho vohiclo at 
11:00 am will havo Iho 
first chanco to buy Iho 
car at Iho prico postod. 
II thoy do not wish to 
buy Iho vohiclo ol lhat 
prico, thoy can simply 
walk away and tho car Is 
avallablo lo Iho public at 
that prico. 

Wo will ropoal this on 
Saturday, Jan. 17lh, 
starting at 10:00 a.m. 

TWO DAYS 
ONLY 

It will bs hold at 

C&MFORD 

Highway 75 North, 

Hallock, Minnesota 

Call 218-843-2652 

for details) 



Real Estato 



Real Estato 



FOR SALE - 160 ACRES 
in Reiner Twp. $250/acre, 
218-463-2008 or Box 
93, Salol, MN 56756 



WANT TO Buy- 3-4 bedroom houso tn 
TflF or surroundinn nron. In nood ol ron- 
ov.ilion prntcitorj. 081-6703 P4l!lp 
FOR SAtt- Huntora hoavon. 320 neros. 
00 iicros woodod. 240 crop ocrol In 2 
pnrcols, most surroundod by stnlo wildlilo 
rolugrt, onslorn Mnrahalt Co., Nonnwosl- 
orn, MN. S2S0/nerrj. 210-4G3-3524. 



100 



HAVE CASH buyers tor land w 
oilondod CRP contracts. For 
acres in section 25. Krntka Township. 
Pfinnmrjton County. S50.000; 100 ncros 
Insactian tG, Reiner Township, Ponning- 
lon County. 540.000; 40 ncron with old 

Township. Hod Lnko County. ' 520.000; 
400 neros In Huss Township. Roseau 
County. S200 por aero (will divide). Norm 
Andorson Rootty. 1602 East Groonwood, 
Th.ol Rivor Falls, MN 56701. phono 218- 
GB1-2320. to* 2ia-6B1-0409. Soiling 
(arms In NW Minnosoto slnco 1969. 



• Moor EnUno: 60 ocroi (oncod to l 
horwi wtm solid 3-bodroom home. 
Only.l/* mllo oft Hwy. 59. Owner wM 
comidot flnonclng. $39,500. 

• H»oi Holt 2 1/2 ocrei wtfh 3-bod> 
room doubl«-*rlde. Attocnod garoge. 
529,000. 

• In Stephen: 3-bedroom bungalow In 
oxceBenl netghborhood. Mdn floor 
loundry.Jl7.TO0, 

• Neai Grygltr 5 ocret with 3-bed- 
room hom« on Hwy. 69. Single 
gciogo. ! 10,000. 

• In Middle River Duplex. Very nice 
Aril floor wtfh one bedroom. Second 
Boor has •money cportmenl. Doublo 
OCiogo built In I9M. S».50Q 

• In lake sronion: 3.M octet with neat 
2 -bedroom homo. 2-yr. old root. 
J4J.000. 

• In lod* Broraon; 3.62 octet with 2 
houML One home hat 2 bedroomi, 
1 1 eel tiding, and largo woikinop. 
Othet homo hes 3 bedroomi, vlnyt tid- 
ing, cttachod gcrogo. $94,900. 



r7::.;.VT 218-681-4087 



FARM 


FOR solo In 


H 


ss Township, 


Ros 


°rm 


County, 160 
s. Eoclion 20; 


40 


ncroTsK 


20: 


2H 


40 


ncros, MClion21. 


701-2680 





FOR SALE- Rurjgy'o Bar and Grill local- 
oci downtown Rosoau. Stop rlnht into this 
well ostnbiishod businoss. tneludos all 
luluros and equipment! "USA* Roalty, 
2I0.463-3140. P4t6p 



»ljm-mrfJ.I:HJ|: 



160 Acres, 110 Tillable. NE of 
Ofclee }295/Acreage. 



915 Acres, Mostly Tillable, 
1 Year Led On CRP. SlrandquisI 
Aiea. 



WANTED: Farmland - 

I have a serious client who 
wants lo buy good farmland In 
Ihe Red Lake Falls, SI. Hilaire. 
Brooks, or west of Plummer 
areas. Will pay cash. 



160 Acres CRP Plummer Area. 



320 Acres. 263 Tillable. Old 

Bldg. Site, 

Good Land, Only 56 Acres of 

CRP. Kralka Bridge Aiea. 

$79,900 



Many Otters To Choose From 
Up To 1,000 Acres.' " 

'233JJJEZ] 



C1750 FOR Solo- Just listodl tOTO ncros, 
920 acres tiiinblo. camp lo to with grain 
bins, catuo fthods and 2- bedroom mobile 
homo. SoMo Roalty, Fosston, MN 50542. 
218-435-1525. Equal Housing Opportun- 

lly. 113c 

COMMERCIAU1NDUSTRIAL PROPER- 
TY avallablo- Commercial building In 
Strondquist. total Space 0(25.261 squaro 
loot which consists ot (2) largo Iroo span 
areas, ono ot 6.B04 squaro lost or 
C3'x108' and 1.800 squaio loot or 
30'xGO'. Tho romolning spaco Is divided 
Into (12) rooms wim an averaga ol 900 
squaro loot In oach, tho Inlorlor walls may 
bo doslgnod to suit Individual noods. Tho 
building uses a fuol dl conical tollor with 
a coal bailor as a back-up unit. The build' 
Ing Is in oxeollent condition and has ro- 
coivod a Honoywotl onorgy audit within 
tho past (5) yoors and Is currently in op- 
oration. Handicapped occosslblo. Terms: 
rJoootloblo. For moro IntormaDoo. plaaso 
contact: Dorothy Soomata, Tri-County 
Schools, PO Bon 17B, KarlstorJ, MN 
56732,218-436-2261. F3t3c 



ISLAND LAKE, near Lonaby. 3 Iota, 
sand sh oio lino, southern oiposuro on 
groat fishing laVo. S25.900, call DusDn ot 

21B-224-2148. P9t5p 

WANTEDJ.FARM OR RANCKI Must bo 
vory pnvato ot socludod. prolor dood ond 
road, no>t to Slate or Fodornt land. Must 
havo buildings. Contact W. D. Brown, 
7570 Diilo Hwy.. Brtdgoport. Ml. 4B722, 

or517-777-7090. IPF4t5p 

IF YOU'RE looking (or a 3-bodroom 
houso in the S40'o, you havo to see this 
ono. Everything now. kitehon. bath, tur- 
naco. root, doors, carpet, paint, etc., 112 

N.Knoaln. 681-6707. 3tlc 

WANTED FARMLAND- I havo a serious 
cliont who wants la buy good farmland In 
tho Rod Lake Falls. St. Hitolfo, Brooks or 
wost ol Plummer aroas. WiH pay cash. 
Call Northland Farm Solos, 681-6036. 

F3Hc 

FOR SALE- 20 ocros miles south. 1 
milo wost ol Arctic. 68(170 dairy bam, 
70x75 Hanson silo loafing shod, Wotls 
Hooi.CqHownor.21B-GB1-3S4B. 70tfc 

FOR SALE by owner- Nleoly romodoled 
3- bedroom, 2-balh homo, finished base- 
ment. 3 typos ol ha at. tancod-ln back 
yard with dock, slnglo car dotachod go- 
rogo. Closo lo downtown, nlco nalghbo'- 
hood. upper SCO's. 681-4933. 3ttc 
LOTS FOR Sato- 100'i200' on Rainy 
Rlvor ot Baudotto, MN. Coll 701-775- 
7015. 170110 



1-3/4 STORY HOME 
FOR SALE!! 




OPEN HOUSE- 

Saturday, Jan. 10th, 2-4 P.M. 

121 Tlndolph Avo. N., TRF 

Call For Appt. 6B1-S603 




FOR »AUE 




4-bodroom, split-lovel home, 1 
mi. east ol Rod Lake Falls. 2 lull 
baths, double garage, finished 
family room, deck and walk-oul 
basement. Now furnace and 
now roof. Seven acres with a 
beautiful view of river. Call 
(218) 253-2413 alter 6 p.m. 



Campers/ RVs 

-♦NEED FAX sarvico? Stop In at The 
Times. Sond or rocolvo lor only $2.00 
first pago with oach additional pa go 
$1.00. Our fax i Is 21B-6B1-4455. Stop In 
at Tho Tlmos, 324 Main Avsnuo North, 

TRF. Telephono 216-681-4450. 

1991 25-FT. 5in wtiool Prowler camper, 
Ilka now, cnll 21B-745-40S7 artor 3 p.m. 

eatfo 

FOR SALE or trade- 1974 Starcratt mo- 
torhomo, Class A, law mllos, now rubbor, 
681-0187. 2t3p 

Sporting Goods 

FOR SALE- Now and used got! carts. 
Wilcox, Red Loko Falls, 1-800-645-5081. 

56tfc 



Cxtra 
€xtra 



Now Accepting 

Applications For 

Northern Watch 

Carriers 




The Northern Watch 

is looking for carrier 

delivery people for the 

Thief River Falls area.* 

Girls and boys of all ages 

are encouraged to apply, 

along with adults. 

JPreSfs 

pick up An Application At 324 Main Avenue North 

•Carrier Delivery Routes Arc Independent Contractors. 



®TheTimes •WSxiSH 

www.trfllmos.com www.nwatch.com 

CLASSIFIED ADS 

DEADLINES: Tho Tim on - Monday, 10:00 A.M.; Northern Watch -Wodnoaday, 3:00 P.M. 



Addrass _. 
Clly 




numbered li"o* provided. 

M.iko Chock Payable to The Tlmos, P.O. Box 100, Thlsf River Fslls, MN 56701 

PLEASE BE SURE YOU HAVE CHECKED WHERE YOU WISH YOUR AD TO RUN 

YOUR BEST DEAL IS TO RUN IN BOTH1 

Q Chock or Monoy Ordor Endosod 

Q fl& MasterCard * ^ Expirntli 

Q HEvisu*__ . Eiplrnlti 




REACHING OUT 
WORLDWIDE 

For As Low A3 $5.00 

□ Tlmos 

□ Times « Intomol 
Watch 




1>.W 14 




NORTHKRN WATCH 



ffalurday, January 10, 1998 



The Classifieds - The Classifieds - The Classifieds - The Classifieds 



Help Wanted 


ASPHALT PAVING company ti 


rinq 


r.crci'd nvin. IrucV drivers, oquipmont op. 


•■r.ilrjrr,. I.iborors BonotitS includo 




.md hiMlfh inr.ur.irico EOE 21( 




!i 101 7t9c 





Help Wanted 



RADIOLOGIC TECHNOLOGIST- Co5u.il 
poMlioo owirLiWo lOf oupononcod Gonor- 
ni B.U'Oiogi: tccti. Mammography dour- 
.ib'n To apply contact. Dnaotu Clinic HP 
Drpt :ifl-eB1-4747, In, 210-681-6732 
D.iK0l,l Clm.c. Ltd is nn EEO/AA Employ- 
er 5QC 

HANDLE'S BEN Fr,inM,n ol THF has Im- 
rrvdMiio openings lor 3 full-tlmo posi- 
tions Management Ttmnoo. Hood 
Cnoctior and Dopl None) ol Fnbnc, Seek- 



EXCELLENT INCOME OPPORTUNITY- 

Growing company oipanding inlo inn 
Brno, nood juccossonontod individuals 
lo mnnngo growth in tho area To receive 
your InloTTwhonnl packet sond nomo. od- 
dross, phono number ond check or mon. 
oy order lo' SG 95 plus S2.00 shipping 
and handling to. Earth Sonstlivo Enior- 
pnso. 311 Valley View Dnvo. Norfolk. NE 

68701-3426. g!4p 

FHY-COOK MON.-FRI.. 8 J.m,3 p.m 
scnocJ days only, oupononco nol noodod 
bulholphjl. call 681-1470. P414p 



Help Wanted 



SALES POSmOS OPES 

Sales Representative 
forKKAQ-KKDQ 

Thu wouM br pitMioc rmpioyinrnt 
KinwiHic* i autooobilr nrxruary Call 
6AI-4900 for application and appointment 



Oakwood Homes in Karlstad, Minnesota, 

is accepting applications for two- and three- 
bedroom townhouse openings. Rent is based 
on 30% of your monthly adjusted gross income. 
For applications and qualifications please con- 
tact Elaine Baker at 218-436-2588. AN EQUAL 
HOUSING OPPORTUNITY. ^s* 



Through 

'THE TIMES 1 

' resumes.nwatch.com 

http://www.nwatch.com • Email: nwatch@nwatch.com 

SfsThe Times 'Wff'cH (g^ 






^£y & Commercial Print Shop ^yy 

K< lain Aw. H. • ThM Rim Flits, UN 56701 ' pit) 6B1-H50 • Fie (218) 6SH4S5 



Ttic TaJen! Bank ii .w electronic job 
n'sumo lh.it employers jm.1 prtveiv 
t-mploymrnl agctici.'i can occcii 
They can review iour qualificition* 
- education, ikilli. work hmoiy - In 
relationship !o ihvir (ob opening). II 
interfiled, employers Mil contact 
you directly Call lor more infotma- 



Help Wnnlod 



For Rent 



A FEW OF WE JOBS AVAILABLE 



♦ BEE KEEPER -FuHime. 
Involvos going lo Texas Feb.-May, 
starting $6.50 per hr. 
(MN&93090) 

♦ FLORAL DESIGNER- FiiHire 

or Part-timD. must have previous floral 
design experience. Salary depends on 
experience. (MN9658828) 

♦ REGISTERED NURSE- 72 hrs. 

every 2-weeki One ol tw shrfts. 
Salaty depends on experience. 
Roseau. (MN7021336) 



OUTSIDE SALES in your aron Entry lov- 
ol solos job. No oipononco necessary 
Dflso plus com mis lion, bonolits nnd 
training. Fortune 300 Company Must bo 
ovor 2t years ol ago. bondablo. good 
work history, nblo to work 50'CO 
hrs/wook. apoitsmindo d nnd por sonnblo. 
II you nro sonous nbouTTfOTIhg S600- 
S900porwook.fa» a brief rosumo to 218- 
749-3018 or sond a bitot rosumo lo: Di- 
rector of Personnel. PO Box 1167, Vugi- 

nia.MN 55792. 616c 

RNAPN OPENtNOS In Roseau Podia- 

vontilntor dependent child. FTSPT bono- 

ta. Floxiblo schodulmg. Univorsal Podia- 

: Sorvico. Inc. Call 1-800-876-2285. 



6t7c 



Chock a\ »ny ol 



f"ttt» 

4 



301 Highway 1 E. • Thlri Rlrtf F»Ui 

218-681-0909 



HELP WANTED- 2 positions. RortU Do- 
tignor and pan-limo solas and dalivory. 
Call or stop In at Country Glossoms. 200 
East 4th Strosl. TRF.6ai-B434. 410c 
TRF MOTOR fouls ovajlablo lor GF Har- 
old, S400t par montn. Also. 2 cairlor 
routos In TRF, 2 In RLF. Cnll 1-800-477- 
6572 Ext. 250. 415c 



HELP WANTED 

Looking For Motivated Individuals. Flexible Hours. 

DINING ROOM: Full- And Part-Time Shifts, For 
Waiters/Waitresses, Hostess And Banquet Servers. 
Will Train. Mature Individuals Welcome. 

KITCHEN: Part-Time In Salad Department And Part- 
Time Cook u 
Picfc Up Applications At The Front Desk Of The 
Best Western, Thief River Falls 



HELP WANTED- Potts poison at North- 
om Motors. Full bonolii packago, coll 
Tom or Gorard at Northern Motors, 218- 

681-4820. IOC 

BHAY-QENTtLLY Mutual Insuronco 
Company, Rod loXo Falls, MN, Is looking 
lor a rojponslblo Individual to manogo 
tho day-1o-doy oporotlon ot Iho company 
Individual musl possos axcollont human 
lolatlong, communication and loadot- 
snlp/monogomont skills os well os a pro- 
fessional prosonco. Position roqulros 
good working knowlodgo ol tho Insuronco 
Industry in gonorol with product knowl- 
odgo ot linos providod by tho company. 
Submit rosumo and salary roQulromants 
to Bray-Gontilly Mutual Insuronco Co., 
PO Box 205. Hod Loko Foils. MN 56750. 
DoocWno to submit rosumo is January 15. 

193B. 6l3e 

DEE INC. has on Immodiato opanlng lor 
a CNC aolup/programmor. A two-ygar 
tochnlcol dogioo Is loqultod. Exporionco 
piolonad. DEE olfors compoitivo wagas 
and bonolits. II Imorostod, ploaso sand a 
lottor ol application and rosumo lo or stop 
by and pick up on application at: Attn: Hu- 
man Rosourcoa. OEE Inc.. PO Box 627. 
1302 Foskolt Slrool. Crookston. MM 
55710. 218-281-5011. E.O.E. Posl-olfor 
drug tasting roqulrod. F2t5c 



ASSISTAIVT DEPUTY 
REGISTRAR 



Al'l^ntiiiii- nrr )riiif niiT|Kol Sir h 
[uit-tuiir [nsiiiiin u. A"i-lmil Dqnity 
Hrp-ir.ir ill lltr Motor Yrlmir U<tiiv 
Ofilir. Ttir po'rtnm iinolvr. liiTii-iiiR 

i"uiti( ilriirt'« liiTiiv>, |>rnnits mill 
Hlnitiitmtii)ii ianl< nix! y rrgwrting 
diilir. iJoiij; nit! i uthrr rrlnlnl »Dit. 
rV]>|Ju-iiti!. riiu-t luir tlir iJ)Jirj' la 
mrk villi tlic [nilJic, nuilr ouminiirr 
mlrir, rut.! ramjiilr m H l ImiLukt ikily 
rr|Kirt>. A|>|J mr utiuliililir mill 

mu-t !«■ rrtunwil in ilif (Viiiiiiipon 
Oiiitm- Aiuliior'- Officr, P.O. Bra 
6IG, Tlrirf Hi«r Folk MN Sft70l an 
of l>r(iir -1:30 |-.m. Jiinu:^ 19. 
199B. 



iliimmi- 




PART-TIME M 

PUBLIC RELATIONS/ ^W 

FUND-RAISING PERSON HOSPICE 

NFPDFn RED RIVER VALLEY 

Hotplceol tha Red River Valley la leeklnga part-time, 10-hour-s-week per- 
son to coordinate the public relation! and fund-raJilng retponiibltlliei In 
Ha otflce In Thief River Falls, MM Ideal applicant would have post sec- 
ondary training or education in communication!, public relations or mar- 
keting, with experience In public relations and fund-raising. Position 
require* flexible scheduling with some area travel. 

Applications must be received by January 31, 1998. Please send resume 
to: Hospice of the Red River Valley, do Director of Public Relations and 
Marketing, 702 28th Avenue North, Fargo, KD 58102-1403. 



IMMEDIATE OPENING 



Hours 8:30-5:30 Mon.-Fri. 
and 8:30-Noon Saturdays. 
Duties include finishing 
ladies garments, counter 
sales, misc. 

Apply in person only. 
No phone calls please. 

NARVERUD 
CLEANERS 



ttHELP WANTED m 

long-torm caret facility. Part- 
tlmo troyllno position open. 
Contact Kalhloon Viorock, 
Dietary Supervisor, at 
Karlstad Hoalthcaro Cantor 
at 218-436-2161. KHC is on 
oquat opportunity employer. 

JWWsiWnofonAve.H'esI 
Kirittad,UNSST32 



■as 



Ingo 



HELP WANTED 
PUBLIC WORKS MECHANIC 

A lull-limo mochanlc to work primarily wilh tho Public Works Slroot 
Department lor Iho City of Thief River Fails. Tho omployoo would bo 
scheduled to work 40 hra^wook Monday through Friday, Floxiblo 
schoduling may bo roquirod on occasion. 

Tho position Involvos tho mnlntonanco and ropalr of various 
mochanlcal oqulj and vohiclos including both small and largo 

engines. An associates dogroo In mochnnlcs and Uiroo or mora yoars 
of previous exporionco in maintaining light and hoavy oqulpmonl aro 
roquirod. 

Individual applications for tho position will bo accoptod through 
January 20, 1998. Any Job appllcalions received nftor 4 p.m. on 
January 20, 1998, will not bo cortskforod. A complolo job description 
and application is avaliablo at tho oflico of tho Minnosolo Job Sorvico, 
P.O. Box 679, 1301 Highway 1 East, Thiol Rtvor Folia, MN 56701. Tho 
City ol Thiol River Falls is an Equal Opportunity Employer. 



PART-TIME MEOICAL- Insuronco para- 
modlcal axam sorvico company Is sook- 
Indivldual lo do mobilo Insuronco 
; in Thiol Rivor Falls and Uia sur- 
rounding communitios. Applicants must 
havo oxcollont blood drawing skills and 
oxporlonco. Coll Karon 1-800-2B5-5708. 

4t6c 

AGRONOMY DEPARTMENT Monarjar 
for 2 million dollar oporaUon in Okloo, 
MN. Contact Kant Okloo Farmers Coop. 
Box 159, OklOO. MN 5G742. 2t4c 



Daycare 



DAYCARE OPENINGS. All ogos. Food 
program. Preschool education. Big play 
aroa. Foncod yard. 631-5063. 2lfc 



f Tho lollowing position U ovailoblo In School District 1564, Thiol Rivgr Frills. ^ 

Minnesota: 

SCHOOL AGE CHILD CARE COORDINATOR 

LOCATION: Challenger Elementary (During school year) & 
Franklin Hiddlo School (Summer) 
EFFECTIVE: immediately 

HOURS: approximately £:45 p.m. * 6:00 p.m. - During School Year 
approximately Noon - 6:00 p.m. • Summer 
DUTIES: Responsible for tho overall School Ago Child Care 
(Latchkey) Program Implementation. Plans daily and seasonal 
program activities, manago and expand program resources, direct 
supervision ol star! members, supervision ot children, 
communication with parents, and other related duties. 
REQUIREMENTS: Minimum ol 21 years of ago and currofll first 
nidVCPR certification required. Dogroo In Elementary Education. 
Therapeutic Roeroatlon, Physical Education or rotated Itold 
preferred. Exporionco working wilh dtvorso groups o! pooplo and 
recreation p-ogram development. 
SAURY: S12.00mr. 
Application! m*y be obtained in person or by writing to Ihe Person t»»l Department, 
School Dlsbict Service Center, 230 S. LaBme Ave. , Thlet River Falls, Minnesota 
56701. Applications will be accepted until 4:00 p.mjFriday, January IB, 1MB. For 
additional Information pleaso contact Jane Uatlson, Interim Community Education 
Director el 21B-eS1-e711. 



OFFSET 
PRESSMAN 



Position Includes various other duties 
involved In the production otpublleaUoni 
Salaries commensurate vrtth experience. 
Fringe benefit package includes vacation 
and sick pay. 401K retirement plan, cafe- 
teria plan and health Insurance. 
- Apply At- 

The Times 

324 MainAve. N. • Thiol River Falls, MN 

(21 S) 681-4450 



APARTMENTS FOR Ront- Tho now 6- 
plox in Karlstad has a two- bedroom and o 
ono -bedroom apartment lor rent Hoot Is 
Included In tho rent, plus a one-car go- 
rogol Gtaat locatlonl Closo lo downtown 
across from Iho clinic and closo to a 
school! For information, contact Wayno 
Ruud at tho Karlstad City Oflico. 21B- 
436-2178. Avaliablo Fobruary t. 1098. 

F419C 

FOR RENT- Spacious 2-bodroom duplex 
oportmont. S305 par month, Includo s 
hoot, wator and oloctric, ovailoblo Immo- 
dlataly. Also, 2-bodroom mobilo homo. 
$250 par month plus militias, deposit, will 
accept HUD tenants. 964-5189. 214c 



FURNISHED 
ROOMS 

FOR RENT 
681-2845 



i ernptofmtnl ortrtip' 



KITCHEN HELPER 

LOCATION: Lincoln High School 

EFFECTIVE: immediately 

HOURS PER DAY: 3 1/4 hours per day (10:30 a.m. - 1:45 p.m.) 

student days 

DUTIES: Assist wllh kitchen dutlos, cook for Iho combo lino, and 

maintain necessary records. Replenish serving tines; general 

clean up including washing tobies and floor: and, other duties as 

assigned. 

SALARY AND BENEFITS: Per negotiated contract. 

REQUIREMENTS: Must rolato well with high school students. 

Exporionco cooking for largo groups proforred. Position requires 

standing ond walking for most ol Iho work shirt and also involvos 

heavy lifting. Must submit to a criminal history background chock. 
Applications may be obtained In person or by writing to the Personnel Department, 
School District Service Center, 230 S. LaBrea Ave. , Thlet River Fells, Minnesota 
56701. Applications will be accepted until 4:00 p.m., Thursday, January 15, IMS. 



.^y^ 



Jl PuBIc School! ok 



STORAGE UNITS 
FOR RENT IN TRF 

Call For More Details 

218-681-1861 



RETAIL/COMMERCIAL SPACE for rent, 
uptown location. t,70O sq. tt. plus storngo 
atop, hoot and water polo, coll C61 -3045. 
CHARMING TWO-BEOROOM apart- 
ment, ovailoblo now. £325 plus utilillos, 
rtmplo parking, deposit, no pots. 681- 

3718. P4t3p 

FOR RENT- Mobilo homo. 2-bodroom. 
[no pots). S270/month. 661-185B, 081- 

0033. P4t5p ' 

APARTMENT FOR rent nbovo Aco Katd- 
woro for ono non-smoker, quiet parson. 

call 681-3664. BBHc 

FOR IMMEDIATE Rent- 1- ond 2-bod- 
room npartmoiits. low ront. costs Includo 
hoaiandwalor.Coll661-4COB. 101tfc 
2-BEDROOM GROUND floor apartmont, 
closo to uptown, oldor pooplo protorrod, 
ovailoblo Doc. 1, and 1 -bedroom upstairs 
apartmont. roforonces roquirod. Coll 681- 

17B9. 93ifc 

FOR RENT- 14x60 2-bodroom (roller, 
washor/dryer Includod, roforonces. no 
pots, $325* deposit, 681-7712. P4t6p 



FOR RENT 
2 BEDROOM 
APARTMENT 



CARPUJQ-IN 

LADNDKT FACILITIES 

NO PETS 



OFFICE FOR RENT 



Professional Building, parking at 
door. Available January 1, 1998. 
Call 681-1635 '9 am.- 5 pja. 



COUNTRY ACRES 
APARTMENTS 

Tinrr Rivrx Fall*, MN 

(218) 681-3370, 



OFFICE SPACE lor rent approximately 
360 sq. ft. In now professional building, 

681-1565. B5Hc 

NEWLY REMODELED 2-bodroom fur- 
nished mobile home/entry, no pats, da- 
posit, rotoroncos. lease roquirod, 681- 

ZB63. P4l5p 

SUMMERF1ELD PLACE ol Nowfoldon 
has a two-bodrconVtwcbalh apartmont 
available. Private entrance, scioenod-in 
porch, air conditioner, woshor/dryor, dish- 
washer and mora. Heat paid by tho man- 
ogomonl. Call 1 -800-504-8033 | r more 
Iniorma Bon ondVof lour. F102t)c 



TWO PROFESSIONAL solos positions 
loading lo Manager Trainee Two open- 
ings now exist lor man and woman In a 
local branch of a largo Fortuno 500 Inter- 
national financial organliatlon. This is an 
Impresslvo opportunity for on ambitious 
parson who wants to got ahead. To qual- 
ify you nood a positive mental ottltudo 
and soll-confidonco. Our corporation off- 
ers complolo corporate bona Ills, modlcal, 
dental, 401K retirement plan and a com- 
plete training program. Provious solos 
exporionco nol necessary. Income 
S25.000-S35.000 ond up'lst year, (com- 
mission with guarontood Incomo). Only 
thoso who sincerely want to got ohood 
need opply. Call Ron Gay, Monday 
through Thursday, Jan. 12th-15th. bat- 
ween 10 0.m. and 5 p.m., 218-281-5210. 
EOE-M^. 214c 



STORAQE, BOATS, CARS, RV'S, etc.. 
Ronsonablo rotas, you Insurol 681-8603, 

leave mossogo. Otic 

FOR RENT- 448 ocras cropland, Sllvor- 
lon Township. Pennington County, not 
CRP. phono 681-JB92. F2t3p 



SPACIOUS TWO-BEDROOM apart- 

merits. Clean ond neat, now carpal and 
paint, dishwashers, garbage disposal, 
off -sire ot parking, honi paid, ovailoblo Im- 
mediately, call 681-4054. II no answor 

loqvo a mossogo. 7SHc 

FOR RENT- Mobile homo. 2-bodroom, 1- 
1/2 both, (no pots), Countrysldo Pork, 

661-1858 or 881-9033. P41Sp 

FOR RENT- Fab. 1, furnished ono-bod- 
room houso. pn pntn. $400.00 Includes 
jUlirJos, roloronco/doposll roquirod, 66t- 

4016. P4tSp 

2-1/2 BEDROOM apartmont tot rant, 
S400.QO/month, avaliablo Immediately, 
call 681-6221 or 681-2057. P4t8p 



300 SQ. FT. OFFICE 

- AND 
600 SQ. FT. OFFICE 

<f u ortmies m mm 
tsr mo. me with 
am rt mb oEPOsmt 

200 Barzen Ave. N, TRF 

681-2038 or 

681-1973 



Mobile Homes 



FOR SALE- 14x70 3-bodroom mobilo 
homo on 100'x200" Fol on Rainy Rlvor at 
Baudotto.MN. Coll 701-775-7815. I70tfo 
1878 MARSHFIELD mobilo homo. 
14x70, nlco Intorlor, fumlshod. 2-both. 
master bedroom, 3 bodrooms, liot tub, 
washot/dryor room, big ontry, $13,500. 
681-2520 or cells 1-500-845-4709. 
P4ISp 



Approximately 1,000 
Square Feet, Handi- 
capped Accessible. 
Across From Hugo's. 

Call 681-4324 
Ram Building Systems 



C EB. 1, 2-bodroom mobilo homo/entry, 
S260.00/mo. plus utlllUBs, no pats, do- 
posit, roforenco. looso. 681-2803. P4i4p 
ONE-, TWO- or throo-twdroom apart- 
ments, brand now, for ront at spodal win- 

lor ralos, 253-4352. IQOtfc 

TWO SMALL etoros tor renl. prima loca- 
tion, 112 and 1143rd Slroal East. Also. 1- 
bedroom apartmont for ronl. 681^957. 
AVAILABLE IMMEDIATELY, largo 2- 
bedroom main floor apartmont, noor boo- 
pital, no pets, doposll, roforenco. lease. 

SB1-2883. 3tlc 

APARTMENTFORRont-8-plox housing. 
2- bedroom, ground la vol. otoctric hoat. all 
utilillos paid, 21S-465-441B aflor Q p.m. 
FOR RENT- Huot ooortmonb, 1 or 2 bod- 
rooms In St: Hllolro, has apartmonts 
avaliablo lor rant with rural development 
and HUD subsidy. Contact tha Housing 
Authority al 637-2431 (or eligibility re- 
quirements and furthor Information or 
contact Bernard Huot at 218-064-5433. 



• 1994 Liberty, 14x54, 2- 
bedroom. $14,000. 

• 1986 Aircraft Classic, 
14x70, 2-bedroom. 
Custom cabinets, central 
air, newer appliances. 
$19,900. 

• 1997 Homark, 16x66, 2- 
bedroom. Perfect shapel 
$28,500. 



218-681-4087 



FOR SALE- 16x80 Marshflold, 3-bod- 
room, 2-both, nlco layout wrlargo ontry, 
located north ol Karlstad, Si 0,750. Call 
Charlio at 701-746-9444 or 701-787- 
SOI 5. F215p 



MOBILE ROME 


lor salo- 


1069 NOW 


Moon (standard) 


12-n.x5B-ft.. daytimo 


call 5233081, oner 8 p.rr 


B74-7825. 


P4t3p 







OFFICE SPACE 
FOR RENT 

302 Third St. East 
Thief River Falls, MN 
Call 218-436-2121 

Ask For Gwen! 



£v: 




QUALiTY HOUSINO 
AFFORDABIUTY 
> ON THE SPOT FINANCINQ^ 



FOR RENT- 3-bodroom apartmont w/ga- 
rorjo, S440/month, avaliablo Jan. 15: 2- 
bodroom apartmont. S405/month, ovail- 
oblo Jan. 1. Both apartmonts in newer 
qtiol 8-plax. Also ovailoblo, smaller 3- 
badroom houso w/garaao, $350/month 
plus uUlltlos, avaliablo Jan. 1. no pots. 
ralaroncos and doposlt roquirod. Coil 

6B1-447B. B g.m.-6 p.m. 105 tic 

APARTMENTS FOR ront In Okloo. roo- 
my, 1- and 2-bodroom, car plug-Ins. loun- 
dry and saiolllto avaliablo. good roloronc- 
os, 790-4662. 100HC 



■*" of Grand Fork* 
1B01 N. Washington St. 
Omn 10-5 D.m. Mon.-Sat 



701-775-3542 



Wanted to Buy 

WANT TO Buy- 1053 or 1054 Nna Ford 
tractor tor parts, must havo o good roar 
ond, phono ovonlnns. 218-440-4425. 

i^to 

3-4 BEDROOM houso In TRF or sur- 
rounding ataa. houso In nood of ronova* 
Hon profotrod, 681-6703. P4ISp 



WANT TO Buy- A good usad Marimba. 



'The lollowing Food Sorvico posHion Is ovoUablo in School District S504, Thiol Rlvor ' 
Falls. Minnosota: 

KITCHEN HELPER 

LOCATION: Franklin Middle School 
EFFECTIVE: 1/21/38 

HOURS PER DAY: 3 1/4 hours per day (10:30 a.m. - 1:45 p.m.) 
studont days 

DUTIES: Sot up and servo as cashier on Iho ala Carto lino. Includes 
washing cafeteria tables, garbage removal, vacuuming cafeteria 
lloor and othor duties as assigned. 
SALARY AND BENEFITS: Por negotiated contract 
REQUIREMENTS: Ability to mako change musl rotate woll with 
middlo school ago students and tho public In general, exporionco 
wilh cooking for largo groups proforred. Position requires standing 
and walking lor most ol the wo* shift and also involves hoavy 
titling. 
Appllcalions may be obtained In person or by writing to the Personnel Department 
School District Service Center, 230 S. LaBree Ave. , Thlet River Fella, Minnesota 
56701. Appllcalions will be accepted until 4:00 pjn., Thursday, January 15, IBM. 



•nv»r Rim Fant Puoic Scrooii otwr no 
, ongln. ten. lelvon. »p« or UiuUxtry r 



Saturday, Januury 10, l'J'JS 



NORTHERN WATCH 



Page 15 



The Classifieds - The Classifieds - The Classified? 



The Classifieds 



Business Opportunities 

BEAUTY SALON oquipmonl Includo:: 
wol stations, dryers, wasrmr/drynr. cabi- 
nets, miicollonoous, 218-745-5365. 



Snowmobiles 



Snowmobiles 



Machlnory 



FOR SALE- 160 JO. tractor with londor 
nnd3-pl., »70JD. tractor with slnglo hy 
drautic, both aro wtdo front row crop. 
Wonted- 2.8 V-0 motor lor '85 Bronco II. 
218-476-2704 otlor 7.00 p.m. PF419p 
1079-2670 CASE, |ust had S7.10O work 
dono on It. radial tiros: 903 Molroo plow. 
8-botton; 20' J.D. drills. 9350. tolophono 

218-450-3390. F2t5p 

1094 0600 J.D. combine t.300 oopnrotor 
hours. All options and maintenance 
rocords, 570,000; 1095 914 pick-up 
hand, oxcollont condition. 57.000: t996 
030 J.D. hood with Hngor rool. S12.000; 
drlvo-on combino traitor lor 9600. S7.000, 

21B-403-3524. P4l6p 

FOR SALE- J.D. LLA grain drill. 2-14' 
wmltch. dry lonilltor. grass sood atlnch- 
mont. markors, good shopo, always 
shoddod and kopt Insklo. disks nro in 
good shape, mud scrapors lika now, 
S2 ,300.00. Also, havo grass sood attach- 
monl for 30' 9350 J.D. grain drill, 
S400.00. phono 218-437-8340. 
ItfOIc/FfOOtfC 

^i i i P ir^i^iJ si 

' Woldors • Cherry Pickers 

• Battery ■ Engine 

Chargers Stands 

• Hot & Ccld Washers 



CALL US FOR 
CLEAN-OUT PRICES ON 
1998's, 1997s AND ALL OTHER 

USED SNOWMOBILES! 

ALSO 
B/ERYDAY 
LOW 
PRICES" Lott 

Hamm's Ripair 

Warren, MN 1-6(30-689-5967 



FOR SALE- 1907 Polaris 440 XC. 2.000 
milon. oxcollonl condition, nnkinr) 
S4.000.00/O b o Cnll 6B1-3176 woo- 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
Mayliold Township Ming dates lor office of 
ono Supervisor. 3-yonr lorm: ono Super- 
visor, 2-yonr torm nnd Cloik, 2-yoar torm 
nro Jan. I3toJan.27. 109Q nt thaclork's 



Miscellaneous 

FOR SALE- 140 John Dooro Inwn tractor 
w/snow blower nnd mowor deck attach- 
montr., 10' Soars CrnMsmnn toblo sow, 
lika now. Soars Craftsman toolbox 
w/drnworr-lop bo*; Inwn wagon, usod 
ono summer; bifj trnmpolino; officio! ping 
pongLiblo; 1990 Goo Storm OT lor parts. 
Call Missy ot 661-7397 ovonings. 2t3p 
FOR SALE- 12.88 ocro hobby farm oast 
a! Challenger. Also, 1971 ORD 3-bod- 
room traitor on own lot. located In Ansoby 
Trailer Court, Hydraulic wood aptitlnr; 
wood cut in B' lengths. 2 cords: 24" color 
TV on swivol bnso: quo on- sir o hi do- a- 
■--■-■■- | inlonnatlon call 



iOl-D 



. 113p 



FOR SALE- 1990 650 Wildcat w/covor. in 
axcollont condition, asking SI. 500.00, 
2ia-38C-10l7or218-4C9-2017. P413p 



1991 ARCTIC Cnl 530 EXT. high m.loa, 
oxcollonl condition. $1,200. Also. t093 
500 EXT 2 In vory good condition. 218- 
701-2820. PF4t5p 



■RAFFLE TICKETS! Numborod or ur 
numborod. Qiont prices I Stop in nt Th 
Times. 324 Mnin Avonuo North. TAF. or 

call CO I -4450. 

PUBLIC NOTICE 
Any resident al Numodnhl Township 
wishing to tile nn affidavit ol confliOacy for 
offico ol Suporvisor (3-yonr lorm) or Clork 
(2-year lorm) musl do so with tho Town- 



GUARANTEED LOWEST pricos- Lap- 
tops nnd computers, on makes and mod- 
els. CHI today lor quota. 218-280-2373: 
SSI. PFIOtJp 



hip Clor 
Jan. 27, 1908. 




Snowmobiles 



skf-tfoo. 



'95 ZR 580 EFI, many oxtros ond nlco '97 
2R 580 EFI. 1,400 miles, oxtras. vory 

nlco, 218-681-6625. PF4l3p 

FOR SALE- 1094 ZR 440. rocont over- 
haul, now eorb slides and CDI box, looks 
and runs groai. asking $2,500 or beat off- 

or,S74-B711. P415p . 

WANT TO Buy- Oldor Arctic Cot El Tlgro. 
Must bo In good condition. Coll 881-5408, 
loavo mossogo. PF4t3p 



1998 SKI-DOO's 

RIDE FREE TIL 
JULY 7, 1998 OR TAKE 
CASH DISCOUNT OF 

UP TO $1,000 
ON ALL '98 & NEW 
' '97 MODELS 



20-50% OFF 



SALE n<KS)i IkADES WcLCOMa 

S & J 

SPORTS, INC. 

I-MW6H114' 7K.J586 Greenbush, MN 



OUR LOT 
IS FULL 

Come And 
Get 'Em 



('96DoifiiEit;'eab ) 4rV'; 0, ' :rJ 
'86 Chevy S-10LS Pickup '■'."' 
'B4 Bulck Park Avuniie 4-0r. 
ISM Chevy 1/2-Ton Ed. Cab *4 
'91 Pontlac Grand Prlx4-Dr. 
'94 Chevy Blazer 4-Dr.-' 
'92 Fort T-BIrd 2-Dr. ■ 
'95 Chevy Blazer 4-Dr. ~ 
'96 Pontlac Brand Am 4-Dr. 
'95 Bulck Park Ave. 4-Dr 
'99 Plymouth Acclaim 4-Dr. 
'93 Olds Clara 4-Dr. 
'95 Mercury Vlliagor Van. 
'84 Mercury Sable 4-Dr. GS 
'95 Chevy 1/2-Ton Reg. Ceb 
95 Chevy 1/2-Ton Bel, Cab 4x4 

95 Old!. Cutlass Supreme 4-Dr. 
!94 Bulck Century 4-Dr. 

96 Chevy Corsica 4-Dr. 

94 Chevy Uimlna 4-Dr. Euro 
'95 Chevy 1/2-Ton Est. Cab 4i4 
'95 Pontlac Grarid Am 2-0r. 

94 Ford Explorer 4Z4XLT 4-Dr. 
2 - '97 Chevy Lumina 4-Dr. 

95 Chevy Tahoe 4-Dr. 4x4 

91 Ford Hanger 4x4 

93 Olds. Cutlass Supreme 4-Dr. 

94 Pontlac Bonneville 4 ; Dr. 

92 GMC Suburban 4x4 

'92 Chevy 1/2-Ton Ext. Cab 4x4. 
'89 GMC Conversion Van 
79Ford1/2 r Ton4x4 



FOR YOUR 

SHOPPING 

COIMVENIEIMCE 

WE ARE OPEN 
8 A.M.-7:30 P.M WION.-FRt. 
SATURDAYS 'TIL 1 P.M. 



Your Full-LinB GM Dealer 



NORTHERN 
MOTORS, INC. 

Hwy. 1 & 59 W. 
Thief Rivor Foils, M"* 



cuj/ou; 

•aiv ana. 



Miscellaneous 

FOR SALE- Cross country skis, polos; 
boots, siio Indios 9: Kimball piano ond 
coronot. All in oxcollonl condition. G81- 

8320. 1t3p 

FOR SALE- Electric motors. 1/4-h.p. lo 
7-1/2 h.p. Sao us for all your olocthc mo' 
lor needs. Fleoi Supply. Coll 681-2650. 
QUALITY REBUILT ENGINES Slatting 
atS795. 12month/l2,000milo warranty ■ 
w/oich. on robultdoblo core. Installations 
and lowing available. Don's Machlno 
Shop, Fosston, MN, 600-448-1513. 17tlc 
OAS AND WOODBURNINQ FIRE- 



EARTH STOVE, NAPOLEON. MAJES- 
TIC, VERMONT CASTING. Also, mnso- 
nary flroplocoo. wood -oil furnaces. Guar- 
ontood LOWEST PRICES. Financing. 1- 
800-440-4043. Mahnomen. 6 Ttic 



1S90 340 Jag wrWarmers and ho'moL 
asking SI, 500. Also, fish houso with its 
own mod and hooter stove. St50. Also, 
quoon-slxo comfort alr.bod with axtra 

sj pod. tramo and brass hoal and loot sat, 

/S1.200, 218-694-4093. 2l4p 



THE WOODMASTER- Hoot your homo, 
shop. barn, groonhouso, ate. Quo tod by 
Engineers ns tno numbor ono in do sign 
lor efficiency, etronglh ond ovor-all 
design. Ensy winter Installation. S loves 
available today, call toll froo 1-0OO-932- 
3629 or 218-253-4328. Northwest Manu- 
facturing. Inc., Rod Loko Falls, MN 
56750. tec 



FOR SALE- N ace hi zig-zag sowing ma- 
chlno in wood cobinot. oxcollont condl- 
Don. Call ovonlngs, 904.5641. 113p 
MACINTOSH QUADRA 610, 8MB RAM, 
100MB HD. 14" Hi-Ros. monitor, 14,4 
modem, lots ol software roady lor Inter- 
not, looks brand now. SOOO/o.b.o. Styfe- 
whtor 2 lnk*|al ptintar. $100 w/computor. 
Call J oo at 064-5666 In tho ovonlngs. 

IF4I7C 

FOR SALE- Intorthorm rumaco, 68,000 
btu irom doublo wkla trallor houso, used 
5 years, had no problems. S450.O0 or 

bost otlor. Coll 781-4551. 1t3p 

COLLECTORS- WE still havo a fow cop- 
ies ot Tho Tlmas Centennial edition avali- 
ablo, SI, 00 por copy. Tho Tlmas, 324 
Main Avo. N., Thiol Rlvor Falls. MN 

56701. 34tfo 

FIREWOOD- Oak, otm, white ash. poo- 
plo. call 661-7684 or 681-1963 ovonlngs, 
will deliver. PF4i7p 



j FOR SALE 

PUREBRED BULLS 

Sons Of Al Trait Leaders 

In Milk And Growth. 

. B.W. From 80 Lbs. To 

'■ 100 Lbs. Excellent W.W. : 

Pick Your Bulls Early 

CAU. 

VERBOUTCHAROLAIS 

1-218-294-6582 



CUSTOM-MADE BALE rings and caffio 
galas, made from t -Inch tubing. Call after 

6.222-3542. PF4t9p 

46 ANGUS cross cows lor solo, 2 bulls. 1 
Chorolois. 1 Angus, tolophono 218-459- 
3390. F2t5p 



BAGLEY LIVESTOCK | 
EXCHANGE, INC. 
Baglcy, MN 



■.</,/!,• ('/ -llu-an .'Irrrrr'.-fr M>ifK(l'\ 
SALES EVERY THURSDAY 



Cattle Sales 

Nwt ill cbun ti D«r Ch«. Itol^Mn 
Sirm. YruiinK D«(Si«ra & lltlfcn. Stock 
Cow,, Fnl Cattle. SUufJiter Cow, & Cull,. 

• COMPUTERIZED RING SCALE 

• CAT-WALK 

• DRIVE-THRU UNLOADING 

• FULLSERVICE CAFE 

■ CATTLE QHULON THURSDAY 



I SPECIAL FEEDER 



I CATTLE & 

SLAUGHTER CATTLE 



Situation Wanted 





/-BASEMENT LEAKING 
//'.WALLS'BOVilNG 


fl • Beaver System ■ 
n * Drain Tilo System 1 
fj -No Digging Up Yani - 1 
3 » Bisomcnt Walls StMightEnod 1 
S • FHA Financing Avaliablo 1 
M • Over 30 Years ol Sorvico 1 
1 Basement Water Controlled 1 
1 1-800-348-6247 I 


>,i--.:.-...-, ■:-.-;.• :: J 



JACOBSON'S 
SNOW REMOVAL 



Ploaso Call. Wo Want Youf Buslaoss. 
Coll 681.1511 oik lor Adorn 
or 601-1106 osk for Curtis 



*THE TIMES haa aluminum snoots (or 
all your small topalis. Tttay aro 23x35 
and cost only 45 cants ouch. Call 681- 
4450 lor mora Information. 




1UTAND SAVE- — — — — — 

Call'964-5237 For... 

i READY MIX CONCRETE, SAND & GRAVEL. 
We Have Heated Ready Mix For 
Year Around Jobs. 

I- For Selurdey Delivery Of needy Mm, Call Frtdiy 
RADIO DISPATCHED TRUCKS 

I NO JOB TOO DIG OR TOO SUAUI | 

Concrete Inc. i 

concrete inc. St Hitalre, MN . 



THURS., JAN. ISTH 
Iltoo A.M. 





Building and 
Remodeling 

For Free Estimates Coll: 

TIM 

681-5465 



MONDAY/TUEBDAY/FRIDAY, S O.m 
5:30 p.m. Northland Shoo Ropalr, 607 81 
SLE. PF120?p 




FARGO LIVESTOCK MARKET 
CENTRAL LIVESTOCK 




North Dakota's Largest Volume Livestock 
Weekly Auctions: Tuos. 4 Wod. * i 

SPECIAL BULL MARKET 
Can For Details CLA FEED PROGRAM 

Call For Dololla 

SPECIAL FEEDER SALE: Byery Wod. 

COW SALEJN CARRINGTON, NDi Monday, Jan. 12 

SPECIAL PRESORT SALE: Tuesday, Jon. 13 

COW SALEi Tuesday, Jen. 20 

Doug Kllen • 218-681-7563 

West Fargo Livestock Market • 1-800-733-4620 



BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY FOR SALE 




Excellent business opportunity on Slate Hwy. 32 in Thiel Rivor 
Falls. Full-service gas station with new computer-operalod 
pumps, Cardtrol system, a free-standing island reader, canopy 
and underground tanks with computer monlloring system. This 
site is close lo downtown and would make an excellent conve- 
nience store location. Call us (or details! 

STAN GIBSON REALTY 218-681-4087 



ELIMINATE HIGH HEATING c 
Stainless Stool outdoor woodbummg fur- 
nace. Hoals multiple buildings. Big sav- 
ings on early ord ore. Rnondngovnllab.0,- 



WINDSHIELD REPAIR- Stona chips, 
small breaks, approx. to% roplacomont 
cost. Most Insuronco companies waive 
doductiblo. For (too ostlmolos call 68 1- 
4233, Anderson Wlndshlold Ropalr. 

NM2-8tfc 

FOLTZ BUILDINGS. Your post homo 
building oxports. Insulated shops/garag- 
es, commotciot/lndusirlol. machinery 
norngo. horso/crjtrjo bams. Call 1-800- 

255-0981. FlStlc , 

FOR SALE- 2 , x2' v-tubo. tight flxturos 
ond stand up, round Indirect lighting, 
■2-x5\ S10.00 oach. ask for Frod Jr., 218- 

881-3387. 10p 

FOR SALE- Plonks. 2')i8-.1u'-12 - -1ir 
Irom 8" to 20" long. Also, 3x1 0-8' that saw- 

mill buy. 218-2S3-2938. F1tfc 

FOR SALE- Banding toot lor tumbor or 
posts with bonding material, now condi- 
tion, S350.00. 218-430-2555. HOp 



STQCK COjga 
HEIHiR SAT.K 



SAT, JAN. I0TH 

1100 P.M. 



For More Information Call 
Market Phone: 218-694-3701 

FAX: 218-694-3700 
Highway 2 West, Bagley. MN 



FOR ALL YOUR 

Repair Needs 

• Chun Sews • SnowmoWas 

• Snow Qlcwori • Outbooidi 

• Inboaids & 1.0. D>rves • All Smell Engines 
* Lawn Mowers & DicMri 

NORM'S REPAIR 

• SALES A SC flVtC£ • SOflOO SNOWMOBILES 

1207 N. Duluth TNef Rlvw Fetle 

001-3346 



Custom Services 



FOR SALE* Bool cows, somo with calf 
on slda, 2 horses. G-lon Oakon traitor, 
Hooston stock mover, stool stock rack, 
gear box lor Minnesota sproadar, 6x20 
stock trailer, Bwathar transport, 268- 

4855. F2t5p ■ 

FOR SALE- 50 nlco boat cows and 30 
brad helioro, start calving March 15. Can 
load for a low months. Good hay lor solo, 
218-79G-5B92. PF4t3p 



(| 



MMRM 
ELECTRIC 



• Residential • rAgr(cu/tura/ 

• Comrrtercla/ 

• Electric Heat 

TIM BERGERSON 
Owner-Operator 

caff 681-4659 



ACKER BODY SHOP- Frame etraighton- 
Ing, collision, glass, touch-up, 14 yoars 
oxporlonco, Insurance oatlmatas wol- 
coma. From Roseau: 6 mltos west, 1M 
rnito south, 463-5099. FStfe 



WE HIVE WHAT YOU NEED,.. 

• Custom Mfg. All feeds 'Tack 

• Livestock toed • Animal Health 
•Horse Feed 'Bulk Feed 
•Liquid Feed •Hutri Block 

• Wator Softener Salt 

• Bos Builder Mineral 

CountRy Stone 



YOUR INDEPENDENT 
_ HERBALIFE DISTRIBUTOR 

N0 " T CATTLEYARD SOTA I fOI) PgODUClS CM 

218-597-2774 



HORSE SALE 

Saturday, Jan. 24 
Starting at 12 Noon 

WrmTAc««r1?«ONo« 
— BrT*tto«t8*iB. 



wmsm 



1ET3EEEH 



ill oony mornings 



CNC & TOOL ROOM EQUIPMENT 

AUCTION SALE 



WELLT^K^EftlGINEERlJNG, INC, 
INDUSTRIAL PARK EAST, GRYGLA, MN 



TUESDAY, JANUARY 20, STARTING AT 10:00 A.M. 



REAlBTATEMDJMnOVfflEJiTSmiiB^ 

Tnnc muchinn have viihoui opllon) and nltachinmu. ' ~* 

CMC ■« "«» VMC MoJtl VF-I. w/*lh »!■ Intlc.tr; Vert. Mill ^ Mllllronita 
r*rmcr, Mod. 04, Serin V. 3 «li control; CMM 'M It & S Micro-Xctl Modrl 701S 
Syitrm p»ckisi »1T. 293' t 39J- « W.T; MIliS; VI ChrvslleT I-'M-IVKK VS Acer 
Mod. UUimfJVK. 0) ^6 Sturpi Model OMV; SAWS: V5 i'rritna Auto Horn, band 
Mod. H0-BI1A; liUuhatt-i LATHE: ^ l!n™ Cap. ir/2f > *0~; CK1NDEKS. Do oil 
Hyd. DB2J-I0; TAC: bfnch lypt; Allt COM!'. U URYEK; HHAT TRIIAT OVEN; 
THESSES. DH1LL PRESS; BELT A DISC. SANDER; PLASMA CUTTER; WIRE 
tVELDER; PORKUIT; TRAILER; HOT WATER HIGH 1'RESSURE WASHED TREC. 
INSTR; GENERAL SUPTOKT ITEMS AND ACCIiSSOKIES, OFFICE! ITJHNITURE. 
MUCH MORE. Trrmi; Canh or Company th«k v 



NORTHWEST POWER SYSTEMS 



Factory Authorized Delsel Pump and 
TuiDocharger Service 




BOSCH STANADYNE 



-ZEXHL- 



kUK] NIPPONDENSO 

Also Cummins and 3208 Cat 



Repairs, Exchange, and New 

■ Pumps 

- Injectors 

- Nozzles 

- fyrboctwiiers 

• Glow Plugs and Controllers 

■ Diesel Puet Additives 

■ Donaldson Fuel Filters 

■ Drive In Service Also Available 



NORTHWEST POWER SYSTEMS, INC. 

204 Atlantic Avonuo 

Thlof Rlvor Folia, MN S6701 

www.northwMt-fxmer-eystom-tom Email: nj» OnorlFiwest-power-tyitem.com 

218-681-5282 800-570-5282 



h:yj,'i:«;inaw/ 

Chapter 7: $300 

KKSV 

Uncontested: $250 

OMDAHHAfOFHCE 

1-800-4^0^6040 



ATVs/Motorcycles ■ 

1096 POLARIS 500 Sportmon 4x4, shaft 
difvo. S4.700. Also. 1 005 Polaris 300 4x4. 

$3.200,218-463-3488. »3p 

'82 YAMAHA Virago 920 motorcycle, has 
a faring, radio, onglno oil coolor, 24.500 
mllos, S1.150.00. D&S Solos. 1-800-253- 

2000 or 218-253-2040. tt3p 

WANTED FOR ports- 1982 Hondo 70 3- 
whaolor tor parts. Phono 218-081-1133 
or 21B-CS1-0033 and loavo a mossogo 
lor Gary. 72tfo 



WANTED- Good Items for St. Hiloiro U- 
ons conslgnmont auction March 14-15. 
low consignment ralos, 064-5493, 964- 
5369.6Bt-76B1. PF4t9p 



FOR SALE- 8-t/2x24-tt. Tlmbofwotl on- 
closed trailer, usod onco. 216-478-3374. 

PF4t9p 



'I I- 



I'ilRC 16 



NORTHKRN WATCH 



Saturday, .lanuary 1(1, 1908 



Saturday, January 10, 1908 



NORTHERN WATCH 



Pa R c 17 



The Classifieds - The Classifieds - The Classifieds - The Classifieds 



FOR SALE- 1995 A 
drive, lo.idno\ in m 
7;3G. Palo PiCCarg . 



FOFWALE- 1987 Ford 4«4 F-150 pickup 
and loppor, arting $-1,000. 6(11-4990 

PF419p 

1391 GEO Tracknr 4>4, no* liroj. 
103.000 roiios, runs rjootf, furdlop. ask- 
ing S-t.900'0 D o dll G01-15G2. im* for 
Billy or loavo n mosr-ifln PJISp ■ 



199! S-10 Blnzar Epon. blacfc'owy mwn- 
or, p«, pi. ult. cruiso. nulo.. 90,000 
rrnloa. $9,495 00. 2 10- 36-1 -5673. PF4l3p 
■91 FORD Eiploior. 4-door, 4.0 V-6, a f. ' 

S7.750. DSS Snlos, 1-BOO-253-Z009 or 

21B-2S3-29-J0. U3p 

■92 CADILLAC FlootwooU RVD. 4 9, V- 



FOR SALE- 199& F-150 XLT 4x4 m- 
tondnil cob pickup. 302. nulo. 28.000 
rmtoa. loadou. 21B-7fl2-310.| PF4l7p 



Automobiles 



FOF1 SALE- tin Dodgn Camv.in. nskmi 
S1.H00. call 0H1-I0J9 Clays, 0(11-7492 ai 
liir tJOOprriP-tlCp 



Automobiles 

1000 PONTIAC GOOD, 4-door. 2 V-C, Ml. 
cruiso. lie. whito w/tluo Intor-or. sjiIo 
pncod 51.350. DSS Snlos, 1-000-253- 
2009or210253-2940. 113p . 



■M PONTIAC Grand Am, 

norruc.H S7.950 00, 681- 
P414p 



FOR SALE- 4»2Chov.. 1984. Suburban, 
full powor. goals 9. otcoiiom condition. 
EB 1-2000 102HC 



1995 CHEVY S-10 4-whooldrivp Slnjor. 
Has command st.irl Call 218-74S-J0S7 
odor 3 p.m. BBtlo 



1987 F-250 3/4-lon pickup. 4.4, 460 . 
gino, 4- spend ovordrlvo. nico conditii 
Call ovo run ga, 21B-6B1-2203 214 p 
FOR SALE- 1093 Dodgo Dakota Club 
Cab 4x4, V-8. outo., loaded. Call 6B1- 
4303 days. o=k lor Hruco. 6B1-615E 
overlings. PF4l7p 



1979 CHEV. Malibu Classic. V-6. fciuu. 
126.000 milos, doytimo call 523-3681 nf- 
lor G p.m 074-7625 P4t3p 
■93 CHEVY 4«4, V-G, 4 3L. 5-sp.-orJ. 
01,300 mitos. lonl. exeolleni condmari, 
514,500. C81-1020tH1or7pm. P4,tGp 
'88 OLDSMOQILE Clora. 4-door, 2 5 4- 
lock engine, good tiros, gray w/roU Iniori- 
or, tuna grout, grunt buy S1.250. D&S 
Sales, 1-000-253-2009 or 210-253-2940 

'Op 

1993 OLDS. Cullaaa Supremo. 4-door. 
londod. 5G.00O miloa, Ron's Aulo, G81- 

3002. 1l3p 

FOR SALE- 1989 Ford F-150 stwlbox 
pickup, now tiros nnd oitiaust. oicollont 
condition, SG.900. Cnll 218-754-2371. 



1979 COUPE PoVilln Cmillac. oicollont 
body. 51.000. 1905 Toyota van. soma 
ruil. S800. 210-403-3524 P4l6p 
-FOR SALE- 1909 Ctiov Mon. 4-door. 
4.4. 454 nuto.. 3.3, SilvOMdO.days 061- 
CG11 P4l5p 



FOR SALE- 19B6 (ull-sizo Joop Qrand 
Warjonoor. 4-v.hool-dnvo. fully loaded, 
power windows, powor sun root, powor 
door locki. air, Ml. cruiso. GB1-6447 ahor 

5:00 pm P416p 

•90 PLYMOUTH Voyarjer Grand LE. all 
options, S3,900Vorlor; B7 Taurus MT-5. 
51.900/oflor. 218-904-5332. P4t5p 



NELSON MOTORS and BROST CHEVROLET 



presents 



CROOKSTON'S 17TH ANNUAL $1,000,000 



INDOOR CAR SALE 



THREE DAYS 

ONLY 



JANUARY 15, 16 & 17th AT THE RED RIVER VALLEY SHOWS BLDG. 



A Few 1 997 

GM Carry Overs 

Priced Well Below 

Invoice. 



8.9% 

on the spot 
financing 



EXTEND-A-CAR 

All vehicles have a 

12 month or 12,000 mile 

warranty with 24 hr. 

Roadside Assistance. 



Thurs. & Fri. 9-9 • Sat. 9-4 

WE MUST REDUCE INVENTORY 



© Sale Phone 281 - 
2900 Thurs., Fri. & Sat. 



These are just a few 
to choose from! 



© Sale Phone 281- 
2900 Thurs., Fri. & Sat. 



PRE-OWNED & PROGRAM CARS 

■57 Pontlac Grand Am QT. 2-Dr.. 5K 514.900 

•9fl Pontlac Grand Am SE. 4-Dr.. 19K *!9-?99 



•96 Chevy Lumlna, 4-Dr . V-fi. PW. PL 

"85 Pontlac Bonneville. 1-Ownor, 35K— — . 

■95 Pontlac Grand Prix SE. 3iK. CO 

*B5 Pontlac Qrand Am SE, 4-0' . PW. PL ~- 
■94 Pontlac Bonneville. 5IK. Maroon — — 

W Dodge Shadow. 4-Dr.. Whito. Auto 

"93 Bulck LeSabre. 1 -Ownor. *3K P4110 — 

"93 Bulck Century, Ok. Maroon. Nieo • 

'93 Mercury Tracer. 4-Dr . 49K. Aula 

'63 Pontlac Bonneville. SZK. PW. PL 

'S3 Olda. Achieve, 4-Dr. Loodod. Auto- 



■93 Ford Taurus OL. *-Di . V-G. Nico _. 
"93 Chovy Cavalier Convertible. 5SK ... 



•92 Olda. Cutlaaa Supreme. 4-Dr,. PW. PL„ 

"92 Olda. Cutlaaa Supreme. 2-0' . V-6 

•92 Old* Cutlaae Clara, Gioat Vaiuo — — — 

"92 Old*. Royal* LS. PW. PL. M.ios 

'B2 Pontlac Bonneville. t-Ownor. M.lot 

'92 Ponllac Grand Prla SE. 2-Dr . Whito 

'91 Pontlac Qrand Prla SE, 4-Dr . Loodod .-. 
•91 Olda. Cutton Supreme. 4-Qi . Loodod — 

'91 Bulck LeSabre LTD. Dk. Bluo 

"91 Mercury Tracer Wagon- 

'B9 Mecury Sable, 4-Dr . V-G... 



~S3,90u 

™ $095 



TRUCKS - VANS - SPORT UTILITIES 

■98GMC Sonoma Ext. Cab. 4WD. 3rd Door -J1B.900 

•97 QMC Jimmy. 4-Dr. 4WD.21K ._ — .520,900 

"97 Pontlac Transport. Hoor A.r ... 

"96 Chevy Tahoo. 4-Or„ 4WD. 32K 

'96 Chevy Blaxer, 4-Or.. 4WD. 19K.„ 

■B6 QMC Sierra Ext Cab. 4WD. 3S0 V 8 _. 



... .518,900 



.,535.900 



.419,900 
,..117,900 



Ford Explorer XLT, Loo'.ior. Pwr. Hoot — ., 

'95 QMC Jimmy, 4-Dr.. 4WD. 47K. Toal 

'95 QMC Ext Cab, 2WD. 30S. V-8, N.co 

'95 Jeep Qrand Chorokee LTD. Moon Boot 

'95 Chev. Blazer, 4-Dr. 4WD'.'lT. PW. PL 

'94 Pontlac Tranapon. 3830. v-6. P«r Door ... 

•93 GMC Vandura, Fui:-Suo. Croon : 

'92 Ford Reg, Cab, 4WD. V-B, Aulo 

'92 Chevy Aatro Van, AW3. Local Troao 

'92 Dodge Qrand Caravan, v-6. Hign M<:oi — , 

'91 Chevy Ext Cab. 4WD, OIK. V-B — - 

'fll GMC Ext Cob, 4WD. V-8. SLE ... 



■90 Chevy Ren. Cab. 4WD. Was 58.900... 
■90 Chovy Reg. Cab. 2WO. Juii Traded ... 

'90 Chevy Aatro Van. Ext Lo«g'-' 1 » 

•89 Chovy Hog. Cob. 4WO. V-B. Aulo , 

■89 Ford Rag- Cab, 4W0 XLT. />utO 

"89 QMC Surburban. 4WD 

'89 GMC Suburban. 4WD ... 



NELSON MOTORS INC, 



HWY. 75 S. CROOKSTON, MN • 2B1-1325 • (600) S68-602S 



;96 Chevy Cavalier. 4. Or. Aqua... 



CARS 



'96 Codltao DeVilla. 4-0r.. LoaJwr. Maroon_ 



'95 Chevy Cavalier, 20r . Sunroof. QtuO... 

■94 Lincoln Continental • Signature Serlea. Block 

'94 Dodge Shadow. 4-Dr.. ES. Groon, Onty 29.000 M los... 

•93 Chevy Cavalier, 4-Dr.. Qmy - 

■93 Ford Tempo, 4-Dr.. Unit BuO — - 

"93 Pontlac Qrand Prla, 2-Dr "»oi Oroon — 



10 Olda. Cutlaaa Supreme. 4-Dr . Maroon 

10 Olda. Delta 88, 4-Dr.. Convnond Start, duo 

19 Mercury Seblo. 4-Dr.. Whno 

19 Dodgo Spirit, 4-Dr.. UGft Di jo „ -. 

19 Bulck Regal, 2-Dr.. GS. Sunroof. Groy ~... 

19 Ponllac Grand Am, 4-Dr . Do* Bluo ~ 

19 Olda. Cutlaaa Supromo. 2-Dr Whno _... 



'85 Olda. Cutlaaa Clare. 4-Dr. Gray..., 



TRUCKS - VANS - SPORT UTILITIES 



■97 Chovy Tahoo, 4-Dr. t-Owno-. Groon.... 



6 Chevy S-10 Ext Cob. 4x2. ngw Btuo -..- »...S10,S0O 

5 Chovy Silverado Ext Cob. 4,4. 350, AT. Biuo/S.ivor J19.S00 

5 Chevy Tahoo, 4-Dr. Custom Po.nt. Black — *H1"999 



...58.500 



14 Chovy S-10 Reg, Cob.. Ony 9.600 M.ios. G.-oon._ 
■94 Mazda Ext Cob.. 4*4. Only 35.000 M.ios. Rod ...... 

'93 Aatro Van, Dark BI-jo - 

■93 Suburban, 4x4. LccaJ 1 -Ownor 

'93 Chovy S-10 Ext. Cob., V-C. Go.in. Whno 

■93 Nltaan Ext Cab. 4<4. Daik Gray - 

•93 Ford F-150, 4x4. XLT. To torn Gray - S10.BOO 

'93 Chovy Sllvorodo Ext Cab. 4>4.3S0. r>Sp. Groan S14J0O 

■92 Chevy S-10 Ext Cab. 4.4. 1 .0»nor. D-ack/Rod^- ...S10.8O0 

'92 Dodge Caravan. 7.Paiscn;or. Maroon 

■91 Aetro Von, 4,3, V-C. Maroon'Sii 



....55.000 
....S7.900 
,...58.900 



....58.900 



'89 Plymouth Voyaguer Van. W.voon.. 

'89 Chovy S-10Blazor. S Dr.. 4.4. HoaTJiark ..._ 

'87 Chevy S-10 Blazer. 2-Dr , 4.4. But*.- 

'87 Chevy S-10 Pickup. 2WD. AT. BrowrVGoia.... 

■86 Chevy Convoraion Von. 300. AT. Bluo — 

■84 Chovy Suburban. 4»4, 350. AT. Blue 

'84 Chevy Cargo Van, Brown... 



,...54.400 
,...51.900 
...56.300 



BROST CHEVROLET 



HWY. 2 & 75 N. CROOKSTON, MN • 261-1930- (600) 598-5537 




1995MIRCURTSAB1I 

4-OMwW.«.0MMt _ 111,330 

1995 FORD HURUICL 

IDr IV.BIfr] 

1995 DODGE INTREPID 

40r. 55.C00U. 110,190 

1991 MKUAC GRAND PRIX 

4-0r. LCX»1 KV.t |*,fl»0 

1991 MIRtURY MRU 61 

SWIonlrY»jon.uiKW,;j.CiCOU. ..15,749 
1990 DODGf WWW 

«-Dr.a3.CC0Ui - tJ,l(0 

1990 UDIIUC SEDAN DlVlUE 
Uaaed.59.OCOU ..- -11,530 



M Htn toi I Ktfcrpt toOmM FmJ 

Iraiaij mvoch to Qnnd H^ni. 



•top. II WW b. . 
Sn Dlvg. SI 



McINTOSH 



Hwy 2 E. - Mdnloth 

218-563-7778 



Galaxle Auto and 
Camper Sales 

=:&.&.CARG0mTE -.-= 
-v'jlfintyTrallBjSj^ 

travelTrmers, 

5th wheels & 

pop-up campers 

8'i24' Snowmobile Tiailer...tS,700 
l)93Hp(li:'..39,00DHI.,Wl, 
1993 Corsica 52.000 Mi....4-0r. 
IMeroslu Van-ROM Hi., Mital 
1992 Fold Tempa...59.D0O Mi., 2-Dr. 
19)0 Lincoln Conllneolil...6S.00D Mi., 

Full Power 
1989 Foil Conversion Vm...»,0ig Ml. 
1916 Old!. 9B...Mt....!2,79S 

Authorbotl fjacnttlonal Dealer 

For Sales. Service And 

Camping Supplies 

Open 8-6 Monday thru Friday 

1 Mil. Soulh Hwy. 59 

ScotHUcktnM ThLIRIvefFdlt, UN 

JciryKkUnon 218^81-7093 



'65 MERCURV Maiquls. Z-tono, V-6. 
157.000 milos. S80O or boat oWor, 601- 
1020alloi7p.m. P4ISp 




1998 CHEVT/GHC EXT. 

3rd Door 4x4 




|TOIfc.tt.Ua*iOTiWaiXttatWrV»;te 



1997 Bulck LeSabre Custom 4. Dr. 
1997 Pontlac Bonneville 4-Dr. 
1996 Pontlac Orond Am 4-Dr. 
1996 Chevy Corsica 4-Dr. 
1996 Chevy Cavollcr 4-Dr. 
1996 Chevy Lumlna 4. Dr. 
1995 Chevy Corsica 4-Dr. 
1995 Pontlac Orand Prix SE 4-Dr. 
1994 Bulck Pork Ave. 4-Dr. 
1993 Eagle Talon 2-Dr. TSI. AWD 
1993 Chevy Lumlna Eurosport 4-Dr. 
1992 Ceo Metro-4-Dr. 
1991 Cadillac DeVllle 4-Dr. 
1990 Bulck Regal 2-Dr. 
1990 Chevy Cavalier 2-Dr. 
1990 Chevy Lumlna 4-Dr. 
1989 Bulck Regal 2-Dr. 
1989 Pontlac Sunblrd 4-Dr.I 
1989 Bulck LeSabre 4-Dr. 
198S Dodge Shadow 4-Dr. 



■. 70.000 M, 



Von 



000.AT.C-- . 

1994 Chevy Lumlna APV 

3.0. AT.. Maroon. 57.000 Ml. 
1992 Pontlac Transport SE 

V-0. AT, Rod. 00.000 Ml. 
1989 Chevy Astro RWD Van 

V4J. AT., Maroon. 00.000 mi. 
1989 Plymouth Vi.yagcr SE 

4CYI..AT.. Gray. 10O.0O0MI. 



1996 Chevy Suburban 4 

350. AT, Whllo. 27.000 Ml. . 
1996 Chevy Tahoe L.T. 4-Dr. 4x4 

Dk. DIlW, 30.000 Ml. 
199S Chevy Blaicr L.S. 4-Dr. 4x4 

V-o. AT. Maroon, 75.000 Ml. 
1995 QMC Suburlun 4x4 

350. AT, OlurVSilvrjr. 09.000 Mi, 
1994 Chevy Blarer 4-Dr. 4x4 



1992 GMC Suburban 4x4 

3M.AT.. BUck. 115.000 Ml, 
1992 Chevy Blaicr 4-Dr. 4x4 

V-0. AT.. Emerald Groan. 70.000 Ml, 
1991 CMC Jimmy. 4-Dr. 4x4 

V-0. AT.. Rod. 100,000 Ml. 
1991 Chevy Suburban 4x4 

2 OiOHl, AT. DUckfOold, 00,000 Ml, 

1990 Chevy Suburban 4x4 

350. AT.. DlacWSirvor. 00,000 Ml. 



immmmwm 



1993 Chevy Ext. Cab S.B. 2WD 

305. AT.. TeaVSitvor. 07.000 M(. 
1992 GMC Ext. Cab L.B. 2WD 

305. AT. Gray. 140.000 Ml. 
1991 Chevy 3/4-T Ext. Cab S.B. 

2WD 350.AT.. MaioorVIan. 105,000 M 
1987 Ford F-150 Ext. Cab L.B. 

2WD 30;,AT.Gra». lOt.OOOMI. 



mwmvmjmvmmn 



1998 Chevy Ext. Cob 3rd Door S.E 

4x4 350. AT.. Hod. 5.000 Ml, 

1997 Chevy Ext. Cab S.B. 4x4 

350,AT.,Hea\Z7l, 3B.0O0MI. 

1997 Chevy Ext. Cab 3rd Door S,l 



4 350. AT.. Auturr 



id. 30.00 



1997 GMC Ext. Cob 3rd Door S.B. 

4x4 350, AT. While. 20,000 Ml, 
1997 Chevy Ext. Cab 3rd Door S.B, 

4x4 350. AT. Autumnwood, 40,000 Ml. 
1997 Chevy Ext. Cab S.B. 4x4 

3O5.AT„Rod.!5.00QMI. 
1997 QMC Ext, Cob LB. 4x4 

305. AT.. E mora Id Croon 30.000 Ml. 

1996 Chevy Ext. Cab 3rd Door S.B. 

4x4 350, AT, Rod. 47.000 Ml, 
1996 Chevy 3/4-T Ext. Cob L.B. 

4x4. 350. AT., Rod. 20,000 M). 
1996 Chevy Ext. Cab 3rd Dr.,S.B. 

4x4, 350, AT.. Maroon, 57,000 MI.V. 
1995 Chevy Ext. Cob S.B. 4x4^ — 

35O.AT.WMI0. St.OOOMI, 
1995 Chevy Ext. Cab S.B. 4x4 

350. AT. Black. 50.000 Ml. 
1995 Chevy 3/4-T Ext. Cob L.B. 

4x4 350, AT. Black. 04,000 Ml. 

1995 Chevy 3/4-T Ext. Cob S.B. 

4x4 350, 5-Spd., WhitaUhie. 40,000 Ml. 
1993 Chevy Ext. Cab S.B. 4x4 

350, AT, While. 40.000 Ml. 
1995 Chevy Ext. Cab S.B. 4x4 

3!0, AT.. Emarakt Groan. 54.000 Ml. 

1993 Chevy Ext. Cob S.B. 4x4 
350. AT. Autumnwood. 39.000 Ml. 

1994 Chevy Ext. Cab S.B. 4x4 
350. AT. LI. Bluo. 100,000 Ml. 

1994 QMC Ext. Cab S.B. 4x4 

350, AT, Maroon. 07.000 Ml. 
1994 Chevy Ext. Cab S.B. 4x4 

350.AT.. Whflo. 03.000 Ml. 
1993 Ford Ext. Cob S.B. 4x4 

3Q2.AT..Gray.01,0OOMI. 
1991 Chevy Ext. Cab S.B. 4x4 

350. AT.. Bluo. 02.000 Ml. 
1990 Chevy Ext. Cab L.B. 4x4 

350. 5-SpOOO. Maroon/Do igo, 175.000 Ml. 
1989 QMC 3/4-T Ext. Cab L.B. 

4x4 350, AT.Maroon/Tan.lOfl.OOOMI 



1994 Chevy Reg. Cab 4x4 

V-0. 5-Spd . Dk. Dlus. 72.000 Ml. 
1993 Chevy Reg. Cab 4x4 

350. 5-5pd. Dk. Bluo, 141.000 Ml. 
1992 Chevy Reg- Cob 4x4 

350. AT, Rod/Black, 77.000 Ml, 
1992 QMC Reg. Cob 2WD 

V-0. 5-Spd. Ron. 01.000 Ml. 
1991 GMC Reg. Cab 2 WD 

V.fl, S.Spd.; Bod 04,000 Ml. 
1990 Dodge D150 Reg. Cab 4x4 

V-0. 5-Spd.. 105.000 Ml, 
1909 Chevy Reg. Cab 2WD 

X5. Bluo. 00.000 Ml. 
I960 Ford F-230 Reg, Cab 4x4 

351. AT. DM, 120.000 Ml. 



1995 OMC Ext. Cab S.B. 4x4 

0.5T. AT.. Dk. Oluo. 40.000 Mi. 
1990 GMC Reg. Cab 2WD 

2D.AT.WMI0, 125.000 Mi. 



Christian ^sas. ■ 



Fertile, Minnesota 



7 -800-53 1-6166 



The Classifieds 



The Classifieds - The Classifieds - The Classifieds 



1988 PONTIAC Orand Am ATC. 
AM/FM/caisotto. whllo w/btuo Inlorlor. 
S1.975.00/o.b.o.. 601-2520 or colli t- 

500-B45-47D9. P415p 

1987 CHEV. Aslro vnn, Joyco Conver- 
sion. V-0, most options, runs nnd looks 
groot. $2,200.00: 1905 Cndi Flootwood, 
FWO. 2 -door, bluo. runs/looks grant, 
S2.100.00. 528-3543. Bodgor. 1t3p 



1S86 FORD Aoroslnr vnn. good con 
lion, now transmission, tiros, 52. 0! 
661-5226. P415p 



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Dodgo Rom, 4x4. oxlorxlod cob. 360, au- 
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PARTING OUT- 1901 Chov. Coprico, 2- 
door, 400 onglno stuck, good trans, CO!- 
6530. IQp 



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Automobiles 



DEWAYNES 

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1993 CHEW S-10 Blwor 

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whito w/rod split sonts, bit, cruiso. n.c, 
powor windows nnd locks, smart buy 
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Jhflim Oujrjpf 

AUTO & TRUCK REPAIR 
ENGINE TRANS. OVERHAUL 

681-4629 

HWy.1*l»W. T.R. FALLS. MN 



10BO FORD F-250 4x4. $1,050. good 
runnor but rusty. 8" fiborglass toppor, liko 
now. S300. 681-8425 days or 523-4491 

overlings. 3»c 

'86 CHEVROLET Colobrlty. 4-door. 6-cy 
lindor, loodod, $1.350/o,bo., 218-435- 
1750. 1l3p ■ 



AUTOMOBILE DEALEHS Inloroslod In 
tuhmittlng bids 10 Gordon Volloy Tolo- 
phono Company lor Iho 1998 vohlelo pur- 
chase should opply 1o Gordon Valioy Tol- 
opbono Compnny botoro January 1G. 
1998. SpocilicoUons on vohlclos roqulrod 
will bo moilod to donlors Intorostod In pro- 
viding wrilton proposals. Proposols win 
bo occoptod only Irom doalora outhortiod 
and willing {o perform wo* ntqulr'ta by 
manufncluror'o warranty. Call Gordon 
Volloy ol 218-687-2400 and ask for Ran- 
dy Vorcdflhl or Lotl Holo, 2t3c 



1B85 CHEVROLET Coloonty, 
1 1 tor. 4-cylindor. aulomntic. Al 
good, $550.00.681-1365. 



I3p 



TTic Beit Buys of the New Year 
art happening right now at 

OLSON'S AUTO REPAIR 
8 TOW SERVICE 

616 Davis Ave. • Thief River Falls 
681-4250 




1991 Ford M504X4 
1990 Qtevy Pickup 4x4 



1988Ford Ranger Ext Cab4x4 
1985 Chevy Pickup 4x4 



Great Selection 

of 
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gpde'BSutoSalw 

fl* 7 Hwy.S9N.-TJ1.P»ll« '^U 

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a#*k 

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•vyveGrinoSng 'Pressure 

• Boring Testing 

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$ 26,995 



SCHEVROLEpCLUBCAB 

4*fZ r 7ij*:.' 
-*Ooor,,MiAiitOil >■ 

< |22|99"5. 





i: V*Au1«BrahfllJart,-r 
SI/iV'MltKlnffpS? 



$ m 





kwmrnxs 



%995 



3.S V-6, Auto,, Air, Cruiso, Tilt, 

Powor Windows, Locks, AM/FM 

Cass., Roar Defrost 



flioiwurffl/CE 



'13,495 




V-6, Auto,, Air, Cruiso, Tilt, Powor 
Windows, Locks, AM/FM Cass. 

• mmmx s '7,995 



GREAT SELECTION OF CLEAN, LOW MILE, LATE MODELS 



B97F0HJTAURU3GL 

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1995 FORD ESCORT IX 

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1892 MERC. QBD. MARQUIS LS 



ISStMERCSABlEGS 
1992 BUCK SKVUWX 
1992 BUCK FARKAVE. 



1S91DCOGEDVNAS1Y 
ISSOFORDTAURUStX 
1987 CHEVY ASTHO VAN 
19a9FORDCBOVWIV1CI 



, 1993UNCOLNCONr. - 

igsrrxxioecMi 

1993OCH8-10TAHbe 
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19B3PLmCBD.VOYAa 
19SBFOROF-1S0SC««, 



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Hd. Hn: Ito ■ Fri ICO Ml ■ U3 Pit, En. I »*.H ■ I« PJJ. 
Hwy. 1 A 59 Wait Thief fllvar Falls, I 



OaRBT WGUS jrjFTUHBEBO 



•95 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE 
LAREDO 4X4 

V...A U ,o..T„*,To,, s 21,995 



trinnrty Sound Sy«tom,"LoariBd -21 5 990| 



'93 FORD BRONCO 4X4 



■95 FORD F-250 4X4 
V-8, Auto., Mew Tim* *"| 6-995 



h 7,995 



au E „ s 1 4,995 



93 CHEVY S-lO BLA 

s 15, 



'93 DODGE DAKOTA CLUB CAB 

4X4 

V-fl, Auto, LE, Loadad S "| "\ ,800 



'92 FORD AEROSTAR 
ALL-WHEEL DRIVE 



V-6, Auto., Loathar ' 



'91 FORD AEROSTAR 
ALL-WHEEL DRIVE 



., s 9,995 



s 8,995 



'91 DODGE W-150 4X4 
'-8, Only 64,000 Mllea S "f 5 995 



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~A\ CSEa% Ea 3'° N',n,.-,.^l,'>„,„If,„-.,i„ ( X..I Hll h, !>>-■>• U li-ii.1' 

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Highways 59 & 1 West 218-681-4303 ThicfRiver Falls 



WJ.l.-McMKJ 



«9<; BRAND AM 2-DR. 



31,000 Ml. 
1999 TAURUS. 41. 000 Ml. 
IBM FORD EXPLORER. 



Loaded, 66,000 Miles 
maa rmc ext. cab 4X4. 

Slop-Sldo, 30,000 Ml., V-8, 
5-Speed 



1DQ1 FORD EXPLORER 
19911 CAVALIER 2-DR. 
199H CUTLASS SUPREME 



2-DR. 
1999 GRAND PRIX 2-DR. 
1999 GRAND PRIX 2-DR. 



199B FORD EXT. CAB 4WD 
1997 BUICK LESABRE 
1997 PONTIAC 6000 
1977 CHEVY CAPRICE 

WAGON 
1999 JAG 340 
319 JD GRADER 

TRACTOR W/MOWER 



: VERN'S AUTO SALES 

Stephen, WIN 



% SPECIALS®,^ 
of the WEEK 



iWttWmB»AmniDTO£OM31.- 

«romi». lti»tt.Pwitot 
IMS JEEP GMM CHEROKtE UUBHll. 



IcilitUIOIIsH ijiciUiOi™ 
IMtMCiSllltlW. luMMrctMS 

MSffliffitaa,Riiiiia)ij« 

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BMlDTOHtBICa. aw 

uafflmffls^iictFiiiiowi 

U»RW»lftl,Pj;!PIMta«»#S 
1«i CmULC RJETWOO BR0W5HIUI. 
Wilis Hits 
IMMMSL Uh' lnlDa.3Ua«Ubb 

m 



Emery's auto sales 



218-681-4478 



SWANSON 
MOTORS 

rrr MEW YEAR 

EXTRAVA6AMZA1 



97 Chovy Gr. Prix Con. 4x4, v*«— h«. 

bTchevy Tohoe 2DR Sport v*«,v>.im 

STgNIC 4X* tixL C«b,w«.— HK*r, — 

Sr&rS'ixIXLT.d-. 

6S Chavy Tahoo LT, 

BO Chovy SBuuor, <v 

BTchevy4x4 Ext Cab Diesel Sltv. 271.. 

SO Cnevy2WD, Ext Cab. Silverado, » 

<tanlMa.WliMBlWlMIM 

9SPontlaoTransport,<>MMm.f>-wH<M>. 
95 Chevy SBuuer LT, u.>mm,«>. 
2 -8S Chovy Suburban LT. *«..>-*•«-•«. i 
gTchevy Ext Cob 2WO, M.vtM«>« | 
9Tchevy4x7Ext Cab Z71, «-,««-. 
9SQMC8uburban,w*^Mw.b* l n,m>*-' 
iTch^a^lOExLCab 4x4, .—»-.-. 

9TcT«^bij5cTLt \\%7X£Z WWZ***. 

aTbbviytxTExt. Cab Silverado, ■•*« 
iS^MC^ykxt'SrbT 



JSwH^m 



97 Bulck LeSabre, *h«,H-v<M«,n-L>» 
B7 Chevy Covallor.e™».«4.»,M-«— t— 



LARGEST SELECTION 
OFIHEYEAR 



04 Chevy Suburban, mwmk 
94 GMC Suburban, mummh^ 
04 Chevy 8BI«or.»-. «.—»■. 
^cVivy"siO&ttCab 2VTO «• 
BTchevy RC Silverado 4x4, » 



97 Pork Avenue, mm MM.hH« 
97 Olds S8L3, *»•«•• < — ~ 

0^'ldT»Rq , aU M v. vi. -. u 

9D Pontlac Grand AM, ■•<.■.« 

90 Bulck Park Avenues. «. *~. 

90 Chevy Lumlna, vM<n».u> 

96 Ponllac Bonneville SE, ■*. 

99 Olda Aurora. »«».»«»«.£( 

gTcadlllac Seville SLS.o^m. 

95 Pontlac Grand Prix, **.w. & 

94 Bulck Regal, ■*.«<*>*■*•••■•. 

MC?dl|j?C*Dev™e, a^nuf. 

MbTdTcionr(Lv^rvr« — . -. - 

B30ld» C™i«(w-«. _ „ 

92 Pontlac Grand Prlx,w. h n.> 

92 Bulck Park Avenue, »-.*- 

bTLexuT«oTv^MMi-i 




l'aiy? IS 



NORTHERN WATiVH 



Snlunfci.v. .Inutility 10, I'J'JH 



Milk processors seek to add value to product 

Price volatility is a sign that the law of supply and demand is working 



(Continued I'ci'i 


. IV 


i 


■n'.ing . 


ng processors !.■ 


.1 Out 


Ol Il-.L- 


n- f Mii t : 



ihresc 



. ,llHHll the 



ili.llkct. 

"If Mill pay .1 substantia] orcua 
urn you won't he m ha«m-« iciy 
long." lie said. "Your i u'.ii'rntrs w ill 
soon find a cheaper soaivc o! supply 
and your .ihilily to ■•el] jour piod 
ucts will he pone. Ami ii jou cam 
sell, you can't buy." 

Nagle said lhat [here definitely is 
;m acceleration in the ticnd toward 
growth in herd si/c. He said tin-* i- 
partially the result ol phasing out ol 
dairy price supports «hieh the fed- 
' eia! government paid to dairy pro- 
ducers from the 11.'"- into ilic 
l l )S0s. Without the artificial -up. 
ports, the market is very heavily 
controlled by supply and demand. 
Little Fluid Mirk Used 

In the Midwestern states, only . 
about 15 percent of the milk pro- 
duced eocs into fluid milk which is 
available in its various forms in the 
stores. The remaining HS percent i- 
used for production of cheese, but- 
ler, yogurt, ice cream ar.d a myriad 
of other products. On the East and 
ajVcsl Coasts, however, up to 60 per- 
cent of die farmers' production is 
used as fluid milk. 

Dennis Tollefson. a sales leader 
for (he Northwest Region of Land 
O'Lakes in Grand Forks. ND. said 
this area is fortunate to have the 
Bridge mans fluid milk processing 
plant and the Land O'Lakes regional 
distribution center located here. The 
plant provides a nearby market for 
dairymen and employment for peo- 
ple in the community. 

PolswJ For Growth 

The plant is strategically poised 
for growth. Tojlcfson said, in the 
event that trade laws change and the 
Canadian market becomes avail- 
able. He added that the plant has an 
adequate supply of milk to meet its 
processing needs, but is not at oper- 
ating capacity — with "capacity" 
defined as operating continuously 
24 hours a day, seven days a seek. 

Land O'Lakes has invested heav- 
ily in the local plant in recent years 
to enlarge its capacity and increase 
its efficiency. 

The distribution center on 
Highway 32 south is only a_few 
years old and handles shipment of 
Land O'Lakes products by semi- 
trailer toad throughout northern 
Minnesota, eastern North Dakota 
and part of northeastern South 
Dakota. It is a modem, up-to-date 
facility which is a community asset. 
Milk Leaves Midwest 

John Lokcn. manager of dairy 
planning for Land O'Lakes in 
Minneapolis, points out that not 
only is just a small percentage of 
milk produced in Minnesota 
processed for fluid milk, only 15 per 
cent of the total dairy products 
processed here are consumed here. 
The remainder must find a market 
outside the state. 

Loken, who has spent a career 
learning what he tried to summarize 
for this article in a few minutes, said 
that the 1990's have shown a sub- 
stantial reduction in margin'between 
what the cooperative pays for raw 
milk and what it is able to sell in 
processed products. He said prices 
the cooperative pays arc tied very 
closely to the established commodi- 
ties market, and the fact that there is 
volatility in price is a good indicator 
that the market responds to supply 
and demand factors. 

Price Reflects Value 

Price paid by Land O'Lakes to its 
member producers reflects the cur- 
rent value and the need to remain 
competitive. Lokcn said. In this 
area, price paid for milk that comes 
to Thief River Falls for fluid pack- 



Milk ronig [.i IVih.iin lor clicc-i- 

rHiilirn.il and prniciii. "Inch arc Un- 
building blocks ot cheese Milk 
coining in 1 Incl Rim I'jil- for llmd 
u*e c.inii's u:oM nl it- value simply 
.■a a liiiuid hundredweight basis 
The micr.t. I.oWii s.nd. is in send an 
.ippiopn.itc ccom-itiic signal to pin- 
du.ers s,i they ian nuumi/e il:c 
production of il-.cr lantiin the mar- 
Lciplacc 

Loken and several others inter- 
viewed i»er the past several weeks 
jHnnlod mil lhat prices paid to dairy 
fanners in the Midwest for their 
milk arc significantly higher than 
p.ml to dairymen m the West— 
.including California. Idaho. New 
Mcsico. An/Una and part of Tc»as 
- -often by a dollar or more a hun- 
dredweight. At leasi partially for 
thai reason, dairy products from Ihc 
west are priced' lower and making 
(heir u.iy into Midwest markets. 
The thought of Wisconsin importing 
cheese from California seems 
ridiculous on the surface, but it is 
more than thought— it is fact. 
Huulinf* Subsidized Here 
Midwest dairymen also have tra- 
ditionally received a milk hauling 
subsidy from the processor— a con- 
dition winch does not c*isi on cither 
coast. Subsidized hauling was initi- 
ated in the l%0s as a perk from 
processors to aitract producers as 
suppliers. Loken said, and has hung 
around as an expected practice. The 
processor pays for the hauling and 
makes a charge to the producer for a 
portion of the cost. 

The basic formula price (BFP) 
for milk is established monthly, 
Lokcn said. The BFP for milk in 
December of 1997. for instance, 
was announced January 5, 1998. It 
was established by taking the actual 
price that milk buyers paid for 
Grade B milk in November, adjust- 
ed by the change in milk powder, 
butter and cheese prices - that 
occurred in December. This formula 
yielded the representative vulue of 
milk made into processed products. 
To that price was added a differen- 
tial of $1.20 per hundredweight paid 
by the bottler for Class 1 (Grade A) 
fluid milk. 

Milk Payment 

Milk in the Upper Midwest is 
purchased on the basis of its compo- 
nents. In this system, four values arc 
recognized. The first three arc milk 
components — butterfat, protein and 
other solids. The fourth value is 
Producer Price Differential, which 
represents every producer's share of 
differential paid by bottlers for milk 
going to fluid consumption. 

Each month, milk buyers set a 
price for each pound of each com- 
ponent and a hundredweight value 
of the Producer Price Differential. 
As an incentive to produce quality 
milk, many buyers offer premiums 
for milk of low bacteria and somat- 
ic cell count and make -a deduction 
for very high counts. 

"Wc don't have n tot ofdiscretion 
over what we can pay for milk," 
Lokcn said. "Wc have a fairly limit- 
ed ability to enhance revenue, 
although wc do attempt to use our 
attention to and reputation for qual- 
ity and consumer confidence in our 
brand name as a price lever." 

Lokcn said that the fluid milk 
market, and to some extent the 
cheese market, are fairly inelastic in 
lhat the demand remains reasonably 
constant. People don't drink more or 
less milk or use more or less cheese 
because of modest price fluctua- 
tions. A one percent change in sup- 



ply oi .!<i:i.i;..Iwi!I i.-ii.illv lti,-.v 
liili: In live |Vlii'iil Ji.iilji- 1:1 [>ii 
he .uldcd 

Tv. i. Issu.sllrisvt hani;. 



ml .hi 



Lincoln SnoFest to have 
coronation next Friday 



(Continued from Page 1) 
Monday through Wednesday from 3 
to 6 p.m. Banners are to be no larg- 
er than 60x86 inches and should 
. hang vertically. Judging will be 
basedpn originality and overall best 
done and topics should be school 
spirit or the SnoFest theme of 
"Wonderful Tonight." 

SnoFest button sale will also be a 
pan of the event with buttons to be 
distributed to classes and sold for S I 
each. Sales will begin at 8 a.m. 
Monday when they arc distributed 
to the classes. Deadline to turn in all 
button money and unsold buttons is 
3 p.m. on Thursday, January 1 5. 

In the event of a first place tic in 



Benefit for Bruce Winslow 
Sunday at Plummer hall 



Benefit dinner for the benefit of 
ilruce Winslow .will take place 
Sunday. January 1 1 , from 1 1 a.m. to 
2 p.m in the Plummer hall. Winslow 
has a type of severe diabetes. 

Plummer Lions and Lioness 
clubs arc sponsoring the benefit 
which includes serving meatballs 



^^1^<LI**S^ 



..,:.,. 



ih!s 



rs One 

s I. tests I 



In the 

stales ate iinrdsiiigh setting ilic 
cheese market because tins luu* 
been able n> ptoilucc it .it .i liuvi-t 
cost tli.ui ihc Midwest Allli^-agli 
Midwest dairymen base Ihc highest 
fucd costs m ihc nation because o: 
the colder elniutc. they have ihc 
opportunity to become the lowest 
overall cost ptiKluclion 



s usually considered 
,i laii'er lienl to support imi-stinc 
m lati,ir saving lacililics .nut eijai 
i:ieni and piosidc enough 
1.<r iw.mr more l.iniiht-s so thev 
alternate tunc oil It I here is 
younger person inteiested in coin 
muting to the il.ury ■ cilhcr a I. irmly 
■r young partner - or 




iciest ii 



c*p.ui 



ot I- 

.llLXdC. 



*er l.irnl e 

.. Incli-a 



list .inj eltcc 



labor 

I.irestylc Issue- 
Regarding the lifestyle issue. 
fewer people— -md cflwtully tin* 
younger generation — .lie willing ro 
make (he time commitment to ;i mi- 
gle family dairy operation winch 
requires constant attention every 
day of the year. Producers in their 
mid-50's are wearing out physically 
as well as psychologically and 
choosing to get out of the business d 



e Ming human 
i.i|nt.il, si.ihlc options arc lew 

I. .'ken said Minnesota is .il Ihc 
siossio.ids .nut in danger ol losing 
lis dairy iiifrasinieturc including 
(■n^essiiig plains, veterinarians, 
iipupniciii dealers who provide ser- 
vice. Iced and nutrition suppliers 
and others. W.ih Hie loss ot this 
iriliasituclure would go the econom- 
ic a.imiv thai it produces and the 
hiss would be felt in communities 
ilnoughoiil Hie stale. 

As the number of dairy farms in 
Minnesota has declined over ihc 
\c.n-. -i part of thi\ mfraMniiWrc 
lias already been lost. There is 
opponuniiy io revive and revitalise 
it, however, and recovery may 
indeed come. The next two articles 
will emphasize optimism for 
growth 



Directors leaving momborship on the Doora of tho Rod Lake 
Watershed District wore recognized at the board meeting 
Thursday, January 8, in Thiol River Falls. From loft aro Russoll 
Sander, Fosston, East Polk county; Don Schirrlck, Rod Lake Falls, 
Red Lake county; and Greg Hilgcman, Oklee, Pennington county. 




New directors who officially join the board of the Red Lake 
Watershed District on January 10 are, from left, George Dalley, 
Red Lake Falls, Red Lake county; Dale Nelson, Thief River Falls, 
Pennington county; and Dennis Nlkolayson, Ersklne, East Polk. 



the points tdlal, the winner, of the 
Dress-Up competition will be 
declared the overall winner. 

Concluding event will be the 
SnoFest dance Friday, January 16. 
from 9 p.m. to 12 midnight in the 
school gymnasium. Tickets are $5 
per person and music will be pro- 
vided by XL 93. Dales who are not 
Lincoln students, including those 
from other districts attending class- 
es at Lincoln, must be registered 
prior to the dance at the student 
affairs office. 

Lisa Semanko is faculty advisor 
to the student senate sponsoring the 
SnoFest. 



with gravy, mashed potatoes, cole 
slaw, vegetable, dinner roll, dessert 
and beverage. Free-will donations 
will be accepted. 

Matching funds will be provided 
by Branches 2444 and 10105 of Aid 
Association- for Lutherans at 
Plummer. 




Win l)-[)tiY mnmix 



75 c 




AROUND 
THE REGION 



Jtm Rystad's blood 
donations total five 
gallons 

Red Lake Falls - Jim 

Rystad, an investigator at the 
Red Lake County Sheriff's . 
Department, was presented 
with a five gallon bucket and 
certificate recently by United 
Blood Services. 

While Rystad figures he 
has donated about seven and 
one-half gallons since he start- 
ed donating in 1966 when he 
was in the Navy. United Blood 
Services records show that he 
donated his -list pint last 
week. 

He started donating blood 
to United Blood Services in 
1977 when he moved to Red 
Lake Falls und said he has 
gone to every blood drive 
"with maybe a few exceptions 
when I had a cold," The 
Gazelle 

East Grand Forks 
gets over $900,000 

East Grand Forks • State 
Representative Tim Finseth 
ana State Senator LcRoy . 
Stumpf presented Mayor Lynn 
Stauss with a check for over 
S900.000 recently. 

The money came from the 
Border City Legislation which 
helps communities on the state 
borders. East Grand Forks 
received more than $900,000 
or the S1.2 million that was 
ay ail able. 

Most of the money will be 
going into tax credits to help 
East Grand Forks businesses 
compete with Grand Forks 
businesses. The Exponent^ 

Buffalo roam 
near Winger 

Winger - Verdcll and Fayc 
Olson, owners of Sandhill 
River Bison Ranch west -of 
Winger, were looking for 
"something that the weather 
and 'the government weren't 
involved with" when they 
decided to raise bison. 

Bison fare well In any type 
of weather.- and the govern- 
ment doesn't control the price 
of the meat which is high in 
protein and low in fat. 

The Olsons' herd of two 
years includes 24 butcher 
bulls, 21 heifers and two 
breeding bulls. Mahnomen 
Pioneer 

Family rug loom 
donated to center 

Clcnrbrook - While 
reassembling an old rug loom, 
the family of Andrew and 
Annie Anderson reminisced. 
The homemade loom was built 
over 65 years ago by the laic 
Annie Anderson nnd Mary 
Rhen. both residents of the 
Leonard community. Children 
and grandchildren helped with 
tearing" and sewing the rags 
used to make the special rugs, 
and the loom has been used to 
make hundreds of rugs. 

The family enjoyed a pleas- 
ant afternoon recently when 
they donated the reassembled 
loom to the Clearwater Senior 
. Citizen's Center. The Leader- 
Record 

Wojciechowski is 
newest area racer 

Grccnbush - Kcilh 
Wojciechowski is the new kid 
on the block in a town lhat is 
already home to several estab- 
lished world-class snowmo- 
bile racers. 

Wojciechowski. will race 
Arctic Cat snowmobiles on me 
oval circuit for Spearing 
Racing, a team (torn 
Saskatchewan. The Tribune 
(Continued On Page 2) 







Volume 8, Number 3 



324 Main Avenue North, Thief River Falls, MN 56701 



Saturday, January 17, 1998 




Tho curtain barn at Amundson's Excel Dairy will houso 1.100 hoad ol cattlo to bo milkod throo timos a day 

Amundson's Excel Dairy is still a family farm 

1,100 cow operation north of Thief River Falls will hold an open house in June 

. . . (...Li. .l... I..... I ... .1...... „,...■., !■.'■(,-, i j.t jlrv < r jiui :I1 llli? 



(Tim i 



the 



tenth it 



•i the lint 



Northern Watch ■ 
of dain farmers twtl ti view toMinl 
the future of the dairy industry in 
northwest Minnesota.) 

by Marvin I.undin 
Snrthern Watch Editor 

"We're Mill a family dairy farm," 
Uirry and Rhonda Amundson say 
about their new and expanded 
I.UHI-eow [inccl Dairy several 
miles north of Thief River Falls in 
Excel township of Marshall county. 
"The only difference is that wc help 
support Id families instead of one. ' 

'Hie Atnuridsons are amonu dairy 



m Kigali 



effki 



:oiisulLir.l\, 




With milk prices not cxpcctci: 
increase materially in the lorsceahle 
future, growth in herd numbers and 
reduction of costs per cow arc seen 
as one way to remain profitable. 
New And Expanded 
lixtel Dairy ; is both new and 
expanded since Larry and Rhonda 
have been dairying for several years 
but the present facilities were newly 
constructed a short distance from 
their former operation. The families 
supported by the dairy include their 
own and those of 
their employees. 
For the Amund- 
the decision 
to make one huge 
step instead of a 
couple of large hut 
smaller ones 

keyed on the con- 
in their 
:xpcricni 



Hie belief 
iH.n ihcv .i:e at a p.imi in life (read 
llul yuiine tnnin'IU when they can 
Uke Hie n-k. and an npiuniMii that 
iherc will always he a need fur milk 
and Mirnennc to supply it 

' "|t\ ■.i.arv.' Rhonda admit'-, 
reletting 1" llic magnitude of dcbi 
ineutrcd in finance" the expansion 
They woiktd nut pergonal financing 
through l-'.irm Credit Assntiaiiun 
and the Small Business Administra- 
tion wnh a compaiativcly small 
amount of •.hurt-term gap financing 
through Und O'Lakes Inc. Cu-i <il 
building such new dairying facilincs 
currently is about S3. 300 per cow. 
Expansion Was Planned 

Expansion had been in the 
Amundsons' minds for some tune. 
They rccogni;cd their approximate- 
ly 175 m TlXJ-criw herd v,as an "in 
between* «.:«— too large for them 
to handle v,nhiiul hiring help but Km 
small to support ihc variety of help 
that would be needed. The initial 



plan was 1*1 douhle the herd in jlmul 
.151) at the existing U'llily. then i« 
rive)caislod..-aNe.ig..inl.. a 7IKI- 
eow held 

l:i discu-sing and analyzing Ihcir 
mm operation ar..l facilities sersus 
one designed and built lor large cal- 
tk numbers, they found costs of 
additions ;md conversions were nut 
practical. Their Iced handling situa- 
tion wa-n"i uliat it needed to be. 
involving four facilities and too 
much tune The milking equipment 
would have In be expanded and 
upgraded at subsi.mti.il cusi. 

In the fin.il an.ilvs]s. when it w.i> 
determined thai Tuiar^ing could be 
arranged fur an all new operation. 
the best option appeared n> be taking 
ihc big step at one nine m the 1 . 1 U»- 
etiw dairv, 

K7.f Cows IleinR Milked 

First cnsis went into Ihc new 
harn August 12. i'W and ihc herd 
has rapidly expanded. As this article ' 
i\ being niiticn 'here arc 874 cows 
being milked with another ISO 



springing he ■ leu ol dry tows 
il-nis oi ai the h..me farm The herd 
limits ot api'imimaiely 70 pet- 
;alf hcilers and M) percent 



u fir- 



with in.inyoilhc lat 
mming Irom the Amundsons' prior 

Utry ;iml Rhonda purchased 250 
springing heifeo each from two 
produccis til large numbers of 
heifers "I looked over about 500 at 
each place in pick out 2W 1-irry 
said. At us normal capacity, the herd 
will have alH<ul ')$0 cows milking 

Culling has been heavy with the 
expectation lhat 30 to 3S perccnl of 
Ihc bcid will he culled m the first 
year. Produ.ium of the milking herd 
is up io an .ncr.iec of (V7-5 pounds 
per day wnh a /0-pound average 
anticipated m the near fuiurc. 
Efficiencies Experienced 

.Some of tlie efficiencies of a 

larger herd and facilities designed 

fur large cow numbers have been 

experienced early on and work is 

(Continued on I'agc 4) 



175 register for 
Governor's Ride 



Registrations for the Governor s 
Snowmobile Ride in Thief River 
Falls arc still being accepted. To 
date about 1 75 people have regis- 
tered for ihc event. Between now 
and February 13. registration costs 
SI5. . , 

The annual event rccogm/.cs Ihc 
economic impact snowmobiles 
hasvc on the economy of Minnesota 
communities. It also gives individu- 
als an opportunity to meet with the 
Governor or staff traveling with the 
Governor. 

Three to four different rides are 
being planned. Each guided ride 
varies in distance, but each will 
travel at relatively slow speeds to 
accommodate all levels and ages of 
riders participating in the event. 
There will be people following 
snOwniobilers to make sure no one 
becomes lost or if and when, they 
have engine problems, the problems 
can be fixed or addressed. 

The event utilizes the talent and 
dedication of many volunteers, 
including several area snowmobile 
clubs, such as the StioDriftcrs, 
Goodridge Trailbla/.crs. Founown 
Sportsman Club and local officials 
from Pennington and Marshall 
counties. Thief River Falls Police 
department, and Minnesota 
Department of Natural Resources. 
In ail, there will be about 40 guides, 

The Governor's ride begins 
Friday morning and starts from the 
Best Western. Participants will 
leave in flights of 20 fo 25 each with 



a guide. A bonfire will be held in the 
Elm Lake area to allow riders to 
warm un. After leaving the bon fire 
they will travel to Grygla where the 
Grygla Founown Sportsman Club 
will sponsor a lunch. After leaving 
Grygla. the Goodridge Trail blazers 
snowmobile club will host a coffee 



Convention and Visitor's Bureau 
representative, said organizers are 
really looking forward to the event. 
Thief River Falls was selected to 
host the event based on their bid for 
the event. She said the bidding 
process is becoming increasini"' 
competitive because communities 
are recognizing the economic 
impact of this event. Because of 
snowmobiling'? importance to the 
econom; ■-"^=-'«-— e -"- 



ailing s -.-, . 
my of Thief River Falls, Thief 
River Falls had bid on the event 
twice in the last two years. 

Olson said last year's event in 
International Falls had 400 regis- 
tered riders. At this point nearly all 
of the motels in Thief River Falls 
arc booked full. She expects that all 
area motels will be booked full. It's 
amazing, she said, how much snow- 
mobilcrs contribute to an cconomv 
when they visit a community. With 
400 in attendance, the economic 
impact this has to a host community 
is well over SI00.O0O. 

The 1996 Minnesota Snowmo- 
hiling Safety Task Force reported 
that snowmobiling generates one 
(Continued on Page 7) 




Task force to develop 
recovery plan for Red 
Lake walleye fishery 



Recognizing that effective man- 
agement rcouircs a coordinated 
clfnrt, preliminary talks between the 
Minnesota Department of Natural 
Resources and the trihal council of 
ihc Red Lake Band of Chippewa 
Indians have resulted in the forming 
of an interagency task force to 
develop a long-term Red Lake wall- 
eye population recovery plan. 

A joint statement on the task 
force formation was issued this 
week hy Bob Strand with the DNR 
division of fisheries in Bcmidji and 
Dave Conner of the Red Lake 
Band's department of natural 



population resulted in the Red Lafc 
Fisheries Association closing reset - 
v.iiion waicrs to commercial fishing 
for Ihc 1997 season. 

Because die reservation bound- 
ary line Insects Upper Red Lake, 
le'siiuice management authority is 
divided between the two jurisdic- 



tions, which arc both aware lhat 
actions taken on either side of the 
boundary will likely affect the entire 
Red Lake fish population.- .* 

Initial task force meeting was 
held November 18" and included 
representatives from the Minnesota 
DNR, Red Lake DNR. Red Lake 
Fisheries Association, U.S. Bureau 
of Indian Affairs. U.S. Fish and 
Wildlife Service and the University 
of Minnesota. Discussion involved 
the historical and cunent status of 
fish slocks, sharing of data, coordi- 
nation of monitoring efforts, poten- 
tial fuiurc, harvest restrictions, 
potential enhancement efforts and 
alternative gear lhat would allow for 
harvest of other species while pro- 
tecting walleye. 

While the 1997 commercial fish- 
ing closure is considered an iiupor- 
" " step toward walleye stock 



™ .1 from Ma7sh.ll County C.ntr>1 High participated and ,h V" M "^»"I ™"?Jl"" 

School In Nowloldan placed first In Minnesota's County Central won the "£P»'i«°"- «™ 

Cyber Knowledge competition recently. The members wore llront 1*1!* Moo .Adam 

event provided by Minnesota Service Lokstod and Andy RIer and (back, leltl Iroy 

Cooperatives has been held foMh.ee years. Elseth. Ben Rokk. and Chad Donorskl. 
This is the second yeer that a team from MCC 

MCC team wins second state 
Cyber Knowledge competition 

by Katrri Carbon 
Northern Watch Reporter 

Strategy, teamwork and the 
application of the appropriate tech- 
nology tools were the elements 
implemented by successful teams in 
Ihc recent stale- wide Cyber 
Knowledge competition.. 

Six young men from Marshal! 
County Central in Ncwfoldcn not 
only participated in the high-tech 
contest, but won il. And, it wasn't 
the first lime. MCC won the compe- 
tition last year also. 

Team members included Eric 
Moose, son of David and Marlys 
Moose; David Lokstad. son of 
David and Judy Lokstad; Andy 
Filer, son of Dennis and Deb Filer; 
Troy Elseth, son of Dcland and Joy 
Elseth; Ben Rokke, son of Phil and 
Marlenc Rokke; and Chad Donar- 
ski, son of Gary and Dawn Donar - 
ski. 

Eric. Adam. Troy and Ben are 
seniors. Andy is a junior, and Chad 
ts a sophomore. Erie, Andy, Troy 
and Ben were also members of last 



ivcry, 



it ood that there 
.hort-tenti solutions. There is 
{Continued on Page 4) 



s advised 
by Mark Jorgcnson. math teacher 
and computer coordinator ai 
Marshall County Central. 

According to Jorgcnson the 
Cyber Knowledge competition is 
provided by Lakes Country Service 
Cooperative in Fergus Falls, one of 
six cooperatives in the state thai 
provide various services to schools, 
cities, counties and other govern- 



mental agencies. 

About 30 schools — large and 
smalt — in Minnesota participated 
Ihis year. "Because there is a fee 
involved, not as many schools par- 
ticipated as they would have liked," 
Jorgcnson commented. 

The purpose of the program is to 
teach students the skills they need to 
eommuniealc. search for. and trans- 
fer information on the internet. It 
can be used to promote teamwork 
and lifelong learning and provide 
Ihc tools that workers will need in 
Ihc 21st century. 

The Cyber Knowledge competi- 
tion was based on Knowledge Bowl' 
formal, and while the procedure was 
simple, the questions and tasks var- 
ied in difficulty. 

The competition began at noon 
on Monday. December S and ended 
at noon on Friday, December 12. 
Questions or tasks — one at a tunc 
— appeared at the Cyber 
Knowledge web site. Team mem- 
bers searched (he internet for the 
answers. When-lhe I'iim part of ihc 
question was answered, .the second 
part or following question or task 

A sample question — "At a 
school near a low n called Gowrie in 
a state thai grows lots of corn there 



Next, they would have to locale the 
school near Gowrie and determine 
from its rosier the first name of the 
female whose last name means 
nilcr. Is lhat ruler as in "a person 
who rules or governs" or "instru- 
ment used to draw a straight line or 
measure?" — Ihc team would have 
(Continued on Page 4) 



ink 



I the 



Win 



L- wllOSl 



asl n 



her 





i's llrsl slcp would be to 




e in ihc cornbcll thai 


includes . 


town .called Gowrie. 



Kiwanis to honor 
police officers for 
life-saving efforts 

To recognize three Thief River 
Falls police officers for their hero- 
ic efforts in preventing loss of life 
in u fire, the morning Kiwanis 
club will sponsor an honors buffet 
Tuesday, Fchruary 3, at 6:30 p.m. 
al the Best Western Inn. 

Officers Teresa Matlison, Tim 
Miller and Brent Monroe will be 
guests of honor at the buffet and 
presented wiih recognition 
plaques from Ihc host club. They 
risked ihcir own lives to awaken 
and evacuate residents of 12 
apartments- on the second floor 
when fire destroyed ihc Dobncr- 
Meehan building in downtown 
Thicr River Falls September 21, 
1997. 

Public attendance is invited. 
Cost of Ihc roost beef and chicken 
buffet will be StO per person and 
may be paid at ihc Best .Western 
February 3. 




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Martha Stenseth 

To Celebrate "90th" 
Birthday Jan. 24th 

Th, family , n „V. uH/aV.J, am/ 

rrlaK.r. in an nntn hnu.t/ar 
Harlhn Sltn.tlh\ lOlh nirlh Jay 

Sat., Jan. 24th fa 2-4 p.m. 
HERITAGE CESTER 

ThKl Rl.rr lilli, MN 

.Vo (T./l>. rirtir. 

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1'ilRi; 2 



NORTHERN WATCH 



Saturday, January 17, 11)98 



FOR SALE 
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BEEF/S1.00 Lb. 

-Hanging Weight- 
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Men's Winter Jackets 



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Select Ladies' 
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Select Misses, Petite 
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Positive Child 
Guidance topic 
of workshop 

Tminvc Child Guidance" i* die 
topic (or Hie third workshop in the 
For the h>ve of Children scri^ 
jointly sponsored by NiiTth1.in.il 
Coinnmniiy ami Teehnie.il College 
ami School District 56J. 

The workshop will Like place 
Wednesday. J.inu.iry 21. from (>:M) 
to '» p.m at NCTC. Instructor will he 
Helem- Medulcv and com <» aiiend 
.sSK). 

■'We used to ilnnk we needed lo 
manage hch:i vinr in children," 
MeCiuley says. "Now we know 
wjys of piiividinc positive direc- 
tion in help children become the 
wonderful people we would like 
them to be!" 

I'rcrepistraiion i* necessary. Call 
custom training .mil continuing 
education at Northland Community 
and Technical Collcpc at 6H1-079.1 

or 1 -xoo-'OT-mh:. 

THIEF RIVER FALLS 

YOUR 
NORTH COUNTRY 
SHOPPING CENTER 



J =~-~^._ 


k AROUND 
r THE REGION 

Knlhi Carlson 



New Karlstad 
Healthcare Center 
administrator 

Knrbtad - Originally from 
Thief River Falls, Ardcn 
Solhcim will return to the area as 
the new administrator of the 
Karlstad Healthcare Center. 

Solhcim firings with her 
about 15 years of experience, 
having woikcd in both small and 
large nursing centers. 

Ardcn anu husband Vcmon 
lived In Plymouth for n while but 
spent too much time traveling to 
their cabin on Lake of the 
Woods. "We're happy to be 
home .agoin." site said. North 
Star New 



Oklee boy has 
proof to go with 
big fish story 

Oklcc - The big one didn't 
get away! Scott Hi Ig email, nine 

Sear old son of Greg and Cayle 
[ilecmon, caught a 27-inch, 9 
lb. 5 oz. Walleye at Zippcl Bay 
on Lake of the Woods while ice 
fishing recently. 

The fish was so big that h 
could not be brought out of the 
hole by the pole. A gaff hook 
was used. 

It was also big enough lo be 
mounted — a good thing linec 
Scott is allergic lo fresh water 
fish and wouldn't have been abje 
to cat the Walleye even if he had 
wanted to. Vie Oklee Herald 



TRF students honored for MN D-Day letters 




Ayla Don I in received a second 
place award and Karen Christcnscn 
an honorable mention award in the 
statewide Minnesota D-Day letter 
writing contest. Doth arc ninth 
grade students at Lincoln high 
school. 

Minnesota D-Day is a day set 
aside to encourage smokers to try to 
quit and urge young people never to 
start smoking. As pan of this pre- 
vention effort, the American Lung 
Association of Minnesota, state 
division of the American Cancer 
Society and the Attorney General's 
Partnership for a Drug Free Minne- 
sota joined forces to sponsor the 
sixth annual "Good Things About 
Being Tobacco- Free Contest." 

Hundreds of entries were submit- 
ted by K-12 students across the 
state. Activity in the high school cat- 
egory was to write a tetter to a deci- 
sion maker to encourage him or her 
to make tobacco-free decisions. The 
entries were judged on adherence to 
.the topic, creativity, originality and 
neatness. 

Ayla, the daughter of Deejay and 
Cay Donlin, wrote her letter to 
Steven Spielberg. "I am beginning 
to sec, more and more, that the sta- 
tistics about tobacco use among 
teens arc true," she wrote. "I believe 
that the people acting in your 
movies have a big influence on 
teenagers and children, and when 
there is a scene with an actor smok- 
ing, it is a bad influence on them. 
That is why I am suggesting that 
you don't show people smoking in 
your movies." 

After citing statistics regarding 
the harmful affects of tobacco use, 
Ayla wrote: "Have you ever consid- 
ered how many of the 3.000 adoles- 
cents who start smoking every day 
were influenced by one of your pro- 



ductions? I would like to propose 
that not only you eliminate the use 
of tobacco from your productions, 
but that you also encourage other 
producers lo do the same. Perhaps 
one day we'll have a 'smoke-free' 
cinema on both sides of the screen." 
Karen, the daughter of Curtis and 
Lin Christcnscn. addressed her let- 
ter to the Thief River Falls city 

"The purpose of this Idler is lo 
ask you to take a tougher stand on 
youth tobacco issues." she wrote. "I 
am appalled at the number of my 
classmates who smoke regularly or 
try a cigarette 'just to sec what it 
feels like.' 

"Every day more than 3,000 of 
my peers smoke their first cigarette 
and another 3,000 become regular 
smokers. Their odds of becoming 
addicted. arc between one in three 
and one in two. Adolescents arc 



Training about scaffold 
safety given by OSHA 



Scaffold "competent person" 
training will be offered Friday. 
January 23. from 8:30 u.m. to 3:30 
p.m. at the Ramadu inn in Grand 
Forks, ND. to cover requirements of 
the new scaffold standard of the 
Occupational Safety and Health 
Administration (OSHA). 

OSHA requires that every 
employee involved in erecting, dis- 
assembling, moving, operating, 
repairing, inspecting or maintaining 
a scaffold receive this type of train- " 
inc. Covered arc risks such as falls, 
falling objects, electrical hazards 



and access lo and from the scaffold 
as well as proper scaffold use, mate- 
rial handling, maximum loads and 
other OSHA requirements. 

Cost is S200 per person or SI 75 
per person for companies sending 
two or more representatives. The 
workshop is sponsored by the cus- 
tom training and continuing educa- 
tion department of Northland 
Community and Technical College. 

Prcregistration is required by 
calling 1-800-959-6282 or2l8-681- 




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Saturday, Jnnunry 17, 1998 



Purl- 3 



NORTHERN WATCH 



encouraged to start smoking by suc- 
cessful tobacco advertising, promo- 
tion, and the easy task of obtaining 
tobacco products, such as cigarettes. 

"My solution to this is: find the 
source where the youth procure the 
tobacco and stop it there. Increase 
the frequency of checks on busi- 
nesses who sell tobacco products to 
make sure they arc not selling to 
minors. Also, create 'zero tolerance' 
discipline policy, such as tobacco 
license revocation for a prolonged 
period of time. 

"I also suggest that tobacco 
vending machines be monitored at 
all times to prevent, and hopefully 
insure, kids from buying [hem at 
that location. I also think that 
minors caught using tobacco should 
be subject to harsher punishments, 
as well as a straight forward infor- 
mative course on what tobacco docs 
to your system...."' 



te- 



ller* urr the bread recipes I 
promised - to ro with the soup 
recipes from last week. The first 
recipes are for those of you who 
mukc your bread the regular way- 
The last ones are for bread 
machines - just use your 
machine's mixing and Marline 
directions. 

These tasty treats would be 
ideal with a hot bowl of soup: 

HERE) POPOVERS 
2 eggs 

1 cup flour 

1 cup milk 

1/2 teaspoon 

1/4 teaspoo 



will 



ground sage 
1/4 teas poon pepper 

Heat oven to 450 degrees. 
Generously grease Nix d-ouncc cus- 
tard cups. 

Beat eggs slightly. Beat in 
remaining ingredients with hand 
beater just until smooth (do not 
overheat). Fill cups about 1/2 full. 

Bake 15 minutes. Reduce oven 
temperature to 350 degrees. Bake 
25 minutes longer or until golden 
brown. Immediately remove from 
cups. 

You can make this delicious 
bread even Jf you don't have 
herbs growing in your kitchen 
window • yum: 

HERB BATTER BREAD 
3 cups flour 
I tablespoon sugar 
I teaspoon salt 
; I'paekagc active dry yeast 

1 1/4 cups very warm water (120 to 

130 degrees) ■ 

2 tablespoons chopped fresh 

parsley 
2 tablespoons shortening 

1 1/2 teaspoons chopped fresh or 
1/2 teaspoon dried rosemary leaves 
1/2 teaspoon chopped fresh or 

1/4 teaspoon dried thyme leaves 

Mix 2 cups of the flour, sugar, 
salt and yeast in large bowl. Add 
water, parsley, shortening, rosemary 
and thyme. Beat on low speed of 
mixer for 1 minute, scraping bowl 
frequently. 

Beat on medium speed for 1 
minute, scraping frequently. Stir in 
remaining flour. Scrape batter from 
side of bowl, Cover and let rise in 
worm place 35-40 minutes, until 
double, 

Grease loaf pan. Stir down batter 
by beating 25 strokes. Smooth and 

Cat batter in loaf pan with floured 
ands, Cover and let rise about 30 
rrtinutcs, until'doublc: 

Heat oven to 375 degrees. Bake 
40-45 minutes or until loaf sounds 
hollow when tapped. Brush top 
with margarine if desired. 

Use those leftover mashed 
potatoes to make this delicious 
oread: 

POTATO BREAD 

6 to 6 1/2 cups flour 
1/2 cup sugar 

2 teaspoons salt 

2 packages active dry yeast 
2 cups very warm water (120-130 
.-degrees) 

1 cup lukewarm mashed cooked 

potatoes 
1/4 cup oil 

2 eggs 

Margarine or butter, softened 

Tvlix 3 cups of the flour, sugar, 
salt and yeast in large bowl. Add 
' water, potatoes, oil and eggs. Beat 
on low speed of mixer for I minute, 
scraping frequently. Beat on medi- 
um speed 1 minute, scraping fre- 
auently. Stir in enough remaining 
our, 1 cup at a time, to make dough 
cosy to handle. 

-Turn dough onto lightly floured 
surface and knead 8-10 minutes or 
until smooth and elastic. Place in 
creased bowl, turn greased side up. 
Cover and let rise in warm place 
about I hour or until double. 
(Dough is ready when indentation 
remains on top.) 

Grease 2 loaf pans. Punch down 
dough, divide in half. Ratten each 
halfinto 18x9 inch rcctangtc, Roll 
up tightly, folding ends under loaf. 
Place scam side down in pan and 
brush with oil. Let rise about 1 hour 
or until double. 

Bake at 375 degrees for 30-35 
minutes or until loaves are deep 
golden brown and sound bellow 
when lapped. 



Sec how quickly you enn mnkc 
fresh rolls - mix these quickies as 
for bread dough above: 

2-HOUR ROLLS . 

1 package yeast 
1 cup warm water 
1 egg, beaten 
1 teaspoon salt 
"1/2 cup warm milk 
3 tablespoons oil 

3 tablespoons sugar 

4 cups flour 

Let rise once, make into rolls. 
then let rise again and bake at 350 
degrees for about 20 minutes. 



The following recipes arc Tor 
bread machines: 

Just think or a crusty loor to 
use to sop up the soup leftovers: 
FRENCH BREAD 

2 1/2 teaspoons dry yeast 

3 cups bread flour 

I 1/2 teaspoons salt 
1 1/2 teaspoons sugar 
I 1/2 teaspoons shortening 
1 1/2 cups plus 2 tablespoons 
lukewarm water 



SOUPQON 

Sherry LuCnure.t re 




T & D*S PLACE 

IBSMDST.lASTlicnuritMtKwnllt 

Tlunf Hiver F .ills 'GUI -WOO 



I'm going In trv this recipe this 
weekend - 1 always have trouble 
with wheal bread and maybe this 
one will «ork for me: 

BUTTERMILK 
WHEAT BREAD 
1 1/2 cups buttermilk 

1 1/2 tablespoons' butter 

2 tablespoons Mig.ir 
1 teaspoon s.ilt 

1 cups bread flour 

1/3 cup whole wheat Hour 

I package active dry yeast 
(1/4 ounce. 2 I/-I teaspoons) 
Uf.e white bread selling on 



This traditional Jewish bread 
cun be braided or make into other 
interesting shapes, or baked us u 
regular louf - eggs' make it light 
und tasty: 

CHALLAH 
.1/4 cup water 
3 cups white bread Hour 
2 lablespoi: 



2 tcaspoo 
1/4 cup liultci 
2 eggs 



Cruncliy und healthy, this 
bread will he u great hit - and you 
can udd whatever cruncliy seeds 
your family likes: 

lOOTr CRUNCH LOAF 
1 1/4 cup plus 1 tablespoon water 
3 cups wheal bread flour 

1 1/2 teaspoons salt 

2 tablespoons honey 



cspiH. 



uilas 



1 tablespoon gluten 

2 tablespoons olive oil 

2/3 cup seeds (pumpkin, flax 
sunflower or any other ym 
want) 

2 teaspoons fast rise yeast or 
3 teaspoons active dry 



egg yolk 
3/4 teaspoon poppy seeds (for top) 
I 1/4 teaspoon last rise yeast or 2 
1/4 teaspoons active dry yeast 

Reward offered 
for information 
about TRF fire 

A $5,000 reward is being offered 
Tor information leading to the arrest 
and conviction of the person or per- 
sons responsible for the Dobner- 
Mcchan (Drevlow) building fire in 
downtown Thief River Falls this 
fall. Thief River Falls Police Chief 
Ken Froschbeiscr said anyone with 
information should contact the 
Police department at 681-6161. 



Make the gift 

as meaningful 

as the Occasion 




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1 ct. wt. 


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Diamonds & Designs 




flaoeif^J AArartic'"qT^\Wil 



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A Bold 
Look At 

Relaxation. 

Aprwinimrntj. Deadline*. Ihinu* lo do 
today. These arc l!ie enemies of relax, 
alion. Fortunately, iclaialinn has a 
powerful ally in the soolhinj: jets of die 
Vigora" whirlpool fiom Kohler. ll 
relabel your body's siren centers and 
massajei away even the most grueling 
schedule. Help make your life siress 
free. Slop by our Kohler" Rq;Ulercd 
ShcnvToom and see how easily a Vijora 
whirlpool can Til into your schedule. 
Ttf 3QDOD: 

CKDHLBl 



Puunbiruj & f (eating, Inc. 
Thief Rtucr Falls. Mn. 



lUOMllnN. HMWJ Thlti Rhiir FllFi 



^He\p Us Celebrate* 

Stop In January 23rd 
. For Coffee & Cookies)! 

\ JUST FOR Y0U...JAN. 19TH THRU JAN. 24RD j 

• 10 % OFF ALL PRODUCTS 

• $1.00 OFF ANY CUT/STYLE 

• $5.00 OFF ANY COLOR/CUT^ 

• $5.00 OFF ANY PERM/CUT 

•I*® ' $ 5 - 00 OFF A SET 0F 

ARTIFICIAL NAILS! 

„ Tol's Studio For Hair^ 

681-6796 

S 309 LaBree Ave. N. • Thief River Falls : 

' Mon.. Wad.. Fri. 9-6; "njoa a Thura. 
9-a; Sat. 9-3 



Edward Jones is the exclusive underwriter 
on the following: 



Tennessee Valley Authority 
Power Bonds 



• 20-yoor maturity 

■ Throo-yonr call protection 

• Into root oxompt from 
atato and local Income 
taxes 



• AAA/Aaa-rntod by 
Standard & Poor's and 
Moody's 

■ Government agency . 

• Quarterly Interest 

■ Estate feature 



'%* 



635- 

"Rate etloellvoil'KVM. YloW and market 
■ vflhi« may fluewthi II lold prorts 
'maturity. 



Call Or Stop By Today. 

ManUWf SI PC 

Jon Larson 

105 3rd St. East 
Thief River Falls, MN 56701 
1 218-681-8380 
1-800-284-6705 



Edwardjones 




w y yr 






FOR 



SALE i 



BRING IN 3 ITEMS-PAY FOR 2, CDC CI* 

GET1 CLEANED... rn Ed 

U2 FREE WITH 6, 3 FREE WITH 9, 4 FREE WITH 121 d 
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Sony Wo LMinoi Fun. HcuseMdi. IVotfftw Gowra or DrspoifM. 

OrterEnmotJamiiiyai. 1333 Otter Goal M TRF location Onfyl 

Meaning OrOan Only. OtntrOtxountsOoNolAf&tt 




Goodwiendi Service 




^cc/p^eflfs iTJafefreft... 



But Bringing Your Car To Us Is No Mistake! 

FULL-LINE BODY SHOP 



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NORTHERN MOTORS, INC. 

HWY. 1 & 59 W. THIEF RIVER FALLS, MN G81-4820 






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— f\ (U~~*~z? \I/M*u*t /W ZwZ**. GmAi — 



Register For Upcoming... 

Crystal Court Winter Racquetball Tournament 

February 27 through March 1, 1998 

January Membership Blitz 

"(U 1<A &W 01 1M2\ . 

m r™3 c§ 



WS-cH. 




'M 




Kuthl CurLson 



i 







v Printed on Recycled Pjper 

^ Containing at Lean ZOK 

Fiberj from Paper" 

Recycled by Consumers 



Ttw Northorn Waicti U putmuwd wookry 
ovory FrkUy and dUintKted lo ovo< !2,0OQ 
ho-jMhaldi In Nortnwoit Minnesota and 
iiitiounding ansa. Tho Northorn Wateti It 
pubUihod W conjunction wtm Tho Tlmoa, 
which tt pubtithM wo«My ovory TucuMy, 

SUDSCRIPT10N RATES 
Ponnlnoton, Rod Lake, MarahoU, Port and 

Cloarwatar Courttloa ..$24.00 Per Yoai 
AH Olhof AOdfOiioi 

WIBl 507 Zip CodO J2D.00 Pot Yonf 

Elwwhoro In llto U.S.A....W0.OO Per Yoar 
AH Mon and Woman In ino 

U.S. Armod Foreoi S3S.00 Per Yoar 

Student Ralo. Month! ...HO.OO Pot Yoar 

UabJotor 



Moment. Tho Uonhom Waich'o iiaoiuty lot 
otnor onon or omlulona In connection 
with an oOvortlMmonl it itilcVy United lo 
public* lion ol tho aOveflliomonl In any 
BuMoquont Iwuo ot Ino lolund ol any 
monlo* paid lor tho advortioomoni 



A Publication of: 




The Times 

324 Main Avenue North 

P.O. Don 100 

ThiefRivcr Falls. MN 56701-0100 

Telephone: (218)681-4450 

Fax:(218)681.4-155 

e-mail: nwaichiiPnwaicli.cimi 

hltp://www.nwalch,com 



Bill 


I 












t^p?£^ 


/ 




ALTERNATE 
DELIVERY 
SYSTEM 
















ftawtvPA '■■'■■' i) 

,"C really alone/ 




W< Iniurt Firm DutDJngt, 
OutbuMnoi & Ptnoiul Properly 



■ Homeowncr'a CovcraQe j 
' For Dwelling* In Town 
Prompt Adjusting Soviet — 
Fret Woodburnlng Inspcctkxu . 



BRAY GENTILLY MUTUAL INS. CO. 

i. t v* Oun.-c/^S.-rrln., P.^a.^.U.-^ S,n<v 1900 
P.O. Box 205, R. L FjlU, MN 56750 253-2252 . . 



PllRC -4 



NORTHERN WATCH 



Silliirduy, Jnnunry 17, 19!>8 



Amundson's Excel Dairy still a family farm 








28 CAUGE COLORED STEEL 
Bj*c building price only. Nat pictured. 

30x45x10 $6,910 

WE BUILD All YEAR ROUND! 



GREG REISENAUER 

BEMIDJI Ht«h 



^Ri^NORTHLAND 

ILJiSI BUILDINGS. INC. 

l-800-736-yjj> 



W 



MIPWAY 
COMPANY 

Supplier For All Your Business Needs 

• Copy Paper • Compuicr Piper * Office Supplies • D.throom Tiuuc 

• Paper Toutl. • Chcmicili ■ Cloning Supplies • Can Linera.tu.iom or Slock 

• Ligh! Bulb, • Food Service Product* el Dispoublci 



Dale A. Nelson 



o>™ 



213 Atlantic Ave. N. 

P.O.Box 119 

Thief River Fall*. MNJ6701 



Bui.:(2I8)681-55M 

Watu: (800)310-2997 

Dui./rax: (218) 681.2404 

Home: (218) 681-8988 




win fttuue & 

STOFtEWIDE SfAL.ES 

riursday Jail. 22; Friday Jan. 23; Saturday Jan. 24; 

All Fur Hats 10% off • Fur Earmuffs 25% off 

• 2 Coyote And 1 Charieton Heston Otter Mowtainmari Hats 

• Leather Top Bombers '48.00 'Cloth TopRabH Bombers l 22.00 | 

mm- All Deerskin Gloves, Mittens, Choppers, 

Rag Wool, Polar Fleece 10-25% off 




Annie's Underwear ON $U£\aimMB,ii»im,vKm 

•Thursday Shoppers Take An Extra S% OWI* 

iium SfHkitj stm • Wf« em t liior »»*«» 

.. 2II-HS-SISI v I4 II4USISI 

2 Blk. East Jet Hvws. 1 1 tV «9 ■ HOBBHlg 



ATTENTION SHAREHOLDERS 
Of ARCTIC CAT And POLARIS 




Selling 



J INVESTMENT SECURITIES 



213 UBree Avc^ North, Suite 203 

Thief River Falls, MN 56701 

218-681-39133 or 600-768-1869 

Mrmbtr SirC 




^n»s«^' 



Lowest Prices Of The Year 
On Every Building! 

. Machinery Sloraj-L- . HorWCntlk- Barns 

■ Insul.ilvd 5r.ops/Gar.i£L's 
. CnmmiTci.it/lrn3uMrial lluildin^s 

Ciiniplt-li'ly i-ntlnl ivtih iv.m.mlv. Licmvil & (londi-d m-ws. 



im_, 

FOLTZ BUILDINGS! 

SiScn. 1-800-255-9981 



(Continued from pafie 1) 
being done on others. 

In the old ham. a milkc 
milk a maximum of 42 cows per 
hour and wa. paid $6.51) to S7 per 
hour with no benefit*. In the new 
Douhle 20 milking parlor there arc 
JO cows' in the parlor at a time and a 
milker averaging 110 to 120 cows 

Ecr hour receives full benefits of 
ealth insurance and vacation in 
addition to a $7.50 to $8 hourly 
wage. With the addition of a couple 
of part-time workers, the parlor uti- 
lization is expected to increase to 
160 cows per hour. 

At the old facility ii took four to 
five hours a dav to feed the ISO to 
200-cow herd. Now more than five 
times that number arc fed in kst 
than twice the lime. 

Computerized identification and 
records provide advanced informa- 
tion on individual cows, identifying 
Eroblems early and contributing to 
:lter herd health and better milk 
for sale. 

Purchases By Semi-Load 
All feed purchases ore made by 
the semi-trailer load, making it easi- 
er to negotiate favorable contracts 
for feed. The total mixed ration 
(TMR) being fed includes corn 
silage, grain corn, alfalfa haylagc, 
dry hay, cottonseed, soybean meal, 
dry beet pulp and protein mix. Larry 
contracted this year for 300 tons of 
dried beet pulp. He turned down an 
offer of 70 to 80 tons of carrots, 
which would have been an accept- 
able feed component, because the 
Quantity wasn't sufficient to work 
into the ration. 

Caitle are fed only once a day, 
but it is an eight-hour operation that 
requires mixing 10 truckloods in the 
490-cubic-foot mounted TMR 
mixer truck. Total feed used last 
Tuesday alone, for instance, was 
109,100 pounds — nearly 55 tons. 
Feed bunks are cleaned out each 
morning and the uneaten feed col- 
lected is weighed to determine doily 



planned to install a manure liquid 
and dry matter separation system 
which had been indicated as the 
"system of choice" by the Minne- 
sota Pollution Control Agency, the 
agency decided the system working 
well in other states had not been suf- 
ficiently tested in Minnesota. And 
since tfic agency would not partic- 
ipate in the approximately $50,000 
additional cost for 'testing" 'ffijr W j ' 
Amundsons', they' opled for a con- 
ventional lagoon system. 

Manure from the loose housing 
areas is scraped to a pit and pumped 
to the lagoon. Bedding of cattle if 
done with ground wheat and barley 
straw. Wood shavings from Marvin 
Windows at Warroaa were tried but 
bits of wood in the shavings floated 
to the top of the manure pit and 
lagoon, creating a pumping prob- 
lem. ; 
Manure Pumped To Fields 
The lagoon has a capacity for 
310 days of manure storage, but 
plans arc to empty it in the spring 
and fall. Emptying is accomplished 
by pumping directly from the 1 
lagoon through a six- inch hose to an 
applicator which incorporates- the 
liquid into the ground behind the 
teeth of a toolbar cultivator. 

With a range of about three miles 
through the use of a booster pump, 
the manure application system will 
fertilize about 600 acres per year. It 
'will be used primarily on ground 
which will produce com the follow- 
ing year. 

Opportunity For Others 
Because the Amundsons will: 
concentrate on producing milk, 
there is opportunity for other people 
to specialize in phases of dairying 
which smaller operations tradition- 
ally handled on their own, including 
growing feed and caring for young- 
stock. 

Local farmers Richard Jorde, Joe 
Ose and Steve Muzzy raise com and 
alfalfa hay and Don Joppru ofThief 



Riwr Kills and Anderson Htmlicr-. 
of Viking raKc cum only under con- 
trad wiih liu-d Dairy. The dairy 
operation requires aboui 7IH) acres 
of com for silage and MX) acres ot 
alfalfa hay. 

In addition, the dairy plans id 
buy about KXl.tXK) hushcls of com 
for grain— the equivalent produc- 
tion of I .OCX) acres at 'a usual area 
yield of 100 bushels per acre. 

Heifer calves bom at Hxeel Dairy 
arc sold at a pre-arranged price at 
about three days of age to Mark 
Hanson, a former Thicl River Kills 
dairyman who sold his milking 
herd. Hanson— who buys, the ration 
removed from the feed bunks each 
day— will raise them U> 600 pounds 
and in turn sell them to Dale Halslad 
of Winger, who will lake care of the 
breeding and earn' them to about six 
weeks prior to calving. 

Hxcel Dairy has the right of first 
refusal to purchase the animals as 
springing heifers. Larry said he has 
told the growers he expects to buy 
hack 100 percent of the heifers in 
the near future and perhaps K0 per- 
cent later. 

Workers Available 
While the Amundsons experi- 
enced some difficulty in hiring and 
keeping necessary workers during 
the fall grain and beet harvest sea- 
son, there has been no problem 



1.1 days— fron 
vice located ii 



since then in finding employees. 
The lop, four positions in ilic dairy 
opciaiii'ii arc salaried with ilic rest 
being hourly workers. A staff of 15 
employees is projected. 

Klionda said that the dairy buys 
grain from area elevators; ear tags, 
non-prescription drugs, calving 
pens and some other supplies local- 
ly: parts and supplies— including 
tfic milker inflations changed every 
Ilic nearest dairy scr- 
Mcintosh; and dur- 
ing consiruciion purchased materi- 
als or services from Ram Builders, 
Tliygeson Construction. Davidson 
Ready-Mix. UHC and local employ- 
ees of Bcrgstrom E.lcctric of Grand 
Fork*, among others. 

Lifestyle Changes 

Already the new operation has 

provided positive lifestyle changes 

along with the challenges which 

turn up each day. 

"This was probably the nicest 
Christmas we have had since we 
started milking cows." Larry said. 
"We were in the bam by seven 
(a.m.) and out by six (p.m.) and had 
a full evening for family. We had 
Thanksgiving day off, have every- 
olher weekend and holiday off, and 
we're even talking about taking a lit- 
tle vacation." 

Larry and Rhonda don't feel they 
arc in competition with smaller 



dairy operations in the area and they 
want in sec dairies of any si/c 
thrive. "We want to sec as many 
dairies in ihc area as possible to help 
maintain the economic base and 
preserve the infrastructure, which is 
built around service," they said. 
Positioned For The Future 

"Our biggest competition is eco- 
nomics. We still have to live wiih 
ihc same milk prices as everyone 
else. What we have tried to do is 
look at the long-term future and to 
position our tarm for long-term 
operation. 

"There will'continuc tn be small 
dairies that will do fine, and that's 
great. Our guess is that the success- 
lul dairies will be the very small (JO 
cows or less) or the very large (J0O 
cows and more), but that's only a 
guess. There are sure to be many 
exceptions lo thai." 

"Dairying is a good life," Rhonda 
said. "We arc hoping this move will 
provide us with a positive lifestyle 
change and .Mil) permit us to be 
involved in a business that wc both 
enjoy." 

The Amundsons arc planning for 
an open house at Excel Dairy during 
June Dairy Month in 1998. At that 
time the public will be invited to sec 
the facilities and learn more about 
the operation. 




Bulk tanks hold milk production at Excel Dairy Presently production at the farm yields one 

for dally pickup by a semi-trailer truck. Each of semi-load per day with two truckloads picked up 

the stainless steel. Insulated tanks holds 6,000 every fourth day. A truckload of milk weighs 

.gallons of milk—equivalent to onB semMoad. 52,000 pounds. - - • 




Double 20 milking parlor at Excel Dairy permits fected an the other side. Expectations are that 

40 cows to be In the milking facility at one time, the parlor will permit milking of 160 cows per 

While 20 cows are being milked on one side of hour as the average of 950 cows will be milked 

the parlor, 20 more are being washed and dlsin- three times per day. 



MCC team wins second state Cyber Knowledge competition 



(Continued from Page 1) 
to figure that out. Once that question 
was answered, the second part 
appeared, "Who played the pan of 
Mayor Shinn in 77ie- Music Man at 
this school?" The team would con- 
tinue to search the school's web site 
for the answer. The correct answer 
to this two-part sample question 
would be worth two points. 

Sometimes the teams were 
instructed to complete a task from 
which a question was asked. A sam- 
ple task instructed the team to 

receive some e-mail from an ele- 
mentary school in New Zealand and 
forward it to rvogtOwcecsu. 
cro.org." The question — "What 
docs KIA WHAKAPONO, K1A 
MANAWNUI mean? (You could 
even start this journey at Hillside 
Elementary in Minnesota — quack, 
quack, about 8.12 squared)." This 
would be worth two points with a 
bonus point awarded to the first 
three teams to complete the task and 
answer the question. 

- Many of the questions were mul- 
tiple choice, some with more than 
one answer, and most with several 
parts. Some involved events in far 
away places. Others involved math 
and problem solving skills. 



The layman will have a much 
easier time understanding the rules 
for the competition than the ques- 
tions. The rules were simple. 

Each school district could have 
one or more teams consisting of six 
students and one team advisor. The 
advisor could teach and coach, but 
was not allowed to complete tasks 
or find information. The advisor's 

furposc was to create opportunities 
pr the students to plan strategics 
and solutions. 

The competition had to be com- 
pleted on school property using only 
the school's internet access. The 
sites that contained the information 
were checked for suitability for stu- 
dents although it was noted that Ihc 
very nature of the World Wide Web 
docs not allow all linked sites to be 
checked. Each participating district 
was expected to have an "acceptable 
use" policy, 

-In Die event of a tic, the earliest 
correct response won. Not only did 
Marshall County Central's team 
members have to do it right, they 
had to do it fast with advisor 
Jorgenson stressing (hat "timing was 
important." 

Every classroom at Marshall 
County Central has access to the 



internet, and team members some- 
times worked individually although 
they were strongly encouraged to 
work together as a team. Jorgenson 
noted that answers did not have to 
come from the internet and that a 
team from another school had 
instead called a business to obtain 
the answer to a question that per- 
tained to that company's stock. 

The winning team from Marshall 
County Central scored 29 out of a 

Kissible -10 points. A team from 
oseau scored 26 to place second 
followed by a Norman County West 



team in third place. 

The fact that the top three 
schools were from northwestern 
Minnesota must suy something. 

While our location may be con- 
sidered by some as remote, obvious- 
ly the commitment to technology in 
our schools is strong with Marshall 
County Central leading the pack. 

Our congratulations to advisor 
Mark Jorgenson and team members 
Eric, Adam, Andy, Troy, Ben and 
Chad — Minnesota's Cyber 
Knowledge competition winners. 
MCC rules! 



Task force to develop recovery plan 
for Red Lake walleye fishery 



(Continued from Page I) 
agreement that restoration will 
require a long-term commitment 
from all involved and that a sound 
recovery plan must include provi- 
sions far sustainable use when 
restoration efforts arc successful. 

The task force will meet again to 
develop specific 'proposals for 
future harvest restrictions, enhance- 
ment efforts, monitoring protocols 
and long-term recovery goals. The 



task force members agree that this 
joint recovery effort represents a 
major step necessary for successful 
management of a shared resource. 

Red Lake Band members. 
Minnesota recreational anglers and 
local economics both on and off the 
reservation will all benefit greatly if 
efforts arc successful in restoring 
one of the world's finest natural 
walleye fisheries. 



Saturday, January 17, 1998 



NORTHERN WATCH 



Page 5 



DEATHS 



Roy Horn, 86 

Gonvick • Roy Horn. 86. died 
Monday. January 12. 1998 at First 
Care Hospital in I'osiion. 

Funeral services were held at 
10:30 a.m. on Thursday. January 15 
at ihc Saiuhold Lutheran Church. 
Interment was at the Samhold 
Lutheran Cemetery. 

A complete obituary will appear 
in Wednesday's edition of The 
Timet. 

Walter Gibson, 80 

Park Rapids • Walter Gibson. 
HO. died Monday. January 12, 1998 
at St. Joseph Health Services in 
Park Rapids. 

Funeral services were held at 1 
p.m. on Thursday, January 15 at St. 
John's Lutheran Church in Park 
Rapids. Burial was at Greenwood 
Cemetery at Park Rapids. 

A complete obituary will appear 
in next week's edition of 77ie Times. 

Eleanore 
Shaver, 57 

Erskinc • Eleanore Shaver. 57, 
died Tuesday. January 13, 1998 at 
First Care Hospital in Fosston. 

Funeral services will be held 
today. January 17 at 2 p.m. at Bethel 
Assembly Church in Fosston. 
Visitation was held Friday from 5 to 
7 p.m. with a 7 p.m. prayer service 
at the Carlin-Hoialmcn Funeral 
Home in Erskinc and one hour prior 
to services at the church. 

A complete obituary will appear 
in Wednesday's edition of The 
Times. 

Chip Stockwell, 19 

Plummer - Chip James 
Stockwell, 19. died Sunday. January 
1 1 , 1998 in Terrebonne township of 
Red Lake County. 

Mass of Christian Burial was 
held Thursday, January 15 at 11 
a.m. at St. Joseph's Catholic Church 
in Brooks with Father Joe Richards 
officiating. Burial will be at St. 
Joseph's Catholic Cemetery in 
Beach, ND. 

A complete obituary will appear 
in Wednesday's edition of The 
Times. 

Selmer V. 
Waage, 83 

Greenbush - Selmer V. Waage, 
83. died Monday, January 12. 1998 
at the Greenbush Nursing Home in 
Greenbush. 

Funeral services were held at 1 1 
n.m. on Thursday, January 15 at 
United Free Lutheran Church in 
Greenbush. Burial was at Zion 
Lutheran Cemetery, rural 
Greenbush. 



Rose Gauthier, 98 

Red Lake Falls • Rose Gauthier, 
98. died Wednesday, January 14, 
1998 at Hillcrcst Nursing Home in 
Red Lake Falls. 

Moss of Christian Burial will be 
held on Monday. January 19 nt 2 ' 
p.m. nt St. Joseph's Catholic Church 
in Red Lake Falls. 

Visitation will be held on Sunday 
from 5 to 8 p.m. with a 7:30 p.m. 
prayer service at the Peltcrson 
Funcrat Home in Red Lake Falls 
and one hour prior to services on 
Monday. 

A complete obituary will appear 
in Wednesday's edition or The 
Times. 

Gladys Sundt, 90 

Dousman, WI • Gladys A. 

Sundt, 90, died Thursday, January 8, 
1998. 
Funeral services were held at 



2:30 p.m. on Tuesday. January 1 3 at 
the Evangelical and Reformed 
United Church of Christ in 
Waukesha. WI. Burial was at 
Highland Memorial Park Cemetery. 
A complete obituary will appear 
in next week's edition of The Times. 

Ernest Aaseby, 67 

Stephens Cily, VA - Ernest A. 
Aaseby died Sunday. January 11. 
1998 at the age of 67. 

Burial was at Grccnhill 
Cemetery in Stephens City. VA. The 
Enders Funeral Home of Stephens 
City. VA was in charge of the 
arrangements. 

A complete obituary will appear 
in Wednesday's edition of The 
Times. 

Alma Drotts, 93 

Thief River Falls - Alma Drotts. 
93. died Friday. January 16. 1998 at 
the CNC Unit of Northwest Medical 
Center in Thief River Falls. 

Funeral services will be held at 2 

t.m. on Monday, January 19 ot the 
fission Covenant Church in 
Viking, Burial will be at Viking 
Cemetery, rural Viking. 

Visitation will be held from 3 to 
8 p.m. at the Green Funeral Home in 
Thief River Falls. 

A complete obituary will appear 
in next week's edition of The Times. 

Jassie 
Miramontes, 79 

Thief River Falls - Jassie 
Miramontes. 79, died Thursday. 
January 15. 1998 at his home in 
Thief River Falls. 

Arrangements arc pending with 
the Green Funeral Home of Thief 
River Falls. 

A complete obituary will appear 
in Wednesday's edition of The 
Times. 

VFW offers essay 
contest to youth 
in grades 7, 8, 9 

Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 
2793 in Thief River Falls is offering 
cash prizes in an essay contest open 
to students in grades seven, eight 
and nine in Thief River Falls, 
Newfoldcn, Plummer, Goodridge, 
Middle River and Red Lake Falls. 

"What Patriotism Means To Me" 
is the topic for the contest and cash 
prizes of S50 for first place, S35 for 
second and S25 for third are offered 
in each of the six schools. Packets 
of information on the essay contest 
have been sent to the guidance 
offices at each school. 

Each school will judge and select 
its own winners and the winners 
from each school will be entered in 
the district contest for additional 
opportunity for prizes and advance- 
ment. 

Essays arc to be 300 to 400 
words in length. Judging criteria 
includes 20 points for addressing 
the theme, 50 points for theme 
development and 30 points for clar- 
ity of ideas. Student entries in the 
competition are due March 15. 

Roy Jorgenson and Barb 
Forsbcrg are choiring the contest for 
Post 2793 and Auxiliary. Students 
who would like to enter may also do 
so by contacting VFW Post 2793 in 
Thief River Falls or calling 218- 
681-1211 for on entry form and 
information. 



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Programs offered: 

Water Heater Rebates 

Wc ofTfer a 1120 relate for ihc installation ofan energy efficient olT-peak 

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Page 6 



NORTHERN WATCH 



Saturday, January 17, 1998 




EDITORIAL OPINIONS 



A fishing pier and access ramp below the reser- The Pennington' County Soil and Water 

voir in Thief River Falls are nearly complete. The Conservation District's share was $28,246. AN 

total cost of the project has been estimated at that remains to complete the project is land- 

$69,718. The city's share of the project Is $45,154. scaping and paving of the parking lot. 

Freedom from smoking clinic being arranged 

A seven-week freedom from 
smoking clinic will be facilitated by 
the registered nurses and respiratory 
therapists at Northwest Medical 
Center in Thief River Falls begin- 
ning late this month. 

■ A "thinking about quitting" ori- 
entation session will be held at the 



medical center January 29 at 7 p.m. "Addiction can be broken." 
Interested parties can register for Hansen said. "This thoroughly 
this session or obtain further infor- researched and highly tested pro- 
motion by calling Tammy Hansen, gram provides quality information 
RRCP. at 681-4240, extension 485. and motivation to quit smoking and 
Registration and payment of the $30 remain a non-smoker." 
fee will be accepted after the orien- 
tation session. , • ' 



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Thief River Falls, Minnesota 

John P. Mattson, Publisher 

Marvin Lundta, Editor 
David 'HUI, Associate Editor 

State Director Of Sierra 
Club Gives Woif Views 

In last week's issue of the Northern Watch we 
published an editorial with our views of the 
Eastern Timber Wolf situation in Minnesota. Wc 
have recently received an opinion piece from 
Ginny Yingling. state director of the Sierra Club 
(North Star Chapter), which she has asked us to 
consider publishing. 

"1 believe this op-cd provides a perspective 
that has not received wide coverage in the media," 
Yingling writes. "There has been much reported 
about wolves attacking livestock, but never any 
numbers to put those attacks into context over time 
or with respect to the total number of farms and 
animals in the state. Also, there have been 'scare' 
reports about wolves and hunters, and parents fear- 
ing for the safety of their children. Again, I believe 
there is need to put these reports and fears into per- 
spective." 

We would expect that the viewpoints 
expressed by the Sierra Club state director in her 
letter will be those presented by the club and other 
similar organizations as the state Department of 
Natural Resources seeks this year to establish the 
basics for a future wolf management plan in the 
state. We believe area residents should be aware of 
these viewpoints and are publishing Yingling's 
opinion piece in its entirely. 

Because wc take issue with a number of items 
she has expressed, we have written a letter to Ms. 
Yingling, which wc will also publish as our edito- 
rial in next week's Northern Watch. Please clip and 
save ihe following to use for reference when when 
reading that response. 

FEAR, NOT FACTS, 
GUIDE WOLF DEBATE 
by Ginny Yingling 
SUlc Director, North Star Chapter 
Sierra Club. 
Fear and loathing, not facts, arc guiding. the-. 
current wolf debate and our "leaders" arc doing lit- 
tle about it. Public meetings are being held to seek 
input regarding wolf management, as the first step 
toward removing federal protection for the wolf. 
So far, these meetings have generated more heat 
than light. Worse, the people tasked with ultimate- 
ly managing wolves after removal from endan- 
gered species protection are doing little to dispel 
the outright falsehoods stated by citizens and 
repeated by the media. Some examples: 

The Department of Natural Resources (DNR) 
consistently cites a wolf population "census" indi- 
cating 2,300 wolves in Minnesota. This is a far cry 
from the national census many people are familiar 
with, which attempts to count all the people in the 
country. Even the author of the report described his 
numbers as estimates, based on an opinion survey 
of wildlife managers, researchers, and hunters 
about how many wolves they think there are! 
Radio collars on a few isolated packs provides the 
balance of this "data." 

At the public meetings, angry citizens call for 
sport hunting and trapping of this "exploding" wolf 
population for a variety of reasons, but based 
mainly on fear for humans, livestock. and deer. 
These are fears that should nS? be dismissed'light- 
ly. Nobody wants children or adults, farmers or 
hunters harmed; but these fears should be exam- 
ined under the light of fact and reason. 

Some soy wolves are "no longer afraid" of 
humans because they aren't hunted. Where is the 
evidence that wolves were ever afraid of humans 
or that hunting makes them so. Many reports of 
wolves approaching humans come from hunters 
wearing camouflage and deer scent. Dressed this 
way and standing by a fresh kill, are they surprised 
a lone wolf might approach them? Perhaps wolves 
have not become less afraid of humans, but con- 
tacts ore sjmply more likely as their numbers 
grow? . 

There ore many wild animals, such as dolphins 
and whales, that arc unafraid of humans and, 
unlike wolves, have documented histories of 
attacking people. Every year, 4.5 million people 
arc bitten by dogs. Nobody calls for sport hunting 
or trapping them. Hundreds of wolves arc already 
killed every year, often viciously, without generat- 
ing the fear response hunting advocates claim. 



Editorial opinion published' under this 
heading Is Intended to stimulate thinking 
and discussion among our readers. Unless 
specified otherwise, the editorials are writ- 
ten by Editor Marvin Lundln and do not rep- 
resent opinion of other staff members. 
Opinions In items from othBr publications 
may not coincide with the editor's own 
views but araoffsred for their general Inter- 



A greater fear for many people is for children. 
This concern has been raised throughout history. 
Yet nowhere in North America, in all our history, 
has there been a single wolf attack on a human. 
Yes, wc should be cautious. Wolves are wild ani- 
mals. People need to know they can legally kill a 
wolf if they truly feel threatened, but the mere 
presence of a wolf is not necessarily a threat. 

Nobody should feci unsafe where they live, 
but dangers. must be kept in perspective. People 
living near wolves need to take precautions to pro- 
tect their family, just as they would living near a 
busy street, lake, or neighbor with any large ani- 
mal; just as when they buckle a child into a carscat. 
No child has ever been attacked by a wolf, yet 
every year thousands of children die in car acci- 
dents, drownings and domestic animal attacks. It 
would be unfair to simply dismiss the fears of par- 
ents about wolves, but even more unfair to fright- 
en parents 'With score campaigns. 

Wc also cannot dismiss concerns of farmers 
who lose livestock to wolves. A necessary and 
humane federal program exists to investigate com- 
plaints and, when confirmed, to trap and kill the 
"guilty" pack. Farmers arc compensated for their 
losses. If the compensation is insufficient, who is 
to blame — the wolves or the people who undcr- 
fund this already low-budget program? 

Despite hysterical news reports, there is not a 
wholesale wolf assault on Minnesota farms. 
According to U.S. Department of Agriculture 
(USDA)' staff who administer the wolf trapping 
program, less than two percent of farms within 
wolf range are attacked. Confirmed complaints 
increased about 25 percent in 1 997, but the number 
of farm animals did not increase dramatically and 
some declined significantly. However, wolves 
killed under the program increased by 40 percent. 
For example, in 1996, there were 85 verified 
complaints of wolf attacks on livestock, with. 1,612 , 
turkcys,.scvcn.bulls and cows,,67 calves and.year- 
lings, 2J sheep, two geese! one horse and 10 dogs, 
being killed. Preliminary data from 1997, report- 
edly the "worst year ever," show 109 verified com- 
plaints, with 925 turkeys, 15 bulls and cows, 77 
calves and yearlings, 32 sheep, no geese or horses 
and 10 dogs killed. In fact, the number of turkeys 
killed in 1987 and both turkeys and sheep killed in 
1989 were much higher; ten years ago! 

Let's put this into perspective. Over 47 million 
turkeys arc raised in the state annually, und wolves 
kill up to 1,700; less than one out of every 300,000 
birds. The federal trapping program kills between 
100 and 200 wolves annually; about one out of 
every 10 to 20 wolves. This docs not include the 
270 to 400 illegal wolf kills annually. Roughly one 
out of every four to six wolves is killed in 
Minnesota every year. How will sport" hunting 
make them fear us more? 

Farmers do not even have to protect their ani- 
mals from attack to receive repeated aid from the 
federal program. Most practice good husbandry, 
but some farmers pasture animals in fields sur- 
rounded by woods or dump dead animals in open 
pits, literally drawing wolves to their farms. 

Finally, there is the impact of wolves on deer. 
A review of the 20-some years of wolf protection 
show deer numbers are far more dependent on 
winter weather, and little correlated to wolf popu- 
lation numbers. Could our two consecutive 
extreme winters account for lowered deer popula- 
tions? 

Studies have shown that wolves take mainly 
old and sick deer. In 1971. the U.S Forest Service 
conducted n study that found over 70 percent of 
deer killed by wolves were over five years old and 
in poor health, while the majority of deer killed by 
hunters were under two years old and in good 
health, suggesting wolves actually improve the- 
herd. 

None of the emotional rhetoric reported in the 
media supports a hunting or trapping season. 
Twenty years ogo, wc set aside fear and misinfor- 
mation to protect ihe wolf. Today, people treasure 
them even more and millions of dollars flood the 
state from people hoping to glimpse or hear a wolf 
in the wild. I hope the DNR will apply science and 
reason to the development of a wolf management 
plan. If not, this promises to be another long, 
unhappy struggle. 



POLICIES 



;- -.'Letters To Ilw Editor: The staff of uw Northern^ ; 

■ '.' Watch encourage* written respond* to editorial coo» \ 
- roeht or team with original thoughts or Ideas at gen-. ", ■■ 

erallnuieit. Letters should be Intended 1 for.jnibllc*- ;. 
"doir>ia ''Northern W«eh exclusively; ]etten.*ent'to;,; 
; multiple publications will generally not be accepted. '" ' 
"Right If 'reserved to edit letter! for length and clarity . 

and lb reject Ileum deemed to be promotional In . 

■ ■ nature or In poor taste. ■'■ -■ .■■-■•■ 

■ '."- .Letters Must Be Signed: All letten must be 
signed and contain ah address at phone number of the 
writer so authenticity can. be verified.. Signatures 
mnstap'ptar on letters published. The staff believes - 



that there Is greater credibility in letters signed In print 
and will not withhold names of writers from publico-' 
''doii;'^-":i ■.' ; 

- v " Responses Invited: Letters critical of Individu- 
als or other entitles may be shown to those Individu- 
als or representatives of those entities In advance of 
publication with an Invitation by newspaper staff for 
response hi, ihe same issue as the original letter. 
' ' Corrections: If an error Is made in- news or 
advertising publication, the staff encourages readers 
toealMt to ourlmrnedlaie attention by calling 681- , 
'4450. We wlll!altempt to correct the error or clarify, 
the misunderstanding in the next Issue. 



Saturday, Jiinuary 17, 1998 



NORTHERN WATCH 



I'ilRC 7 



175 register for Governor's Ride 



billiim dollars of financial impact on 
this Mate. Currently, Minnesota is 
home to an estimated 27(i,(XX) let- 
tered snowmobiles, the larpcsl stale 
snowmobile population in the 
United States. Minnesota also lias 
over IH.0(K) miles of maintained 
snowmobile trails. 

Olson said to get a feci of what it 
would be like to host one of these 
events she participated in last year's 
event in International Halls. She s ' 



at me Thief River Falls Clumber of 
Commerce on Highway VJ South in 
Thief River Kills. (2IH) 681-372(1. 



she had a real good time. 

The event has been billed us a 
two to three day event, hut the 
Governor's ride is really held on The registration (cc includes a 
Friday. Olson explained that the invitation to ihe Governor" 
other event planned during the Reception Thursday, February II 
weekend is the annual meeting of hreakfasi prior to the trail tide o 
Minnesota United Snowmobile Friday morning February 13; tunc 
Association (MnUSA). a snowmo- along the trail; and refrcsluner 
hile lobbying organization, which stops along the trail, 
has 22,000 member families. 

Rcgisiration forms arc available 



Biggest outdoors bonding package being proposed 



Governor Arnc Carlson has pro- 
posed a 5201 million bonding initia- 
tive to improve slalc parks and 
trails, expand habitat for fish and 
wildlife and simplify the recreation- 
al license system. 

"Our great outdoors not only 
make Minnesota unique, ihcy arc 
part of our identity as a stale, and 
must not be taken for granted," 
Governor Carlson said. "It is vitally 
important that wc preserve our nat- 
ural resources for future genera- 
tions. This is an investment in our 
futur 



In 



i the 



announcement 
Governor cited the tremendous eco- 
nomic impact Minnesota's natural 
resources have on the stale econo- 
my. Fishing alone brings in nearly 
SI billion for the slate's economy 
and by the year 2000, outdoor recre- 
ation will generate more than 52 hil- 
lion for the slate. 

The "Access to the Outdoors" 
package was developed in conjunc- 
tion with more than a do/en out- 
doors and environmental groups, 
and is composed of three new initia- 
tives: 

Parks and Trails — 563 million. 
With the proposed investment, 
every slate park in Minnesota will 
be improved. Many park buildings, 
roads and utility systems were con- 
structed in the 1930's and in need of 
serious repair and rehabilitation. 
The proposal will restore 
Minncsoia's flagship state park. 
Ilasca, to peak condition with over 
$6 million. New visitor centers will 
be constructed at llosca. Forestville, 
and Millc Lacs Kathio and hundreds 
of campsites across the stale will be 
restored. More than 59 mitlion will 
be allocated for the improvement 
and restoration of metro area porks. 
A total of 104 new miles of trails 
will be added around the state for 
biking, in-line skating, hiking, ski- 
ing and snowmobiting. Funding is 
also included for Ihe creation of a 
new state park in Duluth to honor 
World War II veterans that will uti- 
lize the retired Navy ship, the U.S.S. 
Des Moines. 

Habitat — 550 million. Funding 
will be used to protect Minnesota's 
wildlife habitat by regenerating 
10,000 acres or forest, establishing 
vegetation on 8,000 acres, 



restoring 500 acres of wetlands. 
This initiative will put another 
2-UXK) acres into wildlife habilat by, 
paying landowners for "permanent 
conservation casements.' Funding 
also would he used to acquire 
17,500 acres for designation us 
"wildlife management areas, or 
WMA. The habitat initiative will 
develop winter cover and food for 
pheasant and other grassland 
wildlife, crealc a system to belter 
monitor wildlife populations, and 
restore forest and brushland habilat 
for grouse and 100 other types of 
hirds. The proposal will protect and 
restore Minnesota's streams for 
healthier river systems and better 
angling opportunities. Money is 



cd lor improved firearms safety 
shooting ranges across 



tra 

ihcsl..... 

Electronic Licensing — 51.2 
million. This "Outdoors Online" 
initiative will create a one-slop 
shopping system for recreational 
licenses. By next summer, hunters 
and anglers can purchase their 
licenses just by dialing a toll free 
telephone number. An ID number 
will be issued over the phone that 
allows them 'to begin hunting or 
fishing immediately. By 1999. 
licenses can be ohtuincd over the 
phone or through terminals at 
licensing locations. The terminal 
system will use information on 
Minnesota driver's licenses to enter 
a DNR database and issue hunting 
and/or fishing licenses on the spot, 
printing all recreational licenses on 
one license. Eventually, this system 
will be available on-line and 
expanded to include all recreational 
vehicle registrations and multi-year 
hunting and fishing licenses. The 
"Outdoors Online" initiative will 
also establish an Electronic Library 
for access to extensive data and 
information about the environment. 
The system will allow hunter, fish- 
ers and hikers' to create and cus- 
tomize their own maps. 

In addition to the SI 14 million in 
new initiatives, the Governor pro- 
posed 587 million in base bonding 
for environmental protection and 
infrastructure. The additional bond- 
ing includes funding for: flood haz- 



ard mitigation and control; ground- 
water protection; road improve- 
ments ut the Minnesota Zoo; 
improved walcr access (through 
boat landing and fishing piers); and 
DNR office consolidation. 

The Governor has urged legisla- 
tive support for his proposal not 
only on economic grounds, hut 
because ihe outdoors arc central to 
our quality of life and arc enjoyed 
with our families. "Il is with our 
family members that wc travel to 
the lakes on the weekend, wc visii 
our state parks throughout the year. 
we snowmobile, we ski, we hunt, 
and some of us even try to fish," 
Governor Carlson said. "Ultimately, 
part of being a Minncsotan is being 
outdoors." 

MS Office course 
at Northland to 
start February 2 

A 12-hour computer software 
course entitled "Introduction to MS 
Office" will be offered February 2. 
4, 9 and II from 6 to 9 p.m. in room 
106 at Northland Community and 
Technical College with Jancll 
Klinkcas instructor. 

Fee for Ihe course is $90 and prc- 
rcgistruiion is required prior lo 
January 30 hy calling 681-0793 or 
I -800-959-0282, It is designed for 
those with little or no experience in 
this software program. 

Thief River Falls 
annual reunion 
set for Feb. 21 

Residents, former residents, and 
friends of Thief River Falls who 
presently reside or arc winlcr visi- 
tors in Arizona arc invited to the 
annual Thief River Falls reunion 
from hio 5 p.m. February 21 in the 
Mesa ..Verde room at 26 1 5 Souih 
Farnsworth Drive in Sunland 
Village East. Mesa. AZ. 

For more information call Bob 
Protz at 602-98-1-4323 or Larry 
Johnson at 602-983-9647. 





Monday - Thursday 4-7 p.m. 



Senior Menu . 

LIVER AND ONIONS -BROILED CHICKEN BREAST 
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SUNDANCE LOUNGE 

Welcome Ironman 250 Race Fans & Swwmobilers 

Wed., Jan. 21 - Sat., Jan. 24 

"Johnny Green & the Greenmen' 

\ Internationally Famous Showband - Appeared In Batman Movies t 
Along With Adam West And Played For The Shiek Of Iran. 
681-7SSS Thief River Falls 



in- 




come Join Us And 




SLOTS • BLACKJACK 
FINE DINING 

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK! 



BAR BINGO 



DAILY SPECIALS 



_Mt» Rib and Walleye Spedala 
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COMMUNITY 
APPRECIATION 

THURSDAY 
JANUARY 22 nd 

0:0O P.M.-10:00 P.M. 

BROOKS, PLUMMIR 
RED LAKI FAUS 




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NORTHERN WATCH 



Saturday, January 17, 1998 



Saturday, January 17, 1998 



NORTHERN WATCH 



Page 9 






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Highway 59 North, Thief River Falls, MN 







Grygla-Gatzke is 

handed another 

close loss, 52-50 



L.iily l.ui'k i 






this 



niling i 



The 



[•.ijjlo. v.\w opened the 1997-98 
hoys high M-hitol basketball season 
wtili inn wins, have now lost eight 
stt.ii(;lit. Included in the streak arc 
uw> n\c!tiiiic decisions, a pair of 
imc-poinl (.Mines, a two-point con- 
test. .1 ihree-point affair, and two 

Latest .setback Tuesday might 
have t>ccn the toughest to lake as 
the Eagles saw an II -point lead 
with three minutes to play turn into 
a 52-50 loss al Warroad. 

"It's very frustrating," acknowl- 
edged Grygla-Cal/kc coach Vem 
Johnson, whose team trailed" 8-6 
and 21-23 at the first two quarter 
slops, hut went ahead 39-32 at the 
end of the third quarter and had a 
47-36 lead heading down the stretch 
before Warroad went on a 16-0 



gar 



nine ™". 
"We slopped doing things," noted 
. 'We quit attacking. Wo- 
ven* icniativc. I'll 



siarting playinc very lenia 
admit il. we fell apart. Wc 



tied." 



gotr; 



A 3-point basket with two sec- 
onds left hy Alex Anderson finally 
slopped the laic-game Warroad 
scoring outburst, but the Eagles 
couldn't come up with a turnover 
before the hum sounded. 

Mike Peterson of Warroad led all 
scorers with 19 points. Teammate 
Jon Docbblcr riad 14. Philip 
Bratcng scored 16 points and 
Anderson netted 15 for Grygta- 
Gat/ke. 

The Eagles went 8-for-10 at the 
free throw line, were, out- re bounded 
29-22 and lopped "the turnover 
charts 12-10. Warroad made 5 of 1 ^ 
free throws. 

1 2 3 4 T 

Grygla-Gatlko 15 18 It 50 

Warroad B 15 20 52 

O-Q - Alox Hollo 4, Alox Andaraon 15. 
Andrew Sundbor-j 9. Mikn Sax 2. Philip 
Qrolong 10. Qryco Torgoraon 4, 

Warroad • John RuimII 5. Man Jonaon 
0. Joo Doooblor 14. Tiavii Amlot 2. Justin 
Monlman 4. Miko Poioraon 1Q. 



— I AREA SPORTS] — 

Rod Loko County Control 

■ Monday. Jan. 13 ■ girts bukttball v», 
Rod Loko Font {at Oklao). 

■ Tuotday. Jan. 20 ■ Boya buafcolboll at 
East Grand Foriu Sucod Heart. 

■ Fnday, Jan. 23 ■ boyi boakeiOall va. 
Wtn-E-Uoe (al Okloo). 

Goodrldgo 

■ Saturday, Jan, 17-rxjyibaikoibalvn. 
Warron-Afi-ntodo-Osio (at NCTC), 1 

■ Tuesday. Jan. 20 - boys baikoiUOvi. 
Loko ol Iho Woods. - 1 , 

■ Friday. Jan. 23 ■ boya baskotoall at 
Marshall County Control. 

Gryelft-Gatzkn 

■ Saturday, Jan. t7 - boya baskniDaH at 
Qadnof/Groonbusti-Middlo Rrvar. 

■ Tuesday. Jan. 20 • boya batftoiban at 
Kittson County North. 

■ Fndny. Jan. 23 - boys basketball vs. 
Roseau. 

Goodrldge/Orygla-aatzko 

■ Monday, Jan. 19 - flirts boskotball at 
Lako or Iho Woods. 

■ Thursday. Jan. 22 • fllrli baskelball al 
Badgor/GrOonDush-Mtidlo Rrvor. 

Bad go r/Groon bush-Middle River 

■ Saturday. Jan. 17-boysbaskeibaPva, 
Grygla-GaUka. 

■ Monday. Jan. 19 - -jirla botkotball vs. 
Slophan-Aroylo. 

■ Tuosoay. Jan. 20 ■ girls boskotball at 
Thiol Rivor Falls: boys basketball vs. 
Slophen-Aigyle. 

■ Thufsoay, Jon. 22 - girts baskolbaH vs. 
GoodrldgoyOrygla-Gauke. 

■ Friday. Jan. 23 - boys boskotOoH at 
Loko ol iho Woods. 

Marshall County Central 

■ Saturday, Jan. 17 - girts boikoinoll at 
Slophon-Aigylo. 

■ Tuesday, Jan. 20 ■ boys baskolBoa at 
Warroad. 

■ Thursday, Jon, 22 - girts bMkotbuH vs. 
Rosa a u. 

■ Friday, Jan. 23 - boys boskotboH vs. 
Goodndgo. 




Gators pull out overtime win 

■ B/G-MR boys rally to beat MCC 56-55 



Craig Lawrence of the Prowlers got his stick up a Tuesday's Thief River Falls vs. Waitpad Section 
little high as he battled Tyrone Cole (14) and Lee 8A high school hockey game at the Huck Olson 
Marvin (15) (or the puck along the boards In Memorial Civic Center. 



Jeremy Vacura came through in 
Ihe clutch - twite - as Badger/ 
Grecnbush-Middlc River pulled olf 
an unlikely comc-from-bchind 5f>- 
55 ovenime win Tuesday in a boys 
high school basketball game against 
rival Marshall County Central at 
Ncwfolden. 

It was a game the Nordics could 
have, and according to Marshall 
County Central coach Run Ucland. 
should have won in regulation lime. 

Out (he Nordics let it slip away. 
They missed four straight free 
ihrows in the final 10 seconds of 
regulation time that could have iced 
it. and then watched Vacura hit two 
free Ihrows with two* seconds 
remaining lo force overtime lied at 
44-44. 

In ovenime. the Nordics' Garrett 
Magner made one of two free 
ihrows with five seconds left to put 
his learn on lop 55-53, only lo have 
Vacura. a 5-10 senior, beat the 
buzzer with a long, off-balance 
game- winning 3-point shot thai he 
banked off the backboard. 

"It was unreal." said Ucland. "It 
was beyond bizarre. I've coached 
800 games and I've never seen any- 
thing quite so bad, as far as losing a 
game like that. Wc virtually had the 
game won in regulation time and 



But acombinatiun of ihc Nordics' 
mistakes and Ihe Gators' good for- 
tunes turned things around al Ihc 
end. 

Badgcr/Grecnbush-Middlc River 
coach fcldon Sparby concurred with 
Ucland in his post-game assessment 
of ihe outcome. "Wc absolutely did- 
n't deserve lo win." he confessed. 
"Wc made so many bad choices and 
gave them every opportunity lo win. 
Out everything backfired on Ihem." 

It was Ihe second straight wild 
finish for the Gators, who lost a 73- 
66 triple overtime' game to Tri- 



igcr/Grccnhush-Middlc 
River let a final minute five-point 
lead slip away with l-for-6 free 
throw shooting lo close out regula- 
tion time. 

"This one was kind of a reversal 
from Friday when had the opportu- 
nity to win and let it get away, " 
noted Sparby. 

Marshall County CcnUaJ led i 0-6 
after one quarter, 23-20 at halflimc 
and 36-32 through Ihrcc quarters. 

The Nordics" David Wilcox led 
all scorers with 19 points. He was 
their only double figure point pro- 
ducer, but Jon Donorski and Matt 
Nelson both chipped in with 9, and 



...,o 14 12 ' 



Warroad shuts out TRF, again Po° r shooting costs TRF girls 

* ** n.l.-r.il I ntr-c chril nnlu V\ Wr. Itnnc I 1.0 "J1- 1 ^ Mill 17-7Q. I Jlke» fOODcd the [UHlOVCr ChOTt 



Warroad shut out Thief River 
Falls for the second time this season 
Tuesday, beating the Prowlers 4-0 in 
a Section 8A high school hockey 
match-up at the Huck Olson 
Memorial Civic Center. The first 
encounter, played at Warroad Dec. 
2. wound up 3-0. 

But despite the setback that 
dropped the Prowlers to 2-1 1. Thief 
River Falls coach Scott Bcrgland 
was selling positive in his post- 
game comments. "We played well," 
he said. "We have nothing to hang 
our heads about. They (Warroad) 
definitely knew they were in a hock- 
ey game. Even though this one was 
4-0 and the first one was 3-0, this 
was a much more competitive 
game." 

The two teams went up and down 
the ice in an entertaining first peri- 
od, but goalies Mike Dowers of 
Thief River Falls ffT*>avcs) and 



Justin Ferguson of Warroad (II) 
were up lo the challenge. 

Dowers was busy again at the 
start of ihc second period when 
Warroad stepped up the attack. But 
he kept Ihc visitors off Ihc score- 
board until the 7:04 mark when 
defenscman Greg Collard's long 
straightaway shot glanced off the 
sophomore netminder's slick. 

The 1-0 margin remained on the 
scoreboard until the 13:40 mark of 
the second period when two point- 
blank rebounds finally resulted in a 
Chad Hontvct goal. 

Dowers' pad save on clean break- 
away by Jackson Harrcn 5:43 into 
the third period kept the Prowlers in 
Ihc game, bul Warroad eventually 
picked up ihe key third goal at 
10:22. Dowers thought he had the 
puck smothered as he sprawled 
across the goat mouth, but 
Hcppner's shot slipped acnass the 



Mborhead beats TRF bovs 86-42:.. 

Fast start leads to 
one-sided contest 



A first quarter Moorhead blitz 
shot the Spuds post Thief River 
Falls 86-42 Tuesday in boys high 
school basketball. 

The match-up between the once- 
bcatcn Spuds, ranked No. 4 in the 
Class AAAA slate polls, and the 
Class AAA Prowlers, who came 
into the game 1-9, was decided in a 
hurry. Nine Moorhead first quarter 
field goals, combined with 2-for-14 
Thief River Falls opening period 
shooting, produced a 24-4 score- 
board spread at the eight-minute 
mark. 

Mike Hogen scored 25 points to 
lead a group of four Moorhead dou- 
ble figure scorers as Ihc Spuds car- 
ried a 45-18 lead into halflimc and 
opened up n 73-30 third quarter gap, 

Anthony Hendricks scored 17 
points to lead the Prowlers, who lost 



s of junior forward Kelly 

Cola lo a broken wrist suffered dur- 
ing the game. 

ThiefRivcr Falls shot just 22 per- 
cent from the field in the first naif 
(5/23) and wound up with a 33 per- 
cent figure for the night (17/52). 
The Prowlers were 7-for-ll at the 
free throw line, where the Spuds 
were l4-for-l7. 

Scaring 

1 2 3 4 T 

TniolRrvorFolto 4 14 12 1Z 42 

Moortiood .24 21 SB 13 Bfl 

TRF - Miko Johnson 2. Kyto Wotorwtxth 
7. Mart Myom 6, Jorcmy Swansea 4, Cowy 
Skjorvon 4. Cody Huschlo 2. Anthony 
Hondricka 17. 

Mcorhoad - Tina Garcia 2. Mfto Haoon 
25, Scot! Blown 2. Shown Woodbury 4, 
Tony Birmingham 10, Koto Nrsllof 2, Travis 
Janidi 3. Doug SetioHriouM 10, Jaton 
Bowo 2. Jotf Ubbon 10, Kovln Battel 4, 



The Thief River Falls SnoDrifters m . 
Present The ^rYiGrC*3i 

4SSSSk 



Se*" n iL 



January 24-25, 1998 



-SPECIAL EVENTS- 

Miller Dash for Cash 

OVALS 

(Saturday) 

Dayco - Dash for Cash 
SNOCROSS . 
(Sunday) 

MAKE-A-WISH 

Celebrity Race 

(Sunday) 




line. 

Just 25 seconds later it was 4-0 as 
Drew Parsley tapped in a rebound. 

Dowers finished with 34 Mops. 
Ferguson came up with a 22-savc 
shutout. 

"Wc had a good first period, and 
we had just as many good chances 
in the third period," noted Bcrgland, 
"but it's the same achillcs heel we've 
had all year - wc can't put the puck 
in the net," 

The two rivals, who have had 
some spirited games in the past, 
skated through 37 1/2 minutes of 
penalty-free hockey before Warroad 
was whistled for a couple of minor 
infractions late in the third period. 
Scoring 

Flrit parlod - neno. 

Second period - W*rro»d. Groo Collard 
(un,), 7:04; WarrMd, Chad Hontvol (Joo 
UlwoEtlng-Joih Hoppnor), 13:40. . 

Third period - WniroKl, Hcppno' (Brian 
Cole), 10:22: Wan-oad, Dmw ' Partley - 
(OonnyOoMarB-JacUonKarronpIO-^. . 

Oaalie.aavee - TRF, Miko Donors 14-13- 
7-34; Warroad, Jwlin Forguwn 1 1-7-+-22. 



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— I TRF SPORTS^ — 

Saturday, Jan. 17 

■ NCTC women vs. Hoiny Rivar,.1 pjn^ 
NCTC roon vs. Rainy Rrvor, 3 p.m. 

■ Hockay - LHS al Roseau (A/8), 
5:1tV730p.m. "' 

Tuesday, Jan. 20 

■ Swimming - LHS boys at CrocJaton 
Triangular, 5 p.m. 

■ Hockay - LHS at East Grand Forks 
(A/B), 5:15/7:30 p.m. 

■ Batkoiball - LHS girls vs. 
BaOgar/Groonbuati-MWdlo River (A/B). 
6/730 p.m. 

■ Wrestling - LHS at Mahnomen (A/B). 
S JO p.m. 

Wodnosday, Jan. 21 

■ Baskolball ■ NCTC woman vs. Central 
Lakns, e p.m.; NCTC man vs. Central Ukos, 
8 p.m. 

Friday, Jan. 22 

■ Boskoroait - NCTC man vs. Concordia 
JV, p.m.; NCTC woman at Itasca. Q pjn.: 
LHS boys vs. Forous Falls (A/B). 6/7:30 
p.m.; LHS girls ot Crookslon (A/B), 6/730 

Saturday, Jan. 24 

■ WrasUlng • LHS at Detroit Lakes Dual 
Invitational, o_m. -"" 

■ Hockey - LHS vs. Moorhead (A/B), 

5:15/730 p-m. 

Crusaders' schedule 
opens with sweep In 
volleyball, basketball 

Our Saviours Christian Academy 
of Thief River Falls swept Lake 
Region Christian Academy of 
Devils Lake, ND in a Friday (Jan. 
9) triplchcadcr that included boys 
and girls basketball gomes and a 
girls volleyball match. 

Paula Ramsey and Tammy 
Myhrcr scored 10 points each in ihc 
Crusaders' 30-8 girls basketball 
win; Jon Lcc collected 22 points 
and David Bray had 10 in the 50-36 
boys basketball victory; while 
Koric Johanning picked up IS ser- 
vice points and Becky Bray added 7 
in a 15-2, 15-4 volleyball sweep. 

A week earlier, the Crusaders 
came up with a pair of wins over 
New Testament Baptist of 
Lnrimorc, ND as Lcc scored 18 
points and Tom Ramsey contributed 
17 in a 57-32 boys basketball win, 
while Karie Johanning had nicked 

^< 10 service points and Morcy 
yhrcrhad9ino15-9, 15-7. 15-5 
volleyball triumph. 

The Crusaders' volleyball team 
opened the winter sports season 
with a 15-2. 17-15. 17-15 volleyball 
win over Heritage School of 
Karlstad Dec. 15. Karie Johanning 
and Tammy Myhrcr had 12 and 10 
service points, respectively, in the 
sweep. 

Our Saviours Christian Academy 
will be back in action Friday, Jan.' 
23 against HcrituRc School and wilt 
play Saturday, Dec. 31. at Lake 
Region Christian Academy. 

Arlcnc Johanning serves as the 
Crusaders' volleyball coach. Cory 
Helm scored the basketball "*— ■— 



ft 



Detroit Lakes shot only 33 per- 
cent from the field and just 52 per- 
cent at the free Ihrow line, but still 
beat Thier River Falls 46-39 
Tuesday in girls Section SAAAhigh 
school basketball. The Lakers won 
because the Prowjers shot only 23 
percent and were out-rebounded 35- 

, Both shooting and rebounding 
have been a problem throughout the 
course of a 4-8 season, acknowl- 
edged Thief River Falls coach Jeff 
Loe, "But it wasn't ever this bad," he 
said. ' 
Detroit Lakes led at. ihe quarter 



stops 11-9.23-15 and 37-29. 

Defensively, I thought we really 
worked hard," noted Loe. "Becky 
Mooncy and Laura Follctt played 
real well on defense. But offensive- 
ly, it's been a struggle for us." 

Jessica Abrahams scored a game- 
high 26 points for the Lakers. 
Nicole Kopori led the Prowlers with 
22 points. They were the game's 
only double figure scorers. 

thief River Falls was l4-for-60 
from the field and 10-for-l8 at the 
free throw line. Detroit Lakes went 
l6-for-49 from the floor and hod a 
l3-for-25 free throw game. The 



Wolverines knock off Mustangs 



Goodrldgc/Grygla-G&tzke broke 
il open in the, second 'quarter nnd 
went on to beil.Rccl Lako County , 
Caili^5M2.t3fee*d^Hli7-*rgirLi 
'high scrrool bnkztbaui-amieirtayed 
' nlGocdrid^Vi'-^'flT':^ 
IWith RqT Lake .G^ ty/Ccntra) 
cchter-AitfMjjeDeijWttrl^on The 

^"^•n^^TiPtpT ,jp "** " ft y 

fouls. ihe^awr»i^toTte4»10-K 
first qiiarua^HJ^ "*^^*^* r 

timo cusbiorif-i „ , 

difference to 38-31 by ihcend'oX the 
third quartefcTwi couldn't. complete 
Ihccorncbeck; 1, ■ '*"■> '.'"„"„'. 

The outcorucv reversed a 67-52 
Red Lake Ccfunty . Central victory 
when the twovicaw.fr'ct: brick on 
Dec 4, and snapped 'o.flvc-game 
win streak forlhe Mustoitgk. 

"Wc played Chervesurtiiough on 
the inside," explained Ooodridgc/ 
Grygla-Gatzke coach Mike Gost. 



The last time wc played them, they 
hit the outside shots on us. This time 
'they iiidn't shoot very well from the 
outside." 

Angic Gost had a 17-point, 9- 
rcbound game for the winners, 
whilc'Dana Wisclh netted II points 
and Amic Kotrba pulled down 18 
rebounds. 

"We did a real good job hitting 
the boards," noted Gast, although 
Red Lake County Central still 
wound up with a 38-37 rebound 
edge. 

Katie O'Neill scored 13 points 
nnd Chervestad had 1 1 for the 
Mustangs. 

Goodridgc/Grygla-Galzke shot 



40 percent from the field (22/55), 
while Red Lake County Central shot 
only 28 percent (17/60). The 
Wolverines were 7-for- 14 at the free 
throw line; the Mustangs -went 7- 
for-12. 



Uttng 



rn.ee... 



5 IS 



Goodrtflge/O-G , 

RLCC - Jonnl MorlnviDe 2. Katie ONoUl 
13. Sylvia Hilgomon 4. Trtda WlOett 2. 
Frances Htfaeman S, Tracy Rosien E, Angle 
Chervestad 11. 

0/0-0 • Jenny Nutton B, Dana Wlseth 
11, KaDiryn Stanley 0. Angle Gosl 17, Amia 
KotrOo 4, Lorl Hagen 2. 



- Sports .Briefs^ 



Sandcn draws attention 

Back-to-baclc'o double-digit 
scoring efforts by Kyle Sandcn 
have arnwn plenty of attention 
and praise for the University of 
Minnesota men's basketball 
freshman redshirt from Thief 
River Falls. ,j^ 

The Gophers' suinuu^cntcr 
since early In the seawo/lhc 6- 
1 1 Snnden had been averaging 
3 points per game before com- 
ing up with a 16-point perfor- 
mance in a 75-68 loss at Pcnn 
State Saturday (Jan. 10). He 
followed that with a 15-poinl 
effort in a 74-60 Wednesday 
night setback at the hands of 
Michigan Slate at Williams 
Arena. 

Sandcn played 32 of the 40 
minutes against- the Nittany 
Lions and logged 31 minutes 
against the Spartans.' 

He became a big part of the 
Gophers' offense when injuries 
hit scoring leaders Sam 
Jacobsan and Quincy Lewis. 
. Minnesota, struggling with 
an 0-4 start in the Dig Ten, will 
face Iowa at home Sunday 
afternoon in a nationally-tele- 
vised game on CBS. 

Anderson helps Huskies 

St. Cloud State University 
freshman hockey player Keith 
Anderson of Thlci River Falls 
had a goal and an assist in the 
Huskies' 2-1, 6-2 Jan. 9-10 
weekend sweep of Nebraska- 
Omaha. 

With four goals and eight 
assists, Anderson is the top- 
scoring freshman for the 
Huskies and is lied for sixth on 
the team scoring list. He is a 
nlus-5 in the plus-minus chart. 

The WCHA-lcading Huskies 
arc at the University of 
Minnesota-Duluth this week- 
end. 



Olson, Wildcats rip 
Goodridge defense 



Scth Olson scored 29 points 
Tuesday to lead Tri-Counly past 
Goodridge 64-48 in a boys high 
school basketball game played at 
Karlstad. 

The Wildcats led only 9-7 after 
eight minutes, but opened up a 30- 
18- halflimc spread and stretched it 
to 49-29 through three quarters. 

Olson was 13-for-I9 from the 
field, including a 3-for-4 showing 
from 3-point range, to spearhead a 
51 percent 29-for-57 Tri-County 
shooting show. 

"I was disappointed in our overall 
team defense," said Goodridge 
coach Eric Mickclson. 

The Wildcats' depth and quick- 
ness took their toll on the Huskies, 
according to Mickclson. "Their 
press didn't hurt us all that much, 
out they picked up a lot of steals on 
their half-court defense because 
they're so quick," he said. They just 
wore us down." 



Eleven Wildcats wound up 
putting their name in the scoring 
column as they dropped the Huskies 
to 5-5. 

Jarcd Eidclbcs and Jim Scheef 
scored 14 points each and Ben 
Hanson had 10 for Ihc Huskies. 

Goodridge was !6-for-40 from 
the field (40 percent) and I6-for-22 
at the free throw tine. Tri-County 
had a quiet 3-for-6 free throw night. 
The Huskies out-rebounded Ihe 
Wildcats 29-17, but also had more 
turnovers, 18-10. 

1 2 3 

Goodridge .7 11 11 ID <8 

Tri-County .0 21 10 15 04 

Goodridge - Ben Hanson 10, Jorod 
EkJetbei 14, Jim Scheef 14, Travis Scheel 
3. Josn Qanarjher 3, Chad Jonnson 4. 

T-C - Ron Carlson 3. Tryo SplWo B. Nick 
Gust 2. Ramone Potior 2. Travis HJello 2, 
Setri Olson 29, Paul Kaimlerctak 5, Phil 
Krumlsrciak 2. Josh Drttlon 2, Luke 
Froeman 0, John Hondrickson 2. 



Royals complete a 
sweep of Pioneers 



Magner had 8 - all coming in over- 
time. 

Vacura had only ihrcc points 
Ihrougtr three quarters, but finished 
with 18 lo lead the Gators. Andy 
Schcnkey contributed 10 points and 
Dory I Wockcnfuss netted 9. 

Neither team shot well. The 
Gaiors were 22-for-60 from the 
Held (37 percent), while the .Nordics 
were just a slightly-better lB-for-48 
(38 percent). Badger/Grecnbush- 
Middlc River was 5-for-9 at the free 
throw line, where Marshall County 
Central struggled with a 17-for-27 
showing. The winners had a 43-31 
rebound advantage and topped ihc 
turnover charts 16-14. 

Badger/Grcenbush-Middle River 
is 6-3. Marshall County Central 
checks in at 8-4. 




CLUB 

'8-BALL 
TOURNAMENT 

EVERY SATURDAY 



MN/USA WFtESTt-ING 
TOURNAMENT 

SATURDAY, JAN. 24TH 

ROYALTON HIGH SCHOOL, Royalton, MN 

Wolgh-ins: 7:30-8:30 o.m.; Wrostllng Boglns: 10:00 a.m. 



Toumnmont la opon lo wroalloro bom botwoon tho yonra 1984 
& 1993, This i3 tho Roglon 6 (Includoo oil ol Northorn MN) 
Qunliflor lor tho MM/USA Stnto Toumnmont and foaturoa a 16- 
man brackot. Tho top 4- p loco (Inlshorn will advance* to trio Btato 
toumnmont on Saturday, Fob. 7, at Champlln Park High 
School, Ctiamplin Park, MN. 



If you hove any quoatlono. Call John LeDuc at 



'ajp-G 



G8V0G65. 



FOURTOWN/GRYGLA 

SPORTSMAN CLUB 



MONTHLY MEETING 

TUESDAY, JAN. 20 

• 7:30 P.M. 

AMERICAN LEGION CLUB, 
THIEF RIVER FALLS 




Oklee Moonlighters 



^ Snowmobile Club 
JANUARY, 18, 1998 • 2:00 SHARP!! 
TICKET BAR, Oklee, MN 

(Not responsible for accidents) 



BVQ-MB ■ Jaromy Vacura 10, Stiuno 
NaJjon 7, AOam Holms* I, Oorvl 
Wockonlusri 9, Brot Bantow 7. Andy 
Sehonkay 10, Richard Wockonluta 2, DavW 
TnudniU 2. 

MCC • Jon DonaraW e, Caleb Holthuion 
4, Man Nolwn 0, Oanan Maonar 6. Daylon 
ElaoUi 2. QroQ Ualand A. Oavkt Wilcox 10. 



Lakers topped the turnover charts 
15-14, 

It was the second win over the 
Prowlers this winter for Ihc Lakers, 
who claimed a 53-48 victory in a 
Dec. 12 meeting at Detroit Lakes. 

1 2 3 

DfltroflLoko* 11 12 14 4(3 

Thiol Rlvor Foil*.,.. 8 14 10 30 

OL • Kara Noiton 4, Alhta Kovola t, 
Jaaalca Abrahams 26, Uia Elijah 5, Tina 
Sannonborp 2, Lha EWoniehlnk 8. 

TRF - Tayo Hunt 2. Uura Fodott 4, 
Rachel MothKKi 3, Bocky Moonoy 2, Nicola 
Kopori 22. Sara Jontan 2. Slepn Loach 4. 



The gap closed, but there was still 
a 2 1 -point scoreboard spread 
Wednesday as UND-Lakc Region 
beat Northland Community and 
Technical College for the second 
time this winlcr in men's basketball, 
81-80, at Devils Lake. 

Northland lost their 1997-98 
home and season opener to the 
Royals by 44 at the beginning of 
December. 102-58. 

Tim Hanson and Kcrmit Cooper 
scored 17 points apiece and Scott 
Hembcrgcr had 12 for the winners, 
who led 53-30 at hainimc. 

"We came out with a match-up 
zone defense and they hit ten 3- 
point shots in the first half." 
explained Northland coach Ted 
Knzc. "Wc gave them open looks." 

The Pioneers came back to play a 
solid second half, chopping the dif- 
ference to 10 points near the mid- 



way mark. 

"It's the same story we've had all 
year," noted Krizc. "We dig our- 
selves a big hole and spend the 
whole game trying to come back. 
But I was really, really proud of the 
way they played in the second half. 
They came back and did a nice job." 

Northland's offense was led by 
Chaka Ali with 15 points.Dwight 
Goodwin 14 and Nic Thompson 13. 

The loss dropped the Pioneers to 






....53 sa 01 



Goodwin 14, 

Whttnoy Jr. 5. Soon Grumomon 5, Chaka 

All 15, Gran! SkDIcfcl. 

UND-LR • Scon Hombargor 12. Korl 
Tonolrwfi 0, Tim Hanson 17, Jon Hooar 4, 
Joo Ford 10, Glonn GoraOi 5. Kormil 
Cooper 1 7, Shaun Vorooul 7. 



* CLASSIFIEDS 




Harv St Tom's Ice Fishing 

'ff^ Lake of Ihe Woods ^sff 



- Bombardier Rides out ol Hospital Bay 

- Bod & Breakfast - 620 Lake St NE, Warroad, MN 5G7G3 

- Experienced Guides, Bait and Poles Furnished. 

- 4-person, Gas Heated Houses and 4-pereon Sleeper Houses. 

- Bed & Breakfast and Housekeeping Packages Available. 




• Call Harv , 
800-5B8-E028 




DEFECT iyE^AGE 



_. .. . -i 
j 

i 

I 



I'lll!".- I" 



NORTHERN WATCH 



Siillircliiy, Jnnuary 17, I'J'JK 



Pirates build lead, 
hold off TRF rally 



t'rniil.iton look o\cr the iNimc in 
the ilmd i|iiiirter uiul held oft ;t Thief 
Kiut Kills Cdiiit-back down ihc 
Mtftili Thursday m (he Pirates 
■.topped the visiting Prowlers 64-.*i7 
in Seeuon SAAA hoys high school 
tuskcirull. 

Ii »;is the si^th straight las-, for 
the l-ll Prowlers, who dropped :i 
•15-35 decision 10 ihc Pirates in their 
first meeting hack on Dec. 4. 

Crookston siancii with a 19-1.1 
first <in.mer lead, Thief River Tails 
«tni ahead 2 l J-28 at half lime, hut 
ihe Pirates broke away in ihc third 
ijiuner, 4SO&. 

The Prowlers chopped the differ- 
ence lo <il)-57 in the final minute. 
hui couldn't complete the rally. 

Jcrcmv Vocllcr of Crooksion led 
all scorers with 21 points. 
Teammate Jason Kuchn netted 1 1 . A 
balanced Thief River Falls attack 
included Kyle Watcrworth with I J 
points. Jeremy $wanson and 
Anthony Hendricks with 10 each. 
Justin Walseth 9, and Mail Myers 8. 

I-'rec throws proved to be a major 
factor, with the Prowlers struggling 
through a lO-for-22 night ai the line, 
while the Pirates nailed 13 of 17. 

Tliief River Falls shot 40 percent 
from the field (22/55). The Prowlers 
turned it over 16 limes, with almost 
half of those coming in the third 



Oookiior 



Defense is key to 
B/G-MR success 



Defense once again proved to be 
the strongest weapon for the 
Badger/Grcenbush-Middlc River 
girls Thursday in a 45-29 high 
school basketball win over Warrcn- 
Alvarado-Oslo. 

The visiting Gators gave up just 
two first quarter points and limited 
the Ponies to 17 paints through 
three quarters en route to iheir fifth 
straight win. ^ 

"Our deferric just dominated 
early," pointed out Gators coach 
Tom Ncibaucr. "Wc played a real 
hard man-to-man and got a lot of 
steals. We've got to do.a few things 
a little better offensively, but defen- 
sively we're p|aying well." 

Tiffany Kagcn scored 14 points 
and Kara Kuznio had 12 Tor the win- 
ners, who had quarter leads of 12-2, 
21-9 and 31-17. ErikaSwanson col- 
lected 1 1 points for the Ponies, who 
put only four players in Ihc scoring . 
column. 

The 10-2 Gators were 14-for-38 



from the field (37 percent) and 19- 
Tor-28 at the free throw line. The 
Ponies made 3 of 5 free throws. 

fa«ri»f 

1 2 3 4 T 

B/a-MkWta Hint 12 9 to 14 45 

Wairort-VO 2 7 B 12 29 

BTO-MR - Kin Kuxnia 12. Tina Skortkl 
4. Slsfsnlo Spartjy 2, TWany Haoon 14, 
Kol»oy FokJod 4, Mtwy Smith 7. Kara 

W-AO - Erikn Swnrwon 1 1 . Jack* ZuU 
'6, Kalla Lootilo 4, Roxaroo Adrian B. 



Thief River Falls is a 
42-30 girls J V winner 

Thief River Falls led at each 

Quarter stop Tuesday en route to a 
2-30 girls junior varsity high 
school basketball win over Detroit 
Lakes. 

Erika Hudson scored 13 points to 
lead the winners, who were ahead at 
the stops 7-4, 15-12 and 29-23. 



MCC girls fall 78-35 



Lake of the Woods used its size to 
set up a fast break offense Thursday 
as ihc Bear ran by Marshall County 
Central 78-35 in girls high school 
basketball at Baudetie. 

"They pushed the ball up ihc 
court." noted Marshall County 
Central coach Alice Dahl. They're 
big, and they run the floor well." 

The Bears had quarter leads of 
23-10.40-19 and 54-27. 

Ellic Waibcl scored 23 points and 
Kimi Dragdon had 18, while Cyndi 
Hull und Heather Hanson both net- 
ted 14 for (he Bears. Kris l i Kilcn led 
ihc Nordics with 16 points. Mandi 
Bbwat and Miki Wutcrwortli con- 
tributed 12 and II rebounds, respec- 
tively, to the Marshall County 
Central efforts. ■ 

The Nordics were 14-for-SB from 
the field (24 percent) and 7-for- 15 at 
the free throw line. The Bears weni 
33-for-KO from the floor (41 per- 
cent). 

Marshall County Central is I - 10 
for ihc year. 



MCC.... 



1 2 3 4 T 

10 9 8 8 35 

Lake ol tho Wooda .23 17 14 24 78 

MCC • Holly Auouatina 4, Chrlatlna 

Hapon 4. Krlitl Kilan 1B. Tiffany Bring 2. 

MiM WaWrwonh 3, Mancfl Biawat 4, Jeatlea 

Anderson 2. 

LOW - Erin Bwdutrand 4, Cynd) HuM 

14. Katto Braaton 4, Eilie Waibol 23. 

Hoalhor Hanson 14,.Kato Haratafl 1. Klrrt 

Brandon 18. 



Warroad hockey JV 
7-2 winner over TRF 

Warroad scored 15 seconds into 
ihc game and had three goals by the 
3:07 mark en route to a 7-2 Tuesday 
junior varsity high school hockey 
win over Thief River Falls. 

Jaymc Holmes scored both Thief 
River Falls goals. John Sylvester 
had 21 saves in the Thief River 
Falls nets; Warroad wound up with 
18 stops. 



Wolverines finish off 
3-0 week with victory 



Goodridgc/Grygla-Giit/.kc fin- 
ished off a 3-0 week with a 63-55 
Thursday night girls high school 
basketball win at Warroad. 

Angie Gast scored 17 points and 
Jenny Nelson had 14. while* Lori 
llapcn and Dana Wiscth both 
picked up 10 for the Wolverines. 
who trailed 15-fi ai the end of the 
first quarter, pulled even at 29-29 at 
lialftime, fell behind again 49-44 at 
ihe end of the third quarter, but wori 
it with a I'J-fi fourth quarter scoring 
advantage. 

"Wc dug ourselves a hole right 
away." pointed out Wolverines 
coach Mike Gast. who said a game- 
long Cioodridge/Grygta-Gat/kc 
press finally took its toll on Warroad 
down the stretch. "Our press was 
pretty effective in ihe second and 
lourt'h quarters." he noted. "We did- 
n't let up. 1 think they [Warroad) got 
tired at the end." 

Warroud's offense f 



Heather Evans with 20 points, Lisa 
Fry 19 and Jessica Johnson 13. 

Goodridgc/Grygla-Gatzke was 
24-for-60 from the field (40 per- 
cent) and a busy 18-for-31 at the 
free throw line. Warroad went 22- 
for-49 from ihe ihc floor (45 per- 
cent) and 10-for-l3 at the line. The 
Wolverines finished with a 33-28 
rebound edge. 

"Ii was a big week for us," said 
Gast. whose team is now 7-5. 

The Wolverines lost ihc services 
ofjunior Kathryn Stanley in the first 
auartcr after a hard collision with 
the wall under the basket. 

1 2 3 4 T 

Goodrldoo/O-Q 23 IS 10 03 

Worrofld 15 14 20 55 

G/Q-Q - Jonny Notion t4. Dona Wisolh 
10,KalhfynS!anloy4.AnBloOast t7.Am.o 
Kolrtja 8. Lori Hogon 1 0, 

Warroad - Holly Pahlen 2, Sarah 
Polo'wjn t. Hontner Evan* 20, Josaiea 
Johnson 13. Uaa Fry 19. 



The Classifieds - The Classifieds 



i 2 a 4 r 

1> 13 ID 7 31 57 

19 9 20 10 64 
remy Snamon to. Casey 
SV|orvon 2. Anthony HendncM to. Kylo 
Walarwann It. Cody HujcNb 7. Juibn 
Walulh 0. Mail Mycn 8 

Crookjion ■ J J Scfiovmrj 5. Cart Muni 
8. Joremy Voolloi 21. Juilm Uuchmcior 9. 
Jaton Kuofin 13. Tim Lmoflrcn 2. Duibn 
5. Ryan Palm t. 



TRF JV boys split vs. 
Moor head, Crookston 

A 68-41 Tuesday loss at 
Moorhcad was followed by a 63-59 
Thursday win at Crookston for the 
Thief River Falls junior varsity 
boys high school basketball team. 

Moor head out-scored Thief River 
Falls 20-7 in the fourth quarter to 
break open the Tuesday game. 
Thursday. Thief River Falls main- 
tained quarter leads of 13-8, 28-23 
and 43-39. 

Collin Schafcr led Thief River 
Falls with 10 points against 
Moorhcad and 19 against 
Crookston. Aaron Hendricks and 
Matt Koehmstediioined Schafer in 
double figures Thursday with 14 
and 12 points, respectively. 



ATVs/MotoTcycles 

WANTED FOR pans- 1082 Honda 70 3- 
whoolor lor pans. Phono 310-081-1133 
or 218-661-6039 and loavo n mossago 

lorGnry. 7gHi> 

FOR SALE- 1997 Polaris 400 4*4 
Sportsman, mco, S4.37S00. phono 218- 
463-2630 bcloro 2 p m. tiSp 

Campers/ RV3 

31' TRAVEL tmllor, air, awning, healer 
good conation. 52.800.00 or hoi tub. 
683-7392. F217p 

Business Opportunities 

A NEW report rovools and trolns how to 
crool nn oilra S5OK-SIO0K in hnsslo Iroa 
roaldunl Income Irom homo. 24-haui 
moiMQO, 888-574-6069. P4l8p 
INCREDIBLE HOME based businosnll 
Mo moo lines, no soiling and no products 
to stock I Multl- billion dollar aliomatrvo 
hooltb industry I Unbehovablo lilonmo In- 
como polonliall Imogino younall rolimd 
within 2 yoarsl Rocorvo your amailng 
laoe "The Musing Link' to modom 
hoollh. call 218-386-2091 or 1-600-572- 

96S5. PBI11P 

BEAUTY SALON equip mo nt Includos 
wol stations, dryers, washor/dryor, CObl- 
not), miscotlonoous, 218-745-5365, 
P4t6p 

Card of Thanks 

THANK YOU 

I want to thank ovoryono for tho cords, 
glfu. plants, telephone calls and visits I 
rocorvod while I was in tho hospital, both 
in Thiol River Falls and .Forgo. Thanks 
also to tho doctors and nursos. A special 
Ihanks to Pastor Lloyd tor all his holp. 

Juol Auno 

l«p 

CARD OF THANKS 
Tho (amiry ol Wayna Holmgren has so 
much to bo thankful lor. First ol aU. wo 
thank God lor giving him to us. Wo thank 
Qod lor letting us all bo a pan ot his lilo 
and lor Wayna being a pan ol ours. Ho 
moant so much to all ol us. Wayno taught 
us all so much. On August 7, 1937, wo 
lost Wayno to cardiac orrost. From that 
day on. woVo alt struggled with it but with 
holp. wo'ra going on. A special thanks 
goes out to Pastor Tim Bauer lor his 
words ol comlort and prayer. To tho start 
al Qroon Funorol Homo and oopceially 
Erllng and Qordio lor all of their concern 
and holp in nuking everything go as won 
as can bo expoctod. To Dob Holmgren 
and Donna Usburg lor their boautlful mu- 
sic. To all tho folks ai Thrifty Whlto, 
Kmart, and Falls Diotol for tho tlowors, 
lood and momoriols and to ovoryono who 
son! condole ncos from naar and far. Wo 
can't begin to thank all ol you onough. 
May Ood bo with you all and koop you 
salo and healthy. . 

Beverly Holmgren 

JoM; Kristy & Michael Holmgron 

Doylo. Michollo S Ryan Oualtoy 

i!5p 



Household Goods 

FOR SALE- Matching couch and rocKor 
ludmor. country bluo m«, rocontty pro- 
tussionolly donned, 5125.00, 218-40G- 
2901. IF2l5p 



Household Goods 

MATCHING LOVESEAT and hido-a-b 
sola, blue lonos, oieotlont conditii 
S20000; quoen<sno wntorbod. oval rr 
ror. S50.00. 253-2678. P4l6p 



SEWING MACHINE 
REPAIR in your home or 
lirirttt In Nurvcrud Cleaners. 

Phone Earl al 

9M-5763 or 681-3441 



. FOR SALE- Apartment sue Whirlpool 
woshar and dryer, used very littlo. Call 
687-2550 oflor 5:00 p.m. F2l7p 



>7*\ YOU CAN BEAT AN EGG; 

ittlli tOU CAN BEAT 4 DRUM; 

YOU CANT BEAT OUR DEAISI 

Sutton's Carpel Wwtiwe 

Bogloy « (218)694-61^1 | 



RICK'S APPLIANCE 




For 5<nk* Call; 
681-2263 or t-800360-2263 

In Hon* of Srcc Seven 



MAPLE DRESSER. S200.00; moplo 
chosi ot drowors, 5200.00; matching 
nigh i stand. $20.00; light oak bookshol), 
£100.00; desk. S70.00: plno nightsland, 
S20 00; sowing cablnol, S50.00, 681- 
5129. 1!Sp 



DON'S 

307 1ST ST. E., TRF 

Acrott From Pinnlngtori Souar* 

HON.- ntW. lil - IJ »*• 14 t*i ROOfDrlUAOl 



a & Sorvlco • NEW & USED 

681-8664 



Mobile Homes 

FOR SALE- 14x70 3<bodroom moDito 
homo on IOO'xSOO' lot on Holny Rrvor al 
Boudolto, MN. Call 701-775-7015. I70»o 
1070 REVERE mobilo homo, 1CiB0, mco 
Interior, furnishod, 2-balh, master bod- 
room, 3 bedrooms, garden lub, wash- 
or/dryor roam, big oniry. 513.500. 001- 
25g0oreolt«1-50O-845~>709. P4t5p 
1970 REVERE mobilo homo, 14x70. 3- 
bodroom, 10x12 ontry. 1-1/3 stall garago 
and lot. nowty romodolod. Located in 
Country Eslatoo. Call ovonings. 681- 
■3805. P4t8p 



FOf) SALE- American Eskimo puppy, 
mnlo, UK.C. rogislorod, 5175.00. Call 
681-4257 ovonings, 681-0018 days. 

FJIttc 

FOR SALE- AKC male yollow Lab pup- 
plol $175.00 onch. cnll 218-745-5824, 

Annus, MN. P415p 

PUREBRED DALMATION pups, born 
Oct. 25, no papers. S50.00 or trado for 
good horso hay, 00-1-5142. P4t8p 
FOR 3ALE- AKC roguloiod Purobrod 
Golden flolnovor pupploo, $125.00, 
available 1-25-80. Call ovonings. 210- 

762-5335. P8I10P 

AKC SIQERIAN Husky pupptos. many 
colors, oxcoiiont guaiiry and condition. 
S125-S150, 701-847-3023. Colo Crook. 

PMSp 

AKC GERMAN Shophord pupplOS, born 
Nov. 27. 2- mnlo s, 2 -la ma las remaining, 
black wilh markings, 5175-5200, 210- 
637.6641. P4tCp 



i^THEO MAR ft 
tSf KENNELS v«' 

GRADUATE Of THE ACAOEMY OF DOG 
GROOMING. ST. PETERSBURG. FL 



fall For Art Appointment 

218-449-3575 



FOR SALE- Round bar lablo. 535.00; 
Kartmoro propano dryor. $50.00, 218- 

463-2636 boforo 2 p.m. ItSp 

FOR SALE' Entortalnmont cantor. 
550.00: 2T TV. $200.00: drossor w/mlr- 
ror. S100.00, 7-ploco lablo. 5250.00. 68 1- 
2520. P415p 



ADD THIS UP.. 

• QUALITY HOUSINQ 
•AFFORDABIUTY 

• ON THE SPOT FINANCINGS 



.^> 




-^ of Grand Forks 
1601 N. Woahlngton St. 
Opon 10-5 p.m. Mon.-Sat 






1" AiaiTOEMAHY SPECIALS 

awicuoBMcmt«»-)iH.« 
a«i«iiiotioi:-OT-tiii.iv#«»-ia.Mi 

BO*0MUfWllt.ICmiltH(i-«H.II 

a we tori, wi, rocur. ono.-*/»-tiH.K 
a Vrori s-DuwDt cmn-mr -itn.is 
a du fikiniiromid tin w/1-DR..inr-nii 

B OU niBW II 1 U lOOIOlM/f-tTl.tt 

a ou mow i-iumt cwrr-m -m.is 
3 ton iEjn-tfu-tn.il 

3mninum-itw -tin.il 

DOUIIE WOIKH lOFA-r/d-tUtlS 

amu tiniunHEH. mmm. iwuie 1 

IIUtlhlUIOMD-fn-IMI.Ii 

Buir auMM-tti.il 

b mi noma 1 m ww-fo-11i7.11 1 ■ 



HPWPJWlWtfllWIfJJl.tllrMI.MMIIII 



AFFORDABLE 

USED FURNITURE 

m:t,x,ku>-tx<imtx-tx-vitx-ta 
221 LaBrwAn.fl m&RrmFALis 



FOR SALE- 14x70 Holly Park mobilo 
homo noods minor wort. Call owner, 

21B-6B1-384B. 7Stlc 

1994 HOMAHK 3-bodroom. 1-1/2 bath, 
control air, all oppllancos Included, 

S24.000, 681-428B. P4t8p 

FOR SALE- 16x80 Marahfiold. 3-bod- 
room. 2-baih. nico layout w/laroo oniry. 
locotod nonh ol Karlstad. 510.750. Coll 
Chorllo ai 701-746-9444 or 701-787- 
6015. F2t5p 

Pets "~* 

FOR SALE- Black Lab pupploa. roady b 
go, 2 males. 4 lomalos. 550.00. 218-874- 
2976. P4i7p 



TO OWE Away- six black Springer and 
Shar pel pupplos, 7 wooka old. 5 lo- 
malos. 1 malo. ndorablo. 681-1005 ovan- 

inos. 2t6c 

LUTINO COCKAT1ELS, hand tod. vory 
tamo. 590.00 tor tho pair, 874-8635. 
P416p 



€xtu, 
€xtra 



Now Accepting 

Applications For 

Northern Watch 

Carriers 




The Northern Watch 

is looking for carrier delivery 

people for the 

Thief River Falls area.* 

Girls and boys of all ages arc 

encouraged to apply, along 

with adults. 



\m 



pick Up An Application At 324 Main Avenue North 

♦Carrier Delivery Routes Arc Independent Contractors. 



® The Times »WicH 

www.trftlmos.com www.nwa1cti.com 

CLASSIFIED ADS 

DEA0UNE8: Tho Time* - Monday, 10:00 A.M.; Northorn Wntch - Wednesday, 3:00 P.M. 







numborod '■"** provkfod. 

Maka Check Payable to Tho Tlmoi, P.O. Box 100, Thief Rlvor Falls, MN 56701 

PLEASE DE SURE YOU HAVE CHECKED WHERE VOU WISH YOUR AD TO RUN 

YOUR BEST DEAL IS TO RUN IN BOTH! 



REACHING OUT 
WORLDWIDE 

Fa At Low Al $5.00 

D Times 

□ Tlmoi . Inlornol 

□ Noflhorn Walen 

Q Nonriom Waich • Infomot 

D Boll- 



Ea.Add'l.10Wordt .51.00 

Pfkammn 

Internal Charge J 1.00 



BEST VALUE! 
PACKAGE DEAL 



v.m<ir.m,\rm 



□ Check orMonoy Order Encloio 
O fltH WajlorCord a 

□ ^Visaa 



"iDato._ 
in Dalo . 



FOR SALE- Purobrod Chocolata Lab 
puppies. Conloct Joff at Erl's, 681-4627 

oral homo 681-7082. 215c 

PUPPIES TO givo away, molhor Is 
Sprl rigor/Lab. Used 10 bolnrj outside, 

523-3075 olior 5 p.m. 1t5p 

ADOPTION I Retired groyboond noods 
non-working homo. Walks qulotly. No 
barking, no llo. Period houao compan- 
ion, 681-5664. 216c 

Notices 

PUBLIC NOTICE 

Dear Part Township filing datos lor oftico 
of ono Supervisor, 3-yoor torm and Clork, 
2-yoar lorni aro January 13 to January 
27. 1098 at tho Ciort'o homo. 

JuoH Chorvostod 

Door Park Township Ctart 

215c 

Wanted to Buy 

WANTED TO BUY- Chlldron'o cross 
country skis, bool alio botwoon 1-3. Call 
218-745-6235. loavo mossago. 4lfo 
3-4 BEDROOM bouaa In TRP or sur- 
rounding aroa. houso In noad ol ronova- 
■ lion preferred. 601-6703. P4t5p 




> W"Wo(£, ', - :' • ' '•.Erirjino Slands 
1 Batlery Cbargtrt *Aiuipi Blocks & 
Cttorry Pldcarg ; Ho»fkAvnlIablo 
Hoi&ColdWastifra 





5230 Deutz Allis 



Cab, Loader, 1300 hrs. 



NaSON EQUIPMENT, INC. 

930Hay59Nonh 

Thief RiwrFaflj. MN 56701 

218-681-1997 



piUJ.IJ-IIIIJ'lJT 

TRACTORS 



17SAIIIsw/loader 
1l35MFw/Loader 
5230 Deutz w/l.oader 
DX 160 Oeirtz AWD 
895 Veraatlls Fresh O.H, 
850 Versatile Rebuilt Eng. 
1586 1.H.C. 
WD - 45 Allis 



COMBINES 



8820JD.-> 

860MF4WD 

TR- 70 New Holland 

760 MF 

750 MF 

N - 7 Gleaner 



NELSON EQUIPMENT, INC. 

930H*y59NoHh 

Thirl (U«Ffl!!i.MN 56701 

218-681-1997 



Saturday, January 17, 1998 



11 



\ 



NORTHERN WATCH 



Page 11 



{WttEM^sWws-: - The CUssmiEDS ~ The Classifieds 



The Classifiedm 



Help Wanted 



Help Wanted - part-time 

Clorh/Doll Halpar 

Hpply at 



PCTflO/ 

puMpens 



BALES POSmON OPEN 

Sales Repre senta tive 
forKKAQ-EEDQ 

...ii would bo part-time employment 
Eipericnce k lutomobilo nKtuary. Call 
68I-4900roT»ppiiestion»nd*ppoinUoerit- 



HELP WANTED: INSURANCE 
, . SAL^S ASSISTANT. 

- Licenitc] /n propcrty/caxiwrty «nd Ufa and 

health dtslrid, but will train the right perion. 
SinrJ momi to 12941, '/o Ttt Tlntt, 324 
Kilo An. N„ Thill Rlvtr Nllt, MK 66701 



bnrVERS AND owner/oparnton wanlod 
to pull my trallora or youra for a imoll but 
■ oroWfnfl local trucking company. Excel- 
lent pay will) posslblo beneflti, looso put- 
chau program available, now equipment 
with ownai/operator specs, and stand up 
ileopara. pulling hoppera 43 ataloa and 
reglonalry. Mull have a minimum ol V 
yoar of verifiable driving oxporienco and 
eurront CDL Ploaso caS Eric ot 21 B-437- 

6MS. PF4t11p 

PAFTT-T1ME MEDICAL- Insuronco para- 
medical oxom sorvlco company la Book- 
ing an Individual lo do mobilo Insuronco 
exams In Thiol Rlvor Fans and tho sur- 
rounding communities. Appticunls must 
novo oxcodoni blood drawing skim and 
oxporionco. Call Koron 1 -600-2 BS-57SB. 

419c ; ' 

FRY-COOK MON.-FRI., B n.m.-3 p.m. 
school days only, oxporionco not noodod 
but helpful. 0011681-1470. P4Mp 
HANDLE'S BEN Franklin ol TBF has Im- 
mediate oponlngs.for 3 fun-tlmo posi- 
tions. ! Mansgomont Tralnoo, Head 
Chocker and Dopt. Hoad of Fabric. Seek- 
ing long-lorm omptayoas. Interest In 
crafts n plus! 3tfc 



mmm 



E5M 



The Takni Bank is an electronic job 
resume that employers and private 
employment agencies can access. 
They can review your qualifications - 
education, skills, work history - in 
relationship lo their Job openings. [[ 
interested, employers will contact you 
directly. Call for more information, 



rlffiffOfTHEJOBSAV/UUBLG 



♦ PARTSmVENrORY CON- 
TROL- Petmanenl, 
FuB-timo, TtilefRivBr FaBs. 
(MN12CT014) 

♦ FIBERGLASS WORKER - 

Permanent, Fiir-lJme, 
$6,65 per hr.(MN5124031) 

•> SHEET-FED PRESS 
OPERATOR- Permanent, 
Futt-BmeJIiief River Falls. ■ 
(MN43&1077) 




I J01 rUgrimy 1 E. • ThW Rhntr Folia 

218-681-0909 



Help Wanted 



JOD OPENING- Eloclrlcal/Eloctronlc 
Technician, tuli-timo. on call. Major lood 
processing laality local od In Fosslon. 
Minnesota. Musi know basic 120V, 240V, 
460V, slnglo phaso and 3 phase. [Jo cap- 
nblo ol wiring iranstomioro Irom 3 phase 
460 to slnglo phaso 110 or 220. Must also 
havo knowledge ol DC controllem and 
motors, AC motor siartora and AC invar- 
lors lor spood control on AC motors from 
314-HP to 15-HP. Must bo capablo ol 
Iroubla shooting computer conl rolled 
sorting syslom and bo able to uso various 
computer softworo programs. Musi havo 
somo knowlodgo ol gas llrod bumon). Ig- 
nition systoms and oToctric solenoids and 
controls. Must havo electrical dogroo or 
training or comparatlvo anporionco. 
Wago dependonl on qualifications. Send 
rosumo to: Attn: Porsonnol Dopt.. PO Box 
87. Brooks. MN 56715. Wo will bo ac- 
cepting rosumos until Iho Olh ol Fobruary. 
F217c 



LOOKING 
FOR WORK? 



II you aro actively sooklng 
omploymont and aro 55 or 
oldor call todayl MN Groon 
Thumb has training and 
omploymont opportunities 
(or quallflod applicants. 



Please Call For Appointment 

' — ! " "latne 

218-681-0909 



TRF MOTOR . 

old. MOOt- pof monih. Also. 2 carrier 
routes In TRF, 2 In HLF. Coll t-BOO-477- 

G572 Ext. 250. 415c 

DEUVEnY/SALES NEEDED Immodioto- 
ry, Thief Brvor Foils ond aron, 2 days por 
wook minimum baso pay plus commis- 
sion. For further Information cnll 701-775- 
471B, Grand Forko. 2t5c 



Huiv 1 and Hwu 59 UJ. Tflf 

OUTSIDE SALES In your area. Entry krv- 
ol sales Job. No oxporienco nocossury. 
Base plus commission, bono Ills and 
training. Fortuno 500 Company. Must bo 
ovor 21 years ot ago, bondablo. good 
work history, oblo to work 50-60 
hnvwook, sportsmlndod and porsonoNo. 
II you aro sorlous about making $600- 
S900 por wook, f ax a briof rosumo to 21 B- 
. 749-3618 or send a briof rosumo lo: Di- 
rector of Porsonnol. PO Box 1167. Wgl- 

nio.. MN SS7P2. 616c 

HELP WANTED- 2 positions. Floral Do- 
signor and part-time saloa ond dolhrory, 
Call or stop In at Country Blossoms. 208 
East 41h Street. TRF, 681-6434. 4tflc 



IMMEDIATE OPENING 

Hours 8:30-5:30 Mon.-Fri. 
and 8:30-Noon Saturdays. 
Duties include linishing 
ladies garments, counter 
sales, misc. 
Apply in person only. 
No phone calls please. 

NARVERUD 
CLEANERS 



ASPHALT PAVINQ company hiring: 
icrood man, truck driven), ocjuipmont op- 
erators, laborers. Benefits indudo 401k 
and health insuronco. E.O.E. 21B-2B1' 

5101. TtOc • 

DEE INC. has an Immodioto oponlng for 
a CNC Mtup/piognunmor. A two-yoar 
lochnlcol dogroo Is roqulrod. Exporionco 
prolarrad. DEE offoni compotltlvo wagos 
and bonelits. It Intoroslod. ploaso send a 
lotlor of application and rosumo to or stop 
by and pick up an appUcaUort at: Ann: Hu- 
man-Resources, OEE Inc. 1 , PO 80X627, 
1302 Foskott Streot, Crookston. MN 
56710. 218-281-5811. E.O.E Poal-offar 
drug lasting required. f$Sc 



ASSISTANT DEPUTY 
REGISTRAR 



Applicntioru lire being uoccptod fcr n 
part-time jiosilion n.1 A.uutunl Dqmt)' 
Htjrijinir in tlic Molar Vdiidc License 
Oflia:. Tlrc |x*ition involit* litnuing 
anil iTpsiration o[ motor \Tliido, 
i-i'iiing dritrr't IkeiiMi, [icnnits, und 
iilcntifiaition auiti nnil uai!)' rcponing 
iluticr along villi oilier iditinl *ark. 
Ar>pliainti> mm! iiare llie ability lo 
«>rk »iili tlic jiublic, main computer 
entries run! 'compile Diut balance itnily 
,rq>orw. Appliaiiionj are available anil 
miw Jic rctumnl to die Pennington 
County Ali.lilt.r'» Office. P.O. Ben 
616, Tliief llivrr Falli. MN 56701 on 
or befcrr 4:30 p.m. Jiiniinry 19, 
1WB. 



litmingtun County ilaei not iliitrimi- 
note mi (Ac buiii of race, color, 
national oripn, icx, religion, ogr, or 
hamlicuppcit tlnlm in entptojment. 



Daycare 



FURNISHED 
ROOMS 

FOR RENT 
681-2845 



c0l!C01-C221or6B1-2057. P4IOp 



OFFICE FOR REiYT 



Proressional Building, parking at 
door. Available January 1, 1998. 
Call681-1635*9a.m.-5p.m, 



FLATBED COMPANY looking for drtvors, 
ownor/oporotors. Must bo oblo to go to 
Canada. Homo weekends. Moro Informa- 
tion. 1-B00-4B8-1423. Ext. 11, E&Q 

Trucking. 417c 

BN/LPN OPENINGS in Roooou. Pedia- 
tric homo core, ono on ono nursing with 
vontilotor dopondont child. FTSPT bene- 
fits. Roxlblo schodullng. Universal Pedia- 
tric Sorvlco, Inc. Call 1-800-878-2285. 
617c 



Position Incaidts various otbar thrttei 
Invchsd In Bis production of publlcstlons. 
Eslsnss eommsnsurtts wtlhwpartonca. 
Frings bsnsflt pscksos bxludts vscsuon 
and sick pay, «1K rttlrtmwit plan, cafa- 
Isrla plan and hstlUi Insurance. 
- Apply At- 

The Times 

M4 Main Avo. N. • TNof HW< Fsli. MN 

(218) 681-4450 



SUMMEHFIELD PLACE- Now In Thiol 
River Falls. Booutilul spacious senior 
aportmont. 55* , ono. ono plus don ond 
two bedrooms starting at (545. Woshor 
ond dryer, balcony. caQ ontry system, 
boat paid by management, heated under- 
ground paiitlng available. Coll lor a pri- 
vate tour. 1.800-504-6093, 215 Ninth 
Siroat East. Thiol Rlvor Falls, Minnesota. 
F80HC 



STORAGE UNITS 
FOR RENT IN TRF 

Call For More Details 

218-681-1861 



LAND FOR rent on bids- 810 crop acres. 
avnllablo with a 3-year loose. Also, an ad- 
ditional 114 ucros avallablo wilh a 1-yooi 
loaso. S1/2 of Sec. 1, Comslock Strip, 
302 crop acres. 3-yoar loose; NE1/4 of 
Soc. 12, Comstock Strip, 157 crop acres, 
3-yoor loaso; NW 1/4 of Soc. 18. Numo- 
dahl. 151 crop acres, 3-yoar loose: NE1/4 
ot Soc 5. Viking Strip. 114 crop acroe, 1- 
year loaso. Doadllno for bids Is Fab. 10. 
1098. Sand bids to Ouano R. Swonson, 
RR 1 Box 48. VUung, MN 56760. Phono 
218-745-4910 or Robotl E. Swanson, 
1023 N. 71h Stroot, Warren. MN 56762. 
Phono 21B-745-5578. Crop bases aro 
avallablo al Marshall Co. ASCS office. 
The owners roaorva tho right to rojod any 

ond all bids. F3t0p 

FOR RENT- Mobilo homo, 2-bodroom, 1- 
1/2 bath, (no pots). Countryside Pork, 
B81-1858or681-9033. P4t6p/P4l10p 



-fOR IMMEDIATE Rent- 1- and 2>bod- 
room aponmonts, low ront. costs tncludn 
heat and water. Cnll 601-4603. 101»c 
FOR RENT- Fob. 1, lurntshod ono-bed- 
room houso, qq_E013. 5400.00 Inctudos 
ulilillos. rotoronco/doposit roqulrod. 681- 

4016. P4l5p 

APARTMENTS FOR Ronl- Tho now 6- 
plox In Knrtstad has n two-bodroom and n 
ono- bedroom opnrtmonl lor ront, Hoat Is 
Included In tho ront. plus n ono-car ga- 
rarjal Qronl location! Closo to downtown 
across from tho clinic and closo to a 
school! For intormntion. contact Wayno 
Ruud at tho Karlstad City Office 210- 
430-2170. Available Fobruary 1. 1990. 
F4t9c 

" forrentT 

2 BEDROOM 

APARTMENT 



CAR PLUG-IN 

LAUNDRY FACILITIES 

WO PETS 



hhilMMHJuhlhTi, 



Approximately 1,000 
Square Feet, Handi- 
capped Accessible. 
Across From Hugo's. 

Call 681-4324 
Ram Building Systems 

FOR RENT- 14x70 2-bodroom, roloronc- 
oa, no pots, $300 phis doposll. 681-77t2. 

P4l7p 

LARGE 2-BEDROOM opojlmont; ono- 
bodroom aportmont; plug-in for car, utlll- 
llas Includod. Call 661-8723 or 681-5308. 

P4t7p .1 

TNO SMALL Mores tot mm. prim* loctn 
lion. 112 and 114 3rd Street EosL Also: 1- 
bod'oom oparimont for rant, 681-4957. 

astro ' / 

RETAIL/COMMERCIAL SPACE for rent, 
uptown location. 1 .700 sq. ft. plus atorope 
aron. heat and water paid, can 681 -3045. 

84tfc - - 

NEWLY REMODELED 2-bodroom fur- 
nishod mobile homo/entry, no pots, de- 
posit, roloroncos. lease roqulrod, 681- 
ZS63. P415p 



COUNTRY ACRES 
APARTMENTS 

TlDxr Rivzst Falloi. MN 

J218) 681-3370^ 

SUMMERFIELD PLACE of Nowfolden 
has a two-bodroom/two-bnth apartment 
avallablo. Privalo ontranco. scroonod-ir 
porch, air conditioner, washor/dryor, dish- 
woshor and moro. Hoat paid by tho man- 
agement. Call 1-800-504-6OB3 for moro 

inlormaHon end/or tour. F102tlc 

FOR RENT- 2-bodroom mobilo homo 
with or without utilities, doposll. will ac- 
copt HUD lonunls. 064-5100. »5c 
SPACIOUS TWO-BEDROOM Opart- 
monts. Clean and noat, now carpet and 
paint, dishwashors, garbago disposal, 
olf-stroot parking, haal paid, avallablo Im- 
mediately, call 681-4054, II no answer 

loavo a mossogo. 76Hc 

FOR RENT- 3-bodroom opartmont w/ga- 
raga, S440/monih, avallablo Jan. 15: 2- 
bedroom aportmont, $405/month, avall- 
ablo Jan. 1. Bolh aparimonts In nawor 
quiet 8-plox. Also avallablo. smaiiar 3- 
bodroom houso w/garogo, $350/monlh 
plus utlliuas, avallablo Jan. 1, no pots, 
roforoncos and doposll roqulrod. Call 

681-4478. 8 a.m.-6 p.m. 105tlc 

STORAOE, BOATS, CARS, RV'S, otc. 
Reasonable ratos. you Insurol 681 •8803. 

loavo mossago. 9tlc 

FOR RENT- Mobilo homo. 2-bodroom, 
avallablo now. HUD approvod. 681-8063. 
P415p 



WANT TO Buy- 3-4 bedroom houso 
TRF or surrounding aroa. In nood ot re 
ovation profarrod. 681-6703. P4t5p 



300 8Q. FT. OFFICE 

AND 
600 SQ. FT. OFFICE 

m Mums am nm 
tsr mo. rm wtTit 

t£AS£ AHO -HPOSmi 

200 Bar2en Ave. N, TRF 

681-2038 or 

681-1973 



APARTMENTS FOR rent In Okloo. roo- 
my, 1- ond 2-bodroom, car plug-Ins, laun- 
dry and saioltlto avallablo. good rotoronc- 

oa, 796-^662. IQOtfc 

ONE-, TWO- or ihreo-bodroom apari- 
monts, brand now. for ront at special win- 

tor ratos. 253-4352. fOOtlc 

FOR RENT* Mobile homo. 2-bodroom. 
(no pou), S270/monlh. 681-1058. 001- 

0033. P4l5p/P4t9p. 

FOR RENT- 14x60 2-bodroom trailer, 
washor/dryar includod, roloroncos, no 
pots, 5325+ doposll. 681-7712. P4t6p 



:fcMlJ.-mjJJ.| a Wlli 



160 Acres, 140 Tillable. NE of 
Oklee $295/Acreage. 



915 Acres, Mostly Tillable. 
1 Yeiir Led On CRP, Slrandquist 

Area. ' , , 



WANTED: Farmland - 

I have a serious client who 
wants to buy good farmland in 
the Red Lake Falls, St. Hilaire, 
Brooks, or west of Plummer 
areas. Wilt pay 'cash. 



160 Acres CRP Plummer Area. 

320 Acres, 263 Tillable. Old 

Bldrj. Site, < 

Good Land, Only 56 Acres of 

CRP. Kratka Bridge Area. 

$79,900 



Many Others To Choose From 
Up To 1 ,000 Acres^ 



Cnll NORTHLAND REALTY 

FARM SALES 

For All Your Rural Property 



(218)-G81-603G 



LICENSED DAYCARE has openings for 
2 yoars, and up. Food program, loncod 
yard,i1.5S/hour,Bai-S260. F2t7p 
DAYCARE OPENINGS. All ogos. Food 
program. Preschool education. BJg play 
Oreo, Fenced yard. 681-5003. 2BC 
WANTED- Daycaro or babysitter for a 5- 
yoar-old and a 4-year-old. both attend 
school M-F. must be oblo to start early. 
Call 681-1069 for moro InlormaHon, 
P4t7p , 

Co In my home. I'm 
havo roforoncos, 

... _ny ago. Call anytime, 

601-2659, ask for Lasa. P4l7p 



AVAILABLE IMMEDIATELY, largo 2- 
bedroom main door opartmont, naar hos- 
pital, no pots, deposit, roforonco. loaso, 

681-2863. 3Bc 

2-BEDROOM APARTMENT, boat and 
water paid, fridge and stove included, 
vory ctoan and quiet building. Call 68 1- 
3898 hflor 5 p.m. 4rfc ' • 



Help Wanted: Payroll Clerk-Full-Time 

This individual will bo rosponslblo for tho completion of staff payroll 
and gonorol accounting functions. Othor dulloo will Includo maintain- 
ing and compiling data for various reports and provldo (raining to Indi- 
viduals for rololod procoduros. TWo (2) yoars of computorlzod book- 
kooping oxporionco and/or complollon ol post-so eond a ry accounting 
training. Must havo proficient knowlodgo of spreadsheet software, 
proforably lotus or oxcol. This porson must bo motivated, organized, 
and ablo to work indopondonlly. Contact DooDoo Johnson, Chlol 
Rnancial Officer, or Nancy Cota, Dlroclor of Human Rosourcos at 
218-681-4949 for moro InlormaHon and/or nn omploymont applica- 
tion. EOA/ADA. 



Sand Application & Rbsu 



o lo: Occupational Development Contor, Inc. 

DooDoo Johnson, Chlat Financial Ofticar, 

P.O. Box 730, Thiol Rlvor Falls. MN 56701 



OR SUPERVISOR: Full-time, position available for 
an experienced OR SUPERVISOR for our future 
Ambulatory Surgical Center (ASC). This position 
will include setting up policies/procedures, staff 
scheduling and supervision, scrub nurse duties 
and continuous management of overall ASC ser- 
vices. Interested individuals must be a registered 
nurse with valid license. To apply contact: 
Dakota Clinic, HR Dept. (218) 681-4747 or fax 
inquiries to (218) 681-6782: Dakota Clinic, Ltd. is 
an EEO/AA employer. 



Real Estate 



Real Estate 



HAVE CASH buyers lor land with now or 
oilondod CRP conlrncts. For salo- ICO 
ocros in wclion 25. Kratka Township. 
Pennington County. $50,000: ICO ncroi 
In section 10. Roinor Towns'! ip, Penning- 
ton Counry. 540,000; 40 ocros with old 



)r-up 



dmns. Ii 



Township, Rod Loko County. S20.000; 
400 ncros In Husa Township. Rosonu 
County, S2O0 por ocro (will tjivido). Norm 
Andoraon Rontty. 1602 Ensl Groonwood, 
Trtlol Rlvor Fulls. MN 50701, phono 210- 
081-2320, lo« 2ta-6B1-0409 Solllno 
farms In NW Minnesota slnco 1DG9. 

0011c 

•1755 FOR Solo- 56 ocro hobby farm, 
com pi of o with fully romodolod 4 -bod room 
country otylo homo. Quonsat and on col- 
ion! outbuildings, Okloo oroo. Sol ho Real- 
ty, Fosslon. MN 56542, 21B-435-152S. 

Equal Housing Op poriunlty. 115c 

HOUSE FOR Solo- 3-bodroom ramblor 
with full basomoni, attach od alnrjio qq- 
rntjo on eornor lot. Call botwoon a.m. 
and 3:30 p.m. for oppotntmonl, 218-253- 

2055. F2t7p 

WANTED- FARM OR RANCHI Must bo 
vory phvaio or socludod, profor doad ond 
road, noxl lo 510 to or Fodornl land. Must 
havo buildings. Conloct W. D. Brown. 
7578 Dillo Hwy, Brldooporl. Ml. 4B722, 

orS17-777-7090. IPF415p 

ISLAND LAKE, noar LonQby. 3 lots, sand 
shorollno. southom oiposuro on groat 
lishlng lako. 525,000, coll Duslln ol 218- 

224-2148. P8l5p 

FOR SALE- Humors hoavan, 320 ocros. 
GO ocros woodod. 240 crop ocros In 2 
porcols, most nurroundod by tlnio wlldlilo 
rotuno, oaslom Morfihoi! Co., Nonhwost- 
orn. MN, S250/acro, 2tB-4B3-3524. 

P416p 

FOR SALE- Rugg/s Bar ond Grill locat- 
ed downtown Rosoau. Stop right into this 
woll osloblishod buslnoso. IndutJos all 
fixturos and oqulpmonH 'USA* Roalty. 

2tB-4B3-3t4e. P416p 

FOR SALE- 20 ocros B miloi south. 1 
mllo wost of Arctic, BB<170 dairy bdm, 
70x75 Hanson silo bating shod, Wolls 
troofl.Collownor.21B-6B1-384B. 7Btfc 



FOR SALE or ront- Small 2-bodroom 
houso on 10 ncros, oulor buildings, 10 
minuios Irom TRF, S300.00/monlh plus 
ulilihos. doposil and roforoncos roqulrod. 

21B-4G3-0004. ItSp 

WANTED FARMLAND- 1 havo a serious 
client who wants lo buy good farmland In 
tho Rod Lako Falls. St. Hitairo. Brooks or 
wosl of Plummor aroas. Will pay cash. 
Cnll Northland Form Solos. G81-0030. 

F3ilc 

IF YOU'RE looking "tor p 3-bodroom 
houso in iho S40's. you havo to soo this 
ono. Evorylhing now, kilchon. bath, fur- 
nace, tool, doors, carpot. paint, ate. 112 ' 

N. Knonlo. 661-6797. 3tlc 

FOR SALE by ownor- Throo-bodroom. 
iwobalhroom 14iB0 traitor houso, 7 
milos wosl ol TRF. coll oftor 8:00 p.m.. 

681-0027. P4tBp 

FOR SALE- 3-bodroom. 2-bath. 1.343 
sq. It. ramblor, located quia! NE skfo of 
town ovoilooking tho rlvor, 24x36 garago. 
Call 681-5480. no answor loavo mos- 

sngo. PFJitlp 

LAKESHORE HOME FOR SALE BY 
OWNER- At Sandy Shoros oast ot Long 
Pt„ 4-yeor-old, 3-oodroom. 2' bath, yoar 
around living, many oitras, 218-783- 
5001. 44tlc 



LOTS FOR Solo- 100'x2O0 , on Rainy 
Rivor al Baudotto, MN. Coll 701-775- 

7815. l701fo 

FOR SALE- Excollom building slto, 
120x1 BO. on blocWop road, dty wator 
ond sowor, 1 block Irom Oakland Park, 
$11,000. Call 081-3940. FB12Bp • 
FOR SALE by ownor- Nicer/ romodolod 
3-bodroom. 2-bath homo, finished baso- 
mant. 3 typos ot hoot, foncod-ln back 
yam wilh dock, slnglo cor doUchod ga- 
rago. Closoio downtown, nico nokjhbor- 
hood. upper $60's,68l-4S33. 3tfc 



Through 

aiL 5 " THE TIMES 

^SjIfelP^" resumes.n watch.com 

http^/www.nwatch.com • Email: rrwatch@nwatch.com 

p^ The Times 'Wgai 

^^& Commercial Print Shop 

324 Uiin Avb. H. ■ Thief Hlwt Fills, UH 56701 M218tHH450 * Fte (2U) W-USS 



6akwood"Hbmes in Karlstad/lVlinnesota, 

is accepting applications for two- arid three- 
bedroom townhouse ■ openings. Rent is based 
on 30% of your monthly adjusted gross income. 
For applications and qualifications please con- 
tact Elaine Baker at 218-436-2588. AN EQUAL 
HOUSING OPPORTUNITY. fg^ 



HsId Wanted: Computar Specialist 
Rosponslblo Individual noodod for tho day-lo-doy manogomont and main- 
lonanco of nil computer hardware, softwaro ond notwork noods. Minimum 
oducalional roqulromont of nn Associate Dogroo In Inlormatlon 
Manngomont or rololod flold. Two (2) yoora of oxporionco may bo substl- 
lutod lor ooch yoar ol formal training. Must bo oblo to work Independent- 
ly, hovo oxcoiiont communication skills, and havo tho ability to train Indi- 
viduals with a variety ol skill lovols. Must, bo oblo to Iravol and work flox- 
iblo hours whon noodod. Contact DooDoo Johnson, Chlof Financial 
Offlcor, or Nancy Cota. Dlroclor ol Human Rosourcos at 218-681-4949 for 
moro information and/or an omploymont application. EOA/ADA. 

Sond Application & Rosumo lo: Occupational Dovolopmont Contor, Inc. 

DooDoo Johnson, Chlof Financial Officer, 

P.O. Box 730. Thiol Rlvor Falls, MN 56701 



COUNTY AGRICULTURAL INSPECTOR 

■ Ponnlnglon ond Rod Loko Counllo3 aro prasonlty loking applica- 
tions for a Pormononl - Part-timo Counry Agricultural Inspector. 
Responsibilities Includo Identification and control ol'noxious woods 
and taking sood oomplos. A job description end application can be 
obtalnod at tho following oflieos: 



PonningtonCountyAuditor 

101 Main Avo. N. 

P.O. Box 616 

Thlof River Fall3, MN 56701 

(218) 683-7000 



Rod Lako County Auditor 

124 Langovin 

P.O. Box 367 

Rod Lake Falls, MN 56750 

(218)253-2598 



Applications must bo received by one ol trios* offices by 4:30 
p.m., January 30, 1988. _ 

Ponnington and Rod Lako Counties do not discriminate on tho basis 
ol race, color, national origin, oox, rolinjon, orjo or handicoppod sta- 
tus In omploymont. 



HELP WANTED 
PUBLIC WORKS MECHANIC 

A full-time moehanic lo work primarily wilh tho Public Works Street 
Dopartmont for tho City ot Thiol Rivor Falls. Tho omployoo would bo 
schodulod to work 40 hraAwook Monday through Friday. Floxlblo 
scheduling may bo roquirod on occasion.. 

Tho position involves tho mnintononco ond repair of vorious 
mochonlcal equipment and vohlclo3 including bolh small and largo 
onginos. An ossocialos dogroo In mechanics and throo or moro yoars 
of previous oxporionco In maintaining light and hoavy equipment aro 
roqulrod. 

Individual nppllcalions for tho position will bo oecoptod Ihrough 
Janunry 20. 199B. Any job opplications rocolvod oftor 4 p.m. on 
January 20, 1998, will not bo consldorod. A comploto job description 
and application is available ot tho offlco ol Iho Mlnnosota Job Servico, 
P.O. Box 679, 1301 Highway 1 East. Thlof Rivor Falls. MN 56701. Tho 
City of Thiol Rivor Falls is an Equal Opportunity Employor. 





FARGO LIVESTOCK MARKET 
CENTRAL LIVESTOCK 




North Dakota's Largest Volumo Livestock Market 
Weekly Auctions: Tuos. & Wed. -9 A.M. 

SPECIAL BULL MARKET 
Call For OoMr/s CLA FEED PROGRAM 

r Coll ret Doia/li 

SPECIAL FEEDER SALE: Every Wed. 

COW SALE: Tuesday, Jan. 20 

Doug Kilon • 218-681-7563 
Wosl Fargo Livestock Market • 1-800-733-4620 



Pane 12 



NORTHERN WATCH 



Saturday, January 17, I!)!)8 



The Classifieds - The Classifieds 



Situation Wanted 

WANTED- Nood help shopping lor gro- 
corlos? Lol mo do l[ for you. For moro In- 
lonmtlor, bill 6HI-I39Q 215c 



Custom Services 



FARM LAND FOR RENT 
THIEF RIVER FALLS REGIONAL AIRPORT 

Tho City ol Thief Rivor Falls has two parcols of farm land for 
rent localod wilhin Iho security fonco at tho Airport 
(approximatoly 50 acres). Land was cullivatod last tall and 
should bo roady tor planting Ihis spring, flontors must comply 
with all Airport safety regulations, and lor door control purposos 
no alfalfa or sunflowors may bo planted. Ploaso inqulro at tho 
City Adminlslralor's Office in tho basomont of tho City 
Auditorium (681-2943) or submit a ronlal quote to: P.O. Box 
528, Thief Rivor Falls. MN 56701 no lator than January 23, 
1998. 



APARTMENT BUILDINGS FOR SALE 
Tlmbertlne Apartments - Warroad, Minnesota 

Excellent investment opportunity! 

18 units {1, 2, & 3 Brs.), constructed in 1983-S90.000 of 

recent improvements by current owner; List Price: $450,000 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

Woodcrest Apartments - Warroad, Minnesota 

Developing Opportunity! - Fire Damaged in 1997 

Fulton Property Management Services 

218-729-0617 

OWNER FINANCING AVAILABLE!! 



FOR SALE ON BIDS 

The Farmera Union Oil Co. tiro warehouee building and pro party 
la being offered (or aaJa on bids. 60x1 26' Slrand steal bldg., approx. 
225' or frontage road on HWVS GO St 1 W., T. Ft. Fall a, MN. lagally 
dee cd bad aa: 

Lot a, Block 2 of Nopar'a Second Addition to Ttilaf River Fatla, 
Pennington County, Parcal ID* 35-63-012-20. 

To aaa property contact: David Klrkeby, Farmers Union Oil Co., G. 
Third ft Atlantic, T. Ft. Fatla, MN, 56701, 216-661-3612. 

Written blda muat ba aubmltted to Sathar Law Office, 311 Main 
Ave: N., T. R. Fatla, MN, 50701, 21&-3B1-4630, prior to Noon, 
Wadnaaday, Fabruary 4, 1900. 

Sellar reserve a right lo reject alt offera/blda. Sale subject to board 
approval. 

PROPERTY SOLD "AS IS." 



• — — — — — " CUT OUT AND SAVE- — — — — — -| 

Call 964-5237 For... i 

READY MIX CONCRETE, SAND & GRAVEL j 
We Have Heated Ready Mix For 
Year Around Jobs. . . 

I For Sstuidsy Deuvwy Of Raao> Mik, CaJ fncWy 
RADIO DISPATCHED TRUCKS 

I NO JOB WO BIO OR TOO SMALL! 

Concrete Inc. 



CONCRETE INC. 



St. Hllalro, MN 



NORTHWEST POWER SYSTEMS 



HYDRAULIC SALES AND SERVICE 




• Sprocket! 

• Pulley* " 

• FTO Shaft! 

• U-Jotnta 

• Hydraulic Pumpa • 

• Hydraulic Wotom 

• Hydraulic Control Velvet 

• Hydraulic Hosa and Flttlnga 

• Quick Couplers 

• Hydraulic Cylinder* 

• Roller Chain 

• Hydraulic FlHera 

• Hydraulic Scale 

• Shaft Couplers 



Quality Service for All Makaa of 

Cylinders and Component* 
Cuatom-Bullt Hydraulic Cylinder* 




NORTHWEST POWER SYSTEMS, INC. 

204 Atlantic Avonuo 
Thief Rlvor Falls, MN 56701 

www-northweM-fjoweMyattenveom 

218-681-5282 800-570-5282 



Hit Pay Dirt 




FOR ALL YOUR 

Repair Needs 



NORM'S REPAIR 

• sues i siff.xe • mcoo ssawcaas 

1107 N. Dulutrt Thl«l Hlvar Full 



MONDAY/TUESDAY/FRIDAY, a.m.. 
5:30 p.m. Northland Shoo Repair. 607 
fltnSl. E. PF12t9p 



* ELECTRIC " 

■ Residential • Agricultural 

• Commercial 

• Electric Heat 

TIM BERGERSON 
O w n c r- Opera to r 

toll 681-4659 



JACOBSON'S 
SNOW REMOVAL 



Sidowalks 
p^jcSatP * Parking Lois 

fpy^^Jt "! Driveways 
'C@^gyyV^G Faimyards 

Ploaso Call. Wo Wont Your Buslnoss 
Colt 681.1511 oik for Adorn 
or 681-1106 oik for Curtis 

EXPERIENCED CARPENTER w 

modeling work lor you, small jobs ok, call 
PotO, 681-5134. P4l7p 




•Wteqe* 

mmsm 

Building and 
Remodeling 

For Free Estimates Colt: 

TIM 

681-5465 



[fe 



Custom Services 



YOUR INDEPENDENT 
HERBALIFE DISTRIBUTOR 

Fmmwnsuu 

218-597-2774 



ACKER BODY SHOP- Frame stralghlon- 
Ing, cotllalon, glass, touch-up, 14 yaars 
experience Insuranco oatlmoloa wol- 
como. From Rosoau: B mllos wosl. 1/4 
mllo south. 463-5009. F3tfc 



Uncontested: $250 

OMDAELAWOFFICE 
1-800-450^6040 

Hay, Feed and Seed 

IT PAYS 

TO PLANT 

5454 

5262 



NEED 
CASH? 

Home Loans 

T All Credit Welcome 

▼ Cash For Any Reason 
T Home Purchase 

T Debt Consolidation 

▼ CD Or Balloon Payoff 
V Self Employed 

T Prior Bankruptcy 
T 125% Equity Loans 
Call 

CAPITOL BROKERS 
701-775-9807 or 
1-800-791-7126 




Hay, Feed and Seed 

FIRST, 2ND and 3id crop allalla. big 
round balos. Also, wtioat. barley straw, 

■ 440-3045. PF4l7p 

240 BIQ round balos of socond crop nl- 
ialla grass hay. Boon lostod. Also, '01 
Grand Morquls LS Mercury car. Contact 
Ambrosa Boaudoln at 216-706-5283. 

PF4titp 

LARGE ROUND allalla grass mliod hay 
balos and largo round straw balos, 563- 

2302. P410p , 

FOR SALE- Socond cutting alfalfa round ■ 
balos. oxcollont quality, no rain. Coll 216- 
£04-6231. 2!6p 

FOR SALE* 350 square balos oat straw, 
shoddod; AN Ford liaclor w/3-pt., 2- 

rod, good condition: 400 D Into motion. 
For moro do tails call 425-7434 aftor 5 

P-m. 1i5p 

SEED FOR Salo- Certified A.C. Oarrta. 
Qrandln and othor whaat varlotlos. 
Sovoral varlotlos ol oats and barioy. 
Good gorms, claanod and do live rod In 
soml load lob or will split load botwoon 
neighbors. Also, conoto and flax saod 
avaitablo. Provlous solos In most aroas, 
compotjtruo prices. Ploaso call Oorald 
Frloson. 204-B22-3633. Mordon, MO, 
Can. II no answer ploaso loavo mossago. 

PF1C135R 

FOR SALE- Allalla or alfalfa mixed hay. 
small/big squaros. round. Excollonl 
horso. dairy or bool qua Nil las. Also, 

straw. 210-681-4028. P4tBc 

FOR SALE- 2nd amino allalla. squaro 
balos, protlon tB.6. lood valuo ot 144. 

216-366-2690, PF419p 

FOR SALE- Round balos of 1st. 2nd cut- 
ting allalla and round balos grass hoy for 
canto or horses; IH 0' Hold sickle mowar, 

218-782-2629. PF4t17p 

FOR SALE- Small and Largo round balos 
lood hoy and mixed, 1,600* and 1,200*. 

222-3790. PF4tflp 

FOR SALE- Mixed hay, 125 rotative food 
valuo. no rain, call Paul at 218-681-6830, 

IP8t11p 

FOR SALE- Small squaro oats straw 
balos, plastic twine, stored inside, $1.00 

ooch. 218-268-4665. P4t6p m _ 

FOR SALE- First and socond cutting al- 
lalla hay. round bales, 218-706-5711 or 

7S6-5422. PF4t9p ■ 

FOR SALE' Big round balos mured hay. 
grass hay and oats straw, plastic twine, 
no rain, 21B-378-4438, Qoodridgo, MN. 

P4t5p 

FOR SALE- Cortlflod standor barley, cor- 
II Hod 2375, Sharp, Vordo and Russ 
whootCoJI2lB-e74-3713. PBtlOp 

WANT TO Buy- Square b. __ 

mlxod ollolfa. Larson Hay Sorvico. 216. 
574-2721. P41Bp 



IliiJHOHSESiLEI 



■ No Sato Hold On Sat, 

Jan. 17 or Fob. 7. 
■ Next Salo: S at.. Fsb. 21 



Catalog Salo & Regular Monthly Salo 

{Catalog Deadline 2/1/98) - 

Tnck: 11 A.M.; Horeos: 2 P.M. 

Held 1 mllo watt ol Vemdila, MN 

on Hwy. 10, 
Ron Sundby-21 8-445-5849 



CUSTOM-MADE BALE rings and cattle 
galas, mado f rem 1-Inch lubtng. Call otlor 

6.222-3542. PF4r0p 

48 ANGUS cross cows For salo. 2 bulls, t 
Criarolais. 1 Angus, tolophono 218-450- 

3340. 2t5p 

PUREBRED REGISTERED Charotois, 
15 bred cows, 2 4-yoar-c4d hord bulls, 1 
3-yoar-c4d bull. 15 yearling bulls, good 
brooding slock. Erlckson Charolals. 218- 

425-7535. PFBHOp 

BUa SALE- Nordlund Slock Farm, 
Cloarbrook and Dahlko Rod Angus, Bo- 
gioy. will auction 45 Rod and Black Angus 
Slmmontal bulls on Saturday, March 7. at 
Cloarbrook. Call 218-776-3655 or 218- 
694-0727 (or catnloos. PF7l17p 



BAGLEY LIVESTOCK 
EXCHANGE, INC. , 

Baglcy, WIN I 
Mlnncsotn's Newest 

■■<i,ih-i'r'hi-:ht:iinwti:V,i>k,'t 
SALES EVERY THURSDAY 



Cattle Sales 

N«d ol] cLUks of Bct'f Catrn. Ilotitcin 
5tren>. Yewtlni! Detf Si«rs 4 Hctftrs. Slock 
Cows, Fat CilUr. Slaughter Cant & Lulls. 

• COMPLTTERIZED RING SCALE 

• CAT-WALK 

• DRIVE-THRU UNLOADING 

• FULL-SERVICE CAFE 

CATTLE QtiUCON THURSDAY 



mmimtmmnmd 



See or Call: 
Jim Potucek 

Warren 
218-745-4800 



El 



PIONEER. _ JiT ^ 

<S. SM. TM TritJimlrU ind uivkt nurkl 
rwrtitrtd n ippkd lor. ol Pvonttr Hi-Brid 
Inftrrulionil. Inc. 0t> Molmi. IA. All ulii 
in tublicl 10 1li< Iirmi ol lib! ling ind ull 
documtna. CtMtPHII 



•cash for oiDer 



:T 
pee 
•«rs 

L ■: 

r. 

i mo' 
"ios: 



. ^jwcesoxes -pop mctiwes.-- 
eia/merre * candy HACHwes - 
;■ gas smtoN irens-- i puhps-,:- 

•flvveRVSING CLOCKS ft- SIGNS- '■' 
lANKSiH.es - SOHWNN.STWGkAYS- 

PtNBAUS - PEDAL CARS t-foYS. 
■:. ANY RBLAiet 'ITEMS: CALL DOUG 

' - (212)681-^22 



FARMERS- ll you have hay for solo od- 
vartlso It In tho Northom Watch. Pooplo 
aro looking to buy. Tho TTmos/Norlhom 
Walch. 324 Main Ave. North, Thiol Rlvor 
Folia. MN 66701.1861.4430. BtfQi ... ■■■- ' 
HAY FOR Solo- ISO big round gross hay 
balos. Call 218-681-3816 ovonlngs. 
PBMOp 



VERY EASY to handlo, 2-1/2 year old 
Purobrod Holsioln bull, seeks gocci homo 
with many loving hollars. Ploaso can 6BB- 

4650, •Brooks area'. F2l7p 

NICE ANGUS hollar, will bo 2 In April, 
mako offer. 608-4650, *Srooka oroo". 
F2t7p 



FOR SALE 

^ PUREBRED BULLS ! 

;i Sons Of Al Trait Leaders ::: 
/ In Milk And Growth. 
i B.W. From 80 Lis. To ¥ 
100 Lis. Excellent W.W. ¥| 
;l Pick Your Bulls Early ;!:; 
! CALL •!; 

' VEHB0UTCHAR0LA1S : : :i 

! 1-21 8-294-6582:? 



SLAUGHTER CATTLE 
SALES 



akkUUliiiii. 



SPECIAL BRED 
STOCK COW (i 
HEIFER SALE 

SAT., JAN. Z4TH 
IltOO NOON 



'''wmii"' 

For More Information Call 
Market Phone: 218-694-3701 

FAX: 218-694-3700 
Highway 2 West. Baglcy. MN 



Auctions 



|6 TtI«H/ / M<MuIU H) 



FOR SALE- Bool cows, nomo with coll 
on old*, 2 horsos, 6-lon Dokon trailer, 
Hoaston stack mover, stool stock rack, 
,gonr box lor Minnosota sproadar, 6x20 
slock Irallor, swalhor Iranoport, 268- 

465S. F2l5p 

FOR SALE- 4 brod Angus hollars to 
catva in March and April. Kavo boon vac- 
cinated and wormod. Can dolrvar. Colt 
218-463-3007 ovonlngs. PF4t11p 
•TOP QUALITY lottomoods and onvol- 
opos for your buslnose. homo or organi- 
zation. Stop In al Tno Timas. Wo can do 
II nlll 681-4450. 



fair MtrJtti/af SptcieUsts 
ftr 4ff fypts Of- Auction* J 

Set-Up - Clean-Up 

Wa Dlwa You The Added Valuo 
With Compollllve Rates. 

OfTiCE 218-681-7650 

Lloyd Otteseh . . .218-449-4911 
JoEMcMuUEN . .218-465-4286 



WANTED- Good Homo for SI. Hilalro Li- 
ons consignment auction March 14-15, 
low consJgnmonl roloo. 064-5403. 004- 
5369,681-7681. PF4t0p 



Slindjia DirUCofiitruciion Burttis wi 
7.3 eo tl.lo 17 cu ft 
Wido vanery ol atuehmems svnuuc 
High capicity aunlury hyUfjiiiics 
Ste your local suinonrcd dciltr lor u 
and financing 



Uf>T0 10 mOHT-HS 0% -CIMflHCIHC 



NELSON EQUIPMENT, INC. &**.* 

930 Hoy 59 North _^_ _ 

Tlilcl Riw: Falls. MN 56701 $£g a 

218-681-1997 ^h! I 



■HL 



CNC&TODL ROOM EQUIPMENT. 

AUCTION SALE 



WELLTEK ENGINEERING, INC, 
INDUSTRIAL PARK EAST, GRYGLA, MN 



I ./SX w ^dJ "SEk? 'M. ® Ml 

, TIIUIISIJAY. -JAN. M-> O .1:011 p.m. 



TUESDAY, JANUARY 20, STARTING AT 10:00 A.M. 



A«ut>rWi Now TIM. iKUitr I. onl r r»o ..m Ml TTw m.ph'ro' "II Item- wm rURCltASID 

KEALFiTAnANOIMrtOVWD^rilUBEOFFPu^.CO^AaAUCnONCO.reKDin'W 

Thttt mucin nr» tuvc varlmu optiom and sltachinniti. 

CMC "95 lti>» VMC Mndtl Vl'-I, w«th •>!■ Indrtcr; Vrrl. Mill "96 Mllllronici 
I'urtnrr, Mod CM. Srllrl f. 3 -nl> control; CMM "96 U A S Mlcio-Xctl Model 7015 
Syuem pjckjine I1T. »3" > 17,1" « WT; MILLS; VS Chtvslitr FM-aVK)l. "93 Am 
Mod UtlimilVK. (2) M* Slurp. Model OMV; SAWS: « 1'ivrlru Auto. HorLz. bind 
Mod. IIIKtllA; tltlu hurt.; IjMHI:. V4 CnraC*p. tJVJl" « «T; GHINMRS: Do >ll 
Hyd DHM-10; TAC; bench lyr-r; A1K COM1*. «i DKVliK; IIRAT TTtr^T OVEN; 
IKESSLS. DKILL PRESS; UELT *. IJISC. SANDI1R; PLASMA CUTTER; WIRE 
WELDrJt; raRKLIIT; TRAILER: HOT WATER HIGH I-RESSURE WASHER; TREC. 
INStK CCNCKAt. SUPPORT ITEMS AND ACCHSSORIES. OH1CK PURNITURE, 
MUCH MOBIL. Termi. Cull or Company (h«k wltha Iwink Irllrrolcrrdll. 



ANTIQUK 41 COLLECTinLK 






VEHICLE- oniistsdj.nMiuii 

IB8I PonUic Donntrillr. V-8. 4-Dr.. Lo»d«i. 
Eictlmt CondHion. M^CO Actutd Mile. 



^6^ 



mmmosmm 



Suturduy, January 17, 1998 



NORTHERN WATCH \- 



I' ilR e 13 



The Classifieds -JFH& Classifieds - ! ' J^^pjjjil^iggg Classifieds 



Sporting Goods 

FOR SALE- Now and usod gotl cans 
Wilcox, Rod Loko Falls. 1-800-645-5001 
50HC 



Snowmobiles 

1B7B ARCTIC Cat EI Tlgro 440 liquid, 
runs good, now seal, good condition. 

601-7160. P4l7p 

inONMAN 440 Salo- Z440 from $3,509; 
ZL 440, S3.009; Cougar. $3,709. Pncos 
Include FRT/ooiup, oihor modols avail- 
aclo. RV Spons. TRF. MN, 1-600-820- 
5403. 115c 



CALL US FOR 
CLEAN-OUT .PRICES ON 

IMB's, 1997s AND ALL OTHER 
USED SNOWMOBILES! 

ALSO 

LOW 

pmEsu 

Hamm's Rmpair 

Warren, MN 1-800-889-S967 



FOR SALE- 1096 Arctic Cat Cougar. 

1.400 mllos, oxcollont condition, Includos 
covor. 21B-2O4-O507. PF5t13p 



FOR SALE- 1092 Polaris Indy-Uto snow- 
mobllo. low mllos, hand-warmota, covor, 
oxcollont condition, SI. 500.00, call 218- 

637-2203 ovonlngs. 1l5p 

1041 ARCTIC Cat 530 EXT, high miles, 
oxcollont condition, $1,200. Also. 1993 
580 EXT 2 In very good condition, 210- 
781-2820. PF415p 



1998 SKI-DOO's 

ride free til ,... - 
july 7, 1998 0r.take 
cash discount of 

upto$i,ooo: 
on all '98 & new 

;'- '97 MODELS 1 ;;"; 



20-50% OFF 

CLOTHING!! 



sale mm iwes rn.com 

S & J 

SPORTS, INC. 

I-6W6WM'T*W8M GrMnbuih, MN 



FOR SALE- B-1(2x24-fl. Tlmborwoll on- 
dosod trallor. usod onco. 21B-47B-3374. 
PF4t9p 

Miscellaneous 

OAS AND WOODBURNING FIRE- 
PLACES and Stovoo. Many brands avail- 
able HEAT-N-GLO. KOZY HEAT. 
EARTH STOVE. NAPOLEON, MAJES- 
TIC, VERMONT CASTING. Also, maso- 
nary flroplacos. wood-oil lurnacos. Guar- 
amaod LOWEST PRICES. Financing, t- 
BOO-446-4043. Mohnoman. B7tfc 



Miscellaneous 




FOLTZ DUILOIN03. Your post 
building exports. Insulated shops/garag- 
os. commoiclal/lndustrlsl, machlnory 
itorogo, horso/cattio bams. Call 1-60O- 

255-0081. FlStlc 

FOR SALE- Slio B Bauer hockoy skatos, 
liko now.jS20.00. To awe nway. old mao- 
azinos. Outdoor Ulo, MN Sportsman, 

681-4090. P4IBI 

QUALITY REBUILT ENGINES Starting 
al $795. 12 month/12.000 mllo warranty - 
w/axch. on robolkJablo core. InstaliaUons 
and lowing avallabla. Don's Machine 
Shop,Fosston.MN.B00-44B-1S1B. 17Ho 
SNOW PLOWfor salo. 681-2766. P41Bp 
FIREWOOD* Oak. olm. whlto ash, poc- 
plo. call 681-7684 or 681-1063 ovonlngs. 

will dolivor. PF4l7p 

WINDSHIELD REPAIR- Stono chips, 
small brooks, approx. 10% roptacomont 
cost. Mosl insuranco companies waive 
doducliblo. For froe osttmatos call 681- 
4233, Andorson Wlndshlald Repair. 

NM2-8HC 

TO GIVE Away- Pupplos. Slborlan Hus- 
ky/Gorman Shepherd, 8 wooks old. For 
Solo- 1077 Int. Scout 4x4 and Moyor 
srvowplow. Call altor 6:00 p.m., 681-4834. 

215p 

FOR SALE- Brother word procossor, 
$500 new, will soil lor S175. used very 111- 

Ho, 681-1464 aMarSpm P4t7p 

COLLECTORS- WE still have a fow cop- 
ies of Tho Tim oa Conlonnlal odlifon avail- 
ablo, $1.00 por copy. Tho Tlmos. 324 
Main Avo. N„ Thiol Rlvor Falls. MN 

58701. 34tfo , 

FOR SALE- Eloctrlc molors, 1/4-h.p. to 
7-1/2 h.p. Sao us for all your otoctric mo- 
tor noeds. Fleet Supply. Call 061-2050. 

47tfc . 

INTEL PtS6 MMX, now, 32MB nun, 2.1 
QB hard drive, BxCD, 33.6 modem, 
sound. 107 Ergo keyboard, mouso, 
Windows "95 plus $300 froo sortwara, 
$680.00 Includes doHvory. Coll 812-306- 
2339 and loavo massage anytimo. 
P8t11p 



Machinery 



•84 HONDA Civic 1500, 2-door hntch- 
bock 5-spood, blue w/bluo mtonor, grant 
gas miioago, special St. 105. DAS Snios, 
1-e00-253-20OOor218-253-2040. 1t5p 
FOR SALE- 1080 lull-siio Joop Grand 
Wogonoor, 4-whool-dnvo, fully loaded, 
powor windows, powor sun root, powor 
door locks, olr, tilt, cmiso, G01-0447 oMor 

5:00 p.m. P4tCp 

FOR SALE- 1002 Grand Pnx. good con- 
dition. $4,000 or bosl oflor, 21B-43G- 

281 S. Il5p 

FOR SALE- 1Q88 Chov. 4x4 Suburban, 
teal/gray, powor windows, locks, a/c. roar 
hoot, oxcollont condition, must soo. Call 
216-436-2053. ask lor Torry. 2l5p 
FOR SALE- '68 Dodga Caravan, asking 
$1 800. call 681-4629 days. 681-7402 at- 

lor 6:00 p.m. P416P 

FOR SALE- 1003 Dodgo Dakota Club 
Cab 4x4, V-8, oulo., loadod. Call 601- 
4303 days, ask lor Bruco, 681-0155 

evonings. PF4l7p 

1B87 PONTIAC Grand Am. 4-door. a.t. 
Also, 1088 Plymouth Voyagor, 4-cylindor, 
a.L Also, Craftsman 7-hp. snowblowor. 

661-242B. 216p 

'68 PONTIAC 6000, 4-door, 2.8 V-6. lilt, 
cruise, a.c, whlto w/bluo Inlortor. aate 
priced $1,350. OSS Solos, 1-600-253- 

2000or216-253-2940. 115p 

•03 CHEVY 4x4. V-8. 4.3L. 5-spood, 
01.300 mllos, tool, oxcollent condition, 
$14.500, 681-1626 aftor7p.m. P4l6p 
FOR SALE- 1976 Morcury Cougar XR7, 
a.c., 351 , oxcollont condition, ono owner, 
21B-437-6646oMor0:00p.m. PF4l11p 
FOR SALE- 4x2 Chov.. 1064. Suburban, 
full powor, seats 0. oxcollont condition. 

681-2000. 102Hc 

' '65 MEHCURY Morquls. 2-lono. V-0. 
157,000 mllos, $600 or boat oflor. 681- 
1628 after 7 p.m. P4l6p 



1095 CHEVY S-10 4-whool-drtvo Blaior. 
has command slarl. Call 210-745-4087 

anor3p.m. B8tlo 



^SPECIALS 
of the WEEK 



iwiFOHP mm. wa* w 

tJ»nlM» 
miJEEHlBMBCIIEWgUlllTHI. 



1090 POLARIS XCR 600 snOWmoOilo, 
oxcollont condition. Coll. 21B-204-6111, 

ask for Bryan or Laurio. 2t8p 

FOR SALE- 1997 Polaris 440 XC, 2,000 
mllos, oxcollont condition, asking 
$4,000.00/O.b.o. Call 681-3176 WOO- 

konds. 671fQ 

FOR SALE- 1094 Polaris XLT with pipes; 
1990 Polaris 500. Call 21B-47B-2774. 

PF4I11P 

FOR SALE- 1096 Indy 440. liquid, w/ro- 
vorso, ski skins, 1,900 mllos, axcotlortt 

condition. 52B-3623. 115p 

FOR SALE- 1975 Scorpion snowmotrilo, 
oxcollont condition. II Intorostod mako 
oflor. Also, pair snow Hros. llko now, slio 
P2I5-75R15. Also, to* chain saw, 681- 

1577. 1l5p 

FOR SALE- 1094 ZR 440. rocont over- 
haul, now carb atldos and CDI box, looks 
and runs great, asking 52^00 or bosl off- 

or. 874-8711. P4t5p 

FOR SALE- 1094 Cougar, $2,300; 1005 
Cougar, $2,800; '05 8'xlO' Ranger trallor, 
$500, vory good condition, 681-607B. 
P41Bp 



FOR SALE- »60 J.D. trndorwllh loader 
and 3-pt,. (70'J.O.. tractor vdih slnglo hy: 
drauiic, both ore wido front row crop. 
Wanlod- 2.B V-6 motor lor "85 Bronco II, 
21B-476-2704ofter7:00p.m. PF4t0p 
CENEX DRILL fill, holds 220 bushels of 
seed and B ions fartULtor, oxcollonl condi- 

tlon. 796-5348. PF4l11p 

18MB600J.D. comblno, 1,300 soparalor 
hours. All options and maintananca 
records, $70,000; 1995 914 pick-up 
hood, oxcollont condition, $7,000; 1096 
, 930 J.D. hood with finger reel, $12,000; 
drtvo-on comUno Irnllor for 9600, 57.000, 

218-483-3524. P4l6p ■ 

FOR SALE- 3788 IH tractor, 3-pt p.l.o.. 
1 8.4x38 duals all around, CAH triple hyd. 
Also, 4 20.8x38 radlals, 60% end all band' 
dual hardware. 218-745-4423. P4tBp 



: used ag ; 

* PARIS * 

* Tl< SALVAGE. i\i. * 

* |.KIIII-'>5II-'I"I7 



Curt Onstnd, Auctioneer iir^\ 
'INUconsc:i)60-rjO lb*) 



Onstnd Auctions 

l«"N. Prfi-"' ''rookiUra, V" ■ 



FOR SALE- Cordioglldo exorcisor, Ilka 
now condition, paid $180.00, will sail for 

$90.00. call 064-5226. 1l5p 

FOR SALE- Planks. 2"x8'-10'-ir.l6' 
Irom 8' 10 20' long. Also, 3x10-8' thai ttaw- 

mlllbuy. 21B-253-2036. Fltlc 

EUHINATE HIGH HEATING costs with o 
Slalnloss Stool outdoor woodbumlng fur- 
nace. Hoats multlplo buildings. Big sav- 
ings on oariy ordors. Financing available. 
GUARANTEED LOWEST PRICES. 1- 
600-440-4043. Mahnomen. SOtfC 
MACINTOSH QUADRA 610. 8MB RAM, 
1G0MB HD, 14" Hi-Pas. monitor, 14.4 
modom. lots of software, ready for Inter- 
net, looks brand now. SBOCVo.b.o. Stylo- 
wmor 2 Ink-Jot printer, $100 w/computor. 
Call Joe at 064-5666 In the ovonlngs. 

IF4t7c 

FOR SALE- nxlos and 12 tiros oft a 
now ooublo wido homo. Call 601-6314. 
P417p 



The Best Buys of the New Vbar 
an happening right now at 

OLSON'S AUTO REPAIR 
B TOW SERVICE 

616 Davis Ave. • Thief River Falls 
681-4250 



1991ForiH504x4 
1990 Chevy Pkfaip 4x4 



1985 Chevy Pickup 4x4 



1994 FORD Tompo GL, 4-door, 4-cy!in- 
dor. automalic. mosl options, oicollon! 
condition, now tiros. 75,000 highway 
miloa, ronsonnblo. DLR, 081-6800. 1t5p 
1991 OEO Tracker 4x4, now tiros, 
103.000 milos. runs good, hardlop, ask- 
ing S4.900/obo. Call 681-1562, ask lor 

Billy or loavo a messopo. P4i5p 

FOR SALE- 1085 Ford cargo van. good 
mochanicol condition, high mllaaga, 
would mako good work van. Priced to 
soil. Call 681-4805 or 081-3441, ask for 
DonorStovo. 4ffc 



Automobiles 



1980 FORO F-250 4x4, $1,950, good 
runner but rusty, 8' fiborglass topper. l>ko 
now, $300. 681-6425 days or 523-4491 

evonings. 3tfc 

'00 CMC 2500 convorslon van, 350 on- 
glna, lo ether. 4 captain soals. double 
elrmool. TV/VCR. loadod, now tiros, 
02000 mllos, groat condition. Coll 218- 

745-4593 oMor 4:30 p.m. IIISp 

FOR SALE- 1074 Gran Torino Sport, ono 
owner, good condition, 216-437-8406 at- 
tor 8 p.m. PF4U1p 



2tGp 



)r 6 00 p 



... $2,000.00; 
. _. ....... $3,000.00. 

. Fosston, 435-1962. 



'86 OLDSMOOILE Cutlass Clara. 4-door, 
2.5 4-iock ongmo, good tiros, gray w/rod 
interior, runs groat, groat buy $1,250. 
D5.S Sales. 1- BOO- 253 -2009 or 218-253- 
2040, 1t5p 



640 J.D. log sklddor. now transmission. 4 
oxlra tires, $22,000. 218-222-3553. 

PF4t11p . 

FOR SALE- 4-1/2 yard Ashland field 
ocrapor, oxcollont condition, 681-4028. 

PF4t1lc 

NEW BELARUS farm tractors. 31-h.p., 
$7,000; B1-h.p.. 4WD, cab. $18,000; 100- 
h.p. 4WD, cab, $20,000. Loadors, 
$3,500. Now and usod parts roadljy avail- 
able. Lyto Blelland Tractors, Inc.. Erakine, 
MN, 218^87-2781 days, 218487-3126 

ovonlngs. PF4l11p 

1BT9-2S70 CASE, Just had $7,100 work 
dono on It. radial tiros; 003 Molroo plow, 
B-botlon; 20 1 J.D. drills. 0350, telephone 

21B-45B-3340. 215p 

FOR SALE- 1074 Massoy Ferguson 31 
Industrial tractor, frosh ovorhaut, llvo 
p t o., 3-polnt and romolo hydraulics, 
good tires, good condition, 253-2312, 
PF4t11p 



Automobiles 




icittiwififAVi. tyum 

wmmit hmivitatiLW 
mmmt temtiimm 

MMiffiS^lkr^LoJll ''' 
l^ipiaftfarti *Tr3« 

IH^fflr^imistfttSg 

IWIMWncmi ^ito.fiMaHS 
UHHi^ll^r|i^lfebai); S7.995 

wan* m 

tWCHEVYCatBRfTT. 




S- Tlli 
1,1998 



KJa-V 



Get all this or just take up to $650 off 
during the Ski-Doo Ride Free Event. 

Now you've got all kinds of ways to save all kinds of money on selected 
models at your participating Ski-Doo dealer. And ifs all happening right ' 
now during the best time for snowmobiling. Just pick your sled, then 
pick your deal. But do it now. When January ends, so do the deals. 



Thibert's Sports Center 

Red Lake Falls, MN 
(218)253-2174 



ARCTIC CAT • /.BCrTsTCflT • ARCTIC CAT • AKC TIC CA T • / >«CTIC CAT ^ARCTIC CAT 



mem the hzonmm 220 sfice in trf 

SflTltKMV ^ SUNDAY - JAN. Zk <* 25! 



IRONMAN 440 SALE 

January 19lh-24th 
Spetial Priting Oa AH 440 Models! 

(Limited to quantities on hand) 



Kitty Cats « — SAVE 

Jag 340 Deluxe, ES 2999 

Jag 440 3399 

Jag 440 Deluxe, ES 3699. 

Ironman Z440 M-A-W »;5t»ds,Tn»jrjci*ito 3599 

Z 440 379 

3999 



ZL 440 

Panther 340 3299 

Panther 440 Deluxe 4199 

Prices Include Freight & Setupl 




9-5:30 M-F 
9-8 THURS 
9-4 SAT 



| OTHER MODELS STILl AVAIUBU 
AT ClOSEOUT PRICIHCIII CAUII 

340 Btanol En 

Cougar EXT DiIdm 

Cougar Dtlux* EXT 600 

Panther EXT Touring 

IRI 600 CJUl lOB USED SLED USTI 



" PICKUP 



STOP BY & CHECK OUT OUR 
UNADVERTISEB IN-STORE S PECIAISI 

4KT;rar 



Hwy. 1 & 59 W. • Thief River Falls, MN 

218-681-1007 or 1-800-826-5403 



ARCTIC CAT • - SRCTIC CAT « JBCriCC4T • ARCTIC CAT • ARCTIC CAT^ ARCTIC CAT 



USED 
EXT. CABSL— — 



>a B c 14 



1996 Chev. Ext. Cab 4x4 Silv., 305, V-8. AT.. 
Running Boards. 19,000 Mi.. Indigo Blue. 
1996 Chev. Ext. Cab 4x4 Silv., 305. V-B, AT., 
Cass. & CD, Loaded. 53.000 Mi., Emerald Green. 
1996 Chev. Ext. Cab 4x4 Silv., 305, v-8, AT. 
Keyless Entry. Loaded. 16.000 Mi.. While. 
1995 Chev. Ext. Cab 4x4 Silv., 305, v-8, AT., 
Running Boards, Loaded, 49,000 Mi.. Emerald Green. 
1995 Chev. Ext. Cab 4x4 Silv., 350, v-8. AT, 
Alum. Wheels. Loaded, 47.000 Mi.. Blue/Silver. 
1994 Chev. Ext. Cab 4x4 Silv., 350, V-8, AT, 
Bucket Seats. Z-71, 47.000 Mi., Teal. 

1994 Chev. Ext. Cab 4x2 Silv., AT, Buckets, 
Alum. Wheels, 90,000 Mi., Red. 

1995 Ford Ext. Cab 4x4 XLT, 351, V-8, AT, 
Custom Paint, Loaded, 42,000 Mi., Black. 

1993 Ford Ext. Cab 4x4 XLT, 302, V-8, AT, 

Alum. Wheels. Loaded. 43,000 Mi.. Silver. 

1993 Chev. Ext. Cab 4x4 Silv., v-6. 5-Spd„ 

Loaded, 90,000 Mi.. Lt. Blue. 

1993 Chev. Ext. Cab 4x4 Silv., v-6. 5-Spd., 

Running Boards. 83.000 Mi., Maroon. 

1992 GMC Ext. Cab 4x4 SLE, V-6, 5-Spd., 

Fiberglass Topper, 66,000 Mi., Red. 

1991 Chev. Ext. Cab 4x2 Silv., V-6, 5-Spd„ Tilt, 

Cruise, A/C, 86,000 Mi„ Blue 




1996 Chev. Reg. Cab 4x4 Silv., 350, v-8, AT, 

Cass. & CD, 41,000 Mi., Emerald Green. 

1995 Chev. Reg. Cab 4x4 Silv., 350, v-8. AT, 

Grand Prix Conversion, 41,000 Mi., Silver. 

1 992 Chev. Reg. Cab 4x4 Silv., v-6, 5-Spd., Tilt, 

Cruise, 99,000 Mi., Blue/Silver. 

1 990 Chev. Reg. Cab 4x2 Silv., v-6, 5-Spd„ Tilt, 

Cruise, 112,000 Mi„ White. 

1990 Chev. Reg. Cab 4x2 Silv., 350, V-8, s- 

Spd., Tilt, Cruise, 82,000 Ml., Black/Red. 

1990 Ford. F-150 Reg. Cab 4x2, 302, V-8, 5- 

Spd., 85,000 ML, Maroon. 

1985 Chev. Reg. Cab 4x2, V-6, AT, Blue. 




SMALL 
PICKUPS 



1996 Chev. S-10 Ext. Cab, 4-CyL, AT, Tilt, 

Cruise, A/C, 25,000 Mi., Autumnwood. 

1996 Chev. S-10 Ext. Cab, 4-CyL, 5-Spd., Tilt, 

Cruise, A/C. 24,000 Ml., Teal. 

1995 Chev. S-10 Reg. Cab,4-Cyl„ 5-Spd.,Alum. 

Wheels, A/C, 53,000 ML, Purple. 

1993 Chev. S-10 Reg. Cab, V-6, 5-Spd„ 48,000 

ML, Black. 

1991 Ford Ranger XLT, 4-CyL, 5-Spd„ 32,000 

Ml., Red. 



NORTHERN WATCH 



Saturday, January 17, 1998 



Saturday, January 17, 1998 



"YOU BEND 

■WE'fiE EQUIPPED TO 

REPAIR ANYTHING FROM 

FRAMES TO WINDSHIELDS - 

GIVEUSACALL 

681-3952 

FREE ESTIMATES 



NORTHWEST AUTO BODY 

NEXT TO FLEET SUPPLY HWY 1 4 SO WEST THIEF RlVEH FALLS 




Used Trucks 

1997 F-150 4x2 XLT, V8, auto 
1996 F-150 4x4 XLT, 6-cylinder, auto 
1995 F-150 4x2 XLT, 302 V8, auto 
1994 F-150 4x2 XLT, S-cab, V8, 5-speed 
1993 F-150 4x2 XLT, 300, auto 
1993 Ranger 4x4, S-cab, V6, auto 
1991 F-150 4x2, S-cab, 300, 5-speed 
1990 F-150 4x4 XLT, 351, auto 
1990 F-250 4x4, V8, auto 
1990 F-150 4x2 XLT, 6-cylinder, 5-speed 
1988 F-150 4x4 XLT, V8, auto 
1988 Ford Bronco II 4x4, V6, auto 
1987 F-250 4x2, V8, 5-speed 
1985 Ford Bronco XLT, 302, auto 

RED LAKE FALLS 253-2891 





rjfiS^D^E 



MBS 

I996I0NTIAC GRAND AM. ' 
1996 DODGE AVENGER ' 
1996 PONIIAC BONNEVILLE 
1995 OLDS. CUTLASS SUPREME 

4-DR. 
1995 FORD CONTOUR 
1395 CHEVY CAMARO, T-TOPS 
1994 PONTIAC BONNEVILLE 
1993 CHEW LUMINA2-DR. 
1993 CHRYSLER NEW YORKER 
19920LDSMOBILETORONADO 
1991 EAGLE TALON 
1991 OLDS. CUTLASS SUPREME 

4-DR. 
1990 BUICK SKYLARK , .., ., .^ 

1989 FORD MUSTANG /#i% ; ^§' •*- 

198B OLDS. DELTA 88 /ilftS&jfiStt' 

1987 CHEVY NOVA AffgggSOfl 



i. trucks Xndi/aiis 

1995 CHEVY S-JOJBLAZER " ,i „ 

1995 CHEVY 4X4 REGULAR CAB 

1995 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE 

1994 MAZDA EXT. CAB 2WD 

1994 GMC PICKUP, 2WD 

1993 CHEVY S-10 BLAZER 

1992 FORD RANGER EXT. CAB 4WD 

1991 FORD EXPLORER 

1987 FORD 

1977 CHEVY 4X4-. 

1985 CHEVY CONVERSION VAN 

G-20 
1984 FORD BRONCO II 



1995 Chev. Blazer 4-Dr. 4x4, P. Seat, Loaded, 

46,000 Mi., Teal. 

1995 Chev. Lumina APV Van, Power Door, CD, 

Rear A/C, 37,000 ML, Emerald Green/Silver. 

1995 GMC Jimmy 4-Dr. 4x4, 69,000 ML, 

Maroon. 

1995 Chev. Blazer 4-Dr. 4x4, P. Seat, 56,000 

Mi., Black. 

1991 Dodge Grand Caravan, Rear A/C, 

Buckets, 7-Pass„ 52,000 Mi., Dk. Blue. 

1995 Chev. Blazer 4-Dr. 4x4 LT, Leather Int., 

CD, P. Seat, Loaded, 58,000 ML, Black. 

1994 Chev. Lumina APV Van, Rear A/C, 72,000 

Mi., Teal. 

1993 Chev. Astro Ext. 8-Pass. Van, New Tires, 

87,000 Mi., Blue. 



THIBERT'S 

RED I.AKK FALLS. MN 

1-800-247-CHEV (2438) 




Automobiles 



Automobiles 



1005 CHEV. 6-10. oxtondod cob. 4*. 
D. 5-spood. Tnhoo pnekngo, now ro 
nnginn. clutch, (rirvujll wiUi vmtri 
inco clean p"ckup. 210-037-0234 o' 
mrjs. P4!Gp 



DEWAYNE'S 

Usod Cars, Trucks, & Aulo Paris 

PHONE: 463-3773 



miAM-MJ.Um 

Creat Selection 

of 
Used Vehicles! 



1986 FORD Aorostnr von, good condi- 
tion, now transmission, l to a, S2.000, 

081-5226. P4t5p 



i9uto 



Hwy.S9M.*T.R.Fitla 

681-3960 • 681-7271 



FOR SALE- IB83 Chov. S-10 Blmor, 
4x4. 2.8 V-6, $2,050.00. Coll 218-681- 
1050. P4t7p 



AUTOS FOR SALE 



'97 FORD EXPLORER 4X4, V-8 
'9? MERCURY TRACER 
'!6 CHEVY S-10 EXT. CAB 

fUflESIDE 
'95 CHEW CAVALIER, 4-DR. 
•96 CHEVY LUMINA 
'95 TOYOTA COROLLA 
'95 OODGE CARAVAN 
'91 CHEVY EXT. CAB 
■93 DODGE 

'92 JEEP CHEROKEE 4X4 
'91 DODGE SPIRIT 
'90 FORD AEROSTAR CARGO VAN 
'88 CHEVY 4X4 
'87 CHEVY BLAZER S-10 4X4 
92 BUICK REGAL, V-8 
'90 BUICK PARK AVENUE 

PONTIAC CUTLASS SUPREME 

PLYMOUTH VOYAGER 
'85 CHEVY ASTRO. 
'84 INTERNATIONAL DUMUCK 

AND UANYUORE ARRIVING DAILYI 



Baker's Auto 
Parts & Sales 

1-800-569-4192 
218-964-5321 

IM.Eumitmttb.nrr.aSa'iai.SUUttt.lOl 



'01 QUICK Century Custom. 4-door, 

powor windows and locks, smart buy 
13.250. O&S Snlos. 1-BOQ-253-2009 oi 

213-253-2040. 1ISp 

FOn SALE- 1Q89 Chov, Hon. 4-door. 
4x4. 454 nuto.. 3*3, Silvorndo. days 681- 

6611. P415p 

1 STB COUPE DoVillo Cadillac, oxcoilont 
body. $1,000; 1085 Toyota von. somo 
mst, $600. 21B-4fl3-352J.P4.flp 
1993 CHEW S-tO Diaior 4i4 LT. boo*, 
od, 00,000 m.los. Call 1st American 
Dank, nsk lor Ed. 745-4411. 6511c 
1SB4 PONTIAC Grand Pilx, 4-door. 
53,000 mlloa, on« ownor. oxcoilont con- 
dition, most opUona. now tiros, rooson- 

obh.OLR. 631-6800. tt5p 

"01 FORD Expknor. 4-door, 4,0 V-6. n.l.. 
o.c. tilt, erulso and moro, wtiito w/rod In- 
terior, umod windows. 4x4, special 
S7.650. D4S Solos. 1-B0O-2S3-2O09 or 
21B-253-2040. 115p 



IHHHIIfTTT 



Galaxle Auto and 
Camperjales 

$.&CARGOMATE 

mm TRAILERS, 

5TH WHEELS & 
POP-UP CAMPERS 

l , i24 l SieiraobllBM(r..45,70l 
1993 HyuntfaL.39,000 ML, 4-Dr. 
1993 Cortita 52,0011 ML..4-Dr. 
1992 Auostar Van...&3.00Q ML. 3rd seal 
1992 Ford Ttmpo...W,000 Mi., 2-Dr. 
1990 UmlB GoalfntmIaT...65,O00 ML, 

Fujfoi er 
19S9 Ford ConvenlQa Van...74,000 Ml. 
1986Qldi.93...4-Dr....(2,795 

Authorized Recreational Dealer. 
j For Sales, Service AM * 

^Camping Supptlta 

Open 6-6 Monday thru Friday 

IMila South Hwy. 59 

ScoflHdvnon Thlil Rlvtr Fall*. MN 

jMirHdutton 2IB-6B1-7W3 



RE-BUILT ENGINES 

CALL 218-435-G37Q OR 1-800-448-1 SIS 


VBW£ ■ . ENGMQNLY 
2.5 GM 85-87 Exo. Flora . Zft ^ M $086.00 

2.B GM 88-81 Int. ^TSowJ, =T.$94B.OO 
4.3 Inj. CttOV. P/U —^^^vMiJiJ-rf; .S875.00 


ENQ«IWWl£D 
$1,320.00 
SI, 320.00 
$1,420.00 
$1,450.00 
$1,300.00 
$1,300.00 
$1,350.00 
$1,350.00 ' 
$1,320.00 ' 
51,370.00, ' 
$1,370.00 
$1,370.00 
$1,370.00 
$1,470.00 
$1,875.00 
$2,150.00 . 
$1,450.00 

F.T FACTORY 

niBcl l0"*g wa dthtry 

IPnrk.FOJllon.lffl 






350 Chov. P/U-Sub 88-S4 .8875.00 

300 Ford P/U Cort> S80S.OO 

300 Ford P/U InJ. ...... ; 5845.00 

302 Ford P/U Corb 5895.00 

302 Ford P/U InJ. Thru 1891 5885.00 

351 W Ford P/U Cart) . .V 5885.00 

351 WFotd,P/UlnJ. . $885.00 

2.8 Caravan/Voyngor $1,250.00 

3.0 Carnvan/Voyagor Thro 1SB0 . . .$1,676.00 
3,8GM.88-aS ....._... .:.. .$875.00 

ALL ENGINES REMAN UFACTU RED IN QHB. 10.000 SQ 

NOTX: UO ST VAN K3TMUT10N3 WE IUS.00 EXCEPT OC 
ai t«V»» « ***ai*rn* on i « ntmtMCW cm. HMMjm haw* d. w 

DON'S MACHINE SHOP, induttria 



7 Cliovy Tahoo, o. ■«, 

7 Chovy Gr. Prix Con. 4x4, v> «*. m 

7 Chevy Tnhoo 2DR Sport. w*»vi.»« 
SxhovySiU Ext Cab, b^imvl*..., 

8 Chevy sfilaier LS, o™ m— m, «.—.« 
rOMc'SiVStLCab. wu. — »« -- ,. — 
rForcT4x4 XLT,K H v lH „. MM »> 

8 Chovy Tahoo LT.0~rHuw.MHB>«M, 
8 Chevy SBIaior.*™*^— —.— *-«- 
«c'hev74x4 ExL Cab Dlo»ol Silv. Z71, 
5 Chovy Suburban LT.ww.co>^— .■» 

3 Pontine Transport, o»- iuh-«m 
rcT£vy^x7ExTcabZ71. ««.««-, 
5 Pontlac Transport 3800,0m ■>«■« 

4 aTa^ , EIIWr B LT^dT* < ri _«»—»« 
4 Chevy 4x4 ExL Cab Silverado, 



DRIVE AWAYi 
WITH A DEAI* 

AT 
§WAI\l50l\l f § 




^.»M»ii l L l iii.mJ«J,>n. i m |-, 



LARGE NUMBER OF 
NEW TRADE-INS 



04 Ford Ranaer ExL Cab 2W 
84 GMC Suburban. *-^w« 
94 Chevy SBtaier, ■« .™ •« •>. 
BTchevy^SWE^L^r^WD; TZ- 



84 GMC ViVert'cT bTJVI' L.-. »— -* pTchevy RC Silv erado 4x4 Reg. Cab. 



OLDSMOBILE 



BUICK 



Vpontiac 

1-800-237-4407 



Cavalier, ND • 701 265-8336 



87 Pontine SSE, »—.«-.«. 

S7 Bulck LeSabra, w wim .m« 

87 Park Avenue, w«w>«>*M.ia 
87 Old! 88LS,**,™-— ^—u. 

BaTo'nUaQ^anTAM SE 4dr,o 

I 5a*cT3rBORoonl.u™-,«*.-i« 

86 Pontine Grand AM, M.n.w 

80 Bulck Park Avenue.uuu,, 

80 Chevy Lumina. vh. vo. u. w 

OS Chevy Monte Carlo, <m.v*« 

OS Olds Aurora. >»_-_> vm. eo» 

oTcadlllac Seville 8LS.»— .«. 

89 Pontlao Grand Prlic mmm 

MB^IcTLiSabre LTD,*.—.*-. 

940\dTc(etnX^n ..«.-.—. 

82 Pontine Grand P(lx,™.v» «. 

02 Bulck Park Avenue, ■.,»*• 



NORTHERN WATCH 



Page 15 



The Classifieds - The Classifieds - The Classifieds - The Classifieds 



1991 CHRYSLER LoBaron Coupo. V-6. 
aulo., oxcoilont condition, most option}. 
DLR, 881-8890. IBp 



Automobiles 



AUTOHOSPITAL 

AIXTO » TRUCK REPAIR 
ENQ1NE TRANS. OVERHAUL 

681-4629 



HWY. I1UW. 



T.R. FALLS, MN 



■02 CADILLAC Fleetwood FWD. 4.0, V- 
fl, rjold wrtan loolhor lolortw, vory nico 
cur nt o low, low ptico. $8,450.00. D4S 
Snlos. 1-B0O-253-2009 or 210-2S3-2940. 

»5p 

FOR SALE- 1033 Dodgo Caravan, air. 
eruiio. till. AM-FM cowotlo, powor wind' 
ows and OOOrfl. vory cioan. Call 631-861B 
doya. G81-4257ovoninga. F4ll1c 



1087 FORD Convoreion vor 
collonl runnor. $3,000.00, 081- 

P4tflp 

1S8B PONTIAC Orand Am 
AlWFM/cnisotlii, whlto w*iuo If 
S1,075.0O/obo.. 681-2520 0" " 
500-B45-47B9. P415p 



1094 FORD 1/2-ton 4x4 pickup. r» mil. 
now tiros, consldor pari tiado. 064.5180. 

P4t6p 

FOR SALE- 1087 Ford 4x4 F-1EO pickup 
and loppor, nsklno S4.0OO, 681-4038. 

PF410p 

T» PLYMOUTH Voyoflor Grand LE. all 
options. S3.0Oa/orfor; '87 Taurus MT-5, 
i1.S00/orlor,218-004-5332. P4ISp 




FOR SALE- 1005 F-150 XLT 4i4. ox- 
tondod cab pickup. 302, outo. 28.000 
mllos. loodod. 218-782-3104. PF4l7p 
FOR SALE- 1090 Toyota Corolla, call 
6B1-0303or378-40t5. F3tGc 



BIG 



COMPLETE MACHINE SHOP 
'•WwGriallnp, •Prnwm 
•Boring Toting 

• Omk Grioang • Bnka Dnna 
•Roton •HoeaMort 

Hwy. SAW. 881-2223 T.R. FaUt 




1997 

CHEVY 
CAVALIER 
2-DOOR 

BRAND NEW!! 
YOUR CHOICE!! 



$9,495 



Your Hometown GM Dealer HSj|HHE!l 

NORTHERN MOTORS, INC. 

Hwy. 1 & 59 W. Thief River Falls, MN 681-4820 1 -800-955-6053 



WESTSIDE MOTORS, INC. 





WILL YOUR SLED MAKE (T 
THROUGH WINTER?? 

MAYBE YOU SHOULD CONSIDER ONE OF THESE... 



Payment based on 72 months, 10.5%, 
$5;000 down, tax & lie extra QfiC 



V-a, Aulo., Air, Cruiso, Tilt, Power Windows/Locks/Soals, AfvUFM 
Cassotto, Luggago Rack, Fog Ughts, Trailer Towing, Much Mora. 




4-CyL, 5-Speed, AM/FM Casselto, Sliding Hear Windows, 
-Aluminum Wheels. While Line Tires, Block Heator 



Payment based on 60 months, 9.75%, 
$3,000 down, tax & lie. extra OAC 



JANUARY INVENTORY REDUCTION!! 



'95 FORD TAURUS SE 1 '95 MERCURY SABLE GS | '88 LIN COLN CONT 




V-8, Auto.. Air. Crulso, Tilt, 

Powor Wlndows/Locko/Soat, 

AM/FM CosMtto. Roar Spoilora 

Aluminum Whool3 

SUE PRICE $ 11, 495 




V-6, Auto.. Air, Crulso, Till, 

Powor Wlndows/Locko/Sont, 

AM/FM Cossotlo, 

46,000 Milos 

SALE PRICE 



'11,495 




V-6, Auto., Air, Crulso, Tilt, 

Powor WindowE/Locks/Soal, 

Loothor Inlorlor, Sunroof, 

Aluminum Who □ Is & Mora 



SUE PRICE 



%995 



GREAT SELECTION, OF CLEAN, LOW MILE, LATE MODELS! 



1997 FORD TAURUS QL 
1996 MERC. MYSTIQUE OS 
199S DODGE INTREPID 
1995 EAGLE VISION ESI 
1995 FORD TAURUS SE 
1995 FORD ESCORT LX 
1995 MERC. SABLE GS 
1992 MERC. CRD. MARQUIS LS 
WE WANT TO EARN 



1994 MERC. SABLE GS 
1992 BUICK SKYLARK 
1992 BUICK PARK AVE. 

1998 FORD T-BIRD 
1991 DODGE DYNASTY 

1999 FORD TAURUS LX 
1989 FORD CROWN VICT. 
1988 LINCOLN CONT. 



1987 DODGE OMNI 
1993 CHEV. S-10TAHOE 
1993 GMC SAFARI 
1993 PLYM. GRD. VOYAG. 
1989 FORD F-159SC 4X4 
■ 1986 FORD RANGER 4X2 



YOUR BUSINESS! GIVE US A CALL TOi 




1996 PLYMOUTH NEON 

KHJM Model, Wf.,«yL Dull AUBtgi, 

w»»1 1,500 



1996 CHEVY SILVERADO 

Club CjS. M, 3>d0oor. Z-71, V>B. ^" n ' 

s 22,900 



. 1997 CHRYSLER LHS 

I iMeHLMUier, And Infinity Sound SvBtui 

s 21,975 



1996 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN 

LE.DMgtiTop'01-The-lme 

I s 20,800 



1997 DODGE RAH CLUB CAB 
4X4.LABAMIESLT(3 4« 

r»«» s 26,995 



1996 CHRYSLER TOWNS 
COUNTRY LXImiopitau 

SUndird Equip. *C0i990 



1995 CHRYSLER TOWNS 

COUNTRY M A» Bisi AdHM Bntel ■BjMjW 

^n 9,995 



1996 CHRYSLER TOWNS 
COUNTRY LXI cb«*» «*v«n 

„. M *25,600 

nSIMilMI J:H!IJl 1995 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE 
LAREDO 4X4 mm, wo, fh Pom 

s 21 .995 



:AB4X2ibo..m«.! 

«-» s 1 8,500 



21,995 



I995 FORD ESCORT WAGON 

LXj'Cyl.. Aula.. Only iJ.0C0 Hi. 

s 9,500 



1995 FORD F-150 CLUB CAB 

'" 4X4 XLT FIbergtua Topper 

,7».»t s 1 9.995 



1994 DODGE RAM 4X2 
LARAMIE SLT »*«.».. [mu» 

S 1 4,995 



1995 FORD F-250 4X4 

ttO,H Auto, BmoV To Work! 



1995 CHRYSLER CONCORDE.. 

Local Oct Owner. 21,00 Mi. 

s 1 4,995 



1994 FORD AEROSTAR VAN 

XLT Wtll Equipped 

s 1 1.995 



1995 DODGE DAKOTA CLUB 
CAB 4X2 v-s u iinwiiEqotr.! 

s 1 3,995 



|1994 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN 

SE Pow WWowirl«ctaflllnwi And Don 

$ 1 0,995 



1 994 PLYMOUTH ACCLAIM 

V-6. Aulo.. GoWP.i:k,igf-Sf.i»P' 

s 8,595 



1993 MERCURY SABLE GS 

W, Auto, FuH Power, 67,000 Ml 



1993 CHRYSLER TOWNS 

COUNTRY ChryslM TsD'Of-TlW-Unc 



s 8,995 

wi 

ZEBS-1 

J,\H,Au1a 

M 5,995 



1993 PLYMOUTH GRAND 
VOYAGER SEK.M.. <■"». smiog 

s 8,995 



1993 CHEVY BLAZER S-10 4X4 

LT Modal, Lo*d«d,V<, Aulo. 



1993 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE 

UMrTEDHA«io,Qu»driTnc,Loidtd 

s 1 7.995 

1S93 FORD BRONCO EDDIE ^BTFHsBSsHSSHBl 
BAUER EDITION V4 surp 

M 4,995 



1992 DODGE SPIRIT 4-DR. 



s 5,450 



s 1 1,800 



1992 EAGLE TALON 

M)r, Sporty And SMfp 



1991 FORD AEROSTAR XLl 



■Lii Jd«1:l.l.| J:liH?^l!ffiJ l992 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN 

CMt^B : 10,900 

^m^s^- ||WW| .J2 , ^^*« 

rMCTKfflE!^9S9CHEVROLETETp^TTA 



s 5,995 



1988 CHRYSLER NEW YORKER 

lUrtCrouEflTtkin,«,Aulo. 

$ 3,500 



Mr, Air, Crulu, TIB, AM/FM C»««fl» 

$ 5,995 



1988 FORD F-150 CLUB CAB 



1988 PONTIAC TRANS AM GTA 

V-fl. Aul3. T-Tops. Lt.llh„. 65 COO Mi 

s 6,995 



1 1987 BUICK CENTURY WAGON 

Wuiwoif, WfL, Auto, FWD 

$ 2,995 



nm 



681-2660 or 1-B00-295-FORD 

Eumito-rftiaiui.sMi'Ji.siitcoAii-iMPJi 
Hwy. 1 & SB Watt Thiol River Fall,, MM 



l 






OARBYWOUS JOFTUNBEBO ALFWKCY TEnBTYAKSH 



s 8,995 



Need A New Or Used Car... 

Call One 
Of Us! "*■ 

WESTSIDE MOTORS 

E-33 lodge njmoum lillliViHIJil DtuiQeTmks OF T.R.F., INC. 
psj ■' C2S> Ea <>' s ''''''''^'^yl7llM■^Z,y«"'^-!!i 1 '',",M l !!l"''' ,, ' * 

i t ..... ^« D . , ,„_„ t 218-681-4303 Thief River Falls 





















\ 































I'iiKi' 16 



NORTHERN WATCH 



Winter Community Ed 
schedule is announced 



Schnul ilistriii 5M 
jtK-cd with .i number 



pli-hed !<> in.nl by filling out ihe 

cI.lss fee and mailing both t« 
Communis Hducatinn. 231) I„>Hrce 
Avenue Souih. Thief Ki\cr Falls. 
MN 56701. 

Persons nuv also rcgi-lcr in per- 
son ,K the community education 
office in ihe school district service 
center. The office is upon from 'J 
.rm In 2 p in Mond.i\ through 
Thursday. A registration 'desk with 
forms and envelopes and a drop ho\ 
arc located inside the double door 
cnir>' which is open from 7 .i.m. io 7 
p.m. 

Nn phone registrations are 
accepted. Nn crass confirm Jtiuns 
arc sent and classes will meet as 
scheduled unless registrants arc 
notified otherwise. Classes arc filled 
on a first-come, first-served basis 
with a minimum of sis participants. 
Refunds will be issued if the 
class is filled before the registration 
is received, if the class is canceled 
for lack of enrollment or if the reg- 
istrant requests a refund three or 
more working days prior to starting 
date of the doss. Such refunds must 
be approved by the board of cduca-' 
lion at one of its twice-monthly 
meetings. No refunds arc issued 
after the class begins. 

Anyone 65 years of age of older 
may enroll in community education 
classes at a 25 percent discount 
from the regular fee. 

Open swimming is available at 
the Franklin middle school pool 
from September through May 31 at 
a fee of $1.50 for adults and SI.25 
for children. Pool hours arc 7-9 p.m. 
Thursday and Friday and 1-5 p.m. 
Saturday and Sunday. Lap swim- 
ming is open from 6 io 7:30 a.m. 
Monday, Wednesday and Thursday 
and 6 to 7 p.m. Tuesday and Friday. 
Pool memberships may be pur- 
chased at $100 per family or $50 per 
individual for 12 months or 575 per , 
family or $37 per individual for nine 
months. Punch cards arc available at 
a cost of $25 for 15 sessions of 
water aerobics instructed by Snooki 
Bondy from 6 to 7 p.m. Monday, 
Wednesday and Thursday. 

Youth swim lessons will begin 
Monday and Tuesday. February 16 
and 1 7, at a cost of $22.50 for eight 
lessons. Schedule is available in the 
winter class information brochure. 

Canoe trip class will be taught by 
Diane Bach February 5. !2. 19 and 
March 5. 12 and 19 from 7:30 to 
9:30 p.m. in the district service cen- 
ter at a cost of $25. 

Introduction to bowhunting will 
be taught by Dana Klos to anyone 
age 12 and older from 6:30 to 9:30 
p.m. each Monday from February 2 
through March 16 at Franklin 
school. Cost is S30 and the class 
will include two evenings of shoot- 
ing. 

Snow shoe making will be taught 
by Diane Bach January 22 from Tto 

Area students 
graduate from 
UND this winter 

Area and local students were 
among the 740 students eligible to 
graduate from the University of 
North Dakota during winter gradua- 
tion. 

UND awards about 2,200 
degrees each year. There were more 
than 740 candidates for degrees this 
winter: 108 were graduate students. 

The following students were 
among those awarded degrees: Red 
Lake Falls — Phyllis Marie 
Sanders, bachelor of accountancy; 
Patrick Alan Thibcrt, bachelor of 
business administration; 

Thief River Falls — Lisa Marie 
Anderson, bachelor of science. Lars 
Olav Dyrud. bachelor of arts, cum 
laudc; bvan Marie Grindc, bachelor 
of science; Sanna Ellen Gustafson. 
bachelor of science in occupational 
therapy, sum ma cum laudc; Lcc 
Michael Nieland, bachelor or arts; 
Leslie Ann Nordheim, master of 
science; Amy Sue Roche, master of 
science; Janet Lynn Uoisland. bach- 
elor of business administration, 
cum laude; 

Viking — Tracy Lynn Unman, 
bachelor of accountancy: 

Warren — Jessica l.ynn [Jelcher. 
bachelor of science in education: 
Marlcne S. Buehner. master of sci- 
ence; Charisse I). I.ehlanc. bachelor 
of ails; Kristina Marie Kosendahl. 
bachelor of accountancy, summa 
cum laude. 

Oyster on dean's 
list at Wadena 

Leslie Oysler nl' Thief River 
Falls, a student in telephone service 
technology, has tiualilied fur the iall 
quarter dean's list ill Norlhwesi 
Technical College in Wadena by 
attaining a grade point average ol at 
least 3.5 while carrying a minimum 



io 



■m 



Wnnintil.iHt.iuiili l.i» etiloi 
center VceisMS'pIu. co.l. 
Aerobics mil Iv ted Iv 
Suncsk Morulas lliroiieh 
from '5 .H) io <>: 
Franklin school cafeteria. Persons 
m.i\ join the class .m\ time and ihe 
S2.< punch caid g.oxl fur 15 sessions 



in the 



cd. 
Low 



impact .iciiihic 



■ tin 



deselopmentally challenged it 
lauglit by Slancvk each Monday 
through mid Mas from 7 to H p.m. 
in the" Franklin multi-purpose room 
under ihe same punch card use. 

Dog etiquette classes will be 
[audit hv Anita Cardinal February 
17," 24 and March 10. 17 and 24 
from 6:15 to 7 p.m. at the district 
service center. Fee is SI5. Cardinal 
will aha teach a Puppy Pity cla.ss 
for owners of puppies 10 weeks to 
six months of age on January 20. 27 
and February 3 from 6:30 to 7:15 

P.m. in the district service center. 
cc will be $10. 

"For the Love of Children" is a 
scries tif workshops to be held the 
third Wednesday of each month 
beginning Januarv 21 and continu- 
ing through April 15 from 6:30 to ') 
p.m. Cost will be $10 per session. 
Information is available from Jill 
Johnson at 681-871 1. Donna Nelson 
at 681-8670 or Shari Olson at 6SI- 
0793. 

After-school classes for children 
include a combined session instruct- 
ed by Judith O. Johnson where par- 
ticipants will make a quick bird 
feeder, survival kit for the car and 
learn basic first aid. Second and 
third graders will meet January 19 
from 3:15 to 4:15 p.m. and fourth 
and fifth graders February 2 from 
4:45 to 6:15p.m. Cost will be $7. 

Two sessions of "Cookies and 
Bars for Students" will be taught 
January 26 and February 9 by Judith 
O. Johnson in the Franklin home 
economics room from 3:15 to 5:15 
p.m. Cost is $7 per session and stu- 
dents may sign up for cither or both 
classes. 

Latch key program for after 
school child care is available for 
kindergarten through fifth grade stu- 
dents at Challenger elementary 
school. Cost is $1.60 per hour for 
the first child in a family. $1.25 for 
the second and SI for the third. 
Register at Challenger Preschool or 
the community education office. 

Chuck Kimbrough will teach an 
introduction to model railroading 
class in three class sessions January 
29. February I9and March 12 from 
7 to 8:30 p.m. in the district service 
center. Fee will be $5 per class. 

"Let's Dance" will be instructed 
for couples 18 years of age and 
older by Bill and Barb Fahcy 
Fridays, January 30, February 6. 20 
and 27 from 7 to 9:30 p.m. at the 
Eagles hall. Fee will be $30 per cou- 
ple. Twenty couples must register 
for the class to be held. 

Investing will be instructed hy 
Jon Larson of Edward D. Jones- 
January 27. February 3, 10, 17 and 




Benefit for 
Paul Wold at 
Free Church 

Benefit supper for Paul Wold of 
Thief River Falls will be conducted 
Friday, January 23. from 4:30 to 7 
p.m. at the Evangelical Free 
Church. 211 Arnold Ave. No. in 
Thief River Falls. 

Wold is undergoing treatment for 
cancer and recovering quile well, 
hut his insurance will not cover a 
large amount or the expenses. 

In addition to the Swedish meal- 
ball supper, music will lie provided 
by "Trie Overtones" tiuurtci and 
other vocalists and musicians. Free ■ 
will donations will he received al 
the door. Matching funds up u> 
$500 will he provided by Branch 
8129 of Lutheran Brotherhood. 



loom FceisSI5 

I..UU . S.iiuI.lIiI uill leach calhgu- 

kiru.iry 5 and March I" and 26- 
lioiii <i .'It to K.'d p.m. in the district 
service center. Cost will be $10 per 

A oiie-Tiigbt rubber stamp class 
will Ik.- taught by lltenda Vatthauer 
Jamiaiv 20 Irom 0:30 to 8:30 p.m. in 
the school district serv.ee center al a 



^LMARV kav 



1z€ u 



care 



usloniized 

sKin 



Mm* Kny.JTmnWriT *l«iriirc 
|,'..«!,Ni,.k-ipK-.ll..ko 1 i,.-ir 



<«U r.*nfrwiMwi1tiil«*iniiil 



Edle Brandll 

NDCItHOCNT QCAUTV COHSUUMfT 

(218) 681-6297 



COOLING m HEATING 



A Now Dimension In 

High Efffcioncy 

Hooting 

r*manu 

Air Command 90 
Oas Furnace* 

Featuring: 

• Stainloss stool hoot 
ox changer 

• Slninloss stool rocuporolivo 
coil 

• Induced dralt 

• Advanced solid stato ignition 

• Long lilo Bume-ra 

• 25 yoar limitod warranty 
•Full lac lory Io sting 

• Elficioncios over 90% 

• Availoblo in upflow and 
count or! low modols 




Col For Fteo fjtnulni 



Rain Care Co. 

John P. Lovly 

Healing/fiir Conditioning 
Goodrldgo, IHN 378-1641 



Compare 

our life 

insurance 



Farm Bureau idli life 
Insurance. Our company ii 
solid, our products arc highly 
rated, and our rates are 
competitive. Talk (o us and 
you'll discover why 10 many 
families truit ui with (heir 
Insurance needs. 

Wc look for ways lo 
help your Insurance dollars 
work harder, It's (hat 
simple. And we'll contact 
you at least once a year to 
make sure your protection 
h up-to-dalc. 

So If you're thinking 
about life insurance, think 
about Farm Bureau Life. 

IMng beside you. IHiriintffor 

JAMES CWIKLA | 

31IL»BtMA,l.K. 

Thl»f Aim F»II.KN 56701 | 

681-2288 



MICHAEL 
PETERSON 

lt1L,Bi„Av,. N. 

THI.fi1lf.rFitt.HN 56701 

681-2288 




Suliinkiv. >:iiiu:ir.r 17, 1!WN 




'95 FORD CONTOUR 
4-DR. 

4-Cyl.. Auto., 
Nicely Equip. *8,495 



'92 GMC SUBURBAN 
4X4 

350, Auto.. 80:000 

1 Owner Ml. *1 6,495 



96 CHEV. S-10 PICKUP 



16,000 hi. '9,495 



'94 BUICK PARK AVE. 
4-DR. ' 

V-o. Lonth™ 
Loadad '13,495 



'95 CHEVY 1/2-TON 
EXT. CAB 4X4 

Srnptilc Paint 

One Owner *1 8,995 



.'90 PLYMOUTH 
ACCLAIM 4-DR. 

4-Cyl., Auto.- 
Our Price '2,1 95\ 




'91 FORD RANGER 
4X4 

V-6. 5-Spd. 

locally Owned '6,995 



'94P0NTIAC 
BONNEVILLE 4-DR. 

fjV-Q, Loadod, toathor '. 

50irner'*12j950- 



'96 P0NTIAC GRAND 
AM 2-DR. 

Quad 4, Auto. 

li»ded '12,495 



'95 OLDS. REGENCY 

'tO^t^t 1 ^° wno r i t ; .. : ■'■■ 



■87 DODGE DAKOTA 
4X4 

v-e. Auto. . 

Nice '5,950 



vi;85JHEV:Vl7»T0M*K 

.*fift<;picKUPX''' 



'89 CMC 1/2-TON 4X4 
SHORT BOX 

supar Clean 
Our Price '8,995 




I GMC CONVERSION 

:■••''■-' ■•■■"- VAN ■■■''■'. 

..;' SSOAUtd.' 

loaded '7,995:'. : 



'89 CHEV. ASTRO 
VANLT 

• y-6. Loadod 



'96 DODGE EXT. CAB 
4X4 

310, Auto., 32,000 Ml. 



194 CHEVY 1/2-TON 
: EXT. CAB 4X4 

■ 3B0,Autu. 

1 Owner '17,995 



'95 MERCURY 
VILLAGER VAN 

V-6, Auto.. Ono Owner 

Loaded '13,995 



'95 OLBSvCUTLASS 
SUPREME4-DR. 

v-6. Auto.. Locally Owned 
Loaded '9,995 




I BUICK CENTURYf' 

: '•'4-OR.--:i4?;M5 
. . . V:6,''Auto„ Loaderf*^ 

Locally 0wil«|iS7|9g5t; 



'91 P0NTIAC GRAND 
PRIX 4-DR. 

V-6. Auto." •: . '," 

Locally Ownod s 5,995 



'94 CHEV. BLAZER 
4-DR. LT 

V-6. 1 Owner 

Loatlstl'14,995 



94 CHEVY LUMINAL 
•^-DB^UROjlft 

V-6, Auto., Lqadodilvwjjj 




•94 MERCURY SABLE 
4-DH. GS 

V-6, AtTjlo., Loadod 

locally 



'8,3,95 




n UjWa'it t!'?.»3g!&j 



'95 CHEVY 1/2-TON 
REG. CAB 4X4 

350. AUtO. I 

One Owner '16,995 




; 96 P0HTIAC 0RAND 
AM 4-DR. f 

, ,4-Cyl., Auto.. A/C , 

Our Price '11,495 



95 BUICK PARK AVE. 
4-DR. 

V-6, 1 Owner 



Loaded '20,950 loaded '16,495 



'96 CHEVY CORSICA 
4-DR. 

Nicely Equipped 
Our.Prlce '8,495 



'95 CHEVY 1/2-TON 
EXT. CAB 4X4 

3SO, Loaded 

One Owner '18,495 




95P0NTIAC>GH 

4-Cyl.,jAUto i ,: BMortyg 



'94 FORD EXPLORER: 
4X4 XLT 4-DR. v 

V-0. Auto., Super Sharp 

One Owner *1 5,495 




2-'97 CHEVY LUl 

•-4--DR.1-'. ,..„ , 

. v-6. AUto„',Lc>ad.edi;J i gj ) , 

Your Cholc»-.'i.*1'3 i j^^j: 



'95 CHEVY TAH0E. . 
4-DR. 4X4 

350, Auto., Ono Owner ; 
REDUCED TO '23,500 



-JIJCTWUUVED-;*:; 

KfOMI«-T0l4M;......V..;'. , 1j^5l 

■92Biii«ariura.,... ;...^;W5 

•92 CHEV. HI. CAB 4M H...i^t).^ 
'93 OUH OnUSS SWREliE;^^ 
t3 CUV. W-T. WRE8. OltjiiSlM 



Your Hometown GM Dealer 5IHI0I^ 

NORTHERN MOTORS, INC. 

Hwy. 1 St 59 W. Thief. River Falls, MIM 681-4820 




Volume 8, Number 3 



'"Tl&tttlcve&t "Wtctttteooto. '<i l^e^iattcU. 1tet<t4fe*ifeesi 



324 Main Avenue North, Thief River Falls, MN 56701 



Saturday, January 24, 1998 




AROUND 
THE REGION 



After 51 years 
Norquist leaves 
Prior Electric 

Roseau - Satisfied cus- 
tomers will be what Rod 
Norquist remembers aboul his 
more ihun 50 years of serving 
ihe Roseau urea, first as a 
repairman and then as co- 
owner oH-rior Electric. 

Nortjulsl, along with co- 
owner Russell Patm, 
announced recently that 
NorinJiM is turning over the 
ownership of the long-stand- 
ing business io Palm and Brian 
felowski. Roseau Times- 
Region 

Man jailed in Polk 
County for refusing 
to enter a plea 

Crooks ton - In a bizarre 
scene, a 23-year-old Fosston 
man stood wilh his father at 
his side and refused to 
acknowledge anything Judge 
Russell Anderson had to say. 

Joseph Frcdrich Rosnow 
was supposed to enter a plea 
on a single charge of fleeing a 
police officer after a prior 
motion lie had filed in 
December 'to "tirsmisif "tnc 
charge was denied. 

Instead of entering a plea 
Rosnow said that nc was 
appearing under the jurisdic- 
tion of ine "American flag of 
peace of the United States of 
America," and he answered 
everything Judge Anderson or 
Polk County Attorney Mark 
Swanson said by saying, "I 
refuse that statement for 
fraud." Documents in 
Rosnow's file indicate that he 
docs not believe in this coun- 
try's system of laws or the 
legal system. 

Judge Anderson had him 
taken into custody and jailed 
for five days on u contempt or 
court charge for refusing to 
acknowledge the court. 
Crooksion Daily Tunes 

Diehard sports fan 
has 90th birthday 

Mentor • By his documen- 
tation, hoskctball junkie Ed 
Neibauer has attended more 
than 7,500 basketball games 
over the years. Ncibaiicr has 
seen every UND basketball 
(and football) team play at 
least once a year since the 
1924-25 season and every 
Minnesota Section 8A high 
school basketball tournament 
from 1946 to the present, with 
the exception or 1978. He has 
attended 33 Minnesota state 
basketball toumments. 

Neibauer spent his 90th 
birthday recently at a familiar 
hangout — the Hyslop Sports 
Center at the University of 
North Dakota. He was sur- 
prised and deeply touched 
when, during a break in the 

Same, he was colled onto the 
oor and presented a corsage, 
and ihe crowd sang "Happy 
Birthday." The Mcintosh 
Times 

NTC thrives after 
spring flood 

East Grand Forks - 
Unlike many other activities in 
the East Grand Forks commu- 
nity, Northwest Technical 
College is thriving with enroll- 
ment showing an increase 
since last springjs flood. Right 
now over 1.100 arc attending 
classes at the school. 

Marketing director Lori 
Grucss attributes the success 
of the college to some of the 
popular programs the school 
offers and the current trend 
towards technical education. 
The Exponent 

(Continued On Page 2) 




SvvisPennCo appears tcrhave 
met stipulation conditions 



SwisIVnn Cn. appears tti have 
met conditions ol a stipulation 
.igreciimnl with llic stale and on iN 

"Things are running really well 
right no*, in lact belter ili.in ever," 
said Swisl'cnn Co. manager Rick 
Nurd lug en. 

Howard Person. Penninglon 
County Solid Waste ofliecr. 
explained that Swisl'eni) Co., the 
county's solid waste handler, had 
met conditions of a stipulation 
agreement it was forced into with 
Ihe Minnesota Pollution Control 
Agency (MPCAI. last summer. 

hollowing reports of problems, 
such as uncovered piles of trash 
being blown into yards and fields or 
ncaihy neighbors, improper han- 
dling of composi, and improper 
storage of solid waste (burned pel- 
lets), the MPCA demanded that the 
site be cleaned up and piles of solid 
waste, compost and burned pellets 
be disposed of and handled properly 
hy the end, of December 1997. In 
addition, it fined SwisPcnn Co 
$2,500 for not having its compost 
process on line hy a deadline in 
June, and $1,460 in coMs for testing 
not completed when rcouircd. • - 

It was a tough year for SwisPcnn 
Co. It suffered a number of setbacks 
— some of which were caused by 
two major fires at the facility, and 
others by annoying minor cquip- 



unglor 



County 
aincdopiimislic 



pruMcri 

Coimuii 

ahojJl ( 

Aecnrding to county official-., the 
county had learned its lesson in han- 
dling solid wasic when il had lost 
lliimsands of dollars operating the 
ladlily. and commissioners had no 
desire to lake over the facility again. 
In order to encourage SwisPcnn Co. 
to meet stipulations in the agree- 
ment with MPCA il promised 
roughly 5150.000 in aid. Of the 
$150,000. $50,000 was given to 
SwisPcnn Co immediately, $35,000 
on October 1. $35,000 on 
November 1, and another S30.000 
upon completing certain goals scl 
forth in the stipulation agreement: 

Mceling the stipulation agree- 
ment meant hauling a signilicant 
pile of solid waste (flufr pile), lo 
landfills, obtaining or renting new 
equipment to dry wet fraction used 
in making pellets, and Tillering com- 
post. Most of ihe aid lo SwisPcnn 
Co. was aimed at solving those 

' ■ Person said two minor things 
remain lo be completed — soil sam- 
ples need to be taken from where 
the pile of burned pellets were 
stored: and the cover crop planted 
over spread pellets needs to be 



plowed over. At the c.irliesi. those 
items cm he completed in Ihc 
sprirrg. Person said another $50,001) 
Irom -SCORE funds will be given to 
SwisPcnn Co. but it's being with- 
held because, as Person said, "neai- 

enough fur the county. 

Person said SwisPcnn Co. has 
made a great deal of progress. Now 
they base to work on the permit 
application process wilh MPCA. 
This process requires that they sub- 
mil information io MPCA lo 
become rc'pcrmitlcd lo operate 
within the stale, and negotiate the 
permit wilh MPCA. One of the con- 
ditions in ihis process will be lo 
demonstrate that they have a market 
for the pellets they arc producing. 
Person said he has seen new con- 
tracts with new customers and is 
encouraged by that. SwisPcnn Co. 
also has to identify landfills il plans 
to use. Right now. the MPCA isn't 
inn happy (hat garbage is being sent 
to the landfill near Grand Forks, 
ND. he said, hut that's a minor point 
of contention. 

Notdhagcn confirmed the fact 
lhal they have new customers for 
their pellet. He said he is very opti- 
mistic about the future of SwisPcnn 
Co. The composting has improved, 
production has increased, and the 
product (pellet) is better. 



- •.-.-•X ■' 


■ 7 !3 




w " ■•■ii!l 




Hv- 




Times employee Sue Phillip looks on as Johnny Green eats fire 
during a visit to the newspaper office. Fire-eating is part of the 
nightclub act of Johnny Green and the Greenman, the band 
appearing this week in the lounge of the Best Western Inn In Thief 
River Falls. The entertaining and talented group also plays a wide 
variety of music from a repertoire of over 500 songs. 

Fire eating part of 
Johnny Green's act 



Thief River Falls Rural Fire department has a new 
fire truck. Representatives of the six township 
members in the rural fire department association 
visited the Thief River Falls Fire Department 
Wednesday to see the new truck. The new truck 
was delivered in November and became opera- 
tional In early December. It has a 320 horse 
power engine, two-person cab,' five speed, 
Allison transmission, a pump which can pump 
1,250 gallons of water per minutes and a 1,200 



gallon tank. Fully loaded it weighs 32,900 
pounds. It Is 10-feet, six-inches to the top of its 
lights. The fire truck, which is owned by the 
townships of North, Norden, Rocksbury, Smiley, 
Sllverton and Excel, cost 5159,000. It replaces a 
1975 model fire truck, which they plan to sell. 
Pictured at the far right of the picture is the 
newly elected volunteer fire chief, Brad Kosel of 
Thief River Falls. 



by Knlhi Carlson 
Northern Watch Reporter 

Things got a little hot at the 
offices of The Times and Northern 
Watch on Thursday morning when 
a smiley stranger walt/cd through 
the door, behind the counter and 
began eating fire. Female staff 
members E as P cd arul ' B'SBlcd. 
Customers stared in open-mouthed 
disbelief. The stranger ate it up — 
the fire and the attention of his audi- 
ence. 

Johnny Green is his name. 
Entertainment's his game, and he 
and his band, the Grccnmcn, arc 
performing ihis week in the lounge 
of the Best Western Inn in Thief 
River Falls. 

Fire-eating is part of the show 
that includes a little comedy and a 
wide variety of music. 

Green's dossier landed on my 
desk several days ago and proved to 
be amazing, almost unbelievable 
reading — enough to turn one 



"green" with envy. 

Speaking of green, that was the 
color of Johnny Green's hair for 27 
years. He believes lhal every per- 
former needs a gimmick. Yes, green 
hair and fire-eating do tend to draw 
attention. 

A Green Bay. Wl native, Johnny 
Green has been entertaining around 
the world for nearly 40 years, He's 
performed in 102 countries and his 
audiences have included kings and 
queens. According to a press 
release, a one-night gig for the Shah 
of Iran turned into an eight month 
job wilh Green finding the Shah "a 
hard man to say 'no' to." Back in the 
states, four presidents — Nixon, 
Carter, Rcagon and Bush — have 
witnessed his colorful act. 

It would be easier to name the 
famous people Johnny Green hasn't 
met than it would be to list all the 
entertainment giants he has hob- 
nobbed wilh. Green and his band 
(Continued on Page 8) 



Future dairy success depends on making changes 

Minnesota's delay in making dairy adjustments means catching up is necessary to be competitive 



of dairy farmers and a view toward 
the future of the dairy industry in 
northwest Mimtesoui.) 

by Marvin Lund in 

Northern Watch Editor 

"I think there is a real future for 

dairying in Minnesota but wc will 

have to make some changes. Our 

dairy industry won't be the way it 

So says Harold Stanislawski. 

dairy development specialist wilh 
the Minnesota Department of Agri- 
culture in Fergus Falls, A native of 
the Grccnbush area and a former 
University of Minnesota extension 
educator in Roseau county. Stanis- 
lawski has been assigned the task of 
helping Minnesota recover its sag- 
ging dairy market share. 

'Minnesota dairymen have been 
living in an isolated situation and 
their past is finally catching up to 
them, Stanislawski said. "Flus is 
not meant to slight the farmers who 
have been extremely hard workers 
and place a high value on their inde- 
pendence and their dairy tradition. 
The surprising thing is not that they 
find themselves in trouble, hut that 
they have been able to hold out as 
long as they have." 

Stanislawski says that dairy 
farmers in California, for instance, 
have not been able to make a living 
on a 60-cow herd for 20 years. The 
successful dairies in that state and 
elsewhere have had to make sub- 
stantial adjustments in their opera- 




tions to be profitable, and those 
adjustments fur the most part have 
included herd expansion. 

Less Work, More Profit 
"Increasing herd si/.e by five or 
10 times or more doesn't equate to 
taking on thai much more work," the 
dairy specialist says. "Dairying has 
always been more than a full-time 
job, There should be less work, but 
it docs mean stepping back and tak- 
ing a new look at the situation, 
forming alliances, setting goals, 
negotiating and perhaps trading a 
little independence for more person- 
al time and more profit." 

• Despite complaints among dairy- 
men in Minnesota that low prices 
have forced them out of business. 
Stanislawski says that milk prices in 
Minnesota have teen consistently 
higher than in other states and that 
the net income per cow here is S333, 
compared with S202 in Idaho and 
$129 in California. That net is 
helped by such things as premiums 
and subsidized hauling that arc not 
available in other areas. 

And because other states can pro- 
duce milk at lower prices, this state 
finds itself at an economic disad- 
vaniagc in national and even inter- 
national marketing. Regardless of 
its dairy tradition, Minnesota has 
seen its market share fall from aboul 
seven percent nationally in 1980 to 
5.8-1 percent today. If that doesn't 
seem like much of a difference, read 
on; it will be mentioned in a differ- 
ent context laicr. 

Idaho Dairies Booming 

Idaho is nut gen- 
erally thought of as 
a dairy stronghold, 
but things arc 
changing. That 
slate and its resi- 
dents have put out 
a welcome mat for 
dairy wilh [he 
result that in the 
past four years 



Idaho has jumped from 10th lo sixth 
ptacc in the U.S. California dairy- 
men arc relocating lo Idaho because 
its climate is similar to California: 
many arc of Dutch descent and have 
ethnic tics to areas of Idaho; and the 
stale sees dairying as an opportunity 
to add value to crops and provide 
employment. 

Two years ago LcSucur Cheese 
Company formed the Jerome 
Cheese Company and built u 3.5 
million pounds per day cheese plant 
in Jerome, Idaho, to utilize the 
growing production. The last cheese 
■ plant to be built from the ground up 
in Minnesota was the Kraft plant in 
Mclrosc,...in 1968. 

While it may be difficult to view 
the national situation from a scut on 
a milk stool, changing conditions 
nationally have a direct impact on 
the individual dairyman. And since 
there is very little that the individual 
can do to control the circumstances, 
the best he can do is learn to take 
advantage of opportunities under 
them. 

"A Mini Dairy Mecca" 

"Northwestern Minnesota has the 
potential io be a mini dairy mccca," 
Stanislawski said. "It has good peo- 
ple, reasonable and productive land 
resources, processing facilities and a 
good transportation system. The 
winter climate may be harsh, but 
dairy cattle do fine-in the ncwly- 
dcvclopcd curtain barns, 

"What is needed is a positive alti- 
tude, acceptance of technology, 
adoption ol additional cow units, a 
recognition lhal it is counter produc- 
tive lo try lo do all phases of dairy- 
ing yourself and a willingness lo 
work with others for mutual bene- 
fit." 

Stanislawski said that an alliance 
of dairy with grain farmers, lor 
instance, could Ik beneficial with an 
alfalfa hay crop rotation helping (o 
break up the scab cycle in wheat and 
harley. Partnerships can be formed 



to spread the work load and permit 
some time away from the dairy. Or, 
if formers don't trust another fanner 
as a partner, at least arrange to have 
the youngsiock raising or feed pro- 
duction dune by someone else. 

According to economic models, 
one job is created for every 70 cows 
in ihe state. A 1,000-cow dairy will 
put S 1 .5 million into the area econo- 
my in wages, health services, feed 
and other needs and services. The 
state's dairy herds have dwindled in 
number to 9,800 now and the num- 
ber is expected lo fall to 6.000 by 
the year 2001 — only three years 
away. 
Growth From N on -Dairymen 
It is Slanislawski's expectation 
that a good deal of dairy develop- 
ment in Minnesota will come from 
people who have been fanners hut 
have not been dairy people. He sees 
small grain and sugar beet fanners 
investing in dairy as a way to diver- 
sify. Deficiency payments for grain 
will be phased out in three years and 



the future of sugar subsidies., and 
protections is uncertain. For the 
most pari, these will be operated by 
hired professionals and trained, 
skilled workers. 

Enter Dairy Finance 
Associates, Inc. 
One organization that sees an 
opportunity in dairy and utilization 
of an already skilled resource is 
Dairy Finance Associates. Inc., with 
offices in Minneapolis. The princi- 

Eals involved in this association 
elievc that the Upper Midwest is 
strong in the major factors needed 
for low cost milk production and 
that the Upper Midwest dairy indus- 
try can be cost competitive with any 
other region of the U.S. 

Dairy Finance Associates pro- 
poses lo construct modern dairy 
handling and milking facilities and 
lease them to several dairymen, 
thereby removing the facilities cost 
of expansion and permitting the 
dairyman to concentrate on herd 
(Continued on Page 9) 



USDA proposes new rule 
on milk marketing orders 

Congressman Collin Peterson has advised the Northern Watch of a 
new USDA proposed rule for federal milk marketing order reform which 
was announced Friday morning, January 23. 

The proposed rule reportedly contains some 1,100 pages, but the 
,basic changes include: * 

• The number of federal milk marketing orders would be reduced 
from 31 to II: 

• The basic formula price would be chanced to better reflect the level 
and manner in which the components of milk arc used; 

• Minimum fluid milk (Class I ) prices will be more market-oriented; 

• Minor revisions will be made to products included in each class of 
milk; and 

• Common provisions, terms and definitions applicable to all market- ' 
ing orders will be streamlined. 

Further infonnation from the summary of proposed changes will be 
included in an article in the Wednesday, January 28 issue of the Thief 
River Falls Timesr 



I'iiCi- l(. 



NORTIIKRN WATCH 



S:iliiriliiv..l:iiiu:irv 17. l'WS 



Winter Community Ed 
schedule is announced 



ranklm scho.il c.iletciia I 

UV IOIII lllCCl.1-. .uiv tunc. 

h end e.^I iui 1 1-i 



lo 



lllp.lst 



otti, 



in the 

r. The . 



open I 



Mondav through 
Thursday A reci-traiion desk wnh 
lorm- .mil envelopes .tml .1 drop bu\ 
■in- located inside iIil- double door 
entry which is open from 'am to 7 



lonniL-nl.tlK challenged i 
Mucin In St.ui'cvk each Morula 
iluouch undMavliom 7 10 
in ilk- I'r.mklin multi -pmpo.i 
UfldeT lile s.llllC punch cud u 



I .iii.i S.uul.ilil willie.iche.ithgi.i 
K-i'Kuf) f< .m.l March 1'i.Liid :(. 

-ClllCCCenlei. Cost «ill k- ilOpei 

A onc-nighi mhlvi siamp clas- 
it ill he- l.mghl In liicml.i Vallluuci 
Jaim.uv :illiuMi(i:.l(HiiS:.»l) pin. in 
the school di-tuclsciv ice ccnlcr at .i 



p.m. 



I>c 



clique I 



clas 



..II I 



No phone re 
.vpreU No c).i- 
nd class, 






scheduled unless registrants are 
notified oiherw ise Classe- arc lillcU 
on .i lirsi-conic. firsl-scrveJ lusts 
with ,i minimum of si* participants. 
Kclunds will be issued if the 
class i- filled before the registration 
is received, if ilie class iv canceled 
lor lack of enrollment or n" the reg- 
istrant reiiuests a refund ihrce or 
more workine davs prior to starling 
dale of the class. Such refunds must 
be approved hy the board of cdu 



■ of i 



lonthlv 



>' il at 



meetings. No refunds are issued 
after the class begins. 

Anyone 65 >cars of age of older 
may enroll in community education 
classes at a 25 percent discount 
from the regular fee. 

Open swimming is available at 
the Franklin middle 
from September through May 
a fee of SI. 50 for adults and SI. 25 
for children. Pool hours are 7-9 p.m. 
Thursday and Friday and 1-5 p.m. 
Saturday and Sunday. Lap swim- 
ming is open from d ti> 7:30 a.m. 
Monday, Wednesday and Thursday 
and 6 to 7 p.m. Tuesday and Friday. 

Pool memberships may he pur- 
' chased at S 1 IK) per family or $50 per 
individual for 12 month's or $75 per 
family or $37 per individual for nine 
months. Punch cards arc available at 
a cost of $25 for 15 sessions of 
water aerobics instructed by Snooki 
Bondy from 6 to 7 p.m. Monday, 
Wednesday and Thursday. 

Youth swim lessons will begin 
Monday and Tuesday. February 16 
and 1 7. at a cost of $22.50 for eight 
lessons. Schedule is availublc in the 
winter class information brochure. 

Canoe trip class will be latighl by 
Diane Bach February 5, 12, \'} and 
March 5. 12 and l*J from 7:30 lo 
9:30 p.m. in the district service cen- 
ter at a cost of $25. ' 

Introduction to bowhunting will 
be taught by Dana Klos to anyone 
age 12 and older from 6:30 to 9:30 
p.m. each Monday from February 2 
through March 10 .at Franklin 
school, Com is S30 and the class 
will include two evenings of shoot- 
ing. 

Snowshoc making will be taught 
hy Diane Bach January 22 from 7 to 

Area students 
graduate from 
UND this winter 

Area and local students were 
among the 740 students eligible lo 
graduate from the University of 
North Dakota during winter gradua- 
tion. 

UND awards about 2,2.00 
degrees each year. There were more 
than 7-10 candidates for degrees this 
winter: 108 were graduate students. 

The following students were 
among those awarded degrees: Red 
Lake Falls — Phyllis Marie 
Sanders, bachelor of accountancy; 
Patrick Alan Thibcrl, haehclor of 
business administration: 

Thief River Falls — Lisa Marie - 
Anderson, bachelor of science, Lars 
Olav Dyrud. bachelor of arts, cum 
laudc; bvan Marie Ciiinde, bachelor 
or science: Sanna Ellen Gustafson. 
bachelor of science in occupational 
therapy, .sum ma cum laude; I.ec 
Michael Nicland. haehclor of arts; 
Leslie Ann Nordheim. master of 
science; Amy Sue Koche. master of 
science: Jancl Lynn Koislarul, bach- 
elor of business administration, 
cum laudc; 

Viking '— Trjcy Lynn Honian, 
bachelor ol accountancy; 

Warren — Jessica Lynn liclchcr. 
bachelor of science in education; 
Marlene S. [iuchrier. master of sci- 
ence; Charisse I). Lcblanc. bachelor 
of arts; Krisiina Marie Rosendahl. 
bachelor or accountancy, summa 
cum laudc. 

Oyster on dean's 
list at Wadena 

Leslie Oyster of Thief River 
Fulls, a student in telephone service 
technology, hasmialilicd lor ihe I. ill 
ijuarier dean's lisi ;ii Northwest 
Technical College in Wadena hy 
attaining a grade point average of ,U 
least 1.5 while carrying a minimum 
nl 12ucdils 



Anita Cardinal 
17." M and March 10. 17 and M 
Iroin d.l5 to 7 pin .it the district 
service center. Ice is $15. Cardinal 
wi!/'.il«r (each a fiifpi 1'l.iv c»s 
lor owners of puppies 111 weeks to 
six months of ace on J.mu.irv 2tl, 27 
and February 3 Iroin 6:31) 'lo 7:15 
p.m. in the district sen ice ccntei. 
Fee will he SHI. 

"For the Love of Children'' is a 
series of workshops to be held the 
third Wednesday of each month 

inc. through April' 15 from 6:311 lo') 
p.m. Co-I will he $11) per session 
Information is available from Jill 
Johnson at 6SI -87 1 1. Donna Nelson 
at 6SI-H670orShari Olson at 6S1- 
0793. 

After-scfioo] classes for children 
include a combined session instruct- 
ed hy Judith O. Johnson where par- 
ticipants will make a »|uick bird 
feeder, survival kit for the car and 
learn basic first aid. Second and 
third graders will meet January 19 
from 3:15 to 4:15 p.m. and fourth 
and fifth graders February 2 from 
-I:J5lo 6:15p.m. Cost will be $7. 

Two sessions of "Cookies and 
Bars for Students'- will k- taught 
January 26 and February 9 bv Judith 
0. Johnson in the Franklin home 
economics room from 3:15 lo 5:15 
p.m. Cost is S7 per session and stu- 
dents may sign up for either or both 

Latch key program for after 
school child care is available for 
kindergarten through fifth grade stu- 
dents at Challenger elementary 
school. Cost is $1.60 per hour for 
.the first child in a family. SI. 25 for 
the second and $1 for the third. 
. Register at Challenger Preschool or 
the community education office. 

Chuck Kimbrough will leach an 
introduction to model- railroading 
class in three class sessions January 
29, February 19 and March 12 from 
7 to 8:30 p.m. in the district service 
center. Fee will be $5 per class. 

•'Lei's Dance" will be instructed 
for couples IK years of age and 
older by Bill and Barb Fahcy 
Fridays, January 30. February 6. 20 
and 27 from 7 lo 9:30 p.m. at the 
Eagles hall. Fee will Ik $30 per cou- 
ple. Twenty couples must register 
for the class to be held. 

Investing will be inslructed by 
Jon Larson of Fdward I), Jones 
January 27. February 3. 10. 17 and 




Benefit for 
Paul Wold at 
Free Church 

fienefil supper for Paul Wold of 
Thief River Falls will Ik con ducted 
F'r.day. January 23. limn -1:30 lo 7 
p.m. at the Fvangclical Free 
Church. 211 Arnold Ave. No in 
Thicl Kivcr Falls. 

Wold is undergoing treatmcnl lor 
cancer and recovering ipiile well.' 
but his insurance will not cover a 
large amount of ihe expenses. 

In addition to the Swedish meat- 
hall supper, music will be provided 
by ■The Over nines" ipiartcl and 
oilier vocalisis and musicians. Free 
will donations will lie received at 
Ihe door. Matching funds up to 
$500 will Ik provided hy Branch 
8129 uf Lutheran llroilicihiM.il 






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■l-Cyl.. Auto., 

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'91 FORD RANGER 
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96 CHEV.S-10 PICKUP 



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1 Owner *1 7,995 



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Loaded *1 3,995 



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'96 P0NTIAC GRAND 
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'87 DODGE DAKOTA 
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'89 GMC CONVERSION 
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350 Auto - . 

Loaded *7,995 



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'94 CHEV. BLAZER 
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V-6, 1 Owner 

Loaded M 4,995 



'95 CHEVY 1/2-TON 
EXT. CAB 4X4 

Graphic Paint 

One Owner '18,995 



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<1-Cyl., Auto. 

Our Price '2,1 95 



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V-6. Auto., Locally Ownod 
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4-DH. 

v-6, Auto., Loaded- lt , * 
Locally Owned *7 , 995 



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Our Price '8,495 



92 FORD T-BIRD 2-DR 

36,000 Ml.. V-6. Auto., 
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1 Owner *7,995 



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V-6, Aiifo., Loadod 

Locally Owned '8,3,95 




'96 CHEVY BL 
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V-6,> Auto. 



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350. Auto. I 

One Owner '16,995 



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4-Cyl., Auto.. A/C 

Our Price '11, 495 



'96 DODGE EXT. CAB 
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318, Auto.. 32.000 Ml. 

Loaded '20,950 



'95 BUICK PARK AVE. 
4-DR. 

V-6, 1 Ownor 

Loaded '1 6,495 



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V-6, Auto., Loadod r .^ 

..0hk0wner-.'-9-,95p : '4 



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EXT. CAB 4X4 

350, Loadod 

One Owner '18,495 



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' "AM2-DR:'""'."-.7i1 

4-Cyl„ Auto., Brlpht Rod'^ 

Our Price '9,995*' 



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V-6, Auto., Supor Sharp 

One Owner '15,495 




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V-6, AUto.; Loadod, :;^ . 

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Volume 8, Number 3 



"Tlan&tcv&li "Wtttttteaatti 'a TRe^catuzt Tteamfia/lie*-' 



324 Main Avenue North, Thief River Falls, MN 56701 



, SatuVgay," January 24,1998 




AROUND 
THE REGION 



After 51 years 
Norquist leaves 
Prior Electric 

Roseau • SiiiMicd cus- 
lomcrs will be what Rod 
NiiKiuisI tL'iiicintwrs about his 
more lhan 50 years i>( serving 
llic Roseau area, firs! as ;i 
rcpairinuii and llicn as et>- 
owner ol' IVior I-leclric. 

Noriiuisl, alnni; with co- 
owner Russell Palm, 
anntiunccd recently thai 
Nori[uisl is lurnini: over llic 
ownership i>r Ihe long-suind* 
ing business lo Palm and Brian 
Pclows(;i. Roseau Times- 
Rrgitm 

Man jailed in Polk 
County for refusing 
to enter a plea 

Crookston - In a bizarre 
scene, a 23-ycar-old Fosslon 
man suxxl with his faihcr at 
his side and refused lo 
acknowledge anything Judge 
Russell Anderson had to say. 
" Joseph Frcdridi Rosnow 
was supposed to enter a plea 
on a single charge of fleeing a 
police officer after a prior 
motion he had filed in 
Decemher to 'dismiss the. 
charge was denied. 

Instead of entering a pica 
Rosnow said thai he was 
appearing under the jurisdic- 
tion of the "American flag of 
peace of the United Slates of 
America," and he answered 
everything Judge Anderson or 
I'olk County Attorney Murk 
Swanson said hy saying, "I 
refuse that statement for 
fraud." Documents in 
Kosnow's file indicate that he 
does not believe in this coun- 
try's system of laws or Ihe 
legal system. 

Judj;e Anderson had him 
taken into custody and jailed 
for five days on a contempt of 
court charge for refusing to 
acknowledge the court. 
Cmoksiiin Daily Times 

Diehard sports fan 
has 90th birthday 

Mentor - I)y his documen- 
tation, b.iskeihall junkie Hd 
Ncibaucr has intended more 
dun 7.500 baskeihjll games 
over Ihe years. Ncibaucr h;is 
seen every UNO haskeihall 
[and fonihall) team play at 
I lms l once a year since the 
1924-25 season and every 
Minnesota Section 8A high 
school basketball tournament 
from l9J6icnhc nrescnl. with 
the cucepiion of 1978. He has 
attended 33 Minnesota state 
basketball lournmcnlv 

Ncihaucr spent his 'JUth 
birthday recently at a familiar 
hangout — the Hyslop Spons 
Center at ihe University of 
North Dakota. He was sur- 
prised ami deeply lou^hed 
when, during a break in the 
game. Me was called onto the 
llnor and presented ;i corsage. 
and the crowd sang "Happy 
Uirihday.'" The Mchumh 
Timet 

NTC thrives after 
spring flood 

l-Iust <!rand Forks - 

Unlike many other activities in 
the lia-l Grand Forks commu- 
nily. Northwest Technical 
College is thriving wnh enroll- 
ment showing an increase 
sin.c l.iM spring's Hood. Right 
now over 1.IW are attcnding_ 
elates at the school. 

Marketing director Lori 
Crucss atttdiiitcs the success 
of Ihe college In some of the 
popular programs the school 
oilers and the current trend 
inwards leclinicil cducaiion 
The tiipimcnt 

(Continued On Page 2) 



SwisPennCo appears to have 
met stipulation conditions 



agree 



isl'eim Co ,i|- 
.ondilioiis ol 
nent with llic \ 



"Tilings an- miming really well 
light now. in l.ici hitler than ever." 
said Swisl'enn Co. manager Rick 
Nonlhagen. 

Howard 1'i'rs.m, Pemiiiigluii 
County Solid ttavic otl.ccr. 
explained thai .Swi.l'cmi Co. the 
cnunly\ soh.l waste liandtei. h.ul 
met conditions ol a stipulation 
agreement it was forced mlo with 
Ihe M.imesota Pollution Conliol 
Agency (MPCAl. last summer. 

1'ollowiiig reports ol problems, 
such as uncovered rules of trash 
being blown into yards and liclds ot 
nearby neighbors, improper han- 
dling of compost, and improper 
storage of solid waste (burned pel- 
lets), ihe MI'CA demanded that the 
site lie cleaned up and piles ol solid 
waste, compost and burned pellets 
be disposed of and handled properly 
by the end of December I'W. In 
addition, it fined Swisl'enn Co 
S2,5(X) for not having its compost 
process on line hy a deadline in 
June, and SI .-IM) in costs for testing 
noi completed when rcouired. 

Il was a tough year for Swisl'enn 
Co. It suffered a iiumlwr ol setbacks 
— some of which were caused hy 
two major Circs at the facility, and 
others by annoying minor equip- 



spring. Person said another VSU.(KK) 
Iroin SCnKI-; lumls w,ll be given to 
SwislVnn Co. but it's being wnh- 



:ld b 



lUllls 



as Pel 
rid Ihe 



ml. "iii 






iiiimiv h.ul leaned Us lesson in han- 
dling solid tt.isie when it had losi 
thousands ot dollars opeiating llie 



rid c 



s had 



rthe lacihty again. 

lo meet stipulations in the agiee- 
inelil Willi MI'CA it promised 
rouglilv $15(),(MX) in aid. Ol the 
SiSlr.(KK), S5(I,(I(KI was given to 
Swisl'enn Co immediately. S^5.(KM) 
on October I. S.15.IKM) on 
November 1. and anolher S3IMKX) 
upon completing certain goals sei 
furih in the supul.ition agreement. 

Meeting the stipulation agree- 
ment meant hauling a signilicanl 
pile of solid waste (lluir pile), to 
landfills, obtaining or renting new 
ciiuipinenl lo dry wet fraciion used 
in making pellets, and filtering com- 
post. Most ol the aid lo Swisl'enn 
Co. was aimed at solving those 

Person said two minor things 
remain to be completed -— soil sam- 
ples need lo lie taken from where 
the pile of burned pellets were 
stored; and the cover crop planted 
over spread pellets needs to he 



enough lor the 

Person i.a.d SwisPeim Co has 
made a grea! deal of progress. Now 
they have to work on ihe permit 
application piocess with MI'CA. 
This process retinites that they sub- 
mit inhumation to MPCA to 
become re-permitted to operate 
within ihe state, and negotiate the 
permit with MPCA. One of (lie con- 
ditions in this process will be to 
demonstrate that they have a market 
for the pellets they are producing. 
Person said he has seen new con- 
tracts with new customers and is 
encouraged by that. Swisl'enn Co, 
also has to identify landfills it plans 
Li use. Right now. the MPCA isn't 
loo happv ihai garbage is being sent 
u. Ihe landfill near Grand Forks. 
ND. he said, but that's a minor point 



Nordhagen ci 
that they have r 




Co. The composting has improved, 
production has increased, and die 
product (pellet) is better. 




Times employee Sue Phillip looks on as Johnny Green eats fire 
during a visit to the newspaper office. Fire-eating is part of the 
nightclub act of Johnny Green and the Greenmnn, the band 
appearing this week in the loungo of the Best Western Inn in Thief 
River Falls. The entertaining and talented group also plays a wide 
variety of music from a repertoire of over 500 songs. 

Fire eating part of 
Johnny Green's act 



Thief River Falls Rural Fire department has a new 
fire truck. Representatives of the six township 
members in tho rural firo department association 
visited the Thief River Falls Fire Department 
Wednosday to see the now truck. The new truck 
was delivered in November and became opera- 
tional In early December. It has a 320 horse 
power engine, two-person cab, five speed, 
Allison transmission, a pump which can pump 
1,250 gallons of water par minutes and a 1,200 



gallon tank. Fully loaded it weighs 32,900 
pounds, it Is 10-feet, six-inches to the top of its 
lights. The fire truck, which is ownod by tho 
townships of North, Norden, Rocksbury, Smiley, 
Silverton and Excel, cost S159.000. It replaces a 
1975 model fire truck, which they plan to sell. 
Pictured at the far right of tho picture is tho 
newly elected volunteer tire chief. Brad Kosel of 
Thief River Falls. 



by Kut hi Carlson 
Northern Watch Reporter 

Tilings- got a lilllc hot at the 
offices of The Times and Northern 
Watch on Thursday morning when 
a smiley stranger wall/cd through 
ihe door, behind the counter and 
began cniing lire. Female staff 
members gasped and giggled. 
Customers stared in open-mouthed 
disbelief. The stringer ale il up — 
the fire and the attention of his audi- 
ence. 

Johnny Green is his name. 
Entertain mcni's his game, and he 
and his hand, ihe Circenmcn, are 
performing this week in llic lounge 
of the Best Western Inn in Thief 
River Falls. 

Fire-eating is pan of the show 
that includes a little comedy and a 
wide variety of music. 

Green's dossier landed on my 

desk several days ago and proved to 

be ama/.ing. almost unbelievable 

ading — enough 



'green" with ci 

Speaking of green, that was the 
color of Johnny Green's hair for 27 
years. He believes thai every per- 
former needs a gimmick. Yes, green 
hair and lire-eating do tend to draw 
attention. 

A Green Bay, WI native. Johnny 
Green has been entertaining around 
the world for nearly 40 years. He's 
performed in 102 countries and his 
audiences have included kings and 
(lueens. According to a press 
release, a one-night gig for ihe Shah 
of Iran turned into an eight monlh 
job with Green finding the Shah "a 
hard man to say 'no' to." Back in the 
states, four presidents — Nixon, 
Carter. Reagan and Bush — have 
witnessed his colorful act. 

Il would be easier to name the 
famous people Johnny Green hasn't 
met lhan it would be to list all the 
entertainment giants he has hob- 
nobbed with. Green and his band 
(Continued on Page 8) 



Future dairy success depends on making changes 

Minnesota's delay in making dairy adjustments means catching up is necessary to be competitive 



fTAM ii Ihe eiyhth in n icm 
Northern Wutth .irnnci on the 
of 'iluiry furaien ami a irc»- ftti 
the future of the ilnin iiiiltMi 
m>rih\rsi Miiiiirsi'ti) I 

hy Munin l.undln 
Northern Watch llditor 

1 1 think Iherc is a ic.il fulur. 
dairying in Minnesota bul we 
have to make some changes- 
dairy industry won'i lie Ihe ■ 



'ay i 



So say- Harold Stanislauski. 
dairy development specialist wnh 
ihe Minnesota Uenarimcni ol Agri- 
culluie in Fergus Falls. A native of 
ihe Grccnbusli area and a former 
University of Minnesoij extension 
educator in Roseau county. Slams- 
l.ovski ha- been assigned ihe task of 
helping Minnesota recover its s;ig. 
ging dairy market share. 

Minnesota dairymen have been 
living in an isolated situation and 
their past is finally catching up lo 
Ihem." Sianislawski s.ud. "This is 
not meant to -light the fanners who 
have been exircmely hard worker- 



anil p 



r inde- 



jienJcnce anil ihcir dairy iradilii 
Die surprising iking is nut that they 
find themselves in trouhle. hut ih.it 
they have been ahle to hold out as 
long as they base." 

Stani-.law-.il says lhal dairy 
farmers in California, lor insiance. 
have not been able to make a living 
on a fittcow herd for 20 years. The 
successful dairies m lhal si.ue and 
elsewhere have had lo make sub- 
stantial adjustments in their upcr.i- 



lions to be profitable, and ihose 
adjustments for the most pari have 
included herd expansion. 

Less Work, More Profit 

"Increasing herd si/e by five or 
10 limes or more doesn't cquale lo 
taking on that much more work." the 
dairy specials! says. "Dairying has 
always been more than a lull-lime 
job. There should lie less work, but 
il doe- mean stepping back and tak- 
ing a new look al the situalion. 
forming alliances, selling goals, 
negotiating and perhaps Hading a 
lilllc independence for more person- 
al lime and morcprofii." 

Despuc complaints among dairy- 
men in Minnesota that low prices 
have forced Ihem out of business. 
Sianislawski says lhal milk prices in 
Minnesota have been consi-icntly 
higher lhan in other stales and that 
ihe nel income pel cow here is S.W, 
compared wnh S202 in Idaho and 
SI 2') in California. Thai nel is 
helped hy such tilings as premium- 
and subsidized hauling lhal .He not 
available in oilier areas. 

And because oilier slates can pro- 
duce milk at lower prices, ibis state 
finds iisclf al an economic disad 
santage m national and even uucr- 
nalional marketing. Regardless ol 
its dairy iradition. Minnesota has 
seen il- market -hare fall from alnnii 
seven percent nationally in I9H0 lo 
S.K-: percent today. If thai docsnt 
seen, like much of a difference, lead 
on: it will he mentioned in a ihlfer- 
enl context laicr 

Idaho Dairies Hmiminc 

Idaho i- not gen- 
erally thought ol a- 
j-^ a dairy stionghold. 
" mil 'ihing- arc 
banging Thai 



Idaho has jumped from lUih to sixth 
place in the U.S. California dairy- 
men arc relocating lo Idaho because 
lis climate is similar to California; 
y are of Dutch dese 



ethnic lies lo areas of Idaho, and Ihe 

slate sees dairying as an 

lo add value to crops and provii 



s dairying as an opportunity 
value to crops and provide 
mriloymcni. 




Two years ago l.cSueiir Cheese 
Company formed the Jerome 
Cheese Company and built a .1.5 
million pounds per day cheese plant 
in Jerome. Idaho, to utilize the 
grow in,: production. The lasi cheese 
plant to In; built from the ground up 
m Minne-oia was Ihe Kraft plant in 
Melro-e.,,. in 1'JdK. 

While it may be difficult lo view 
the national situation from a seat on 
a milk sIim>1. changing conditions 
nationally base a direct impact on 
the individual dairyman. And since 
there is very little lhal llic indindu.il 
can do to conirol the circumstances, 
ihe best he can do is learn to lake 
advantage of iipporlumlies under 
ihem. 

"A Mini Dairy Mecca" 

" "Northwestern Mmi-.e-ola ha- llic 
potential to lie a mini dairy mccca." 
Sianislawski -aid It lia- good peo- 
ple, reasonable and produeme land 
resources, processing facilities ar.d a 
good transportation sy-iem. The 
winter climate may he h.irsh. hut 
dairy caltlc do line in Ihe newly- 
developed curtain barns. 

"Whai is needed is a positive alti- 
tude, acceptance of technology, 
adoption ol additional cow units. ,, 
recognition thai il is counier produc- 
tive to iry to do all phases of dairy- 
ing vour-elf anil a willingness In 
work Willi others lor mutual bene- 
lil." 

Stam-lawski said lli.U .in alliance 
of iLuiv wuh grain l.umcis. I..r 
instance, s-iilil he K-nelici.il w ,:!> an 
allalla hay crop loi.mini helping i" 
break up the scab cycle in wheat and 
barley. Partnerships can he formed 



to spread Ihe work load and permit 
some lime away from the dairy. Or. 
if farmers don't trust another farmer 
a- a partner, al least arrange lo have 
the youngsiock raising or Iced pro- 
duction done hy someone else. 

According in economic model-, 
one job is created lor every 71) cows 
in the state. A I.IHHl-cow dairy will 
put SIS million into the area econo- 
my in wages, health service-, feed 
and other needs and services. The 
slate's dairy herds have dwindled in 
number to 'J.M(M) now and ihe num- 
ber is expected to fall to fi.(KM) by 
the year 2001— only lluce years 

Growth From Non-Dulrjmcn 
It is Slanisl.iw-ski's expectation 
[hat a good deal of dairy develop- 
ment in Minnesota will come from 
people who have been farmers but 
base not been dairy people He see- 
small grain and sugar beet laniicr- 
investmg in dairy as a way lo diver- 
sify. Deficiency payment- for grain 
will lie phased out in three years and 



the future of sugar subsidies and 
protections is uncertain. For the 
most pan. these will be operated by 
lined professionals and trained, 
skilled worker- 
Enter Dairy Finuncc 
Associates, Inc. 

One organization that sees an 
opportunity in dairy and utilization 
of an already skilled resource is 
D.ury Finance Associates. Inc.. with 
office- in Minneapolis. The princi- 
pals involved in this association 
believe Hut the Upper Midwest is 
-Hong in ihe maior factors needed 
for low cost mdk production and 
that ihe Upper Midwest dairy indus- 
try can lie cosi competitive with any 
sillier region of the U.S. 

Dairy buiancc Associates pro- 
poses lo construct modern dairy 
handling and milking facihlics and 
lease them to several dairymen, 
thereby removing ihe facilities cosi 
of expansion and permitting the 
dairyman to concentrate on herd 
(Continued on Page ')) 



USDA proposes new rule 
on milk marketing orders 

Congrcssr.ian Collin Peterson has advised the Northern Watch of a 
new USDA proposed rule for federal milk marketing order reform which 
was announced Friday morning. January 23. 

The proposed rule reportedly contains some 1,100 pages, hut the 
basic changes include; 

• The number of federal milk marketing orders would be reduced 
from 3 1 lo II; 

• The basic furmulu pnec would be chanced to better reflect the level 
and manner in which the components of milk arc used: 

• Minimum fluid milk (Class I) prices will lec more market-oriented; 

• Minor revisions will he made to products included in cjcIi class of 
milk: and 

• Common provisions, terms and definitions applicable lo all market- 
ing orders will be streamlined. 

Further inlonnation fruin the'summary o! proposed changes wdl be 
included in an article in the Wednesday. January 28 issue ol the Thief 
River Falls Times. 



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AROUND 
THE REGION 



BMS notes Martin 
Luther King Day 

Bemidji - Typically a day 
when black' history and the 
civil rights movement are 
commemorated, Bcmidji High 
School celebrated the birthday 
or Martin Luther King a little 
differently. - 

Vincc Dye, coordinator of 
BHS Indian Education, helped 
make the day more about 
diversity as he put together an 
American Indian dance and 
drum presentation for an 
assembly, 

About 14 students, all 



Eya-Bay, a drum group from 
the Red Lake Nation, per- 
formed. The Pioneer 



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Sunday, Jan. 25th 

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School Gym -TW 
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Saturday, January 24, 1998 



NORTHERN WATCH 



Page 3 



— I DEATHS | — 

Thorbjorn 
Hanson, 82 

South Junction, Manitoba • 

■ Thorhjorn Hanson. K2. died on 
Monday, January 19. 199H at 
llcihcsdn Hospital in Stcinbach, 
Manitoba. 

Graveside services will be held 
in the spring. The Heist son Funeral 
Chapel Co. of Roseau is in charge 
of the arrangements. 

A complete obituary will appear 
in Wednesday's edition of The 

Gerald L. 
VeVea, 60 

Bnmes, WI - Gerald L. VeVea. 
60. died Saturday, January 17, 1998 
at rural Barnes, WI. 

Funeral services were held 
Thursday, January 22 at I) a.m. at 
Westwood Lutheran Church in St. 
Louis Park. Burial was at Glen 
Haven Memorial Gardens. 

■ A complete obituary will appear 
in the next edition of The Times. 

Joann W. 
VeVea, 58 

Bnmes, WI - Joann W. VeVea. 
58. died Saturday, January 17. 1998 
at rural Barnes, WI. 

Funeral services were held 
Thursday, January 22 at 2:30 p.m. 
at Faith-Lilac Way Lutheran 
Church of Robbinsdalc. Burial was 
at Glen Haven Memorial Gardens. 

A complete obituary will appear 
in the next edition of The Times. 

Arthur Klasen, 80 

Oklee - Arthur Klasen. 80, died 
on Tuesday. January 20. 1998 at 
First Care Hospital in Fosslort. 

Moss of Christian Burial will be 
held today, Saturday, January 24 at 
2:30 p.m. at St. Francis Xavier 
Catholic Church in Oklee. Burial 
will be held at St. Francis Xavier 
Catholic Cemetery near Oklee. 

Visitation was held Friday from 
5 to 8 p.m. with a 7 p.m. prayer ser- 
vice at the Pcllcrson Funeral Home 
in Red Lake Falls and one hour 
prior to services at the church. 

A complete obituary will appear 
in Wednesday's edition of The 
Times. 



. Community forum 
on education Tues. 

Next session of the community 
forum on education in the Thief 
River Falls public schools has been 
scheduled for Tuesday. January 27. 
from 6:30 to 9 p.m. at Challenger 
elementary school cafeteria. All 
persons in School District 564 are 
invited to participate in the forums. 



q%s @}ounuy't @}tut <2%wr 


■ Don't think of otait job* swij- 

hiijooniej'ijittlbt|UD, 

life holds so rainy fleets - 

this earth is only one... 

Just think of him u itsting 

from the sorrow ud leui 

in i place ofmnntu and canfort 

whtre there ire do dajiand jtart. 

Think bow be most bt wiihini 

that we could know today 

bow nothing bat our sadness 

cm nail; past away. 

And llii£ of rilm as firing 

lo the hearts of those be loathed... 

for notUag lord b em lost - 

and be was toied so much. 

- E Brtnnerasn - 


G?>t Jtuving oflrmety of, 
^1/24/80.9/9/97 - 






*74c ati cee M- atf 

T£c site* 70*4 Sttt$ 

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Call Or Stop By Today. 

Mwntmr 5IPC 

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105 3rd St. East 

Thief River Falls, MN 56701 

218-681-8380 

1-800-284-6705 

www etfwarflfonot com 

Edwardjones 










PAYMENTS 

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Tho Nonnom Waieft U putttMO wooMy 
iveiy Frtdiy and tti:*u!od lo ovor 22.000 
nouurioMa In Hoeennu Mlnrwtou and 
lunouncung sr»a. Tho Nonnom Watch it 
puhitinod In conjunction with The Times, 
whkh It puORshod wMUy evory Tuoiday. 

SUBSCRIPTION RATES 
Pennington, HodljAo, UarthaB, Polk and 

Clunvaier Counties .424.00 Per Year 
ADOtrwrAddreuot 

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mm an advenUemoni tt itnccy llmll 
publication ot mo advnitlaoment In 
aubioquont luuo or tho rolund ol 
montoa patd tor tho odvonuemont 




The Times 

324 Main Avenue Nonh 

P.O. Box 100 

Thkr River Falli. MN 56701-0100 

Telephone: (218) 681-4450 

Fox: (218) 681-1455 

e-mail: nv/ntch Cfnwntch.com 

htipJ/www.nwatch.eom 




ALTERNATE 
DELIVERY 
SYSTEM 



,f 



YOU ARE INVITED 

TO PARTICIPATE IN A 

COMMUNITY FORUM 

ON EDUCATION IN THE 
THIEF RIVER FALLS PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

DATES: Tuesday, January 27, 1998 

TIME: 6:30 - 9:00 P.M. 



LOCATION: Challenger Elementary 
School Cafeteria 



^ 



Pane 4 



NORTHERN WATCH 



Saturday, January 24, 1998 



Saturday, January 24, 1998 



NORTHERN WATCH 



Page 5 



J 



NORWEST INSURANCE INC. 

ihsurance -Our People Make The Ditlerwce" 
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Let's have some recipes Tor 
Super Bowl weekend today, 
although Ihey would be good any 
time. 

I like these different recipes and 
use whatever cereals or leftover 
snacks and crackers strike my 
fancy In them: 

ORIGINAL CRISPIX MIX 

7 cups Crispinccrc.il 
I tup mined nuis 

1 cupprct/cls 

3 tablespoons margarine, mcllcd 
1/4 teaspoon garlic salt 

1/4 teaspoon onion salt 

2 teaspoons lemon juice 

4 teaspoons Worcestershire sauce 

Combine cereal, nuts and pret- 
zels in large cake pan (9x13). Set 
aside. 

Stir remaining ingredients 
together and then gently stir into 
cereal mixture until well-coated. 

Bake ill 250 degrees about 45 
minutes, stirring every 15 minutes. 
Spread on paper I owe Is to cool. 
Store in airtight container. 

And here's the other original 
party mix • both of these can be 
mode a day or so ahead, If you can 
keep the family out of them: 
ORIGINAL C1IEX PARTY MIX 
6 lahlespoons butler 

2 lahlespoons Worcestershire sauce 
1 1/2 teaspoons seasoned salt 

3/4 teaspoon garlic powder 
1/2 lea-spoon onion powder 

3 cups Com Chex cereal 
3 cups' Rice Chex 

3 cups Wheat Chex 
I cup mixed nuls 
I cup nrclzcts 

1 cup bagel chips, broken into t 
inch pieces 
Heal oven to 250 degrees. Melt 
butter in large roaster in oven (I use 
■ a large metal bowl). Stir in season- 
ings. 

Gradually stir in remaining 
ingredients until evenly coated. 
Bake I hour, stirring every 15 min- 
utes. Cool on paper towels. Store in 
uirtighl container. 

Something even better than those 
old potato chips: 
. NACHO POTATO SNACKS 

I large polato 

Hot taco sauce 

t (4 ounce) can chapped chtlics 

1 cup shredded chcdclar cheese 

Preheat oven lo 350 degrees. 
Out about 20 ihin slices of washed, 
unpccled potato wiih peeling on 
'them, Place in single layer on 
greased baking sheet. 

Put taco sauce on each slice, then 
top with chilies and cheese. Bake 
about 25 minutes, until polato is 
tender and cheese is melted. Serve 
warm. 

Here's something you can have 

ready and bake at the lost minute: 

ITALIAN PARTY BITES 

I Italian bread shell (12 inch) 
1 teaspoon minced onion 

I teaspoon Italian seasoning 
1/2 cup shredded mozzarclla 

cheese 
1/2 teaspoon Thyme leaves 
I tablespoon olive oil 
I cup thinly sliced vegetables (red 

pepper, zucchini, mushrooms, 

onion, etc.) 
1 (2.2 ounce) can sliced black 
olives, drained 
1/4 cup shredded Parmesan cheese 

Preheat oven lo 450 degrees. 
Place bread shell on cookie sheet. 

In bowl, toss minced onion, 
Italian seasoning, mozzarclla, 
Ihymc, olive oil and sliced vegeta- 
bles. Spread mixture over bread 
shell. Top with olives and 
Parmesan. 

Bake 8-10 minutes and then cut 
into 2 inch squares. 

Simply delicious, serve with a 
variety of dipping sauces: 
SAUSAGE SNACKERS 

1 can cresccnl rolls 

Fully cooked smoked cocktail hot 

dogs 

Heal oven lo 375 degrees. 
Separate crescent rolls into triangles 
and then eul each triangle into 
thirds. Place one hot dog on each 
triunglc and roll up. Place on 
ungrcoscd cookie sheets and bake 
12-15 minutes until golden. 

Have this ready to combine at the 
last minute too: 

VEGGIE PIZZA 

2 cans crescent rolls 

8 ounce package cream cheese, ut 

room temperature 
t teaspoon dill weed 
1/8 teaspoon garlic powder 
Chopped or sliced fresh vegetables 

Heat oven lo 375 degrees. Press 
crescent roll dough onto ungrcoscd 
15x10 inch baking pan to form 
crust. Bake 13-17 minutes, until 
golden. Cool fully. 

Combine cream cheese, dill and 
garlic powder and spread over 
cooled crust. Cover and refrigerate 
one hour. Top with sliced and/or 
chopped veggies, 

Here's one more trick you con do 
with those handy dandy crescent 

"sAVoTtvffiRMESAN BITES 

I (8 ounce) package cream cheese, 
at room temperature 

1 1/4 cups Parmesan cheese, 

divided „ 

2 (8 ounces each) can crescent rolls 



1 cup chopped red pepper 

1/4 cup chopped fresh parsley... 



like 

Mix cream cheese and 1 cup 
Parmesan wiih electric mixer unltl 
well blended. 

Separate crescent rolls into 8 rec- 
tangles and scat perforations. 
Spread cream cheese mixture on 
each rectangle and lop wiih red pep- 
per and parsley. Fold long end up 
over Tilling lo center, then fold u 
aguin lo enclose filling. Cul 
into 4 squares. 

Place biles, seam side down, on 
cookie sheet. Sprinkle with remain- 
ing parmesan. 

Bake ai 350 degrees for 13-15 
minutes, until golden. 

We've hod the snacks - now for 
something more substantial ■ this 
should be a hit with your guests • 
serve with a crusty loaf of bread 
and enjoy: 

BRATS AND KRAUT 
1 (2 pound) bag sauerkraut 
1/4 cup brown sugar 
3/4 tablespoon caraway seed 

1 (12 ounce) beer 

2 (6 each) bags of bratwursi, 

quartered 
1 small onion, diced 

Sauic onion in butler or mar- 
garine and odd sail and pepper. Add 
brals und beer and simmer 5-10 
minutes. 

Mix drained sauerkraut, brown 
sugar and caraway seed. Add 
onions, brats and beer and bake at 
350 degrees for I 1/2 hours. 

No guessing about whether or 
not these beans arc tender. Set 
them lo cook and forget them and 
they'll turn out delicious every 
time • I made them for a bunch of 
Boy Scouts once and ihey said 
they were the most delicious 
they'd ever eaten (I suppose all 
the fresh air they got fishing, 
along wiih the charred hot dogs 
they roosted over the fire, helped 
a little): 

SIMPLY DELICIOUS 
BAKED BEANS 

5 slices bacon, fried crisp and 

crumbled 
2(16 ounces each) cans baked 

beans, drained 
1/2 green pepper, chopped 
1/2 medium onion, chopped 
I 1/2 teaspoons prepared mustard 
1/2 cup ketchup 
1/2 cup hickory smoke barbecue 

1/2 cup packed brown sugar 

Mix all ingredients in crock poi. 
Cover and cook on low for 8-12 
hours, or high for 3-4 hours. 

Something sweet Is good too - this 
is packed with energy rood to 
cheer on the favorite team - and 
It's quickly make ahead or time 
with a mix: 
WALNUT DATE SNACK BARS 

1 package yellow cake mix 
3/4 cup packed brown sugar 
3/4 cup bulter, melted 

2 eggs 
2 cups chopped dales 

2 cubs walnuts 

Heat oven lo 350 degrees. 
Grease 9x13 pan, 

In large bowl, combine cake mix 
and brown sugar, blending well. 
Add margarine and eggs and beat 2 
minutes. 

Combine dales and walnuts and 
stir into cake mixture (batler will be 
stiff)- Spread evenly in greased pan. 

Bake 34-45 minutes, until edges 
arc golden. Cool 10 minutes, then 
run Knife around edges lo loosen. 
Cool 1 hour and cul into bars. 

Another cake mix and pre- 
pared frosting make these bars 
simple, but simply super: 
GOOEY CHOCOLATE BARS 

I package chocolate cake mix 

1/2 cup oats 

1/2 cup butler, softened 

1 C SB , t , 

6 ounce package chocolate chips 
1 can coconut almond or pecan 

prepared frosting 

3 tablespoons flour 

Heat oven lo 350 degrees. 
Grease and flour 9x13 inch pan. 

Combine cake mix, oais, mar- 
garine and egg wiih mixer until 
crumbly and well blended. Reserve 
1 cup of mixture and press, remain- 
ing mixture in prepared pan, 

Bake at 350 degrees for 8-12 
minutes, uniil slightly puffed. 
Sprinkle wiih chocolate chips. 

Combine frosting and flour. 
Spread over chocolate chips and 
sprinkle with reserved lopping. 
Bake an addition.il 1 8 minutes (cen- 
ter will not be sci). Cool completely 
before serving. 

Class of '68 to 
hold meeting to 
discuss reunion 

Classmates of Lincoln Hi 
School Class of 1968 will hold 
meeting 8 p.m. Thursday, January 
29, . at the Evergreen Ealing 
Emporium lo discuss plans for its 
30lh reunion. All classmates arc 
encouraged to attend. 

For more information call 681- 
7418 or 681-3533. 




i 



E&peciaMu 1lhmeii'& SieaM 

Spcciaiizuuj in 
Wotneti's Stxcuaitutc 3ica£th Cati 



: 1 



Expextencc the iliffctence. 
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• (binual Exams 

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We axe loc ate d at Ihc piivatc pxac t ie e office of; 

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2100 5. eobunSia Sid 
Suite 110 • Qxand Smfo, SJD 

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I 



Design 
your life 
insurance 
plan to 
fit. 




Hi 1 ran prwiilt the twits. 
Cmtnm Term tl life Insurance 
from harm Bureau li cmtom- 
di-ilf-ned to fit >our special 
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options. You make the decision* 
/...,«,: fc-ik/e™. ItM.ngforM' 

JAMES CWIKLA 

3nUSrttAvt.lt. 

Ihltl Rlvtr Fall, UN 5STDI 

681-2288 



t^k 



MICHAEL PETERSON 

31!LiBrH«vt.N. 

Ihltl Rlrtf Fill. UN 56701 

681-2288 



JSS 



I'iirh 6 



Snturduy, Jniiiiiiry 24, I'J'JX 



EDITORIAL OPINIONS 



^Hta you iiuy m^ 





lllPSWOIlcl 

is onus: 







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WffcH 

Thief River Falls, Minnesota 

John P. Muttson, Publisher 

Murvln Lund in, Editor 
Duvld Hill, Associate Editor 

Our Response To Sierra 
Club Chapter President 

As indicated m the January 17 issue of Ihc: 
Northern Winch, in which a guest editorial by 
Ginny Yinglinj: was published, wc have written to 
Ms. Yinyliny with our views on her comments and 
Ihc timber wolf question in northern Minnesota. 
Thai letter is published below as our editorial for 
today's issue. 

Dear Ms. Yingliue.: 

We are in receipt of your opinion editorial 
regarding the wolf debate and the revised copy 
daied loday. The original had been prepared for 
publication in the January 1 7 issue of the Northern 
Watch, our regional publication which goes to 
about 25,0(50 homes in our area, but ihe revision 
was received in ample lime to make the change 
noted, and we have done so. It is being published 
in its entirety as a guest editorial in our normal 
editorial placement. \ 

My purpose in writing to you'is not only to 
inform you of the receipt of your material and its 
impending publication, but to be honest and up 
front in giving yon my personal viewpoint on 
comments in your opinion piece and timber 
wolves in our state, Allow me to first react to some 
of your statements. 

I have attended only one of the public meet- 
ings being conducted by the Minnesota DNR — the 
one in Thief River Falls — and there were- about 
200 people there. I have no information about any 
of the other meetings. There was indeed a good 
deal of animosity toward wolves expressed at this 
meeting. I believe it may be a little unfair to term 
testimony by citizens as "outright falsehoods." 
although I would admit that not all opinion is 
unbiased nor all research entirely conclusive. I 
contend that what is often perceived to be true 
and/or false may indeed be neither or both, 
depending on the existing circumstances. 

I have no reason to doubt that ihe DNR esti- 
mate of 2,000 to 2.200 wolves in Minnesota (the 
.number .presented at ,lUe, meeting in -Thief River 
Falls) is as accurate an accounting as can be made, 
given the nocturnal nature of wolves and their 
general preference for seclusion. I note that you do 
not actually question the number, only the method 
of taking inventory. A number of people at the 
Thief River Falls meeting did question the num- 
ber, believing it to be far too low. One fanner who 
had 1 1 wolves legally trapped and removed for 
sheep depredation within a half mile of his home 
over a several month span said he had no idea 
there were that many wolves in his area. Perhaps 
use of the term "census" is an unfortunate one. For 
all their purported intelligence, wolves are notori- 
ously inept at filling out forms, as you indicate 
that people in a formal census are expected to do. 
An educated guess, based on the best available 
information, is ail that can be reasonably expect- 
ed. I believe the DNR is honestly doing this. 

I have heard the comment that wolves are no 
longer afraid of humans, but not necessarily 
because the wolves aren't bunted. The lack of fear 
rather stems from an increasing familiarity with 
humans as the wolfs population grows and its 
range expands into more highly populated areas 
where contact with human scent, domestic live- 
stock and pets are commonplace — much as you 
suggest. Whatever the reason, however, this 
increased contact seems likely to eventually result 
in a condition which could trigger a wolf attack on 
a human. Not only would that be a tragedy for the 
people involved, but the retaliation against wolves 
could be devastating. It behooves all people with 
an interest in wolves, either pro or con, to do 
everything possible to prevent such a situation 
from ever happening. People in cities do not invite 
child molesters to set up residency in their neigh- 
borhoods. Residents of rural Minnesota have the 
same type of reservation about wolves. 

I don't doubt that dolphins and whales have 
attacked people, as you say, but they don't normal- 
ly stray into yards in northern Minnesota and 
therefore aien't much of a concern here. And, of 
course, it isn't necessary for the public to hunt or 
trap dogs which bile people since they are domes- 
tic animals and their locations generally arc 
known. 

Your reference to statistics regarding livestock 
and poultry losses and the conclusions drawn from 
them are interesting. Others could likely make a 
case for their cause with manipulation or interpre- 
tation of the same numbers, although I certainty 
understand your point regarding the wolf kill 
impact on total agricultural production numbers. It 



Editorial opinion publlshod under this 
heading is Intended to stimulate thinking 
and discussion among our readers. Unloss 
specified otherwise, tho editorials are writ- 
ten by Editor Marvin Lundin and do not rep- 
resent opinion of other staff members. 
: - Opinions In items from other publications 
may not coincide with the editor's own 
views but are ottered for their general inter- 
est. 

undoubtedly is very small. If the birds or animals 
killed happen to be your birds or animals, howev- 
er, the loss becomes a good deal more personal 
and the percentages much larger. The claims 
process is cumbersome and payment often very 
slow. Is the number of "270 to 400 illegal wolf 
kills (by humans) annually "substantiated'.' If a 
DNR estimate, does it have any more validity than 
the population estimate? How does one justify dis- 
crediting one number and accepting another'. 1 

I disagree thai fanners .should have to protect 
their livestock from incursions by wolves. They 
may indeed pasture animals in areas surrounded 
by woods, because that is the type of land suitable 
for grazing livestock. Any repealed aid from a fed- 
eral program that you mention would have to be in 
the federal trapping program. The federal govern- 
ment pays no depredation claims. The only finan- 
cial recovery to fanners from losses to wolves 
comes from the state, and that through the 
Depanment.of Agriculture. 1 ain happy to hear that 
you concur this predation account is under-fund- 
ed. 

Since you have the statistical sheets provided 
by the DNR regarding livestock losses, I'm sur- 
prised you don't also have the sheet entitled 
"Minnesota Wolf Recovery Facts" which was also 
distributed at the DNR meetings. If so. you would 
have had the current information which notes that 
"In Minnesota, each wolf takes the average equiv- 
alent of 1 5 to 18 deer per year, two-thirds of which 
arc fawns." Thus you would not have had to rely 
on a 26-year-old U.S. Forest Service study — what- 
ever its validity or lack thereof — made three years 
before the wolf was listed tinder the Endangered 
Species Act. ~~ 

You arc correct in stating that the last two severe 
winters have taken a toll on the suite's deer popu- 
lation. Losses were very high. Unfortunately, 
wolves were not content to feed on carcasses of 
deer which died from starvation and exposure. 
Many people expending their own funds to feed 
deer and reduce losses to cold and deep snow were 
disheartened and angered to have wolves move 
into these concentrations of deer and wantonly kill 
and injure many which would otherwise have sur- 
vived. Sndwmobilcrs also reported numerous 
cases of deer being killed by wolves and left 
uneaten. Certainly wolves will kill old, weak and 
injured or unhealthy deer, but the reality is that 
they are opportunists which will take the most vul- 
nerable prey most readily available. Therefore, 
when deer populations have been reduced by 
severe winter conditions, the impact of wolf 
depredation on the remaining herd is magnified. 

I have talked to a number of people in our area 
and none of them have seen any of the "millions of 
dollars flooding the state from people hoping to 
glimpse or hear u wolf in the wild." Most think 
such a claim borders on falsehood, although they 
put it a little less delicately, Perhaps the claim 
should be verified by an actual census. 

Although you may be surprised to hear it. peo- 
ple in our area of the state also hope the DNR will 
apply science and reason to the development of a 
wolf management plan if and when the Gray Wolf 
is delisted from the Federal Endangered Species 
Act. You may also be surprised that nearly every- 
one up here would like to retain a viable popula- 
tion of timber wolves in Minnesota. The disagree- 
ment will probably be only on how many arc 
enough, where they should be located, and how 
that population and location should be attained. In 
general, residents of our area would like to have 
wolves contained to, wilderness areas or at least 
public lands. People who spend those millions of 
dollars to hear a wolf howl in Minnesota would 
undoubtedly much more deeply appreciate the 
experience in a wilderness setting than from the 
parking lot of their motel. 

Ginny, I sense that you are a compassionate 
person concerned with preservation of a species 
which is a symbol for wilderness and the natural 
environment. I applaud you for your interest and 
willingness to be involved. But I ask you and your 
organization to not be too willing to dismiss the 
experiences and feelings of others out of hand 
simply because they may be different from what 
you have been told and wish to believe. An atti- 
tude of compromise could go n long way in effect- 
ing a satisfactory resolution to the wolf debate in 
Minnesota. I think you will find people from wolf 
country more conciliatory than you may expect, 
but they resent being called liars for telling what 
they have experienced. They deserve no less 
respect than the species you wish to protect. 
Sincerely, 
Marvin Lundin 



POLICIES 



Letter* ToThnEdltot: The staffer the Northern 
Watch encourages written responses to editorial com- 
, meni or letters with original thoughts or ideas of gen- 
eral Interest. Letters should' be intended for publica- 
tion in Nortlicm W«ch exclusively; tellers sent to 
multiple publications will generally not be accepted. 
Right is reserved to edit letters for length and clarity 
and to reject letters deemed to be promotional in 
nature or in poor taste. 

letters Must Be Signed: All letters must be 
signed and contain an address or phone number of the 
writer so nmhcnuciiy can be verified. Slffnatnrcs 
must appear on tetters published. The staff believes 



that there is greater credi hi I ity in letters signed in print 
and will not withhold names of writers from publica- 
tion. 

* Responses Invited: Letters critical of individu- 
als or Other entities may be shown to those individu- 
als or representatives of those em lues in advance of 
publication with on invitation by newspaper staff for 
response In the same issue as the original letter. 

Corrections: If on error is made in news or 
advertising publication, the staff encourages readers 
to call it to our immediate attention by calling 681- 
4450. We will attempt to correct the error or clarify 
the misunderstanding in the next issue. 



Snturduy, January 2-J, 1998 



NORTHERN WATCH 



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Mission Of The Northland Community And Technical College Foundation Is: 
To Encourage, Enhance, Support And Recognize NCTC's Impact On The Northwest Region Of 
Minnesota; To Attract Area Students By Providing Scholarships; And To Support NCTC Functions. 

"Ob 9ounkai QfZvM) 9ueJ!atlM Hi % iLibn Of (ktPufL" 

DhEoaou J(ooiami 



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Mark Berg 

Dr. Tyrone Birkeland 

Kelsy Blowers 

Robert Bollesen 

Lance B rower 

Duane Brown 

Cindy Cedergren 

Dr. Earl and Melvlne Dagg 

Dean Dalen 

Robert Dondelinger-Scholarship Fund 

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Fraternal Order of the Eagles of TRF 

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Hartz Foundation 

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Evory oliort hoo been mndo to list all donoro. Wo apologlzo II wi 



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lodvertontty mloood nomoono. Pleaso notify Iho college 



Danie Packard 

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Estate of Robert & Madelyn Robarge 

Regan and Julie Rohl 

Jim Sackett 

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Douglass and Kay Steiger 

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NORTHERN WATCH 



Snliirdny, January 24, I«J'J8 



Saturday, January 24, 1908 



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Fire eating part of 
Johnny Green's act 



(.Continued frofii p;i(!c 1) 

B:rfonned on (he same hillini: as 
uiltly Holly in Milwaukee. They 
have played with such treats us the 
Beatles and the Rolling Sloncs. 
They've appeared with Anne 
Murray. Arkt Guihrie and countless 
others. 

Green's cuicer he pan wiili a hand 
in the late 195()\. In the early simics, 
Johnny was told that his band 
wouldn't make it "even if you dyed 
your hair yrccn." Instead of taking 
thai as an insult, a light hull) went 
on in Johnny Green's head. He 
accepted the challenge, and the 
entire five-man hand dyed their hair 
green. The green hair brought them 
the notoriety they sought and a 
photo in a 1964 issue of Life maga- 
zine. 

The group hit the big lime when 
they landed roles in the Batman 
television scries in 1966. Sporting 
kelly green hair, the five young men 
appeared in 27 episodes as the evil 
Joker's henchmen. The band alio 
scored a hit record with the Batman 
theme song which they played with 
(he Billy May Orchestra. 

Batman star Adam West and 
Johnny Green have remained 
friends and recently did a car show 
together in Detroit. MI with CNN 
reporting on the event. 

Green continues to cam royal- 
tics from his work in the Batman 
scries, and residuals have increased 
in recent ycats in the wake of the 
successful Batman movies anil 
renewed interest in the original tele- 
vision series. 

Another highlight in Green's 
career was louring overseas with 
Bob Hope during the Vict Nam era. 
That association led to another 
long-standing friendship. Though 
his pal is now 96 years old and 
blind, he didn't forget Johnny al hol- 
iday time, and Green proudly shared 
the picloral calendar he und his wife 
received from the Hopes this year. 

Television appearances didn't 
stop with Batman cither. More 
famous names surface — Glen 
Campbell, Joey Bishop. Regis 
Philban. David Lcticrman, to name 
a few. 

One can't begin to list Ihc people 
this man knows or the places he's 
been, and unless you understand 
Japanese, German, ■ Arabic and 
almost every other foreign lan- 
guage, you can't even rcau every- 
thing that's been wrillcn about the 
nomadic entertainer. 

In my estimation, however, see- 
ing is believing. I look in his show 
on Wednesday nijjht. walking in just 
in time lo catch his "hot" fire-eating 
act — impressive, unusual. 

Things heated up even more 
when the band started its set. The 
first three songs were Wilson 
Pickett's "Mustang Sally," Patsy 
Cline's "I Fall to Pieces," ZZ Top's 
"The Grange." And if lhat wasn't 
enough variety. Johnny Green shed 
his bass guitar for an accordian, and 



kind played ihe "Beer Barrel 
Polka." 

The grou|> is diverse, and I laler 
learned that it has over 5IX) songs in 
ils repertoire enabling the band to 
play lo and please any type of audi- 
ence anywhere. 

While ihc 50-somcihing-ycar-old 
Johnny Green has led and promoted 
the group over the years, the other 
hand members have left and been 
replaced. He continues lo be, how- 
ever, surrounded by talcni — Rifled 
musicians who arc as much fun to 
walch as ihcy arc lo listen to. 

Convinced that this group had 
something special to offer, I intro- 
duced myself to Johnny Green and 
discovered one of the most person- 
able people I've ever met. 

The Wednesday through 
Saturday gig at the Bcsl Western is 
the band's second appearance in 
Thief River Falls in the past six 
months having played at the Rusty 
Nail in August. 

Jl's filling lhai Johnny Green and 
the Grccnmcn are performing in 
Thief River Falls during the 
Ironman 250 snowmobile races. 
Green has a promotional photo 
taken in Ihe I960's or him and his 
band members posing on four 
Arctic Cat snowmobiles — Iheir 
height green hair matching ihc 
stripes on the side of ihc sleds. 

From here Johnny Green and the 
Grccnmcn will continue to entertain 
in clubs and casinos across ihc 
country. Green is also involved in 
the promotion of a number of out- 
door concerts as well as having his 
fingers in several other business 
ventures. On top of lhat, he plans to 
do more recording. 

There arc a few foreign countries 
he hasn't visited yet. Green hasn't 
becn'to all of ihc African countries 
ycl, and he has plans to go to Dubai 
— a liny country in the Middle East. 

Docs he plan lo retire? "No, 
never," he said. Will Johnny Green 
and the Grccnmcn return to Thief 
River Falls? He replied, "I hope so." 
Anyone who catches this class act at 
ihc Best Western ihis week will 
probably hope so too. 

Crop insurance 
topic of meeting 

Crop insurance issues will be 
discussed by Ken Ackerman, 
administrator of the USDA Risk 
Management Agency, ai n meeting 
Friday.. February 6. from 9:30 to 11 
a.m. in Youngquist auditorium at Ihc 
University of Minnesota in Crook- 
ston. 

Formers, ranchers and all other 
interested parties are welcome lo 
attend the meeting which will offer 
a good opportunity to hear about ihe 
agency's future plans and to discuss 
participants' concerns regarding 
crop insurance. 

Ackerman is also sneaking at a 
meeting in Valley Cily, ND at 3 p.m. 
thai same day. 



ATIENTION SHAREHOLDERS 
Of ARCTIC CAT And POLARIS 




f \ 

RED LAKE ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE 

Statement of Nondiscrimination 

Red Lnku Electric Cooperative, Inc. is the recipient of Federal 
finuncinl anatstnnco from tho Rural Electrification 
Administration, and agency of tho U. S. Deportment of 
Agriculture, and is subject to the provioiona ofTitlo VI oftho Civil 
Rightfl Act of 196-1, ns nmended, Section 604 oftho Rehabilitation 
Act of 1973, an amended, tho Arc Discrimination Act of 197G, ns 
nmended, und tlio rulcn and regulations oftho US. Doportmont 
of ARriculturu which provido that no person in tho United States 
on tho basis of race, color, national origin, ago or handicap shall 
bo excluded from participation in, admission or access to, denied 
tho benefits of, or otherwise bo subjected to discrimination under 
nny of this orRaniiation'a prosrams or activities. 

Tho person responsible for coordinatlnR this organization's 
nondiscrimination compliance efforts is Ronnio M. Konnody, 
Manager. Any individual, or specific elnss of individuals, who 
feels that this organization hus subjected thorn to discrimination 
may obtain further information about tho statutes and rcpiln- 
lionn listed nbovo from nnd/or fito n written complaint with Uu'b 
orKunizntion; or the Secretary, U.S. Department of Apiculture, 
Washington, D.C, 20250; or the Administrator, Rural 
Electrification Administration, Washington, D.C. 20250. 
ComplninlH must bo filed within 180 days after tho nllcRcd dis- 
crimination. Confidentiality will bo maintained to the extent pos- 
Hible. 



Future dairy success depends on making changes 



(Continued from Page 1) 
management. 

Information provided by ihc 
association describes the proposal 
as follows: 

"The milking facility designed to 
serve four dairies is to consist of 
our frccslall barns connected hy 
covered alleyways to holding areas 
adjacent lo the milking ccnlcr, 
where iwo milking parlors arc locat- 
ed. The floors of the holding areas 
and milking parlors arc to he 
cleansed with a flush system lo 
remove manure. Manure removed 
from the barns, holding areas and 
milking parlors is to be stored in 
holding facilities designed lo 
accommodate al least one year of 
manure production. Periodically 
manure will be removed and 
applied, as directed by each client 
dairy, lo crop land as fertilizer. 

Facilities for the storage of feed 
commodities and forages will be 
available for the use of each dairy. 
Frccstalls arc to be equipped with 
matlrcsscs covered with bedding 
material selected by each dairy. 
Alleyways in each barn will be used 
for feeding, and watercrs arc (o he 
located to maximize usage. 
One Unique Difference 

"In all general respects, the facil- 
ity will not be unlike other large 



Malc-of-lhc-ari facilities now in use. 
The unique difference is lhal all of 
the livestock will be owned and 
cared for hy multiple independent 
dairy producers in separate harns. 
Facilities for each dairy will include 
a small office, calving barn and spe- 
cial needs barn with treatment pens, 
worm treatment room, veterinary' 
supplies, storage room and milking 
facilities for cows which must be 
isolated from the main herd. 

"Cows in the main herd will he 
milked by ccnlcr personnel al desig- 
nated limes agreed to hy each pro- 
ducer and the center. The automated 
milking system will include a cow 
:ification system and will pro- 



vide each producer reports of r 
production at every milking for each 
cow. 

More Time To Manage 
Freed of the responsibility for 
designing, financing, staffing, con- 
struction and managing a large scale 
milking operation, each producer 
will have substantially more lime to 
work with ils herd to assure cow 
comfort and lo achieve optimum 
levels of productivity and milk Qual- 
ity through attention to nuiriiion, 
animal hcallh. genetics and general 
core. 

"Each barn is to be designed to 
ammodatc up lo approximately 



ing a liiige ridge opening with ends 
and sidcwalls equipped with wind 

can he adjusted lo retain or expel 
heal, as needed. 

"The center's operating staff will 
include an on-site manager respon- 
sible for all facilities, milking oper- 
ations and relalionships with client 
dairies. Facilities are lo be designed 
for round-the-clock operation with 
approximately 20 hours scheduled 
for milking and three periods per 
day allocated for cleaning and 
repairs. Approximately 16-1K full- 
time staff people, caeh working -10- 
50 hours per week, will be 
employed to operate the ccnlcr." 
Potential Client Profile 

Dairy Finance Associates pro- 
jects that ils potential clients will be 
established and successful dairy 
farms, typically family owned and 
operated, with 75-150 cows and 
having decided they need lo triple or 
quadruple ihe si/c of their herds to 
lower operating costs. 

As proposed,. the. lease fee is to 
be based on a combinalion of base 
rent and a percentage of milk rev- 
enue, This means lhat producers and 
Ihc center alike have a stake in opti- 
mizing production and milk quality. 



Dairy farmers had no pay raise for 18 years 



by Terry Nelson 

Area Dairy Director 

National Farmers Organization 

The scries of articles in Ihe 
Watch these post weeks on area 
dairying has caused me to write this 
article. I work wilh dairy farmers 
every day. It is appalling and scary 
to see Ihe number of farmers selling 
out because of noi being able lo 
moke a living at dairying. I want lo 
share wilh you a few facts and 
observations about dairy. 

In 1963 ihc average price for 100 
pounds of milk was S3. 11. In 1973 
ihe average price was S6.30 and in 
1983 it was S12.49. In 1993 ihc 
average price wasS11.80 and for 
the first 1 1 months of 1997 ihe aver- 
age price was SI 1.93. These prices 
are from ihc USDA— prices 
announced for ihc Minnesota and 
Wisconsin Scries and the basic for- 
mula price for each month and the 
overage for the year. 

From 1980 through 1997 ihc 
price averaged SI 1.96. Dairy form- 
ers have nol seen an increase in their 
milk price for 18 years. How many 
businesses would stilt exist if they 
were charging the same for their 
service or product today as ihey did 
in 1980? How many people in the 
labor force are receiving ihe same 
wages as they were paid in 19807 
How can anyone expect farmers lo 
pay 1997 expenses on 1980 
income? Compare how taxes, insur- 
ance, equipment, repairs, fuel and 
all of our living expenses have 
increased in the last 18 years. 

The dairy farmer is receiving Ihe 
some price for his product as he did 
18 years ago. Is it any wonder why 
dairy farmers arc going out of busi- 



ness? Fanners have been told to gel 
bigger, gel more efficient, and you 
can survive. Is lhat whal life is uboui 
— surviving? Or is it to make it bet- 
ter for ihc next generation? 

Formers have also been lold thai 
"when your neighbor goes out of 
business, it will fee better for you." 
They try to pit farmer against 
farmer. 

Look at ihc number of farmers 
who have gone oui of business. On 
January 1, 1992. [here were 603 
dairy farms in the 10 northwest 
counties of Minnesota. As oT 
January 1, 1998. iherc arc 314 — a 
48% decrease is just six years. Has 
thai helped the remaining dairy 
farmers' price? No; it is lower today 
than it was in 1990. 

Arc you paying the same for milk 
in ihe store loday as you did in 
1980? In 1980 ihe retail price was 
S2.I0 per gallon. Today ihe retail 
price is $3.50 per gallon. The farm- 
ers' share of ihc milk price in 1980 
was 52%; today the farm shore is 
29%. The consumer price has 
increased but the farmers have not 
received any of it. The same story 
holds true in other farm commodi- 
ties, including livestock and g^rain. 

Farmers were given ihe nghi to 
organize and sci iheir price in 1922 
when Ihc Copper- Vol stead Aci was 
passed. Co-ops were formed by 
farmers for farmers. They were 
designed to buy in volume and pass 
the savings on to the members. The 
co-ops were also designed lo 
process ihc farmers' production, sell 
ti and return the profits to the farm- 
ers. 

Th*cc-ops now control 85% of 
the nation's milk supply but they 



have forgotten why ihcy were 
formed and who formed and buili 
them. They have ihc ability to pay 
producers the price they need to be 

K rofitable but they have become big 
usincss. Their leaders receive 
wages and bonuses based on their 
profit dollar. The cheaper they buy 
that milk supply, ihe higher their 
profits. 

Now the co-ops arc using their 
members' dividend dollars lo build 
mega dairies controlled by the co- 
op, guaranteeing Iheir supply or 
milk and nol worrying oboui ihe 
farmers who built Ihe co-op and 
iheir production. Their goal is to 
control the milk supply from ihe 
all Ihc way to the consumer. 



Organization was formed for the 
sole purpose of gaining cost of pro- 
duction plus a reasonable profit in 
all commodities for farmers and 
ranchers. As farmers organize. 
National Fanners Organization, 
thrpugh collective bargaining, can 
obtain the higher prices farmers so 
desperately need to conlinuc iri 

business. 

. Farmers are the owners of iheir 
production and ore the best produc- 
ers and managers around. They also 
need lo become the bcsl marketers 
through collective bargaining. 
Individually Ihey have no strength 
in the marketplace with the giant 
companies, bui together they can 
gel the prices they need and deserve. 
For more information, 1 invite 
farmers to call me al 1-800-584- 
7057. 



Self defense and violence prevention seminar Feb. 2 



Intended for both men and 
women, a two-hour self defense and 
violence prevention seminar will be 
prcscntca Monday, February 2, in 
ihe theater at Northland Community 
and Technical College in Thief 
River Falls. 

Three separate sessions will be 
conducted at 10 a.m. to 12 noon, 1 
to 3 p.m and 7 to 9 p.m.. and inter- 
ested persons are encouraged to 
attend the one most convenient for 
them. The seminar sessions arc free 
of charge and open lo the public bui 
not suitable tor small children. 
Registration is nol required. 

The even i is being made possible 
through ihe efforts of Northland 
Community and Technical College, 
the NCTC student scnale and the 
Violence Intervention Project. For 
additional information contact the 
Violence Intervention Project at 
681-5557. 

Speaking on the subjects or per- 
sonal safety and sexual violence and 
how they impact Ihc life of individ- 
uals will be Bill Nelson, chairman 
of the board and volunteer advocate 
al the Central Minnesota Sexual 
Assault Center. 

Nelson said he specifically wants 
lo shore what he has learned with 
men and women who want to make 
ihe world a safe place to live. 



'The seminar will empower you 
wilh essential, but often overlooked, 
self defense strategies and cducaie 
you about sexual violence." states 
Kelly Rogalla, sexual assault pro- 
gram coordinator with the Violence 
Intervention Project. 

Topics which Nelson will 
address include: 

• Myihs vs. Reality; 

• Self Defense Techniques; 

• Environmental Awareness; 

• Roots of Sexual Violence/ 
Sexism; and • 

• What We Can Do To Decrease 
Sexual Violence in Our Society. 

■From his diverse' background. 
Nelson brings n unique perspective 
to the seminar subject. He has 
gained insight into sexual violence 
from his interviews with convicted 
rapists and child sexual molesters. 
He is a Fifth-Degree Black Belt 
Master Instructor in the an of Soo 
Bahk Do Korean Karate. 

Nelson earned his BA degree In 
psychology with a minor in criminal 
jusiice from St. Cloud State Univer- 
sity. He has been a private investi- 
gator for the past 15 years and is a 
former police officer. He has pub- 
lished Ihc book Your Weapon Within 
which will be available at the semi- 




NCTC to award over 
$25,000 in scholarships 



Northland Community and Tech- 
nical College in Thief River Falls 
will award over S25.000 in scholar- 
ships in a ceremony at the college 
iheatcr Wednesday, January 28, at 3 
p.m. 

Hartz Foundation will provide 
$20,800 with S3.000 coming from 
Northern State Bank of Thief River 
Falls. Other scholarships to be pre- 
sented include the TRF Communily 
Arts Council fine arts scholarship. 
technical college student senate 
scholarships, Anita Carlson memor- 
ial scholarship. TRF Education 



Association scholarship. Rich Lytlle 
scholarship and John Stcidl memor- 
ial scholarship. ^ 

In all, 121 students will share in 
Ihe $25,400 in scholarship funds, 
according lo Kctsy Blowers. North- 
land's financial aid director. 

The public is invited to attend Ihe 
ceremony. A reception will lake 
place in the college commons fol- 
lowing ihc awards presentation. 
NCTC will-award another round of 
scholarships during the spring quar- 



K.i moM producers, die amount of 
the Ice is expected to be nut more, 
and may be significantly les.s. than 
Ihc cash outlay fur debt service, 
milking hihur anil supplies, power 
and liiel. supervision, equipment 
upil.uing. facilities maintenance and 

'Relief (turn ihc demands of 
thiee-times-a-day milking, seven 
days a week, is seen by dairy fatni- 



■ Donald Ault. prcsidi 
; Research. 



Woodcrafters to 
view computer 
drafting program 

Northland Woodcrafters will 
hold ils January meeting at North- 
land Community and Technical 
College Tuesday. January 27, nt 7 
p.m. to view utilization of equip- 
ment in the architectural technology 
and design program. 

Department head Kim Philipp 
will demonstrate computer aided 
drafting (CAD) and how computers 
can be used to assist in design and 
modification of woodworking pro- 
jects. She will also answer ques- 
tions about the department's pro- 
gram. 

An organization for anyone who 
is interested in makinc items from 
wood. Northland Woodcrafters 
invites any interested persons from 
ihc area to attend the meeting. 
Those attending Tuesday arc asked 
to park on ihc. cast side of the 
NCTC complex und cnicr by the 
cast door, where Ihcy will be direct- 
ed lo ihc architectural technology 
and design department. 



AS- 

ipolis 
lulling firm; 



mpottan 



rihutki 



lily life." Dairy Finance 
Associates stales. "Relief from the 
responsibility of supervising a 
staiul-alonc milking operation is a 
further benefit. The essential factors 
that attract farm families to dairy 
operations— rising and caring for 
livestock, growing crops, regular 
cash income— arc, under the pro- 
posed style of operation, all retained 
under the direct control of each 
dairy producer." 

Principals Involved 

Principals involved in Dairy 
Finance Associates arc: 



dairy/agribusiness ( 

■ Charles Hann. wno ucaus 
Norwood Capital Group, Inc.. a 
Minneapolis capital management 
company with inierests in petroleum 
am! agricultural business opera- 
tions; 

• Ralph Hofstad, president of 
Hofslad Associates in Minneapolis 
who, during his 41 years in ag busi- 
ness, served three regional form 
cooperatives in executive level posi- 
tions, including heading Land 
Ol-akcs; 

• William Hucg Jr., professor 
emeritus in agronomy and plant 
genetics and former vice presideni 
of Agriculture, Forestry and Home 
Economics at ihe University of 
Minnesota; 

• Leslie Peterson, president, 
Farmers Stale Bank of Trimont, who 
has been engaged in banking and 
farming for over 40 years and 
chaired the agricultural division of 
Ihe American Bankers Association; 



• James Schocttlcr. president of 
Mcllgrcn Schocttlcr Investments. 
Inc., and a financial analyst with 
experience on projects for large and 
small husincsscs. 

Stanislawski notes thai a propos- 
al such as thai hy Dairy Finance 
Associates is one of several poten- 
tial answers for some dairies. It is 
projected lhal it would lake 40 to 50 
operations such as that proposed by 
the association to simply regain 
Minnesota's lost dairy market share 
as noted earlier in this article. 

"Growth in herd si/c and making 
changes in financial structure and 
herd manogement may not be the 
way we would prefer lo go." Harold 
Stanislawski says, "but ii may he the 
way we have lo go if Minnesota 
wants lo retain a profitable dairy 
industry that is competitive and an 
economic benefit to the entire state." 

(Next week: A couple of non- 
dairy entries in the dairy business.) 




HOUSE 




MONDAY 
JANUARY 26,1998 
10:00 am to 2:00 pm 

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HoUadb/: 

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SOYBEAN GROWERS 

Still Working On Your Spring Planting?? 
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Phono 1-216-745-4361 



Jason Clark. CPS 

Fertilizer Plant 

Phono 1-218-745-4361 



■ Sports Briefs - 



i i-i 



Ah 



I Ninliil.nn 



Technical College ».i- 
lumcd MiniK'M>i,i Cnmmuiiiiv 
Collide C'onl'aeucc Noilhcrn 
Dmston ki-.Wih.iH ['layer ..1 
the Week I'ur liis J.iii, 1.117 
ctlnrlr. ■ijuiriM Miihh Si.iU 1 
Urmoisuv-Hotliiieuu. Hifihiin- 
.itidR.unv Rim •.•.hen he avci- 
.iged :2..l points and S.7 
rebounds per (!.niie. lie is :i 6 1 
product ul Ru1.liinsil.ik- 
Armstrong High School. 

■ Nick Dee of Thief Rivet 
Fulls is ;i regular at 190 pound-, 
kir the t timet miv nf Noiih 
Dakota wrestling (cam. 



Early Payment And Volume Discounts Still Apply! 



— I TRF SPORTSl 



Monday. Jan. 26 

■ Uar.kotD.VI ■ NCtC women at Forgu: 
F.iVj, 6 p m ; NCTC man .11 Fergus F«!'s. 8 

Tuoiday, Jon. 27 

■ WioMi-nfl ■ LHS Northwest Ouno (AB1. 
430pm 

■ Swimming ■ LHS boys vs Park Rop.OJ, 

■ HocHoy ■ IMS vs. CrooMlon (A.0). 
5.15/7 30 p.m. 

* Basketball ■ LHS gilts 01 MooftHt.in 
(AD) S 45*7:30 p.m ; LHS boys at Oomid/i 
IMS). 5:45/7.30 R.m. 

Thursday, Jan. 29 

■ Wrosliing • LHS vs, Detroit Lakes and 
Foolwi (A/D). 5 p.m 

■ Basketball ■ LHS girls at Eosl Grand 
Forks (A/B), 5:45*7.30 p.m. 

Friday, Jan. 30 

■ Hockey ■ LHS w. Lake ol tho Woods 
(AA). 5:15/7:30 pm. 

■ fJaikolMll • NCTC women ol R,vny 
River, fl p.m.; LHS boys vs. Fisher'Climai 
1KB). 6/7:30 p.m: NCTC mon at R*ny 



TRF hockey JV beaten 

Thief River Falls junior varsity 
high school hockey team is 3-10 for 
lite year following a 4-1 Saturday 
loss al Roseau and a 2-0 Tuesday 
setback al East Gnmd Forks. 

Josh Holmes was in goal for [he 
Thief River Falls squad. 




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(218} 281-2240 



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Prowlers rally, edge Gators 

■ TRF girls beat Badger/Greenbush-Middle River 



Tlnef River l-'alK wiped out a ID- the middle 

point Ihitd i|»arter delieit am 

i'.ulgei/C.rccnhush-Midillc 
■IS-t.' Tuesday in (litis hie.h s 



:lhe 



Lull ii 



i led the I'n 



i|u.iricr Mop, 14- in, j.i-jii anil ■.*.:- 
,\[. But they watched a .U'-2!) ihitd 
i|u.irter spread disappear in the I. ice 
of an 11-0 run hy the Prowlers. The 
two leattis then swapped leads unlil 
Thief River l-'alls named the upper 
hand near the midway point ol the 
fourth iniaricr. 

"We didn't panic when we fell 
hehind." said Thief River Falls 
coach Jell' Luc. "We were patient. 
We kept picking away." 

The howlers' comeback was lied 
in Nicole Kopari. who scored 9 of 
her game-high 20 points in the 
fourth quaner. 

"We were moving her around ear- 
lier in the game." explained Loc. "In 
the fourth tjuaner we put her hack in 



While Kop 
rally, the Gators promeriis suiiicu 
when point guard Tilfany llagen 
went io the bench with her fourth 
foul carlv in die third quart cr. 

"We were up hy 10." noled 
lladger/Grcciihush-Middle River 
coach Tom Neihauer. "13ui when she 
(llagen) sat. things tunic lo a siaud- 
Millforus." 

Stefanic Snaiby stored 14 points 
and Missy Smith had 12 for the 
Gators. Kopari was the Prowlers' 
only double figure scorer. Rest of 
ihe points were spread among sever- 
al key contributors, mentioned Loc. 

The outcome was affected jKiini- 
cd out Neihauer, when the Gators' 
standard full court pressure defense 
proved ineffective against the 
Prowlers. "I was real disappointed 
we couldn't handle the man-to- 
man." he said. "They were breaking 



our press. Aficr three minutes we 
went to /one. Thai's the most /one 
I've played my whole life." 

Thiel Rivet Falls was IK-for-.M 
from ihe field (.15 percent) and K- 
for- l(i at the free throw line. 
Badger/Greenbush-Middle River 
went M-for-35 from the floor (41) 
pcreeni) and H-for-Ki at the line. 
The Gators finished with a 25-20 
rebound edge, hut also had more 
turnovers. 1(>-I2. 

Results left ihe I'rowlcrs 5-H and 
snapped a sin-game win streak Tor 
the 11-3 Gators. 






rvo-w 



2 3 



7 It 43 



Grygla-Gatzke snaps streak 



Philip Brateng scored 26 points 
and grabbed 12 rebounds Tuesday 
to lead Grygla-Gal/kc past Kittson 
County North 61-52 in a boys high 
school basketball game played at 
Lancaster. The victory snapped a 
nine-game losing streak for the 3-'J 
liagles. 

It looked for a while, however, 
like the Grygla-Gai/ke losses might 
continue to mount when Kittson 
County North jumped out to a 13-4 
lead. 

But the liagles quickly rallied. 
They were within 17-16 by ihe end 
of the first quarter and look charge 
of the game hy building a 35-22 
halftimc lead. It was 48-32 through 
three quarters. 

"Wc made some adjustments 



defensively." said Grygla-Gal/ke 
coach Vcrn Johnson in explaining 
the Eagles" recovery after falling 
behind early. "The two middle quar- 
ters we played some really good 
defense. Wc also did a nice job on 
Ihe boards, and wc were more 
palieni on offense: wc were looking 
for the good shots." 

Braicng sparked the comeback 
with 19 first half points. "He 
(Braicng) had u great all-around 
game," noted Johnson. 

Alex Anderson added 1 8 points to 
the Grygla-Gat/.ke offense. Jeremy 
Hostrup scored 23 points to lead the 
Cougars, nicking up 12 in the fourth 
quarter. Kris Hokanson and Adam 
Wilebski both contributed 12 points 
io the Kittson County North total. 



Nordics lose to Warroad 59-51 



Jon Docbler scored 24 points and 
Warroad shot 51 percent from the 
field (24/47) Tuesday in a 59-51 
boys high school basketball win 
over Marshall County Central. 

"They shot the ball awfully welt, 
and we didn't shoot it very well." 
reported Marshall County Central 
coach Ron Ucland. 
. Warroad led al the quarter slops 
,13-8. 32-28 and 46-41. Marshall 
County .Central pulled even at 47- 
■17. but couldn't produce a lead. 

In. addition to- the hot shouting 
touch. Warroad won out .on most 
loose ball situations - many of them 
leading to lay-ups after gaining pos- 

B/G-MR shooters 
notch easy 73-28 
win over Warroad 

A 22 percent shooting perfor- 
mance by Warroad and 50 percent 
shooting by Badger/Green bush- 
Middle River added up to a one- 
sided 73-28 win for the Gators in a 
late-reported Friday (Jan. 16) boys 
high school basketball match-up. 

"Wc shot well and they didn't." 

Kuintcd out Badger/Green bush- 
liddle River coach Eldon Snarby. 
The Gators led only 15-1 1 at the 
end of the first quarter, but had a 
36-15 halftime cushion and enjoyed 
a 57-20 third quarter spread. 

Difference in shooting also car- 
ried over the free throw line, where 
the Badger/Greenbush-Middle 
River was 16-for-23 and Warroad 
wenijust5-for-15. 



session on scrambles near the bas- 
ket. 

"The ball was tipped around all 
night." noted Ucland. "bui wc 
couldn't convert on the opportuni- 
ties. They're a- lot quicker than, we 
arc; they goi most of the loose 
balls." 

It was ihe third straight loss for 
the 8-6 Nordics, "All the things thai 
were going right for us earlier this 
year arc now going right for the 
opposition." noted ucland. 

Caleb Holthuscn scored 14 points 
and Jon Donarski had II for the 
Nordics. 

Marshall County central was 19- 






MCC... 



2 3 4 



...B 20 



10 ! 



Pioneers beat Raiders 50-39... 

Strong finish nets 
win for Northland 






I 20 



2 3 

Warroad 11 4 5 

B/G-MMJOlO HWor IS 21 21 10 73 

Warroad • Jamlo Miramonlot 2, Matt 
Jonson 5. Jon Doeblar 7. Travis Amlol 2, 
Justin Matnrnan 4, Miko Poiorson S. 

B/Q'MFt - Jflromy Vocura 17. Shana 
No lion 0. Adam Kolmas 0. Gary I 
Wockonluas 11. Bra! Bonlow 2. Andy 
Sctwnkoy 11, Richard Wockonlusu 0. Brian 
Willttlml 2. David TmsclnsU 0. 








— A &**..*H...ay tyJJU*\* h*J- R.twxu+. cVim — 



Register For Upcoming... 

Crystal Court Winter Racauetbail Tournament 

February 27 through March 1, 1998 

January Membership Blitz 

"0^ Z*it rXtfo 01 1W- 

Kerf l *-^ (d«V-^ 

HBal !"»] Ce* 



Northland out-scored Central 
Lakes 16-0 over the final 3 1/2 min- 
utes Wednesday- as the Pioneers 
turned a five-point deficit into a 50- 
39 Minncsoia Community College 
Conference women's basketball vic- 
tory over the Raiders. 

Sarah Houlc of Central Lakes 
scored from underneath the bosket 
to give the visitors a 39-34 lead with 
4;0I (o play. That matched the 
biggest spread in the game, and it 
would also prove to be the Raiders' 
final points of the night. 

Northland's game- winning finish- 
ing kick was jump-started by Jenny 
Johnson's 3-poinl basket from the 
side with 3;36 to play. That was fol- 
lowed by a Darlcnc Nelson free 
throw and a Naomi Wilebski basket 
on the inside to put the Pioneers on 
lop for good. 40-39, with 2:02 
remaining. 

Eight straight points at the free 
throw line (on 10 tries) then iced it. 
A fast break lay-up by Wilebski 
wilh 2.8 seconds on the clock fin- 
ished the scoring. 

Until Northland took over at ihe 
end, the two teams both struggled to 
gel into u rhythm in a game thai fea- 
tured more turnovers (37) than field 
goals (35). The Pioneers shot just 28 
percent from ihe field (17/60) and 
turned it over 20 times. The Raiders 
shot an only slight I y-better 32 per- 
cent from the floor (18/56) and lost 
the ball 17 limes. 

"Il was kind of a ragged game." 
admitted Northland coach Rick 
Nikuncn. "Wc finally settled down 
the last five minutes and quit turn- 
ing it over." 

The Pioneers won wilh l3-for-2l 
free throw shooting, compared to a 
2-for-9 showing by the Raiders. 
Northland also finishing wilh a 42- 
31 rebound advantage - 15 of those 
coming on ihe offensive end. 

"Defense won il," said Nikuncn. 
"We're going through kind of a mid- 
slump right now as far as 



«&J 



>. 27 - 



East Grant! Forks Sucrod Hi. _ . 
Gryglo-Qatzko 

■ TuoWoy. Jan. 27 • Boys b! 
Kill win Central. 

■ Fnday, Jan, 30 ■ Dor> t> 
Maririall County Control. 

Good rid ga/Gry Qls-Gatzko 

■ Monday. Jan. 20 - qIMs basketball v. 
" n Counly North. 



offense roc 



, halftime 



■i dri' 



20-19 lead as Nelson scored 
ilh five seconds left. 
ahead 29-1 



Central Lake; 
when J.J. Steinhurst scored with 
10:53 left in the game, and the 
Raiders didn't give ilic lead up unlil 
their stretch drive collapse. 



Ftod Lake Falls 

■ Saturday, Jan, 31 - 1 
WatrMd (oiGoodiklDO). „,_,_,, „, 

Bfldaor/Groonbush-MldrJIo Rlvor 

■ Tusidoy, Jan. 27 - boys boskolSboll at 

■ Thursday. Jan. 23 ■ tfrls Bi 
Ftosoau. 



Woods. 

Mora ha 1 1 County Control 

■ Monday. Jan. 20 - grrli boskolOall vi 

■ Tuosday. Jan, 27 ■ grii Basketball vi 
Stephen .Aroylfi. 

■ Thursday, Jan. 2D - g< 
Warroad. 

■ Friday. Jan. 30 • boys bask 
Gryrjla-Gatiko. 



10 10 

B/Q-Mtl - Mortl FlooJO 2. Slclanlo 
Sparby 14, Tiffany HaoenB. Koro Kujmo 4. 
Kara Super 2, Missy Smrth 12. 

TF1F • Katio Hartion 2. Toyn Hgnt S. 
Laura Follolt 0, Amber Klinkor 4, Bocky 
Moonoy 5. Nicole Kopari 20. 



Grygla-Gat/.kc shot 41 percent 
from the field (23/56) and made 12 
of 17 free Ihrow attempts. Kittson 
County North shot only 36 percent 
from the floor (20/56) und went 8- 
for-15 al the line. The Eagles fin- 
ished wilh u 31-19 rebound advan- 
tage over Ihe Cougars, who topped 
the turnover charts 16-9. 

i 2 3 4 T 

rjryorOfQotiko 10 10 13 13 01 

Kittson Co. North 17 S 10 20 52 

O-Q - Aloi Horto 2. Alo< Andorson 1B, 
Androw SufWberg 3,-Joddari Holla 4, Toboy 
HWlhuson 2. Dryco Toraorson 4, Philip 
D railing 20. 

KCN • Mall NortUn 2. Kris Hokanson 12. 
Adam Wilebski 12. Joiomy Hoalrup 23. 
Conrad Olsonoskl 2. 



for-48 from the field (40 percent), 
while Warroad went 24-for-47. Both 
sides were 9-for-l5 at the free throw 
line. The Nordics had more 
rebounds (26-25) and ■ more 
.turnovers II4 : 1 3), 



WOftOOd 13 10 14 

MCC - Jon Donarski 11, CatoD 
Hollbutan 14. Matt Nelson 0, Carroll 
Majnor fj, Dayton Elsolb 2. Greg Uoland 4, 
Dovld Wllcoi S. 

Warroad ■ Pat Russell 4, Mall Jonson G, 
Jon Doeblar 24. Travis Amlot 3. Justin 
Mornman 0. Miko Poiorson 11, Jarod Powaii 
2. 



"This was a big game; it will go a 
long ways in dctcrminine a state 
tournament spot," said Nikuncn, 
referring to the Northern Division 
standings that, at the start of the 
night, showed Vermilion at 4-0, 
Fergus Falls and Central Lakes 3-1, 
Northland and Itasca 2-2, Mcsabi 1- 
3, Rainy River 1-4, and Hibbing 0- 
3, Top four regular season finishers 
in the eight-team division earn 
MCCC playoff spots. 

Nelson scored 14 points, Johnson 
13 and Wilebski 12 to lead the 
Pioneers, who are 7-5 overall. 
Central Lakes did not have a double 
figure scorer. , 

t 2 T 

Conlral Lakes 10, 20 39 

Northland 20 30 SO 

Conlral Lakes - Haalliar Posdil 8. Amy 
Kappes 7. Casandra Buckingham 4, 
Rhonda Ploli 2. Sarah Koulo 0. J, J. 
Steinhurst 2. Krlsty AsWund 2, Glno Jocoos 
0. 

Northland - Paula Hovda 0, Jenny 
Johnson 13. Naomi Wilebski 12. Darlono 
Nelson 14, Karrln Sloskopl 1, Meckonik) 
Mahviu4. 



— I AREA SPORTSl — 

Rod Lnko County Control 

■ Tuesday. Jan. 27 - boys basketball at 
Rod Lake Falls: girls basketball vs. 
Cloororook-Gocivlek (al Okloo), 

■ Thursday. Jan. 20-0)1*-*"- 
Warrcn-AJvarodoOslo (al PI 

■ Salurday, Jan. 31 - boys bi 
Fbhor'Clirnai. 

Goodrldga 



Saturday, January 24, 1998 



NORTHERN WATCH 



Page II 



Green Wave skates 
to 4-2 win over TRF 



Regrouping from 11 poor showing 
iiT-a-y-0 Salurday loss at Roseau, 
Thief Hivcr Falls put logclhcr a 
sluing effort Tuesday in a Section 
KA high school hockey malch-up 
■nsiliast Grand Forks. Ho 



Ihe re 



ull was the s; 



s.This 



c hy a 4-2 margin, dropping the 
visiting Prowlers to 2-13. 

"I thought wc played pretty well." 
said Thief River l-'alls coach Scotl 
Hergland, who let it Ik known in no 
uncertain terms thai he wasn't happy 
with the Prowlers' performance 
against Roseau. "Wc played 11 prctly 
good hockey game against a quality 
opponcnl." 

Early-game goals by Kyle Cash, 
who scored just 41 seconds into the 
conicst. and Brian Bakkcn, who 
scored al the 3:47 mark, provided 
lire Green Wave lo a 2-0 head slart. 

Thief River Falls matched that 
with goals by Wade Chiodo and 
Jared Kciersonjust 1:31 apart in the 
first five minutes of the second peri- 



od. 

I-asi Grand Forks broke the tie on 
a Travis Carivcau coal 4:36 into the 
third period and added an insurance 
goal by Cash with 34 seconds left. 

Thief River Falls, meanwhile, fell 
into a season-long pattern with a 
handful of near-misses that could 
have lurncd the game in the 
Prowlers' favor, poinlcd out 
Hergland. 

Sophomore Mike Dower had 31 
saves in Ihe Thief River Falls nets. 
East Grand Forks goalie Wade 
(tollman finished with 23 saves. 

Scoring 
r-lral period - EOF. Kyle Cash (Brian 
Bakken), :41; EOF. Bukknn (Tyler 
Palmtseno-Cash). 3:47. 

Second period -TRF. Wade Chiodo (Jon 
Rliiov-Jaiod Rolorson). 3:12: TRF. Relerson 
' (Kyle AndoraoivChioda). 4:43. 

Third period ■ EOF. Travis Cartveau 
(Scotl Mack-Justin Hillor). 4:30: EOF. Cash 






14:20. 



Huskies fall to Bears 



Goodridge had trouble on both 
offense and defense Tuesday in a 
62-48 boys high school basketball 
loss lo Like of Ihe Woods. 

"We couldn't shoot from ihe out- 
side." reported Goodridge coach 
Eric Mickclson. "They sal in a zone 
and there was nothing wc could do 
about il." 

And it wasn't any better al the 
olhcr end of the court, according to 
Mickclson. "I was disappointed in 
our defensive effort." he said. 



The visiting Bears trailed 13-12 
at Ihe end of ihe first quarter, but 
ihcy were ahead 28-18 at halftime 
and were up 44-30 through three 
quarters. 

Rian Berg scored 20 poinLs to 
lead Lake of the Woods, Ben 
Hanson paced Goodridge with 18 
points. "Ben hud a good^ game," 



pointed out Mickclson. "He's been 
prctly consistent." 

Goodridge shot only 35 percent 
from ihe field (17/49). while Lake 
of the Woods shot 47 percent 
(2H/60). Al the free throw line, the 
Huskies were 12-for-17 and Ihe 
Bears went 2-for-4. Goodridge had 
n 27-20 rebound advantage. Lake of 
the Woods topped the turnover 
charts 14-13. 

Il was Ihe fourth straight loss for 
the Huskies, who arc now 5-8. 

*ka>ri«f| 

I 2 3 4 T 

Lako of the Woods 12 10 10 18 02 

Goodrtdge 13 5 12 1B 48 

LOW - Welly Buogler 3, Cornell Carry! 8. 
Rlan Dorp. 20. Eric Holon S. Marty 
Kumenluk 10, Grog Hulnagie 3. Tony 
Coktwoll 10. 

Goodrtdge - Bon Hanson 18. Jarod 
Eidaibes 12. Jim School 8, Travb School 8. 
Josh Gallagher 2. Choncey Hulvoticn 2. 



Raiders pull away, 
beat NCTC 102-82 

■ Northland men fall to 1-12 



Central Lakes, after lhrcalcninc 
to break the game open on several 
occasions, finally took charge at the 
end as the Raiders posted a 102-82 
Wednesday night Minnesota 
Community College Conference 
Northern Division men's basketball 
win over Northland in Thief River 
Falls. 

The Pioneers overcame four dou- 
ble digit deficits to slay in the game, 
but ihcy couldn't keep pace down 
■ ihe sircich. Trailing 64-51 following 
a three-point play by the Raiders' 
Gus Bollum wilh 14:46 to play, 
Northland relied heavily on the 
strong inside piny by Chaka Ali to 
get back in it. A put-back by the 6-4 
freshman nulled the Pioneers within 
73-70 with 8:05 remaining. 

Northland was still within 84-78 
on a base line drive by Ali with 4:50 
left, but that's when Central Lakes 
put together a game-securing M-0 
run. Andre Watts begun il with a 
three-point play and Bollum fin- 
ished it with a fast break lay-up as 
Ihe spread zoomed to 95-78 with 
2:37 on the clock. 

Two sets of free ihrows by 
Northland's Grunt Skibicki and 
Dwight Goodwin interrupted the 
Central Lakes outburst, but the 
Raiders tacked on seven more 
points in the finul 1:49 to win going 
away. 

"Wc played hurd for 35 minutes, 
then gave it away in the lost five," 
offered disappointed Northland 
coach Ted Kri/c. "I thought .we had 
them." 

Despite 17 first- half turnovers, 
the Pioneers played the Raiders on 
near-even terms while trailing just 



46-41 al intermission. ■ 

"Wc hud too many first half 
turnovers." noted Kriic moments 
aflcr the conclusion of the contest 
that dropped Northland to I-I2 for 
the year. "I don't know what the 
turnover situation was in the second 
half, but I do know wc hod poor 
shot selection." 

Ali finished wilh a game-high 30 
points, while Josh Whitlock netted 
18, Goodwin 16 and Skibicki. the 
newest member of the team, con- 
tributed 10. Five Raiders hit double . 
figures, led by Bollum, a 6-4 sopho- 
more from Braincrd, with 28 points. 

Northland was 29-for-62 from the 
field (47 percent) and stayed in the 
game with 24-for-29 free throw 
shooting. Central Lakes enjoyed a 
4I-for-72 shooting performance 
from the floor (57 percent) and 
made 14 of 23 free throw attempts. 
The Raiders finished with a 34 ( 30 
rebound edge. The* Pioneers hod 
more turnovers, 27-21. 

The week began with Fergus 
Fulls and Central Lakes tied atop 
the Northern Division standings ut 
4-0, followed by Mcsubi 2-2, 
Vermilion and Rainy River 1-2, 
Hibbing 1-3, and Northland 0-4. 
Top four regular season finishers 
earn MCCC slate tournament spots. 

s *° "■ , 2 T 

Control Lokes 40 50 102 

Northland **1 -"I 82 

Control Lakos ■ Gus Bollum 20. Gerard 
KJmman 0. Chad Nolton G, Jolt Olson 2, 
Tyroa RoynokJs 18. Scott Savor 15, Andre 
Watt* 11. Josh Hanson 15, Bob Josson2. 

Northland • Nle Thompson 5. Dwtghl 
Goodwin 10, Josh Whllloek 10, Sean 
Dnjg-joman 3. Chaka All 30, Grant Skibicki 
10. 



Gators handle Storm 



Strong play under the bnskct car- 
ried ' Badgcr/Grccnhush-Middtc 
River io a 62-53 boys high school 
basketball win over Slcphcn-Argylc 
Tuesday. 

The Gators out-rebounded the 
Storm 39-27 and had a huge udvnn- 
lagc al the free throw line, where 
they were 21-for-29, compared lo a 
l-for-4 night for the visitors. 

"Wc controlled the inside game," 
explained Badger/Greenbush- 
Middle River coach Eldon Snarby. 
"Wc put the ball inside and drew a 
lot of fouls." 

Stcphen-Argylc stayed close wilh 
outside shooting, hilling 8 of 15 
from 3-point range. 

The Galors led ut the quarter 
slops 14-6. 28-18 and 38-36. They 
iced it with I5-for-I8 free throw 
shooting in the fourth quarter - 
most of ihcm down the streieh with 
the Storm backed into a musl-foul 
situation. 

Jeremy Vacura 12-for-12 at the 
free throw line as part of a game- 
high 25-poini game for the Gators. 
Teammate Shane Nelson netted 10. 



Steve Crummy scored 12 points, 
Recce Scttcrholm II and Jared 
Hanson 10 for Stcphen-Argylc. ■ 

From the field, the Gators were 
23-for-64 (36 percent) and the 
Storm went 30-for-65 (46 percent). 
Both sides had 12 turnovers. 

1 2 3 4 T 

Stephon-Arayto 12 1B 17 S3 

Q/G-MWdle Rlvor 14 14 10 24 02 

S-A - Slovo Crummy 12, Raeca 
Sottorholm 11, Dann Adoiphson 8, Andy 
Aakro O. Jarod Hanson 10. Rich Wagner 4. 

(VG-MR ■ Joromy Vocuia 25, Shone 
Wilson 10, Adam Holme* 0. Dory I 
Wockanluss a. Bret Bonlow 2. Andy 
Schonkoy 5. Richard Wockenluss 4, DavW 
TmsclnsW 2. 

TRF girls beat B/G-MR 
In JV basketball, 44-39 

Thief River Falls held leads at 
each quarter stop Tuesday en route 
to a 44-39 girls junior varsity high 
school basketball win over 
Badger/Greenbush-Middle River. 

Kim Almquist scored I4pointsto 
lead the winners, who led ul. the 
breaks 12-9. 18-14 and 31-22. 



Second half fast 
break lifts Eagles 
past RLCC 68-46 

East Grand Forks speeded things 
up in the second half Tuesday, and 
as a rcsull, ran nway with a 68-46 
boys high school basketball win 
over Red Lake Counly Central. 

The Muslancs. who hud an 1 1-10 
lead at the end of the first quarter, 
played the Eagles lo a 21-21 first 
half lie before the Sacred Heart 
offense went into fast break mode. 
The winners went ahead 44-37 in 
the third quarter and stretched il to a 
22-point spread over the final eight 
minutes. 

They increased the tempo, and 
wc didn't get back on defense," 
explained Red Lake County Central 
coach Chris McLean. 

It was the fifth straight loss for 
the 3-9 Mustangs, who once again 
had trouhlc getting shots to fall in a 
32 percent l8-for-56 performance 
from the field. "It was another 
owful shooting night," noted 
McLean, whose team has struggled 
lo hit even the 40 percent mark dur- 
ingthe losing streak. 

77ie Mustangs were 6-for-10 at 
the free throw line; the Eagles made 
8 of 14. 

Umrimm 

1 2 3 4 T 

RLCC 11 10 10 40 

EGF Sacred Heart 10 11 23 24 68 

RLCC - David Fox 4, Eric Walter 2. 
■Mark Lomn*on 15. Nle* WakJal 14, Matt 
BjerUle 0, Ross Ant 2. Matt Hn-by 3. 

EGFSH ■ Aaron Greoolro S, Eric* Nell 
10. Bon Horkon 8, Nolo Bondorud 13, Tom 
EbortowtU 1. Paul StMa- 10. Jon Kotrba 
13, Joo Zovoral 8. 

Mahnomen/Waubun 
Is 39-32 winner over 
TRF wrestling team 



early lead, then held off a Thief 
River Falls comeback lo emerge a 
39-32 dual meet ■ high school 
wrestling winner over Thief River 
Falls Tuesday. 

Trailing 27-10 after seven of the 
1 3 matches had been completed, the 
visiting Prowlers rallied behind 
wins by Josh Hagcn at 145 pounds. 
Josh Stinson nl 152 and Jeremy 
Houskc at 160 to pull within 27-26. 

The Thief River Falls charge was 
stopped iit 171, but a second period" 
pin by Cody Cropcau at 189 
chopped the Mahnomen/Waubun , 
lead to just 33-32. However, a first j 

g:riod pin by heavyweight Milcsj 
nicer put an abrupt end to the". 
Prowlers' bid for their first win in!; 
six dual meet starts. 

Earlier in the evening, the visit- 
ing Prowlers came up with wins by 
Beau Abrohamson at 103 and Jon 
Swansonat 135. 
Utfinciman/W-nibun 30, TRF 32 
ltd • Beau ADraha-nson (TRF) pinned 
But TOon :I8; 112 • Randy Bonogoiiky 
(MW) pinned Ryan Poloant 3:06; 119 - 
Casey Thronson (MAV) by lofloil; 12S - Brian 
Francis. (MflrV) by lorfolt: 130 - Kyle Fiand* 
(1*W) by lortelt; 13S • Jon Swonson (TFlF) 
doc. Nick Hobon tB-7; 140 - Mitch Johnson 
(WW) doe. Philp Mormanson 11-4; 145 - 
Josh Haoen (TRF) pWnod Oavtd Gorary '59; 
1S2 - Join Stlmon (TRF) pinned Kevin 
Winkler (MW) 2:4B: 180 - Joromy Housko 
(TRF) doc. Tom Morton* 19-7: 171 • Ouonlln 
Toeman (MfW) pinned Mark Chopolta 537: 
1B0 • Cody Crapoou (TRF) pinned Danny 
Gorary 224: hwy • Miles Baker (M/W) 
pinned Robert Spry :10. 

TRF swim squad to 
host Park Rapids in 
Tuesday dual meet 

After making buck-io-back trips 
to Crookston, the Thief River Falls 
boys high school swim team will be 
at homcTucsday When Ihe Prowlers 
■host Pork Rapids Area in'a 5 p.m. 
dual at Ihe Franklin Middle School 
pool. It'll be just the third home 
appearance of iheycar for the Brian 
Olson-coached Thief River Falls 
squad. 

The Prowlers competed in the 
Crookston Invitational Friday (Jan. 
' 16) and returned to the Pirates' pool 
for a triangular Tuesday. 

Moorhead won the invitational 
meet wilh 355 points, followed by 
Grand Forks 210, Detroit Likes 
203. Park Rapids Area 159. 
Crookston 153. Thief River Falls 
9l.andPcrham88. 

In the triangular, Bcmidji collect- 
ed 149 poinls, Crookston 94 and 
Thief River Falls 63. 

"A lol of cuys are dropping 
times." pointetl out Olson, noting 
that the Crookslon pool is measured 
in meters, compared lo yards fea- 
tured at most pools, which requires 
a bil of adjusting in figuring indi- 
vidual performances. 

Freshman Neel Patcl and eighth 
grader Aaron Field had significant 
time drops during the invitational, 
while junior Colin Browning and 
seventh grader Bryan Sorvig were 
aitention-gcticrs with their times 
during the triangular. The team's top 
swimmer, sophomore Zach Olson. 
also turned in a lop-notch effort in 
the 500 al the triangular. 

TRF Pukm - Crookaton Invitational 

200 medley relay - 11. (Gabe Carison. 
Cody Sorvio. Aaron .Field. Nalhen 
B-Oirmlng),2:41.6e. 

200 freestyle - 3. Zach Orson. 2:14.05: 0. 
RoryHoven, 223.11. 

200 I.M. - 13. Coin Brooming. 2:5920. 

50 Iroesiyle - 10. Sam Komr. 30.31: 0. 
Cody Sorvtg. 3230; 14. Bryan Sorvkj. 30 JO: 
18. Abe Lee. 43.01. 

(Continued on Page 12) 





lite 'tii 

1, 1998 



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TRF swim squad to 
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1.03; 17. Unman 
Browning, til (17. 20. Nool Pntol. 1:31 OS 

MOIroo»iylo-3. Zacn Olion, 01 U. G 
Rory Hovon. 22 56. IS. Cody Scrvig. 
7:15.07; 17. Bryon Sorvig. 04 83 

200 Irooitylo 'ol.iy ■ 5 Coin Orowrvnn. 
Sam Koiar, ZocM Olson, nory Haven, 
1.57.32; 12. Wool Palol. Onbo CXion. Aba 
Loo. Aaron Fiold. 2:35 DO. 

100 bnckttroko • It. Nathan Drowning 
12100. 

100 binn«!»lroko - 14. Colin Browning 
1:34.01; 18. Aaron F«ld. 1:4050; 18. Oabo 
Carljon. 1:51.32, 20, Noel Palol. 1;54 80. 

400 Irooitylo relay . 4. Colin Drowning. 
Sam Kotar, Zoch Obon, Ron/ Hoyon, 
4 27.00. 

TRF Pin co ■ - Crookilon Triangular 

200 modloy rolay ■ 4. Nalhan Browning. 
Zoch Olion. Sam Kola'. Ron/ Hoveri. 
2.2503; S. Orynn Sorvig. Oabo Canton. 
Andy Hudson. Aaron Fiold. 2:49 E0. 

S0o Irooitylo - 2. Zocn Ctton, 2.13 59. 8. 
Aaron Fnkt. 3 04.29. 

200 I.M. - 3. Rory Hcvon. 2:4560. fl. 
Andy Huflton. 3:18.13. 

50 Irooitylo • 4. Sam K«ar. 2994. Q. 
Cody Sown, 34.09. 

100 bullarlTy - 4. Rory Hovan, 1:2801. 

100 Irooitylo - 4. Sam Koiar, 1:0004. 8. 
CodySorwo, I:I4.«4. 

SCO Irooitylo - 3 Znch CHion, 552.03, 5. 
Bryan Sonrtg, 8:10.37. 

200 Irooitylo relay- 4. Cody Soivir;. Rory 
Hovon, Sam Koiar. Zocn CHson. 2.03.74; 0. 
Abo Loo, Oabo Carlson, Nool Palol, Bryan 
Sorvifl. 2:51.07. 

tOO DacKtlroko ■ 3. Nalhan Growning, 
1:20.37; 8. Oabo Carlton. 1:43.11. 

tOO oroailslrolao - S. AnJy Hjdion, 
1:43 30; O.Aaron Fiold. 1:54.50. 

400 Irooitylo rolay - 3. Cody Sorvig. Andy 
Hudson. Nollion Drownina. Aaron Flo Id. 
5:05.GO. 

Red Lake Electric 
plans membership 
meetings in area 

Four membership meetings for 
Red Lake Electric Cooperative arc 
planned in laic January and early 
February in ihc cooperative's scr- 

An informational mcciing is 
scheduled for Tuesday, January 27, 
ai 1:30 p.m. in the Oklcc communi- 
ty cenlcr, 

Disinci 3 meeting will be at 1:30 
p.m. Monday, February 2. in the 
Ncwfolden community center; 
District 9 mcciing will be at 7:30 

tm. February ~ at Black River 
ulhcran church west of Si. Hilairc 
and District 6 meeting will be 
Thursday, February 5, at 7:30 p.m. 
in the Red Lake Falls community 
hall. 

Topics of discussion for the 
'meetings' include electric industry 
trends, Turtle' automated meter sys- 
tem and DIRECTV programming, 
along with other items. Official 
business, including election of 
director candidates, will also be 
conducted at the three district meet- 
ings. 

Members ore invited to attend 
any of the meetings, even ifthcy arc 
not in those members' districts. 

District 3 includes West Valley, 
New Maine, Marsh Grove, Ncw- 
folden, Vikinc and New Solum' 
townships in Marshall county. 

District 6 includes Terrebonne, 
Emardvillc, Gcrvais, Red Lake 
Falls, Louisville, Wylie, Brown's 
Creek and River townships in Red 
Lake county. 

District 9 consists of Numedal, -■ 
Nordcn, Dray, Sanders, Polk 
e, Black River and River Falls 
townships in Pennington county. 

Free attendance and door prizes 
will be awarded at each meeting 
and lunch will be served. 



Husband of MR 
graduate appears 
on O'Brien show 

Mark Edwards and his hand 
«/(»m(Mif Minneapolis are winners of 
the Ciman OHricn College Band 
Contest and will appear on The 
Cnium O'llrirn Show on January 
30. 

Edwards, who writes lyrics and 
music as well as singing wiih ihc 
group, is married lo Heidi Dyrud, 
daughter of Phil and Avis Dyrud of 
Middle River and a 1992 graduate 
of Middle River high school. 

Selection was made from a video 
of the hand performing an original 
song. Earlier this month the band 
was informed it won the contest and 
would be flown to New York City 
late this month to tape the show. 



The Classifieds 



The Classifieds - The Classifieds 



Mlscollaneous 

FOR SALE* Oil tumaeo, good tor shop or 
oorogo, 150, Also, Anplo computor, $300, 
681-1701. It7p 



DOWN UNDER II 
CUSTOMERS.! 



I Hnvo Ooon In Forgo WHH My &ck 
HuUJind. I Am Dock And Roady To 
Rotumo Dutinnu. Ploais Como 
Down And Find Your Favoittoill 



Bonus: Buy 1 Book For Reg, 
Price-Gat 1 Book For 50C 

tony For Th* InconinKilonc* 
BIB Knight Avt. hL, TnUf RlmK Foil* 



Situation Wanted 

MONDAY/TUESDAY/FRIDAY. 9 n m - 
5 30 p.m. Northlnnd Snoo Ropoir. C07 B3i 

si. E. PFiarap 

TO QET n world ol products catalog, 
iond $4 pnynolo lo World ol Products. 
PO Oat 104, Rod Lnko Foils. MN 50750. 
Pfll14p 



The Classifieds 



THE WOODMASTEH- Hoal your homo, 
shop, bom. groonhouso, otc. Ouotod by 
Engmoor* as ttio number one Ki design 
tor ottleKincy, atronglh nnd ovor-oll 
dosJgn. Easy wtnlof Installution. Stovoti 
avallablo today, call toll troa 1-aoo-B32- 
3029 or 218-253-4320. NormwMl Monu- 
locturlng. Inc., Rod Lnko FbMi, MN 

50750. 1t7c 

FOR SALE- OWor 280 IBM compotlblo 
computor. prlntor and notlwaro, bosioflor 
(undorS100). 601-7422. 117p 



FOR ALL YOUR 

Repair Needs 



NCCM's i triir 

• SAitI & S£ tn-.Zl • SH COD S'iC'.VCS-iCS 

1M7N,Dululh ThlotnivtrFilt* 

001-3340 



Daycare 



UCEKSED DAYCARE has oponlngs lor 
2 yoors and up. Food program, foncod 
yard.S1.55^our.601-S2G6. F217p 
WILL PflOVIDE daycoro in my homo. 
I'm dopondablo nnd also havo roloronc- 
03. havo room tor any ago. Call anytlmo. 
0B1-2CB3. oaklorLoso. P4i7p 
WANTED- Daycara or bobytilnor lor a 5- 
yoar-old and a 4-yoar-oM, both atlond 
school M-F. must bo oblo to start oarly. 
Call G81-10C0 lor moro Information. 

P4l7p 

DAYCARE HAS oponings for rull-timo 
InlonUprO'Schoolors, hours 5:30-4:30. 

coiieai-1043. P4»op 

DAYCARE OPENINGS. All ogos. Food 
program. Proschoo) oducaDon. Big play 
oroa. Foncod yard. 681-5003. 2tlc 

Household Goods 

ENTERTAINMENT CENTER, $50.00; 
27" TV, loan than 1-yoor-cld; rjrossor 
w/mirror, S100.00. 681-2520 or 1-500- 
645-4709. 2tSp 




DOIM'S 

307 1ST ST. E., THF 

Acm— From Pitnlngton Souor* 

Wri-nutt iah - ii rot- 14 pju cwsarmimat 

mi AM -tJ tJ.'14* PA-CLOBOItt IKR 

SEWING & VACUUMS 

Boloo A Sorvlca • NEW ft USED 

681-8664 



SEWING MACHINE 
REPAIR In your home or 
bring (o Narverud Cleaners. * 

Phone Earl at 

964-5763 or 681-3441 



MATCHING LOVESEAT and hido-a-bod 
sola, bluo tonoo, oxcotlont condiUon, 
$200.00; quoon-slio watorbod, oval mlr- 

ror, $50.00, 2S3-207B. P4tBp 

FOR SALE- HkJo-a-bod solo, orr wftlta, 
good condition, $80.00. Colt 6B1-5001. 
217p 



RICK'S APPLIANCE 




Fa«oryAnlbortnJ 
Sm let On MM 
MiJarBnodi 



For Sorvlco CitL- 
681-2263 or 1-800-3&0-2263 

In Homo a Sfiep Sorv>» 



FOR SALE- Apartment slxo Whlrlpoo 
washor and dryor, usod vary Dttlo. Call 
687-2550 ottor 5:00 p.m. F2t7p 



mU CM BEAT MEGS; 
YOU UN BEAT A DRUM; 
YOU CAN! BE&T OUR DEALS) 

Sutton's Carpet Warefiwe 

FJnalny ■ (216)684-6161 



Miscellaneous 

FOR SALE- Etoctrlc motora, 1/4-h.p. to. 
7-1/2 h.p. Soo us for alt your oloctric mo- 
tor noods. Float Supply. Call 661-2850. 

47t)c 

FOR SALE- Sharponlng oqulpmom, eor- 
blda blades, Z*-40*. Rottlpor, routar, 
shaper bits, holosaw, nool blades, hand 
sow and rotoottier. sotlora, Jolnlor, 
pianos, knlvoa, 222-3035. P4I10p 

, Hot Wattr Outdoor 1\kio£ Jumact 



ovof.an dnlgn, oaiy vtotor Innallallon. 
Star** ArwtliNt Today Caff ToO Fr— 

1-800-932-3629 or 218-253-4328 

NORTHWEST MANUFACTUBlNa INC 
V Rod l»k« Fain, MN 00760 _s 
QAS AND WOODBURNINQ FIRE- 



EARTH STOVE, NAPOLEON, MAJES- 
TIC. VERMONT CAST1N0. Also, maso- 
nory llroplacos, wood-oil fumacoa. Guar- 
ontood LOWEST PRICES. Financing. 1- 
600-44 6-4043. Mahnomon. 0711c 



SERIOUS COLLECTOR buying old Oil 
and gas and auto, signs. Old qt.-5 qt. and 
gallon and 5-Qflllon oil cans and oil bol- 
Dos, gas pump globes, old t 
gas pumps. Son/tee stalion olr dispens- 
ers. Also old oorvtco station caps and 
badges and olhor gas and oil memonibl. 
lia. Paycashl 1-80O-4E5-B440. P4H0p 




EXPERIENCED CARPENTER will do ro- 
modollng work (or you. small jobs ok. call 
Polo. 681-5134, P4i7p 



JACOBSON'S 
SNOW REMOVAL 




Ploase Can. Wo Wont Your Businoss. 

Coll 6BM511 oik for Adorn 

or 681-1106 ask for Curtis 



Weqe* 

CONSTRUCTION 

Building and 
Remodeling 

For Freo Esllmotcs Call: 

TIM 

681-5465 



FOR SALE- SUo 8 Bauor hockey skotos, 
liko now, $20.00. To glvo away, old mug- 
wines. Outdoor Ufo, MN Sportsman, 

081-4098. P4IBI 

GUMBO MUDDERS, 44x18.5x15 on 
15x10 chroma spokos, 6-holo rims, 

$600.00.218-425-3181. 1l7p 

COLLECTORS- WE s«n havo a low cop- 
ios of Tho Times Contonnlol odlUon avall- 
ablo, SI. 00 per copy. Tho Tlmos, 324 
Moln Ave. N., Thiol Rlvor Falls, MN 

S6701. 348o 

ELIMINATE HIGH HEATING costs with a 
StaJnloss Stool outdoor woodbumlng tur- 
nato. Heats mulUplo bulktlngs. Big sav- 
ings on oarly orrJers. Financing ovoilablo, 
GUARANTEED LOWEST PRICES. 1- 

600-446-4043, Mahnomon. SOHc 

FOR SALE- Planks. rx8*-lCr.12--16' 
from ff to 20' long. Also, 3x10-8' lhai sow- 

mitl buy, 218-253-2036. Flflc 

FOR SALE- Sogo Saturn, 2 controllers, 
momory cnraldgo and 6 gamaa for $200. 
Good condition, instructions included. 

Coll 686-3104. P4t9p 

WINDSHIELD REPAIR- Slano chips, 
small brooks, approx. 10% roptacoment 
coat Most insuronco companies waJvo 
doduetlbla. For free ostlmotoo call 681- 
4233. Anderson Wlndshlold Repair. 

NM2-BHC 

INTEL P166 MMX. now. 32MB ram, 2.1 
QB hard tlrivo, 8xCD, 33.6 modom. 
sound. 107 Ergo keyboard, mouso, 
Windows '05 plus $300 boo software 
$880.00 tnehxfoa doDvory. Call 612-306- 
2339 and laavo massaga onytimo, 

P8H1P 

FOR SALE- OJdos and 12 tires oil a 
now doublo wide homo. Call 681-6314. 

P4I7P 

PAYING CASHS- Wontod by sorlous col- 
lector, all typos ol old advertising signs, 
Coca-Cola. Popsl, boar, auto., gas and 
oil, soil drink and oil othor typos of signs, 
onyquanutyl 1-80O-23 6-7708. P4l10p 
FOR SALE- Four-Inch Joinlor. nlco condi- 
tion. Also, choice of 2 chain saws: 16" 
Slihl0-l2orHomelilo,681-4l37. »7p l 
FOLTZ BUILDINGS. Your post Iramo 
building axparta. InsirJatod snops/gorog- 
on, commorclolflndustrlol, maeninory 
siomgo, horeo/cotdo bams. Call t-800- 

255-0BB1. FtSfJc 

QUALITY REBUILT ENGINES Starling 
at S705. 1 2 monoVl 2,000 mllo warranty - 
w/oxch. on (obulkJablo coro. Installations 
and towing avallablo. Don's Machlna 
Shop, Fo8Ston,MN,800-446-151B. 17tfc 
SNOW PLOWfor sole. 681-2766. P4t6p 
FOR SALE- Brothor word prc-cosaor. 
$500 now, wilt soil for $175. usod vory lit- 

Bo, 661-1464 oftorSp.m. P4t7p 

RREWOOD- Oak. olm, while osh, pop- 
plo, call 681-7684 Of 681-1963 ovonlngs, 
wilt dotlvor. PF4t7p 

Situation Wanted 



Notices 



- REWARD/- 

FOR INFORHATIOH TO 
THE WHEREABOUTS OP 
THE FREIQHTLCfER BOOM 
TRdCK AND AIR JACK. 
aNJT STOLEN FROM THE 
WAYWE HOLMGREN SR. 
HOQSE MOVING ESTATE 
9*54-5697 



Excol Township will OlOCI ono Supervisor, 
3-yoor torni and ono Clork. 2-yonr torm. 
Township rosldonis Inloroslod In tiling ol- 
fldaviio lor candidacy may do no througlt 
January 27, with Uio Township Clark. 

Joo Oso, Clork 

217c 

PUBUC NOTICE 
Rlvor Fnlla Township will bo electing two 
township officials. Ono Suparvisor and 
ono Clork. Township rosidonts Inloroslod 
In filing affidavits ol candodlcy may do so 
botwoonJan. I3ondondlng Jan. 27 wlih 
Township Clork. 

Robert Fladoland 

Township Clork 

T2t6rJ2t6c 



ATVs/Motorcycles 

WANTED FOR ports- 1062 Hondo 70 3- 
whootor lor pans. Phono 210-601-1133 
or 218-681-6039 and laavo n mossotjo 
lor Gary. 72tlo 

Campers/ RVs 

31* TRAVEL trailer, air, owning, hoalor, 
good condition, S2.600.00 or hot tub, 
663-7292. F2t7p 



Sporting Goods 

FOR SALE- Now and usod goll carts. 
Wilcox. Rod Lnko Falls, 1-80O-645-5O0I. 

£6tlc 

NORTHERN OUN A Pawn pays cash for 
guns. 311 N. Main. 681-6611. SGUc 
FOR SALE- 1982 E-Z Go goll cor. oil in- 
Joctod, 4-whool. new tiros, good condi- 
tion, $750, 21B-745-5104. 1t7p 



Custom Services 

EXPERIENCED CARPENTERS looking 
for small 10 medium eiio. now or romo- 
doling Jobs. Call 681-0375 allot 4:00 p.m. 



YOUR INDEPENDENT 
HERBflllFE DISTRIBUTOR 

FOR fflODUCTS Mil 
218-597-2774 



ACKER BODY SHOP- Framo strolghlon- 
Ing, collision, glass, touch-up, 14 yoars 
oxporionco, Insuronco osilmalos wel- 
come. From Roseau: 6 milos wosl, 1H 

mile soutn. 463-5090. F3tlc 

rnings 

^TELEPHONE MESSAGE PADS- tOO 

shoo is por pod. 05 corns per pad. $4 .25 
for flvo pads. AvailnBlo at Tno Tlmos, 324 
Main Avonuo North. Thiol Rlvar Falls. 



Custom Services 



|:M.'IMs»li..47 

Chapter 7: $300 

KKE7 

Uncontested: S2S0 

OMDAHIUW OFFICE 

I-800-4SO-i>040 



Real Estate 


FOH 


RENT- Jwl out ol CRP. NE V*. 






4. 50C 34. 




rloal lovinship. call 211 


601-3019. 


Hnrb Ooolho. It7p 




WANTED FARMLAND- 1 h.iv 


a sonrxia 




who wonts lo buy good 


lrmiand in 


Iho Rod Lnko Foils. SI Hilnirr 






ol Plummor orons Wii: 






Northland Form Sal os. 


601-C036. 


F31tc 







OARN LOWERINQ ond strolghton.ng. 
Buildings loworod. rnbod, leveled of 
slrolghtonod. Guarnnlood woik. Froo os- 
Smatos, Ltayd Halvorson. Doliwl Lokos. 
218-238-6071. Pfll14p 



NINO YOUR wo0dingv iipfing and 
summer dotos slill nvmlablo. pnekngoa 
sunt nl $293. Coslom Crontiona Pholog- 
r;iphy. GB1-GIB2. P4t10p 



4 ELECIRIC 

• Residential • Agricultural 
■ Commercial 
■ Electric Heat 

TIM BERGERSON 

Owner-Operator 

call 681-4659 



Wanted to Buy 

WANTED TO Buy- 5-15 acres within 10 
rmlo radius of TRF, call 681-6027 altor 

OiOOp.m. P4t8p 

COLLECTOR PAYING cash for old slot 
machines, soda pop mochlnos, old pea- 
nut nnd gum machines ond |ukoboxos. 1- 

600-236-7708. P4H0p 

WANTED TO BUY- Children's cross 
country skis, boot sLio botwoon 1-3. Call 
218-745-6235, loavo mossogo. 4tlo 
WANT TO Buy Cylinder |ug lor 500cc 
Arctic Spirit onglno. Also, 3/4-h.p. sooled 

aloclrlc molor, 597-2700. 2t8p 

WANTED TO Buy- Yamaha SS ot similar 
snowmobllo body. In good shapo. Call 
218-762-5311 aflor 7:00 p.m. tt7p 



FOR SALE- 20 ocros 6 milos souin, 1 
imlo west ol Arctic, 68x170 dairy bam, 
70x75 Hanson silo looting shod, Wolis 
Irons. Call ownor, 216-681-3648. 7Qllc 
HAVE CASH buyora lor land wiltl now pr 
oitondod CRP contracts. For sale- 160 
acres in soclion 25. Kratka Township. 
Pennington County. S50.000; 160 acros 
in section 16. Romor Township. Penning- 
ton Counly, $-10,000; 40 ocros with old 
lnor-up buildings, in soclion 7, Lambert 
Township. Rod Lnku County, S20.000; 
400 acros in Huss Township, Roseau 
Counly. $200 por aero (will divido). Norm 
Anderson Ronity. 1602 East Groonwood. 
Thiol River Falls, MN 56701. phono 210- 
681-2320. lax 218G8I-0400. Selling 
(arms In NW Minnosota *lnco 1069. 
BOtlc 



RECREATIONAL LAND (or sale- 40 ocr- 
os and 60 acres kxnind in Marshall 
County. NW ol Thiol Rivor Foils, MN. 
near StrnndQuilt. 40 ncros priced nl 
54.000 00 or bost otter. 60 ocros priced at 
$12,000.00 or bosl ollor. To buy or sol! 
farms, contact Pholps Farm Snlos. PO 
Box 501. Brmnord, MN GG401. Phono 

216'829-182t. 4t0c 

FOR SALE- 2-bodroom homo, doublo 
garage, now 3< season porch, now fur- 



P4110p 

LAKESHORE HOME FOR SALE BY 
OWNER- At Sandy Shores oosl ol Long 
Pi., 4-yonrold. 3-bodroom. 2-bolh, yoar 
around living, many oxlrns. 216-783- 

5G01. 44»c 

IF YOU'RE looking for a 3-bodroom 
houso In Iho $40' s, you havo to see this 
ono. Evorythlng new, kltchon, bath, fur- 
naco, root, doors, carpel, paint, otc., 112 

N. Knoalo. 681-6707. 3tfc 

FOR SALE- 3-bodroom, 2-bolh, 1,340 
sq, ft. rambior. located qulot NE sldo of 
lown ovortooklng tho nvor. 24x36 garago. 
Call 60I-5400. no answer loavo mos- 

sogo. PF4tilp 

SMALL 2-BEDROOM homo, now floor- 
ing and lurnnco, 1-1*2 dolochod garago, 
qulot rosldon11.nl area, call 681-7673. 
216p 



mom. 3 typos ol lion 
yard with dock, smijiii 
rogo. Closo lo dowriio. 
hood. upporSCOs. G01-4LI33 31le 



ighBci 



COZY 3-BEDROOM hou-,o in Rod LnVo 
Falls, allnchoi doublo gniiiiin. arjplinnc- 
os, now flooring mrougnoui Full tmsn- 
mont. noar school, quiol noir]iiborliood 
Coll 253-2579 ollor GOO. 117p 



MLS. 



JfSTAN ' 
OIBSON I 

jj, MALTY A ™;;»^;' 

www.t rti I m • >, c em /gl b to r>- r • >lty 
1. BHICE.HEDUCED.DfUlifilYlNQ 
CA41Jl.v_H£5H*JHA«T_J/LJHI££ 
BCfXafAIJ.5, Seitlntj lor 100.. Thli 
builnoaa la a galdon opportunity lor 
torn* amtjllloui ponion, Moit ot tho 
•qulpmonl la nowor and Includti ■ 



Call Today Far Moro Details: 

STAN GIBSON REALTY 

218-681-4087 



PUBUC NOTICE 

Rosidonts ol Star Township, anyono 
wishing to hold ofllco of Township Super- 
visor for n 3-yoar lorni or Township Clork 
lor a 2-year torm must Mo with tho Town- 
ship Clark al his home. Jan. 20. 1008 to 
Feb. 6, 1B08. 

Ron Kotrbi 
Star Township Clork 



WANTED TO RENT: 
FARM LAND 



in trf area for 1998 and 
beyond. 218-280-2081 



-.IFOR ALL your prtnilng noods, stop nt 
Tho Tlmos. Wo print latiorhoads, envel- 
opes, resumes, booklets, pamphlets, 
whatihavo you. Call 681-4450 lor your 
froe'osHmolo lodayl . 



218c 



4S72 MOBILE homo. 4.4 acros. 3.5 miles 
north ol Rod Lnko Falls. Call ovonlngs. 

210-253-4369. P41l0p 

LOTS FOR Solo- luffxHW on Rainy 
Rlyor at Baudotto. MN. Coil 701-775- 
76t5. I70tfo 



:lJ!<^r^JJ.];T7^ 



160 Acres, 140 Tillable,. NE ol 
Oklee $295/Acreage. 



915 Acres, Mostly Tillable, 
1 Year Lell On CRP, Slrandquist 
Area. 



WANTED: Farmland - 

I have a serious client who 
wants to buy good farmland in 
the Red Lake Falls. St. Hilaire, 
Brooks, or west ol PJummer 
areas. Will pay cash. 



160 Acres CRP Plummer Area. 



320 Acres, 263 Tillable, Old 

Bldg. Site, 

Good Land. Only 56 Acres ot 

CRP. Kratka Bridge Area. 

$79,900 



Many Oltiers To Choose From 
Up To 1,000 Acres, 



PUREBRED DALMATION pups, born 
Oct, 25, no popors, S50.00 or Irode tor 
good horse hay. 064-5142. P4i8p 
FOR SALE- AKC malo yellow Lnb pup- 
pies, S125 each. All shots. Coll 21 6-745- 

5B24, Angus. MN. P4t0p 

FOR SALE- American Eskimo puppy, 
male. U.K.C. registered, S175.00, Call 
681-4257 ovonlngs, 681-B618 days. 

F4111C 

GIVE AWAY- Adult black Lnb spayod lo- 
malo, counlry dog. vory Iriondiy. lovos 
playing catch. 218-253-2878 
116f'P4M0p 



FOR SALE- Black Lab puppios. ready 10 
go. 2 males, 4 lomolos, S50.00, 218-874- 

2976. P417p 

FOR SALE- AKC rogislorodPurobrod 
Golden Roirlovor puppios, $125.00, 
avallablo 1-25-98. Call ovonlngs. 218- 
762-5035. penop 




€xtra, 
€xtra 

Now Accepting 

Applications For 

Northern Watch 

Carriers 

Pick Up An Application At 324 

-Carrier Delivery Roulcs Are 




The Northern Watch 
is looking for carrier deliv- 
ery people for the 
Thief River Falls area.* 

Girls and boys of all ages 

are encouraged to apply, 

along with adults. 

-*= wm air* a. o tp&ai v 

M*ress 

WScH 

Main Avenue North 

Independent Contractors. 



® The Times • WSxSH 



www.nwotch.ci 



CLASSIFIED ADS , „„ o „ 

DEADLINES: Tho Tim 00 - Monday, 10:00 A.M.; Northern Watch - WodnoBday, 3:00 p.m. 



City 

Stale _ 



Make Chock" Payable to Tho Tlmos, P.O. Box 100, Thief Rlvor Falls, MN 56701 

PLEASE BE SURE YOU HAVE CHECKED WHERE YOU WISH YOUR AD TO RUN 

YOUR BEST DEAL IS TO RUN IN BOTH, 





REACHING OUT 
WORLDWIDE 

For AJ Low A* $5.00 . 

□ Tlmos 

□ Tlmos - Inlomol 

□ Nortnorn W.itch 

O Northum V/otch . Iniomol 



Q Chock or Money Order Enclosed 

Q 0*^ MasloiCnrd * 

Q 3Ev,sn. 



_ Expiration Date „ 



I'nci- 14 



NORTHERN WATCH 



Suturdiiy, .Innuury 24, l')'m 



FOR SALE ON BIDS 



ng and proporty 
■I bldg., appro*. 
nil*. MN. legally 

hlal Rivor Falls, 



Tho Farmer* Union Oil Co. tiro watahouaa t 
la bo In Q otforcd for aala on bid a. 60' x 120' SI ran 
125* ol (ronlaga road on HWV'S SO ft 1 W.. T. 

LOI 0, Clock 2 of Nopor'a Second Addition 
Pennington County, Parcel ID* 35-33-012-20. 

To aoo property conlecl: David Klrheby, Farmere Union Oil Co.. E. 
TMIrd & Allanllc. T. P.. Falls. MN, 50701. 210-001-3512. 

Wdllen bide mual be aubmltled to Solhof Lew Otllce. 311 Main 
Avo. N.. T. F1. Falls. MN, 30701, 21D-001-OS30. prior to Noon. 
Wedneadey, February 4. 1003. 

Seller reeervea right lo rajeel all oflers/blda. Sale aubject to board 

PHOPERTY SOLD "AS IS." 



APARTMENT BUILDINGS FOR SALE 

Timberline Apartments - Warroad, Minnesota 

Excollent invostmont opportunity! 

18 units (1. 2. & 3 Brs.), constructed in 1983-S90.000 of 

recent improvements by curront ownor; List Price: $450,000 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

Woodcrest Apartments - Warroad, Minnesota 

Doveloping Opportunity! - Firo Damaged in 1997 

Fulton Property Management Services 

218-729-0617 

OWNER FINANCING AVAILABLE!! 




Through 

"THE TIMES" 

resumes.nwatch.com 

http://www.nwatch.com • Email: nwatch@nwatch.com 

IHThe Times »WatcH /g^. 



^ag^& Commercial Print Shop 4£?"y 

321 thin Ave. H. • Thief fflw Fills, UN 56701 ' (ill) 6)1-4450 • f u: (218) 6114455 



POSITION AVAILABLE: 

The Housing and Redevelopment Authority for the 
City of Thief River Falls is seeking an Executive 
Director. This position includes the management of 
Skylite Apartments. Job descriptions may be 
obtained at the Minnesota Job Service Office at 1301 
Hwy. 1 East, Thief River Falls, MN 56701. Resumes 
will be accepted until 12:00 noon, Friday, Feb. 6 
1998. Equal Opportunity Employer. 



OR SUPERVISOR: Full-time position available for 
an experienced OR SUPERVISOR for our future 
Ambulatory Surgical Center (ASC). This position will 
include setting up policies/procedures, staff schedul- 
ing and supervision, scrub nurse duties and contin- 
uous management of overall ASC services. 
Interested individuals must be a registered nurse 
with valid license. To apply contact: Dakota Clinic, 
HR DepL (218) 681-4747 or fax inquiries to (218) 
661-6782. Dakota Clinic, Ltd. is an EEO/AA employ- 



Northland Community and Technical College, a comprehensive 
college, In Thief River Falls, Minnesota, Is accepting applications 
for the following administrative positions: 

Dean of Academic Affairs • Serve as the college's chief acad- 
emic officer, responsible for providing leadership, planning, 
development and supervision ol academic programming and 
instruction. Preferred Qualifications: Masters degree from an 
accredited Institution. Salary S60.578-S83.799 plus fringe bene- 
fit package. 

Dean of Student Services - Serve as the college's chief stu- 
dent services officer, responsible for providing leadership, plan- 
ning, development and supervision of sludent service matters 
and activities. Preferred Qualifications: Masters degree from an 
accredited Institution. Salary S58.435-S78.149 plus fringe bene- 
fit package. 

Appointment Date: July 1, 1998 

Application Procedure: A letter of epplicallon, resume, and 
copies of transcripts are to be forwarded to Becky Hoflhusen, 
Director of Human Resources, Northland Community' and 
Technical College, 1101 Highway One East, Thief River Falls, 
MN 56701. Screening of applications to begin March 1, 1998. 
Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer. 



The Classifieds - The Classifieds - The Classifieds 



Help Wanted 



Help Wanted 



l. Must I 



1 Jj.llik 



cludo Sonos G. 3*5 yours oiporionco ro- 
quirod. Snloiy nnd bonodls nra common, 
suroto with ouporionco. Ptonso send m- 
sumo nnd salary roquiromonts lo fled 
Loko County State Bank. PO Don 2U0. 
Rod Lnko Falls. UN 56750. F2l0c 



HANDLE'S DEN Fr.111kL.r1 ol T 
mmlialo openings lor ;i luN 
lion-i Wdniiijomnnl Turn 
CinickuronilDonl Ho.ulolFr 
mg long-tmni ornployoon 



' 3»c 



HaifrHHMlr- 



MANAGERS! 



ACQ 



WESTERN STORES 

Salaried position + Bonuses + unmatched 
benefits + Lots of Training. Mall store 
hours. Any customer service or retail sales 
experience especially clothing or foot 
wear a plus! Train in your hometown - 
relocate later or move now. Apply in 
person at: ( 

nCC WESTERN STORE 

Columbia Mall 

(701) 772-787S 

Grand Forks, ND 

or mail your resume to: 

RCC Western Stores 

P.O. Box 1139 

Rapid City, SD 57709-1139 

e-mail: www.rccwestem.com 



HELP WANTED: INSURANCE 
SALES ASSISTANT. 

Liccnjedinprowtv/cj'jiJJiyjnaiil! juJ 
hejnri dtsiitJ. bul mill irim ito ngni peuon 
Send rimms to 12941, c /d Till Tlmii, 324 
Mlin Am. H„ Thill flkti Fills. MN 56701 



AVON S8-S18/HR.. no door-to-door, 
quick cash, lun nnd lolnmng. 1 .800-736- 

OieBlnq'sls/rop. P4IBp 

DRIVERS ANO owner/op orators wanted 
la pull my trailers or yours lor n smnll but 
growing local trucking company. Excol- 
lont pay with possiblo benefits, loaso pur- 
chnso progtam available now oquipmonl 
with ownor'opo rotor spocs. and stand up 
sloopors. pullmg hoppers 48 otatos and 
regionally. Must havo A minimum ol 1- 
yoor ol verifiable dnvmg ouporlonco and 
cuitont CDL. Please call Eric nt 218-437- 
854B. PF4U3p 



HELP WANTED: 



APPLY AT THE 
RUSTY NAIL 

307 Main Ave. N.. T.H. Falls 



OFF-SET PRESSMAN 

Ful lino pciMn in ,i modiim ■eaueped print 
incp Kno-kWJo cl it'evl li'doSml pn!i^| 

"""' TYPESETTER 

Part tmo petition. Typtfwnng ura^i ccpy 
to' nowlpjpor pufclicifconj ind also mcA n 
ttio (jrodueton ,iroj cl .1 prm ilcp Qua'-lvd 
aw'-conl jhe^y m aCk> 1= r>TJ0 '0 waili ,1 
mprajro. and h.i.o adoaualo ipu:rtj and 
Siammjr atity Mull bo niJLnrj la taka a typ 
noma ipoCnj IcJI 

Petition i Incrudti various other dutk>s 
involved In th« pr oduciton of puDtlciikmi. 
Sibil** commeniurit* with iipcrltnc*. 



tick pay, 40tK rtttitrnent plan, cilr- 
Urlt plan and health Iniuranca. 
- Apply AI- 

The Times 

(218) 681-4450 



FURNISHED 
ROOMS 

FOR RENT 

681-2845 



LARGE 3-OEDROOM npnMmim 
bodrcxyn npartmonl. plug-in loi cj 
tiusmcludud CnNC0I-fl?23or 66 
P4l7p 



RENT- 3 -bodroorn apnrtmoni w.'g.i- 


S44D,'monlh, nvnilnBlo Jan. 15; 2- 




Jan 1. Dottt npartmonls In nowar 


D-plnx. Also nv.lilabto. snuillor 3- 


3m hou^o w/gnrngo. S350/monffi 


jlililios, nvailablo Jan. 1. no pats. 


ncos nnd do posit roqulrod. Call 


478. Bn.m.-Op.m. 10511= 



Approximately 1,000 
Square Feet, Handi- 
capped Accessible. 
Across From Hugo's. 

Call 681-4324 

Ram Building Systems 



TWOS 

lion. 11 
49S7. I 



DEE IHC hns an irnmodwilo oponmg lor 
a CNC s otup/prog rammer. A two-yoar 
tochnlcal doqroo is loquirod. Eiporionco 
pialonod. DEE olforn eompotitivo wagos 



STORAGE UNITS 
FOR RENT IN TRF 



218-681-1861 



SMALL HOUSE lor ronr- fnclutfo* ooii- 
iioiTiont. not phono-cnblo. doposlt, no 
pots. S3S0.OO. 681-4016. P5111p 
FOR RENT- Mobilo homo. 2'bodroom, 
(no pots). S270/monlh. 681-105B. 8B1- 
9033. P4t5p/P-tt9p 



NEWLY REMODELED 2-bodroom lur. 
mshod mobilo homa/ontry, no pots, do^ 
posit, rofoioncos. lonsu laquliod. 681- 

2B63. PJtOp 

FOR RENT- Mobilo homo, 2-bodroom. 1- 
1/2 bath, (no pets). Countrysido Park 
681-1658 0(1381-0033. P4t6p/P4t10p 



ilits. It 



I. plan 



ASPHALT PAVING company tilling: 
sctood man, inj<A dnvora. oqulpmant op- 
oratots, loboroTS. Donolits inciudo 401k 
nnd haalth Irtsuianco. E.O.E. 218-2B1- 

5101. 7t0c 

FIWLPN OPENINGS In Roseau. Pedia- 
tric homo cam, ono on ono nursing witn 
vonnlnior dopandoni child. FTSPT bono- 
rib. Floxlblo scheduling. Unlvorsal Podia- 
trie Sorvlco. Inc. Call 1-8 00-876-228S. 

6t7c 

ACCOUNTING CLERK noodod lo sian 
Immodlatoly. Compulortiod A/P and A/R 
antrlos along with ottior misc. dutlos 
Computar and accounting oipoilanco 
hotptul. Full'Urna position with complolo 
bonotlts packago available. Ploaso sand 
tosumo to: *2942. CO Tho Tlmos, PO 
Box 100. Thiol Rrvor Folia. MN 56701. 

419c 

FRY-COOK MON.-FR1., 8 a.m.-3 p.m. 
school day) only, oiporionco not noodod 
but halplui. call 661-1470. P4t4p 



I otto r ol application and iosu 
by nnd pick up an application at: Attn: Hu. 
man Hosourcos. DEE Inc.. PO Don 627. 
1302 Foskott Snoot. Crookston. MN 
F67I6. 210-201-5811. E.O.E. Post-ofloi 

drug tosttng roquitod. 117c 

UNIVERSAL SCREENPRINT Is loolunrj 
lor a print or to do multi-color work on 
caps, jackols, shirts, ate. Mon.-Fil. 
dayshilt, ho II day- vacation pay, hontUi In- 
suranco. Sond application to PO Box 
501. TRF. MN. Equal Opportunity Em- 
ployor. 4t9c 



Help UJanted - Part-time 

Clerk/Deli Helper 

Rppfy at 



-S^ 



Hmy 7 and Huju 59 LU. TflF 



HELP WANTED- Poraon (or floor clotm- 
Ing, oorly mornings, coll GB1-2319. 3HC 
JOB OPENING- Eloctrlcal/Elactionlc 
Tachnldan. (ull-tmo, on coll. Major lood 
procassing facility locatod In Foaslon, 
Minnosolo. Must know basic 120V.240V. 
460V, singlo phoso and 3 phase Bo cop- 
oblo ol wiring troralormora Irom 3 phoso 
460 to singlo phoso HOor 220. Must also 
havo knowlodgo Ol DC conlroHora and 
motors. AC motor filartrKS and AC Invor- 
lors lor spood cofitiol on AC motora Irom 
3/4-HP to 15-HP. Must bo capnblo ol 
I rouble shooting compulor contrallod 
sorting syslom and bo ablo to uso various 
computer sottwaio programs. Must havo 
soma knowlodgo ol gas (irod bumars. Ig- 
nition systoms and oioctitc sdonolds and 
controls. Must havo etoctrlcat dagroo or 
training or compoiatlvo oxporlonco.. 
Wago dopondonl on quail ncatlons. Sond 
rosumo lo: Attn: Portonnol Dopt.. PO 
Sox 67, Brooks. MN 56715. Wo will bo 
accepting rasumas until tho Bth ol Fobru- 

ary. F217c 

REGISTERED NURSE' Rlvorviow 
Hoallhcoro Assodatlon has a position 
open (or an RN, lo bo tho Choigo Nurso 
(or Iho PM shllt (including ovary othor 
woakondj at Hlllctosl Nursing Homo. 
Provlous auparvlsory oxpoilonco and 
LTC oxporlonco prolorrod. Wa'U got you 
Btartod with a compobUvo salary and oil- 
giblo bonolils. II Interested, contact: Rlv- 
orviow Hoallheaio Associaiion, Human 
Roaourcoa Dopt.. 323 S. Minnosolo, 
Crookslon. MN 567IG. 218-281-0415. 
Fax 21S-2B1-Q222. E-Mail: landoinOriv- 

orvlowhoallh.org. EOE. F2t0c 

FLATBED COMPANY looking (or drivors. 
ownorr'opoiotors. Must bo ablo to go to 
Canada. Homo wookonds. Moro inlorma- 
Hon, I-800-46B-1423. Exl, 11. E&G 
Trucking. 417c 



,'MTWirHB-Wg 



The Talent Bank is an electronic 
job resume thai employers and 
private employment agencies can 
access. They can review your 
qua liltcal ions - education, skills. 
uvork history - in relalionship to 
their job openings. If Interested, 
employers will contact you direct- 
ly. Call for more Informalion. 



AFEWOFTHEJOBSAWLABIE 



♦ SMALL ENGINE 
MECHANIC - Permanent, ■ 
FuMmo JWefRrVer Falls. • 
(MN28fe7969) 

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR - 

30 hrs. a week, . 
S1200-S1400, Thiol River 
Falls. (MN651 6090). 
*irnUTY MANAGER - 

- 40 hrs. per week; 57.00 per hr., 

thief Fiver Falls. 
(MN3474581) 




RETAIL/COMMERCIAL SPACE lor font, 
uptown location, t.700 sq. It. plus stor- 
age aioa. hoot and water paid, call 0B1- 

3045. B4tte ' 

QREENBUSH SUMMERF1ELO Placo 
has a ono- bod room handlcappud acces- 
sible opaitmonl aval labia. P rival o on- 
trance, cottago -stylo unit with scroonod- 
In poich. Includes dishwasher, wash- 
or/dryor. mlcrowavo ovon, garbago dis- 
posal, ol' conditioner, hoot paid. CoiJ 1- 

BOO-504-G093 today. .7ilc 

QUIET, LARGE 3-bod'Oom main floor 
apartmont. nicoly docotnlod, no pols, do- 
poslt/roloroncas/loaso, 6BI-2863. 

P4tt0p 

FOR RENT-- Throo-bndroom mobilo 
homo InTRF, available Fob. lot. call 449- 
4331. P4M0p 



Oakwood Homes in Karlstad, Minnesota, 

is accepting applications for two- and three- 
bedroom townhouse openings. Rent is based 
on 30% of your monthly adjusted gross income. 
For applications and qualifications please con- 
tact Elaine Baker at 218-436-2588. AN EQUAL 
HOUSING OPPORTUNITY. ^ 



Halo Wanted: Payroll Clerk-Full-Time 

This individual will bo rosponsiblo (or tho completion of staff payroll 
and gonofnl accounting (unctions. Olhor dutios will inciudo maintain- 
ing and compiling doto lor various roports and provido training lo Indi- 
viduals for rolaiod procedures. Two (2) years of compulorirod book- 
kooping oxporioneo nnd/or complolion of posl-socondary accounling 
training. Must havo proficionl knowlodgo of sproadshool soltwaro. 
proforably lotus or oxccl. Tht3 porson must bo motivatod, organized, 
ond oblo to work indopondontly. Contact DooDoo Johnson. Chiol 
Financial Officer, or Nancy Cota, Diroctor of Humon Rosourcos at 
218-681-4949 lor moro information and/or an omploymont applica- 
tion. EOA/ADA. 



Sond Application & Rosu 



o to: Occupational Dovolopmonl Center,- Inc. 

DooDoo Johnson. Chiol Financial Otticar, 

P.O. Box 730, Thiol River Falls, MN 5G701 



OFFICE FOR RENT 



Professional Building, parking at 
door. Available January 1, 1998. 
Call 68H635* 9 a.m.- 5 p.m. 



OFFICE SPACE 
FOR RENT 

302 Third St. East 
Thief River Falls, MN 
Call 218-436-2121 

Ask For Gwenl 



2-BEDROOM MOBILE homo/ontry, 
S2S0.0O plus militios, no pots, deposit, 
roloroncos, loaso roqulrod, 631-2863. 

P4t9p 

SPACIOUS TWO-BEDROOM apart- 
mams. Clean ond noat. now eorpot nnd 
paint, dish wash ors. garborjo disposal, 
oll-siroot paiking. ha at paid, avnlloblo Im- 
modiatoly, call 681-4054, II no answer 
toavo a mossago. 7611c 



300 SQ. FT. OFFICE 

ANO 
600 SQ. FT. OFFICE 

m mums mi mis/ 
isr mo. met with . 
tHsc 4W imsmi 

200 Barzen Ave. N, TRF 

681-2038 or 

681-1973 



STORAGE, BOATS, CARS, RV'S, otc.. 
Roosonablo rates, you Insure) 681-0003, 

louvo mossaflp. Btfc 

TWO CHARMING two-bodroom oparl' 
monta. availabto now, omplo parking. 
S3S0 plus doposlt end S325 plus utillrJos 
and doposlt. no pots, 681-3718 or 6B9- 

2B64. 7tfc 

ERSKINE SUMMERFIELD Placo, two- 
bodroom. two bathtoom opanment avail- 
able, omonltlos Include wushor/dryor, ml- 
crowavo oven, dishwasher, garbago dis- 
posal and air conditioner, hoat paid by 
manaoomonl. Garago available. Call 1- 
800-504-8093 for moro Inlormatlon 

and/or privoto lour. 7ifc 

SMALL 2-BEDROOM homo, now floor- 
ing and fumaco. 1-1/2 dotochod garago,' 
quiet residential area, call 681-7073. 

2tBp 

APARTMENTS FOR rent In Okloo. roo- 
my, 1- and 2-bodroom, car plug-ins. laun- 
dry and satollllo avallablo, (joodroforonc- 

03,706-4662. IQOtfc 

FOR IMMEDIATE Rent- 1- ond 2-bod- 
room npartmonls, low ront. costs Inciudo 
heat and wotor. Cnll6B1-4603. 101 He 
ONE-, TWO- or throo-bodroom apart- 
monts. brand now. lor rant al apodal win- 
lor rates. 253-4352. IQOtfc 

FOR RENT * 
2 BEDROOM 
APARTMENT 



SUMMERFIELD PLACE ol rJowtoldor, 
has a two- bedroom/two- bath apartment 
available. Private ontrunco, scroonod-ln 
porch, nlr conditioner, wnshor/dryor, dlsh- 
wnshor ond moro. Hoot paid by tho man- 
agement. Call 1 -BOO- 504 -6093 lor mora 

information and/or tour. Fi02tlc 

LAND FOR ront on bids- 610 crop ocros, 
avallablo wilh a 3-yoar loaso. Also, on ad- 
ditional 114 ocros avallablo with a 1-yoar 
loaso. SI/2 ol Soc. 1, Comstock Stnp, 
302 crop ocros. 3-yoar loaso: NE1/4 ol 
Soc. 12. Comstock Strip, 157 crop acres, 
3-ynar loaso: NW 1/4 ol Soc. IB, Numo- 
dnhl. 151 crop ocros, 3-yoar loaso: 
NE1/4 ol Soc. 5. Viking Snip. 114 crop 
acros, t-yoar loaso. Dondllno lor bids is 
Fob. 10. 1908. Sond bids to Duono R. 
Swanson, RR 1-Box 48, Viking, MN 
56760. Phono 218-745-4910 or Robert 
E. Swanson, 1023 N. 7th Street, Warron. 
MN 56762. Phono 218-745-5578. Crop 
basos aro avallablo- at Marshall Co. 
ASCS office Tho owners rosorvo tho 
right to rojoct any and all bids. F3t9p 



TRF 

MINI STORAGE 
FOR RENT 

3 SIZES I 

CALL 

681-1270 



water paid, Irldgo and slovo Includod, 
vory dean and quiet building. Call 681- 
3008 altar 5 p.m. 4tfc 

Mobile Homes 

■JNEED A GIFT lor that hard to buy lor 
porson? How about a gilt subscription to 
Tho Times, 324 Main Avonuo North, TRF, 
681-4450. 



'QUALITY HOUSING 
■AFFORDABILITY 
ON THE SPOT FINANCING 



£* 



UPERIOR HOMES 



"^991 



__ SPECIAL FOR 

1£T MONTH'S RENT 

1-YEAR LEASE REfiMRED 




COUNTRY ACRES 

APARTMENTS 

TiDxr Rtvrx Paixo. MN 

1(218) 681-3370J 

FOR RENT- 14x70 2-bodioom, 10 lor onc- 
os, no pots. S300 plus doposlt. 681-7712 

allot 5 or loaHo mossogo. P4t7p 

APARTMENTS FOR Ront- Tho now 0- 
plox In Karlstad haaa two-bodroom and a 
ono-bodroom apartment lor mnt. Hoat Is 
Indudod In tho ront, plus a ono-cor go- 
tagol Great location! Closo lo downtown 
across from Iho clinic and closo to a 
sehooll For Information, contact Wayno 
Ruud at iho Karlstad City Offico, 2IB- 
436-2178. Avallablo Fobruary 1, 1098, 
F4t3c 



-V of Grand Forks 
1801 N. Washington St 
Open 1 0-5 p.m. Mon.-Sot 

107B REVERE mobilo homo. 14x70, 3- 
bodroom, 10x12 entry. 1-1/2 stall garage 
and lot, newly lomodolod. Locatod In 
Country Esiaios. Call ovonlngs. 6B1- 

3805. P4tBp 

FOR SALE- 14x70 Holly Park mobilo 
homo needs minor work. Call owner, 

218-681-3848. 7011c 

FOR SALE- 14x70 3-bodroom mobilo 
homo on 100'x200' loi on Halny Rivor at 

Baud0ttO,MN.Call701-77S-78t5. 1 70 If 

1094 HOMARK 3-bodroom. 1-1/2 bath, 
contial air, all appllancoa includod. 
524,000.681-4288. P4t8p 

Business Opportunities 

INCREDIBLE HOME bosod buslnossll 
No mootings. no selling and no products 
to stock I Mu HI- billion dollar attemativo 
hoalth Industryl Unbollavabla lilotlmo In- 
come potential! Imaglno yoursoll rotlrod 
within 2 yoorsl Rocotvo your amailng 
lapo Tho Missing Link lo modern 
.health, call 210-386-2691 or 1-800-572- 

PC85. Petllp 

A NEW roport lovoals ond Iralns how lo 
craat an oHra S50K-S100K In hassle Iroo 
rosldual Incomo from homo, 24 -hour 
mossago, 888-574-6089. P4t8p 



swing positions aro available in School Dislrlct «5C4, Thiol Rivor 

REGULAR ROUTE BUS DRIVERS 



EFFECTIVE: 1/ 
DUTIES: Drlvo regular c 






i. bus route on days school Is 



REQUIREMENTS: Must have a valid Minnosolo Cortiliod Drlvoi's 
Llconso wilh School Bus and Air Brako Endorsement nnd n good driving 
record. Must submit to a criminal hislory background chock. 
STARTING SALARY RANGE: S3.75-S10.6Ohour dopondonl upon 
oiporionco wilh bonolit packago. 
Appllcillani may b* oblalntd In panon or by writing to tha Panonnal Dtpartman 
230 UDraa Ava. South. Thlal nivar F»ll«, Ulnnatota S6701. Application* will ba 



Suturdiiy, January 2-4, I99K 



NORTHERN WATCH 



Phrc 15 



The Classifieds - The Classifieds - 



3 



Machinery 




5230 Deutz Allis 



Cab, Loader, 1300 hrs. 



NELSON EQUIPMENT, INC. 

930 Hoy 59 North 

ThiclRiw Ml», MN 56701 

218-681-1997 



NEW BELARUS (arm tractors. 31-h p. 
S7.0OO; 81-h.p.. 4WD. cab, S1B.OO0; 
100-hp, 4WD. cab. S20.000. Loaders, 
$3,500. Now and used parts roadily 
avallablo. Lylo B|oHand Tractors, Inc.. 
Erakino, MN. 21B-687-27B1 days. 218- 

687-3120 ovonrnns. PF4H1p 

FOR SALE- 4-1/2 yard Ashland Hold 
BCiopor. oxcollont condition. 681^4028 



.IM^H^l 



HIJMJ'.J 



TRACTORS 



175 AIlls w/Loader 
1135 MF w/Loader 
5230 Deutz w/Loader 
DX 160 Deutz AWD 
895"Versatile Fresh O.H. 
650 Versatile Rebuilt Eng, 
1566 1.H.C. 
WD -45 AIlls 



COMBINES 



8820 JD 

860MF4WD 

TR - 70 New Holland 

760 MF 

750 MF 

N - 7 Gleaner 



NELSON EQUIPMENT, INC. 

930 Hwy 59 North 

Thief River HgMNSSTOr*' 

218-68M997 



Hay, Feed and Seed 

FOR SALE- Largo round bales ol straw 
pickup, your own or wo can deliver. 218- 

6BI-261S. 2lflp 

WANT TO Buy- Squaro bales olloJla or 
mi.od allolla. Larson Hay Sorvlco. 21B- 

574-2721. P41Bp 

SEED FOR Sale- Cortiliod AC. Darrlo, 
Grondln and othor whoat vortollos, 
Sovornl vonotios ol oats and barloy. 
Good germs, clonnod and dollvorod In 
semi load lots or will split load batwoon 
neighbors. Also, canola and (tax sood 
available. Provlous sales in most araas. 
competitive prices. Ploaso call Gorald 
Frtoson, 204-B22-3633. Mordon. MB. 
Can. II no onswor ploaso loovo mossago. 
PFietfSp 

Livestock 

FOR SALE- Comploto herd Ol 60 brod 
stock cows, mostly Charolols ond Chaio- 
tnis cross, low Hereford. Ho re lord cross. 
Call 218-782-2629. PF4l13p 



FOR SALE 

PUREBRED BULLS : : 




FOR SALE-Throa 10' J.D. 9350 drills. 6" 
spacing with markers and Kuhn Irons- 
port. Also. 1976 IH 1066 wilh loctory cab. 
duals, 8,030 hours, 1-yoar-old Loon 790 
hoovy-doty motor. 21B-773-B100. 4t0c 
640 J.D. log sklddor. now transmission, 4 
extra tiros, S22.000, 218-222-3553. 

PF4t1lp 

FOR SALE* ON Ford tractor, rostorod, 
new paint and parts, 218-463-2646 

ovonlngs. MI7p 

FOR SALE- »60 J.D. tractor with loader 
ond 3-pt.. *70 J.D. tractor wilh singlo hy- 
"drnuHc, both aro wldo Iront row crop. 
Wanted- 2.6 V-6 molor for '85 Bronco II, 
21B-47B-2704nlior 7:00 p.m. PF4t0p 
FOR SALE- J. D: 4010 Iractoi/J.D. load- 
or. »46. 54,200.00, B74-7105. 1l7p 
FOR SALE- 1974 Massoy Forguson 31 
Industrial tractor, frosh ovorhoul, live 
p.l.o., 3-polnt and romoto hydroullcs, 
good tiros, good condition. 253-2312. 

PF4tltp 

CENEX DRILL I III. holds 220 bushels ol 
sood and 8 Ions lartlllzor, oxcollont con- 

dIUon, 706-5348. PF4t11p 

FOR SALE- 3788 IH Irnctor, 3-pL p.l.o.. 
18.4x38 duals all around, CAH Irlplo hyd. 
Also 4 20.8x38 rodluls. 00% and all 
band dual hordwaro, 218-745-4423. 

P4l8p . 

•SOMETHING, TO SELL? Advortlso in 
Tho Tim oo. Wo uso compute riled typo- 
aoltlng and layout doslgn. Chock It out! 
Coll 681-4450. 

Hay, Feed and Seed 

HAY FOR Sale- 150 big round gross hay 
batos. Call 21B-681-3B16 ovonlngs. 

PBHOp 

FARMERS- II you havo hay for solo ad- 
vortlso I! In tho Northern Watch. Pooplo 
aro looking to buy. Tho Times/Northern 
Welch, 324 Main Avo. North, Thiol River 
Falls, MN 56701. 681-4450. Brio 
FOR SALE- 2nd cutting allolla, squaro 
bales, protlon 10.6, lood value of 144, 

218-386-2600. PF419p 

FOR SALE- 275 small round bales grass 
hay, no rain and 110 largo round bales 
gross hay. locatod 8 miles north and 2- 
1/4 oast ol Okloo, 681-5263. 21Bp 
FOR SALE- Cortiliod standor barloy. cor- 
tiliod 2375, Sharp, Vordo ami Buss 
whoat. Coll 218-874-3713. P8110p 
FOR SALE- First and second cutting al- 
lolla hay. round boles. 21B-7B0-5711 or 

796-5422. PF419p 

FIRST, 2ND and 3rd crop allolla, big 
round bolos. Also, whoaL barloy straw, 

449-3945. PF4t7p 

FOR SALE- Allolla or alloHa mixed hay. 
smell/big squaro S, round. Excoltont 
horso. dairy or boof qualllilos. Also, 

Sttaw 216-681-4028. P4I8C 



IPBtllp 



| BAGLEY LIVESTOCK 

EXCHANGE, INC. 

Baglcy. MN 

Minnesota's Newest 

■.<i.il.-iV.''i.-.'l"tii."<"'-l''''^-<' 
SALES EVERY THURSDAY 



Cattle Sales 

Need ell ebuca of Ektf Guvcs. Holslrtn 
Sierra. Ytaillng Dnf Stctn ft llel/cis. Sleek 
Cows. Fol Caltlt. Slauejitrr Cows 4 Dolls. 

• COMPUTERIZED RING SCALE 

• CAT-WALK 

• DRIVE-THRU UNLOADING 

• FULL-SERVICE CAFE 

CATTLE QWX.ON THURSDAY 




.ilUliilillii. 



SPECIAL BRED 
STOCK COW a 
HEIFE R SALE 

SAT., JAN. MTH 
, 12:00 NOON , 



r 'Mrm«v^ 

For More Information Call 
Market Phone: 218-694-3701 

FAX 218-694-3700 
Highway 2 West. Baglcy. MN 



Snowmobiles 



Snowmobiles 



Sons Of Al Trait Leaders 

In Milk And Growth. 

B.W. From 80 Lbs. To 

100 Lbs. Excellent W.W. 

Pick Your Bulls Early 

CALL 

,_. VERBOuTCHAROLAIS 1=1 

[: 1-218-294-6582 J 



FOR SALE- 4 brod Angus 
coivo In March ond April. Havo boon vac- 
clnalod and wormod. Can dollvor. Coll 
218-463-3007 ovonlngs. PF4l11p 
CUSTOM-MADE BALE rings ond cattle 
gales, modolrom 1-Inch tubing. Collaftor 

8.222-3542. PF4t9p 

PUREBRED YEARLING Slmmontol 
bulls, oxcollont EPO's. Somo solid rod, 
oosy calving. Roasonoblo prico, 210- 

681-8836 ovonlngs. PF4t13p 

FOR SALE- 25 Horolord cows, bred to 
Angus bull, duo starting March 1st, 
$850.00/oach. Also. - 86 Ford F-250 4x4, 
4-spood. 460. low mllos. good tiros, 681- 

2408. P4t9o 

COWS FOR sale- Flvo oro crossed An- 
gus and Hva aro purebred Golbvioh. Also, 
ono purebrod Qolbvlch bull. For moro In- 
formation call Matt at 218-265-2858. 

1l7p ■ 

PUREBRED REGISTERED Chorolals, 
15 brod cows. 2 4-year-old hord bulls, 1 
3-yoar-otd bud. 15 yoarllng bulls, good 
brooding stock. Enckson Charolnla, 218- 

425-7535.' PFBtlOp 

BULL SALE- Nordlund Stock Farm. 
Doomrook and Dahlko Red Angus, Ba- 

Sloy, win auction 45 Rod and Black Angus 
Immontnl bulls on Saturday. March 7. at 
Cloarbrook. Call 218-770-3655 or 218- 

694-6727 for catalogs. PF7t17p 

FOR SALE- Two purebred yoortlng Golb- 
vloh bulls. Also coming 3-yoor-oM pur- 
abrod black Golbvioh bull. Phono 378- 
4396. PF4t13p 



240 B1Q round bolos of second crop al- 
falfa grass hay. Boon testea. Also, '91 
Grand Marquis LS Morcury cor. Contact 
Am&roso Booudoln at 218-790-5283. 

PF4H1p 

FOR SALE- Small and largo round bolos 
food hay and mixed, I.GOOt and 1_200t, 
222-3790. PF4t9p 



CALL US FOR 
CLEAN*0UT PRICES ON 
199B's. 1997's AND ALL OTHER 

USED SNOWMOBILES! 

ALSO 



Hamm's Repair 

Warren, MN 1 ^00-889-5967 



FOR SALE- 1996 Arctc Col Cougor. 
1 .400 miles, oicollont condition, includos 
covor. 21 8-234-6597 . PF5t13p 



1094 ZR 440, roconl ovorhoul, now curb 
Slldos and CDI box, looks ond runs great, 
nsklngK.Q00.218-B74-B7t1. P4M0p 



IBM LONO track Indy Sport, 
condition. 1.B00 miles, asking S2.600.00. 
21B-7B2-3l8BeHor5:0Op.m. PBI14p 
1BM JAO, new track, shock, hondworm- 
ors. drtvo boorings. low miles on now 
440Z ongino. rebuilt clutch, nlco shape, 
mako oHor, 222-3405 ovonlngs. Iti7p 



FOR SALE- 1906 Pantoro 440 FC; 1091 
Prowlor 440 LC, S500, 51.200/o.b.O.. 

681-2720 or 681-1322. 1t7p 

1097 ARCTIC Cot ZRT 600, 144 sluds, 
8-ln. carbides, excellent condition, 
S4,70CVo.b.O., 681-6182. P4t10p 
FOR SALE- 1977 El Tlgro 40OO. S400; 
1972 Panther 295, S300.00. both good 

condition, phono 074 -B5 55. 1l7p 

FOR SALE- 1004 Cougar, S2.300; 1905 
Cougor, S2.000; '95 8'x10' Rongor trailer. 
S5O0, very good condition. 681-607B. 

P4t8p 

1079 ARCTIC Cot El Tlgro 440 liquid, 
runs good, now oeol, good condition, 

681-7169. P4l7p 

YAMAHA EXCEL snowmobllo. Ilconsod 
through 1099, oxcollont shape 19B7 
modol, 6B1-2387. loovo mossago. good 

prico 1 213 p 

FOR SALE- 1994 Poloria XLT with plpos; 
1990 Polaris 500. Call 21B-47B-2774. 

PF4111P 

FOR SALE- My wilos snowmobllo. 1990 
Polaris lady 400 In mint condition, studs, 
carbides, now clutch; high/low wind- 
shlold, cover, S1 ,800.00/0. b.o. Call 218- 
""! atlor 5;00 p.m. 1t7p 



Lsi 


skfifoo. 


ILilUUiUlilUUHIIIIilH 


1998 SKI-DOO's 

RIDE FREE TIL 
JULY 7, 1998 OR TAKE 
CASH DISCOUNT OF 

UP TO $1,000 

ON ALL '98 & NEW 

'97 MODELS 


I 20-50% OFF I 

| CLOTHING!! | 



smimm mxs mcas 

S & J 

SPORTS, INC. 

|.«H4W1H'7E-2M6 Orwnbuih. MN 



. — — — — — 'CUTOUT AND SAVE' — — — — — — 

Call 964-5237 For... 

READY MIX CONCRETE, SAND & GRAVEL. 

We Have Heated Ready Mix For 

Year Around Jobs. 

I For Gjlufdjy OoNvmy 01 RfiaOy M». C.iQ Frmay 
RADIO DISPATCHED TRUCKS 
■> no job too wa on too smalu 

I Concrete Inc. 

CONCRETE INC. St. Hllolro, MN 



rlST FARGO LIVESTOCK MARKET 
CENTRAL LIVESTOCK 




North Dakota', Lergott Volume Uvailock 
Weakly A uctions: Tues. & Wad. 

CMn^M! cla feed program 

Call For Detain 

SPECIAL FEEDER SALE: Every Wed. 

Doug Kllen • 218-681-7563 

West Fargo Livestock Market • 1-800-733-4620 

^/^/j/iZl^^^^^wjl 



FARM EQUIPMENT 



WANTED- Good llems for St. Hllalro Li- 
ons consignment auction March 14-15, 
low consignment rales. 964-5493, 064- 
5369.6B1-76B1. PF4t9p 



to mit^ cMgngR 



Ziuctlnneers 



fur Marttlh) Spic/lliitt 
for Hit Ifpti 01 Auctltntl 

Sel-Up - Clean-Up 
We Give You The Addon* Value 

Wilh Compollllva Roles. 

Office 218-681-7650 

Lloyd Omsai . . .21B-44W911 
Joe McMuura ..218-46W286 



r^a 



*•**> 



IF YOO'RE PLANNING AN AQCTION - NOW IS THE 
TIME TO TALK TO THE CLARK A. SATHER 
AUCTION COMPANY. CLARK HAS BEN INVOLVED 
WITH OVER 700 SUCCESSFUL EQUIPMENT AND 
REAL ESTATE AdCTIONS IN MINNESOTA AND 
NORTH DAKOTA. DON'T THROW AWAY A LIFE- 
TIME OF HARD WORK BY LEAVING YOUR AUC- 
TION TO CHANCE. SELL WITH THE MARKETING 
SPECIALISTS. Hwy. 11 East __ 

/if C _a C tt Croonbush. MN 56726 

Fan (218) 782-3600 

Toll Froo 

1-300-950 3832 



Horses 



FOR SALE- 1-1/2 year old loglstarod 
Point (illy, bay and whilo ovoro, 5900, 
7B2-2415. 1I7P * 



HAWK 
BUILDERS 




"Howard Hawkinson 



681-8749 



Construction & Logging Equipment 

AUCTION 



THURS. JAN. 29 "^ » 10 AM 



ONAMIA, MINNESOTA 

Siuing EQUIPMENt FO«: WOODLINE SAWMIOS, INC. 



1EHM4: Purtl 
IOCA1ION: 1 






llithwj 



,t on Qu»l 



FflHWAROERS : tt TlmbtiUck »0A Forwirdtf, ■.■" COTOM^iwScrco HmI Boom. S*i L2S07. 
j^ltllft Tttt "-—" " t~~-*-<, ■>■ i-Jm .rn»WLFn DQren: Cm »»gCriwk.r Pont. 
Lono Tni*. Wkl» Track. 5-W« DWa. POPS Cso. Vn JJOKieO«. JO 4S0E Cfiwlar Ooar, tin 
TWS0EH721067 • R UpnfB TIBFP LOADER : JD S44C Rubbar Tlrad Loadtr, iLWOrtppie. ifti 
40557) 'iBtuXtUuBADEaa: JD ITOA Motor Oraoar. irn 106271. C*t1J««or0rio>f,«^P»ij 
m 8T1H30 • HTP"*"UC EXCAVATO "- "-'-•—- 
nmNDEB: Farmtuml HSO Tub OrlrnStr ■ 
Tncior. iffi 13473. Husky mtsC Hoal 8 



Ere, Vn B210H0JI17 • HIS 

; B»it»iMH»»IB«jrn.onFnfl 

„.„ „. .. , 1000 Tractor, K»w Motor t. hysraulci, tvh 
Drum »lppa'' c * n,rt ) w - "l* faad Chlppat/QrtnOar, 



flffLFH: Taylor MO.000 DTU Wood Dollar • MUCKS: Fort 3TO-2V ^^•J^<^fl'S*' i 
SJrcrS AWo. Trsra. IMt Ford FSOO Truck. 1SS0 Fort MMSarrkaTiuek.lirn8tSO0Ci^VMi 
• T micXTBiCTOB : V* Intl F227S Ttnoam AUa Track Traelor • IEWLEtH: V* Savagi Poia 
J.?.* * 1 l^iSi ' gi i n^i. iv rwi. T»n« w Pnia TnJIar • VEHICLE; •** CMavroM 



TrX.^*t*»M0 OrapcK. ir Pok. TrstJar. W PoU Trallar • mBELE: -H ChawoW 
SuburDan. LoMod. • BCJDJES: Vl ChavniM 4x4 PWnipTnKt*! lauiuPfckupTniek'BfiES 
tS^Sat^lllWLs^S. Racap Tint*. - r ^m»"F"" Sm;i.t3 ; Twm Cyimdar 7-HP 
Wrioht Air Comonraaof. Oil Barnil Rack. TranimliaWn Jack. Mlicallantoua Bhop I^lpmanL 
^ - Paru.Approilma(.r,400Cor<l»oir' *■»-• •"■--» "-— 



A WAYNE PIKET^ T 
UCTIO|V 
. COMPANY A' ^ 

Lie. 48-01 • Princeton, MN 55371 
612-389-2700 

w pikca u cOntn . us west . nc i 



Wayno Plks, CAI - 61 2-389-2700 
Princtton.MH 
Ueenw 48-01 



FOR SALE- 1097 Polaris 440 XC. 2.000 

mllos, oxcollont condition, asking 
S4,000.00/o.b.O. Coll 6B1-3176 woo- 

konds. 671fe 

1096 500 Indy snowmobllo. liquid cooled. 
factory covor, low miles. o«ollon! condi- 
tion. S3.000.00. COU21B-6B1-2015. 218p 



. ARCTIC CAT ^ARCTIC CAT^ABCriCCAr^ - ARCTIC CAT • ARC TIC CAT 



1-500 SALE 

January 26th -31st 
Special Pricing On All Models! 



(Limited to quantities on hand) 



Kitly Cats .... 



...$AVE 



Jag 340 Deluxe, ES 2999 

Jag 440 - 3399 



Jag 440 Deluxe, ES . 



Ironman Z440 M-A-W */stufc.T,ther&crtuc 
Z 440 - 



T 



11 440 
Panther 340 



..3699 
..3599 

3799 

3999 

3299 




Panther 440 Deluxe 4' 99 

Prices Include Freight & Setup! 



HOURS 

9-5:30 M-F 

9-8 THURS 

<M SAT 



OTHER MODELS STILL AVAILABLE 
AT C10SE0UT PMCIHGIII CALUI 



STOP BY & CHECK OUT OUR 

UMADVEfmSED IN-STORE S PECIALS! 

' V-'^'Vf — 

ARCT/car 



340 Bsartal 
Cougar 
Panther 
ZRT 600 



EXT 

EXT Dilute 
EXT 400 
EXT Touring 



CALL FOR USED SLED USTI 



218 



Hwy. 1 & 59 W. • Thief Rl»er Falls, MN 

-681-1007 or 1-800-826-5403 



ItfjaUJHV • XB3 3U3HV ■ 1 V3 3113VV • MV3 3J13HV ■ XV3 3I13U V • I W 3IUUV_ 



V 




I'acr I ft 



NORTHERN WATCH 



Saturday, January 24, 1998 



Saturday, January 24, 1998 



NORTHERN WATCH 



Pace 17 



1998 CHEVY/GMC 3 rd DOOR EXT CAB 4x4 

350 V-8/Automatic • Air Conditioning 
» Til! Wheel & Cruise Control • Stereo Cassette 
• Power Door Locks/Windows • Much More! 




EaHasazffim 



24 



256» 



MSRP 528,007.25 



iT'^ fffTT 



Christian 
^Motors^ 

FERTILE, MN 

800-531-6166 







4-Cyl., Auto., Air, Crulso;- Tilt, 

Powor Windows/Locks, AM/FM 

Cassotto, 17,000 Milos Romnlning 

Factory Warranty 

SALE PRICE $ 11, 995 



4-Cyl.. Auto., Air, Crulso, Till. 
Powor Windoivs/Lccks/Soal, 
AM/FM Cassotto, 21,000 Milos 
Romainlng Factory Warranty 

PRICED TO SELL! 



V-6, Aulo., Air, Crulso. Tilt, 

Powor Windows/Loeka/Soot, 

AM/FM Cassotto, Roar Dolrost, 

Clean 

SALE PRICE $ 12,995 



'95 FORD EXPL. LIMITED II '93 GMC SAFARI 



V-6, Auto., Air, Crulso, Tilt, Powor 
Windows/Locks/Soal, 

" Loathor Inlorior, 
And Much Mora! 

CLOSEOW PRICE $ 22,495 




V-6, Auto., Air, Crulso, Tilt. 
Powor Windows/Locks, 

AM/FM Cassotto, 
O-Poosongor Sooting 

SALE PRICE S 8,795 




V-6, 5-Sp00d, 

AM/FM Cassotto, 

Box Unor, 

41,000 Milos 

SALE PRICE S 6,995 



'95 FORD TAURUS SE I '91 DODGE DYNASTY I "89 FORD CROWN VICT/ 




V-6, Auto., Air, Crulso, Tilt, 

Powor Wlndows/Locks/Soat, 

AM/FM Cassotto, Roar Dofrost, 

Aluminum Whoo!o_ 

SALE PRICE S ' 



*12,495 




V-6, Auto., Air, Crulso. Tilt, 
Powor Windows. 

Powor Locks, 
AM/FM Cassotto, 



SALE PRICE 



%495 




V-8, Auto., Air, Cruiso, Tilt, Powor 

Windows/Locks, 

AM/FM Conaotto, 

Cloan Car 

SALE PRICE $ 4,595 



86 FORD RANGER I '95 FORD ESCORT LX I '92 BUIOK PARK AVE. 




V-6, Auto.. 5-Spood, AM/FM. 

Toppor 

-2-Ton o Paint, 

82,000 Mltos 



SALE PRICE 



"3,795 




4-Cylindor, Auto., Air, AM/FM 
Cassotto, Aluminum Whoolo, 

Roar Spoilor, 

40,000 Milos 

SALE PRICE $ 7,995 




V-8. Auto., Air, Crulso, Tilt, 

Powor Wlndows/Locks/Soat, 

AM/FM Cnssotta, 

66,000 Milos 

SALE PRICE $ 1 0,495 



GREAT SELECTION OF CLEAN, LOW MILE. LATE MODELS! 



1997IFOHD TAURUS GL "- 
1996 MEAC. MYSTIQUE GS 
1986 DODGE INTREPID 
199SSAGLE VISION ESI . : 
1995 FORD TAURUS SE' ,; . 
1995 FORD ESCORT LX 
199SMERC..SABLE GS 
1992 MERC. GRD. MARQUIS LS 
1994MEBC. SABLE GS 



-1992 BUICKSKYLAHK.. . ,. , 7:1993GMC'SAFAHI- ^ -jJT«! 
1992 BUICK PABKAVB*Wi::i8^.'^lpGR0. : ,VbYAd£'ia 

199T DODGE DYNASTY.i-;*.A?gIggE61^fSKJra" 
1990 FORD-TAURUS lit' J*ttm^titfB^m*X3$A 

1989 ford crown: vicr;'2fc^99%*ORDTAiJnusaE2d 



WE WANT TO EARN YOUR BUSINESS! GIVE USA CALL TODAYI 




681-2660 or 1-800-295-FORD I 

Kwy. 1 & 59 West Thiol River Falls, MN I 



J£r7TUNS£R0 ALfWfTf TtRKYUMBH 



CARRTWOUS J£rTTUHB£M ALtlHtVf 



The Classifieds 



FOF1 SALE- 0-l/2«24.,l Tlmbofwoll 
onciosod Trmlor. usod onco, 2IB-470- 
3374. PF4»p 



CONTRACTORS -FARMERS 



2000S to 14.000S 

UTILITY TRAILER 

t» m mcxi 

Alr.o CARS & PICKUPS 

CALL 

"The Trailer Man" 

218-281-4491 

10 Milos NE ol Crootwton On *13 



Automobiles 

FOR SALE- 1B93 Dodgo Cornvon. air, 
cruiso. till, AM-FM caa lotto, powor wind- 
ows ana doors, vory clonn. Cnll GUI- 
BOIBdays, 681-4257 ovonWga. F4111C 
FOR SALE- 1 070 Morcury Cougar XR7. 
(i.e., 351. oicollonl condition, ono ovmor. 
21B-437-C04fjQrlorC:O0p.m. PF4M1p 



Trucks & Semis 



FOR SALE ON SEALED BID 

1990 GMC 

TOP KICK 

2-TON TRUCK 

e&t ^t Scat & wse 

Thiel River Falls 6814447 



Automobiles 



4. 0.2dioso1. 6B1-72W. 



FOR SALE- 1983 Chov. S-tO Btaior. 
4x4, 2.8 V-6, S2.S50.00. Call 21B-C81- 
1056. P4l7p 



19B5 CHEVROLET Colubnty, 4-door, 2.5 
lltsr, automatic. Woo* hoalor, runs goodl 

SGOO.OO/oHor.681-1BG5. 117p 

'84 HONDA Civic 1500, 2-door hn.ch- 
bock. 5-s pood, bluo wrbluo intorlor. groat 
gas milongo. spoclal $1,105. D4S siloa, 
1-80Q-253-2009or21B-253-2940. 1t7p 
FOR SALE- IBM Ford Rangor 4x4 with 
toppor. out, cab, call 681-5481. P4i7p 
'92 CADILLAC RootwOOd FWD, 4.D. V- 
B, gold w/ian loathor Interior, vory nice 
car oi smart buy prlco 56,450.00. D4S 
Solos, .-B0O-Z53-2M9 or 216-253-2040. 
1BB4 CHEVY 1/2-lcfl 4x4, at.. V-8. 305. 
crulso, 88,000 miloo, 218-253-2367 nftor 

G:OQ. P4l10p 

1989 CUTLASS Sopromo. 2-door. whilo. 
2.8, 60.000 on motor. 54.000 or bosl Off. 

or. 218-874-3713. 2t7p 

'84 PONTIAC Bonnovlllo, 305 onglno. 
auto., loadod. asking 5700.00 or bast off- 

or.'2S3-2821 nights. tt7p 

1987 FORD Conversion von. E-150. ox- 
col lent- mrm or, S3.000.00, 6B1-2Q2B. 

P4IBp - 

FOR SALE- 1989 Chov. Astra van, 4.3 
engine. 87,000 milos, vory cloan condi- 
Uon;S5,B00.00,21B-BBt-1058. F4l9p 



1991 MERCURY Cougar LS Coupo. 
loadrxJ, 34,000 milos. Ron's Aulo, 081- 
3002. 1t7p 

1992 OOOQE Spirit, 4-oow, 4-cyllndor, 
automatic, 02.000 milos. tiko now condi- 
uon. 54.200.00. Nolson Aula. GB1-B090. 
TI7P 

1993 CHEVY S-10 EJiaior 4.4 LT. load- 
ed. C0.000 mlloo. Call 1st Amoticon 
Bank, ask tor Ed, 745-4411. B5t1c 
1996 OLDS. Cutlass Supremo Coupo. 
loadod, 5.250 milos. factory wonanty, 

Ron'sAulo. 081-3002. 117p 

"91 FORD Explorer, 4-dccr. 4.0 V-6, o.l, 
n.c, lilt, cruiso and moro, while w/rod in- 
torlor, Hnlod windows, 4x4, spoclol 
S7.450. OSS Solos. 1-800-253-2009 or 

21B-253-2940. 1t7p 

FOR SALE- 1993 Dodgo Dakota Club 
Cab 4x4, V-8. auto., loadod. Con 601- 
4303 days, ask lor Bruco. 681-6155 

ovonlnps. PF4l7p 

FOR SALE- 1992 Grand Prix, good con- 
dition. S4.000 or bast odor. Call 430- 
2B15. 1l7p 

1994 FORD Tempo OL. 4-door, 4-cytin- 
dor, automatic, most options, vary good 
condition, NolsonAulo.. G81-6890. Ii7p 
FOR SALE- 10G9 Chavy 4x4 1/2-ton. V- 
8. 4-spaod, lock-out hubs, toppor. 51,500 
or mako an otfor, afior 0:00. C8MG37. 

PF4l13p 

FOR SALE- '84 Honda 1.8 L. (1829) on- 
glno complotoly ovorhoulod. 2.8 cylinder 
hoods; 1970 GMC 3/4-ton 2WD pickup 
with 400 big block. For moro Information 
call 218-781-2663. 1l7p 

1995 CHEVY S-10 4-wnool-drivo Blaior, 
noa command start. Call 21B-745-40B7 

prior 3 p.m. BStfo 

1991 CHRYSLER LoDaron. 2-door 
Coupo. V-6, automatic, oxcallonl condi- 
tion, vory cloan. bolow book, Nolson 

Auto. 681-8890. 1t7p 

1980 FORO F-250 4x4. 51,950, good 
runnor but rusty. 8' flborgloss loppar. tiko 
now. $300. 681-8425 oays or 523^491 

ovonlngs. 31tc 

FOR SALE- 1 987 Ford 4x4 F-150 pickup 
and toppor. asking £4,000, 631-4098. 
'65 RAQTOP Mustang, 55,500/o.m.o., 

21B-6B1-4165. IPF4t13p ^ 

'95 DODGE Intrepid, 4-door, groon 
w/groon Inlorior, nico cor, V-G, lots ol op- 
tions, groat buy. 59250. DiS Solas, 1- 
BOO-253-2009 or 218-253-2940. 1l7p 
1984 CADILLAC Eldorado, toadod. Boao 
symphany storoo, SI, 100: 19B2 Escort, 
sunroof, oloroo, $1,100, boh ora front ; 
wtiooldrivo; 1984 Pontine etoBon wagon, 
oigrtt passengor. $800. ait havo axcoliont 
bodies, run and start great, phono 681- 
6340. P4t10p 



USED FARM EQUIPMENT 


S«A*L*E 


ROW CROP EQUIPMENT 


TRACTOR5 


6-ROWAU.OWAYROTO- 


'90 JD 8960, 4,000 Hrs. 


BEETER 


'83 JD 8850 


12-RPW 22 H&S BEET CUL- 


'84 JD 8650 


TIVATOR 


'81 JD 8640 P.T.O. 


12-ROW22AUOWAYBEET 


'95 JD 8970 1,500 Hn. 


CULWATOR 


■81 VERSATILE 875 


4-ROWW1C HARVESTER 


'89JD4555MFWD 


36-ROWHS.SBAND 


'92 JD 4455 MFWD 


SPRAYER 


TILLAGE . 


12-ROW 22' JD PLANTER 


JD 230 25' DISK 




JD 960 44' CULTIVATOR 


GRAIN EQUIPMENT 


JD 3100 PLOWS • 


930 JD PLATFORM 


12 BOTTOMS 


1 980 JD 7720 


JD 3600 8-BTM. PLOW 


853AJD ALL CROP HEADER 


JD 650 26' DISK 


20' JD RIGID PLATFORM 


JD 650 30' DISK 


1 983 JD 8820 


JD 980 441/2 CULTIVATOR 


9600 JD COMBINES 


Q 


1981 JD 7720 RWD 


WESTERN IMPLEMENT 


HALLOCK, MINNESOTA PHONE: 218-843-3637 | 



Hit Pay Dirt 




■ Models available witn SAE operating capacities from 
BSO IDs lo 2050 IPs. 

■ Standard Dlrt/Construciion fluckets with capadllei from 
7.3 cu. It. to 17 cu. fl. 

■ Wide variety of attacfimenu available 

■ Hioh capacity auxlliaiy hydraulics 

■ Sea your local authorised dealer lor sales, service, pans 
and financing 

UPT0igm0NTU5 0%™N(IHG 

NELSON EQUIPMEIVT, INC. e^« « ft" «"" gmi 

930 Hi^ S9 Nonh ^ m» g ,. 

- TOclRM-rFflDi.MN 56701 Cliv^PHI 

21fr681.I997 ^^*™»i I^m. 



VEHICLES 

'97 PONTIAC GRAND PRIX, 

4-Dr., 19,000 Miles 
'96 OLDS. SUPREME SL, 

Loaded, Lealher 
'96 CHEV. LUMINALS, 

Loaded, 24,000 Miles 
'96 FORD CONTOUR GL, 

34,000 Miles 
'96 CHEVROLET CORSICA, 

V-6, 23,000 Miles 
96 OLDSMOBILE ACHiEVA, 

SC, Coupe, 33,000 Miles 
'95 MERCURY SABLE GS, 

Loaded, 32,000 Mites 
'95 FORD TAURUS GL, 

51,000 Miles 
'95 FORD ESCORT XL, 

2-Dr., Aulo., Air., 
'95 CHRY. CONCORDE, 

Loaded, 39,000 Miles 
'95 MERC. COUGAR XR7, 

Every Option Available, 

43,000 Miles 
'95 PONTIAC GRAND AM, 

Coupe, Red, 37,000 Miles 
'94 PONTIAC BONNEVILLE, 

SSE, Black W/Suniool, 

48,000 Miles 
'93 FORD TAURUS GL, 

58,000 Miles 
'93 CHEV. LUMINA EURO, 

62,000 Miles 
'92 OLDS. SUPREME SL, 

Loaded 61,000 Miles 
'92 OLDS. DELTA R0YALE, 

Loaded, 60,000 Miles 
'90 OLDS. DELTA 

BROUGHAM, Local Trade- 
in, 82,000 Miles 
'90 OLDS. DELTA R0YALE,' 
"Local Trade-in, 67J000 Mile's' 

TRUCKS U VANS 



'97 CHEV. EXT. CAB 4X4, 

34,000 Miles 
'97 CHEV. EXT. CAB 2WD, 

V-6, Auto, 24,000 Miles 
'97 FORD F-150 EXT. CAB, 

2WD, 28,000 Miles 
'96 JEEP GRD. CHEROKEE, 

LAREDO, 21,000 Miles 
3-'96 FORD F-150 4X4, 302, 

Aulo., Loaded 
'96 FORD F-150 4X4, 6-Cyl., 

5-Spd„ 28,000 Miles 
'96 FORD RANGER EXT. CAB 

4x4, Every Oplion Available 
'95FORDWINDSTARGL, 

Rear Healer & Air, 

26,000 Miles 
'94 CHEV. S-10 BLAZER, 

4-Dr, Local Trade-in, 

32,000 Miles 
'94 PLYM. GRAND VOYAGER, 

SPORT, Rear Heal 8 Air, 

43,000 Miles 
'94 PLYM. VOYAGER, 

42,000 Miles 
'94 PLYM. GRAND VOYAGER 

LE, Rear Healer 8 Air, 

33,000 Miles 
'94 FORD F-150 2WD, High 

Miles, Bui Priced Right! 
'94 FORD RANGER SPLASH, 

34,000 Miles 
'94 FORD RANGER EXT. CAB 

36,000 Miles 
'94 DODGE DAKOTA EXT. . 

CAB, High Miles, Bui Priced 

Right.' 
'93 FORD RANGER, 

66,000 Miles 



PJQHg STOT BrjANCIHG AVaJlABLEil 



LOREN'S 
AUTO SALES 

HWY. 1&59W. 
THIEF RTVER FALLS. MN 

681-5842 



The Classifieds 



The Classifieds - The Classifieds - The Classifieds 



Automobiles 



W>fr]--13M;^TT 



'88 PLYMOUTH VOYAGER 
87 CADILLAC BROUGHAM 

'86 OLDSMOBILE REGENCY 
'85 GMC PICKUP 



Hwy. 59N..T.R. Falll 
681-3860-681-7271 mn. 



1097 CHEV. Lumlno, 4-door. V-0, ll.l 
mltos. factory warranty. Ron's Auto, C 
3002. It7p 



BIG 



COMPLETE MACHINE SHOP 

• Vah-t Grinding -Prawne 
•Boring Toting 

• Crank Grinding -BrafccDrDnu 
•Rotors 'MudiMnrt 

Hwy.g9W. 6B1-2223 T.R. Falls 



Galaxle Auto and 
CampeirSales 

t.CARB0MATE 
_ llity Trailers^ 

CAR TRAILERS 
TRAVEL TRAILERS, 

5TH WHEELS & 
POP-UP CAMPERS 

I'l!l , SluTOOblllTllll!r...iS,?0G 
1993 Hytindal...39.000 Ml., 4-Dr. 
MCotllr.1 52,011 MI....MI. 
1 992 Aaroitar Van... 53.000 Mi., 3rd xoat 
1)92 Fort Tim|io...69,D00 Ml, 2-Dr. 
1990LlicilnCoilln!alll...t5 1 OOOMI., 

Full Power 
1SS9 Fold Camanln Vaa...74,00a HI. 
19J50IIJ.9I...Mr....t2,795 

Authorized Recreational Dealer 

ForSatea, Service And 

Camping Suppllaa 

Open 84 Monday thru Friday 

1 Mils South Hwy. 59 

ScenHuKrton Thiol Rlwsr Falls, MN 

JorryHltltrson 21f«81-7093 



ESI 



WB 



WB. 



m 



Automobiles 



Automobiles 



• Valvo Grindng • Flywhool 

• Comptosslon Turning 
Hood Wort • Small Engino 

• Ci-ankshafl Work E)oring 



AutQ\\ R Rni 

I II VatoeW on" 

G31-1880 
1 -800-584-341 S 
MOM. - FRI. 7:00-5^0 • SAT. 8:00 - 12 KOON 



■m-f.in.i:nn.iT 

FOR SALE- At! Chov., 1034. Suburban, 
full powor, soaU O, oicollonl condiUoo, 

081-2000. 102Hc 

FOR SALE- 1D88 Fottf F-150, 303, 5- 
apood. 4x4, 3.E00. Call 378-4162 Of 378- 

4340. P4r9p 

1W3 POHTIAC Ornnd Prix, 4^Joor, LE, 
V-0, most options, now Uioa. oxcollonl 
condition. S8, EOO. 00, Nolson Auto. Solos. 
68 1-6830. 1l7p 



The Best Buys of the Season 
are happening right now at 

OLSON'S AUTO REPAIR 
8 TOW SERVICE 

616 Davb Ave. ■ Thief River Falls 
681-4250 



1994 Chevy Blazer 4-Dr. 4x4 

1992 Chevy Blazer 4-Dr. 4x4 
1992 Ford Ranger Pjdcup 4x4 
1991 OWs Bravada 4HDr. Smart Ilac 
1989 Chevy Blazer 2-Dr. 



AUTO HOSPITAL 

AUTO & TRUCK REPAIR 
ENGINE TRANS. OVERHAUL 

681-4629 

HWY. 1 ft IB W. T.R. FALLS, UN 



DEWAYNE'S 

Used Cars, Trucks, & Auto Parts 

PHONE: 463-3773 



•8B OLDSMOBILE Cutlass Clora. 4-Ooor. 
2.S 4.tocK onglno, oood tios, rjrnv w'rod 
mtonor, runs rjront. O'oot buy Si .250. 
DSS Salos, 1-BOO-253-2009 or 218-253- 

2040. 1l7p 

•07 JEEP Watjonoar Limitoo. 4-dooi, 4.0 
V-6. 4x4, londotJ w/optlonn, d.irk 
bluo/bluo Inioriof. now tiros, bnst buy. 
54,750. D4S Snlos, 1-600-253-2009 or 

21B'253'2a40. 117p 

FOR SALE- 1074 Ginn Torino Sport, ono 
ownor. rjood condition. 210-437-848G of- 

tor 6 p.m. PF4111p 

FOR SALE- 1095 F-150 XLT 4x4, ox- 
tended cob pickup. 302. auto,, 2B.OOD 
milos. loadod. 216-782-3104. PF4t7p 



•tW PONTIAC OOOO. 4-door, 2 8 V-0. till, 
cnjlso. o.c, wtllto w/tluo inlorior. solo 
prtcoO S1.350. D&S Salos, 1-800-253- 

2000or21B-253-2Q40. It7p 

1BB3 OLDS. Cutlass Supramo SL. 4- 
door, V-G, 56.000 mltos. Ron's Auto, 68t. 

3002. 117p 

'88 FOHD Tnunjs wnoon. (jood Bros, now 
Bottory. nlco condition. 130.000 milos, 
S2.000, 681-6273. P4l10p 




1979 FORD pickup. 4x4, 300 C-cyllndor 
onglno. 4-spood transmission, tocV-oul 
hubs, sliding ioar window, whlta spoke 
rims, dual tanks, AM-FM tnpo sloroo, nlco 
body, 2IB-7B1-2845. 1l7p 



iaim RHANIl AM 2-DR. 

31,000 Mi. 
1996 TAURUS. 41.000 Mi. 
1994 FORD EXPLORER. 



Loaded, 86,000 Miles 
1994 GMC EXT. CAB 4X4. 

Slep-Slde, 30,000 ML, V-8, 

5-Speod 
1991 FORD EXPLORER 



1999 CAVALIER 2-DR. 
1999 CUTLASS SUPREME 
2-DR. 
1999 CRAMP PRIX 2-DR. 



19BB GRAND PRIX 2-DR. 
1999 FORD EXT. CAB 4WD 
1997 BUICK LE SABRE 



19B7 POHTIAC 6000 
1977 CHFVY CAPRICE 

WAGON 
1969 JAG 340 
316 JD GRADER 

TRACTOR W/MOWER 
19SJCADILLIAC2-DR, 



1B06 FORD 1/2-ton. fl-cyllndar, a-apood 
ovontitva, naw brakos. S1.5O0/0 b.a.; 10* 
Eaklmalcaaugar. $150. eS1-5.CS. ZtSc 



-SS CHEV. Lumlna. 44oor sodan. -black 
w/burganaVlntarlDr, V-6, nlcaly oqulppod. 
56.500 miles, bolow book. S11.450. DSS 
Solas, 1.S00-253-2O0S or 215-253-2340. 



* SPECIALS' 
of the, WEEK 



VERN'SAUTO 
SALES 

Stephen, WIN 



wuuMMCrOKAiarrfLPlittOltn. 



1986 HMD HUHMB. tW-SM-ftwiimDj. 

BBiUlW 

HKB JFFP RRASD CHEROKEEUIHTEO. 



laUWftH SjniUMSOO 

iwmKmm rSiiimumtt 

1BI0llgilTO. ftiitatBllt« , lW 
miHHIWH SmfaHllna 
llt«ter< PM 
IMSBiitllMtlliK IWItW 
IMUHeCMTOWKllt SaMl Ktt fill laMS 

mw,n»ii«s!n!i,ioi>*«*(t?J« 
iiiicijmcRFjrrowB)i. 
mtoira, k,ms 

IWCKWCBBglTT. HOTlDtt. S1JM 



Emery's auto sales 

218-681-4478 



RE-BUILT EIMGIIMES 

CALL 218-435-637-9 OR 1 -800-448-1518 



VBKIE EHQNE0M.Y ENGINE KSTAUETJ 

2.5 GM 85-87 Exc. Flora . -^s . . . .S06S.OO - SI .320.00 
2.Q QM BD-85 Curb -^.^r^^-r-SSBS.OO *J.3 2 0-°° 

•2.BQMB6-01 Inf, ST^tSa****, =.".$845.00 S1.420.0O 

4.3 in), chov. p/u :-^J»$*$3r--r:. .$975.00 si.4so.oo. 

305 ChOvy.Cart. eB-Q^-rrrC: $076.00 , S1.3pO.00 

350 CMovy Cnrb 6B-85 5E5-S2 I!*™ SS 

303 Chov. P/U-Sub 80-94 .$876.00 $1,350.00 

350 Chov. P/U-Sub 88-94 $876.00 J1 ,350.00 

300 Ford P/U Cnrb "2£-°2 £!'£&££ 

300 Ford P/U In) $045.00 S1 ,370.00 

302 Ford P/U Cnrb $BB5.00 *]'2Z2'S2 

302 Ford P/U In]. Thru 1B01 $895.00 *1> 3 Z5'S2 

351 W Ford P/U Cnrb $895.00 $1 .370.00 

351 W Ford P/U in) $005.00 J1.470.00 

2.6 Coravnn/Voyogor $1^50.00 $1,875.00 

3,0 Cnrovnn/Voyagor Thru 1989 ...$1,075.00 $2,150.00 

aBGM 80-B9 I...... $976.00 $1,450.00 

ALL ENGINES REMANUFACTUHED IN Q1JB 10,000 SO. F.T FACTOHY 

HO Tfc MOSI VAN INSMUAIIONS AH.E UM CO CXCtPt wEsas 
M pnai ti* w«a-u»« m i ritut»t>» ten. buiuiron L'«^^ , S^" ,, S™^- - _.„ 
nuUton Owti wi Mi* u-r taSmipva w U*M • r«*u^^i5-^»»r^-*S '»"«"« 4"~* , T 

PON'S MACHINE SHOP, Induatrinl Pnrtc, proton, HH 



NORTHWEST POWER SYSTEMS 



NOW IN STOCK 
REBUILT EXCHANGE 

STARTERS 

AND 

Alternators* 
Northwest 
Power Systems, Inc. 

204 Atlantic Ave. N. • Thief River Falls, MN 56701 

www nortnwoW- pow or-syalom.com omoP:npriO nortrtwDSt- powo r- Byslom.com 

(218) 681-5282 • 1-800-570-5282 



«»^^SWANSONM01OKS 

07 Old> Bravado, i>«».i-«.w«.. to— ■ 

HAS MORE TRUCK 



97 Chevy Tahoa. »».*.—-»« MM.—- 
oTchtvy Or. Prix Con. 4x4, v..—,-. 
WSCtonyTx* Ext Cab, fc*..v.™. 
^cTiBvySBIazBr LS, o™* ,*»—«.■. 

l^FOrS^iXLT^L. VI. H. «- MMIMh 

90 Chovy Tahoa LT, tM.MH*,iMa .i-**. 
OlTDodsaDakota 4x4 Ext Cab. ««*«, 
gSGMC SLT Blazer.—. —.—«——. 
99 Chovy Suburban LT, n™.eo. ***.•*• 
oVponlJac Transport, o™«i*a.w.»».*«. 
05 Pontine Traniport 380O. 
M cTovyTonoa 2dr 8.5 DSL. w«,»— . 
94 Chovy Blnzer LT 2dr,n« .w—«n— 
94Chovy4x4 r ExLCabSllvorndo,ii^i 
Soi^4xVExt 1 CabTr "" ' 
94*Ford Ranrjor Ext Cab 2WD, 



FOR YOUR BUCK 



LARGE NUMBER OF 
NEW TRADE-INS _ 



94 GMC Suburban, • 
MChevy S10 Ext Cab 2WD, «-«..*. ^. 
\\^CYM*y%4 Ext Cnb 8.2 DSL Sllvorado, 
fl?cVovy L RC Sllvowdo^i Ron. Cab, 
sVchVry "sVo^X^'ExtTcnb, •>-.».«. * « 



MBllLLMllUIUaAIM 

BB Bulck Park Avenue,*wi>— «.«- 

57*Cadlllac Oovlllo,»..vt «-.»—.- 

97Bonnovlllo SE..-H.— .— »-™» 
97 Bulck UaSobre, imwhu. — — 

iff'oida'Bs'Ls, *w w- ■—. . w— * w w 

98Po"tiK , Grond AM SE4dr,*wvi*» 

BSolcia 98 Roflency,u«».v«w.«-(i«. 

96 Pontine Grand AM, n« «.«-.*«<. r~ 

BsVontlao Sunblfd GT.»— .»•.-.■.«. 

95 Olds Aurora, u> 

BSPontlac Grand Prix, » 

94 Bulck Regal, »*«m *>-««. n »«. 

93 Olds 90 Regency Touring Sedan. 

92 Dodge Spirit* 

92 Chevy Beretta GT, w 

92 pontine Grand "to Ix 3r%* 

92Pontlao Grand Prix, v. 

B2*Bulck Park Avenue, cm.*. 

^CndUlSc bevlllo.v* 

grToidV Oeltn 80 Roynl Broughm.w 




LARAMIE SLT & SPORT MODELS! 318, 360 & DIESEL! GREAT OPTION PKGS.4 



Tt/e&t&ede "WCatotA, tyou* "WtiiOvtut Stvte, Wow- O l ^<yu... 




WESTSIDE MOTORS [p 

J dodge Vhjmditin U\Y\'Mi;\ DnilnnTmcte OF T.R.F., INC. }!& 

^2S& Ea 9 |0 S '"''' , '' w 'i''v"j;' , '~ i ,'[ii/S,'!;ri!i',?ra~,f,,',"''''' ffr 



■m&^Btmm^: 






r |ar i 





ar 



IstaM 




Karlstad, located north of Thief River Falls on Hwy. 59, is the second 
largest city in Kittson County with a population of approximately 872. 
The city boasts a number of businesses, recreation areas and schools. 
Around 1883 a Swede named Anthony Carlson established a homestead in 
the country west of Twin Lakes. In 1904 the Soo Line Railroad built a track 
across Carlson's farm and purchased acreage for a townsite from him. 
The new town needed a name. Some suggested Klingville and 
Clayton. Karlstadjuas. suggested and chosen, honoring both Mr. Carlson and 
the city of Karlstad in Sweden. 

Pelen, a village to the east that had been busy during stagecoach days, 
moved its buildings to Karlstad. Early businesses included two hotels, a 
blacksmith shop, two livery barns, a general store, a mercantile, a lumber 
mill, a flour mill and an elevator. Another store building was moved in from 
Fir, about three miles southwest of Karlstad. The first business actually built 
in Karlstad was the Pearson Hotel. 

Today the city of Karlstad is home to eight churches. In addition to 
the public school system, the Heritage Christian School is located in 
Karlstad. 

Moose Park includes 16 campsites with water and electrical hookups, 
bathroom facilities, two picnic shelters, two tennis courts, two softball 
fields, playground equipment and two sand volleyball courts. 

Karlstad Country Club is a nine-hole public golf course with grass 
greens and a newly remodeled clubhouse. 

There is a municipal skating rink in the city. 

The 8,200 acre Twin Lakes wildlife management area is located four 
milesnortheastofKarlstadonStateHwy.il. 

Businesses of all types are located in Karlstad to meet the needs of 
the residents and surrounding farm community. 

In addition to the activities provided in-the churches and schools, 
. there are a number of organizations which encourage adults and children 
alike to be involved in their community — Lions Club, Mosse Country 
, Gardens Club, Halma Ideal 4-H Club, Karlstad City and Commerce and 
Royal Neighbors. 



T?rtmtM" z 



Mainstreet Floral & Gifts 




218-436-3131 
When You Say It With Flowers jgw 
Say It mill Oars W. 

Your Hometown Florist Ol&floia 



^Altru ClinicK 



nannnnamann 



limSOlAMlt: 
M,CIU*HEPICI«mii.:mi 

ciiQUinnoL isd rt him; ■ 



rmiir«iTKU«rYiR 



nwiwiuiiMiiiiiiiiiwreni 



,t tin it IttMMOCUntTmnc 
tfivmnurru 
I DU&IOniCUIX-UY 



A Proud Business of Karlstad 

Anderson 66 Auto Sales 

436-3122 • Karlstad 

Elmer Anderson - Rory Anderson 



'95 GMC Jimmy S-10 4x4 
'95 Cbev. Ext. Cab 4X4' '94 Chcv. Ext. Cab 4x4 




Eagles Club 

milMIIIIUHUIUIIIIM 

Wedding Dances & Receptions * Catering 

• Bingo Wed. 7:30 p.m. 

Charitable Gaming A01585 

436-2315 Karlstad 



FARMERS UNION OIL CO. 



Lako Bronson Karlstad 

754-4300 436-2668 

Full Service Gas & Diesel Station 

Hardware ■ Fertilizer Plant 
Auto & Truck Maintenance Service 

Chemicals ■ Anhydrous 
Custom Application • Plus Morel 



fflira 



Proudly Serving Karlstad's 
Communication Needs 



Wikstrom Telephone Company, Inc. 

O Karlstad, MN 56732 /«■». 

1-800-252-1166 W 



Kittson County Craft Headquarters 



• Gifts • Clothes ' Toys • Jewelry • Fabric 

,• Pharmacy Russell Stover Candy 

• Baby Dept. • Greeting Cards 



Engen Drug & Variety Inc. 

43S-2438 Karlstad 



We're Proud To Be A Port Of The Community 

KARLSTAD INSURANCE AGENCY, INC. 



Uox31U 
KarlMwl Dai* Ui i 
Karlilail 



Gunderson Autobody 

Professional Repair and Refinishing 
Tim Gunderson, Owner 
Rural Karlstad (218) 436-2826 ' 



Hotter Repair 

Towing e% Road Sorvlcn .ataaaaV 

Specializing In Diagnostic Computer S»rWc ff iSflPfl) 



Srafto Repair • Stmts *■ Comploto Auto R ffpn fr 

Automotivo Transmission Rttoalr i^^STiS; 

Marti Holtor -218-436-2244 
1 Block North Of Farmer's Elevator, Karlstad 



* HARDWARE 

HANK. 



"The Largest 

Display Of Hardware 

In Northwestern 

Mlrfnesota" 

Also: Clothing, 

Lumber, & Culverts 

We Ship UPS 



| Your Full Service Independent Bank \ 

Prime Security 
„,,„ A Bank 



FDIC 



tft 



436-2151 



State Farm 
Sells Life Insurance. 



Bob Carlson 
218-436-2211 



Hageland Real Estate Co. 

P.O. Box 246, Karlstad, MN 56732 



218-436-7260 



toiv interest rote* won't be around forrver! 
•e thinking of buying or telling a home, jutt giue u. 



Germundson's 
Home Furnishings 

Furniture, Carpeting, Accessories 

122 Main Street, Karlstad, MN 56732 

218-436-2388 



KARI.STAD HEALTHCARE CENTER. INC. 

304 Wuhington Avenue West 
Karlstad 

218-436-2161 



' Referral calli and Admlnloni taken 24 hour* per day, ^ d*r* P" *"'' 
All pavor aourcet accepted Including Medic*™, Medicaid, Private A VA 
' Rehabilitation Service! (OT, IT, ST) 

1 Home-like famlljr environ meat 



OwwcrTjoh. 



■J!i«Y» 



Power Comptny 



KARLSTAD FARMERS 
ELEVATOR 

Locally Owned 

Serving Vic Community Since 1916 

See Us For Your 436-2265 

Grain & Feed Needs Karlstad 



Proud To Serve The Karlstad Community 

American Legion 
Post 445 




KARLSTAD COUNTRY GOlt CLUB 

Hwy. If tm, Karfftorf 436-4633 

SwonFetKromTj'SIM- Indmduol iUO-CeHtgtHoim-ilO 

Cart (tntoli; $10 ■ 9 Holm; H Eoch Jblcfitionol 9 Holt IowkU. 

Weekend Ratii: SB ■ 9 Holct ■ All Doy J1 I 

Weekdoy Bntw 5S - 9 Hole* • Al Doy 11 

Hoi Op«n To H» PuW* Afiw 4:30 PJn. W«dne«favi Dm To Womtn ib«8Ut 
AnJAJttf^QP.M.TriijridoYlDmToMen'iUoav* 



FIVE STAR PROPANE & OIL INC. 

SON Oil 
436-2338 

For All Your Propane & Fuel Needs 



m 



Northwest 

Medical 




Norlhwost Modlcal Conter* 120 LaBroo Avenue Soulh* Thiol River Falls, MN 56701-2819 • (218) 681-4240" email: nwmc © nwmc.org • http://www.nwmc.org 

Alicia Haviland Takes on 

ED with a Loving Vengeances 



i* 



flu 



Alicia Haviland blows into a room 
like u whirlwind, raising her audience's 
understanding of the misery she calls 
ED like dust on a hot 
August day. 

At her presentations, a 
rubber snake is curled 
around her neck and 
shoulder, and breathes its 
phony breath into her 
car. "ED reminds me of 
this," she says, gripping 
your gaze with hers and 
refusing to let go. 
"This snake is what ' 
ED is like. It's like 
carrying around this 
invisible fear all the 
time. It demoralizes 
your self-esteem. It 
continually tells you 
you're not good 
enough. You don't 
look good enough. 
You don't act good 
enough. You're 
too fat. You're too 
overweight. It con- 
tinually takes the wonderful per- 
son you arc and beats you up." 

ED is short for Ealing Disorder, 
which Haviland defines as any obses- 
sion over food. The most well-known 
manifestations of ED are anorexia, 
bulemia and obesity, but there are oth- 
ers. 

"I don't have a problem with diet- 
ing. Just excessive dieting," Haviland 
says. "Any diet taken to an extreme is 
ED talking," she says. "I don't care if 
it's the grapefruit diet or the low-fat diet 
or die cookies and milk diet. Whenever 
you find yourself obsessing about what 
you cat or what you don t cat, that's 
ED." 

Haviland recommends all things in 



moderation. "Breathe, cat, sleep, exer- 
cise in even proportions. Any imbal- 
ance of one of these elements allows an 
unsettling consequence. If you can't do 
it alone, in the right way, then you 
need" to get help. You 
have to 




respect and 

take care of your body. It's 

the only one you get." 

Haviland points out the Food Guide 
Pyramid as a good guide. "We don't 
want you fat; wc don't want you skinny; 
we want you healthy. You need protein, 
carbs and yes, fats, too. The pyramid 
doesn't say no fat.' It says, a little bit 
of fat each day.'" 

Haviland says eating disorders arc 
in epidemic proportions right now. 
There are many reasons why. "It starts 
with day I, wnen they put you in the 
nursery and everyone asks. How much 
does the baby weigh?'" she says, "And 



wc say. 'Oh, what a chubby baby,' or. 
'Oh, what a skinny baby.' We're classi- 
fying babies according to their appear- 
ance and weight from day one!" 

Then there's the TV. I went into 72 

houses, and every piece of furniture 

faces the TV. I believe we've created a 

demi-god. Our conversations arc rare 

of late," Haviland says. "If 

you want children to 

learn the ABCs. what 

do you do? Repeat it, 

repeat it, repeat it, 

repeat it. If you want 

them to learn crime. 

drugs, sex. violence and 

the unhealthy need for 

perfection, what do you 

do? Plug "cm into that 

television set and have 

them il there for hours 

and ho irs! An unrealistic 

world of expectations 

begins ,o take form. ED 

waits fo ■ those moments of 

shaky 'df-estcem." She 

notes th.it everywhere we 

turn, we are being given 

obsessive messages about 

food. 

"If you look on every 
single cover on every single 
magazine, Ihere's something 
about some kind of diet. We eat, 
breathe and sleep dieting." She points 
to the front pages of popular maga- 
zines, or to a poster of Pamela Sue 
Anderson, star of Baywatch. "These 
pictures are probably computer altered 
or airbrushed to make them look per- 
fect,'" she notes, pointing to Anderson's 
unusually tiny waist and hips. She 
holds up a Barbie doll. "And how could 
any girl possibly measure up to this? 
We must teach tnat Barbie is a toy, and 
(Continued on Page 8) 



Auxiliary 



ScholarshipRecipieat* 




Auxiliary Scnoiarsmy* „, 

p,8)6BI-4240. extend 304. 



Northwest 

Medical Center 



120 LnBftm Avonuu Soul" 
Thiol Rlvot F.-illa. MN 50701 -28 1 
Phono: |218) 681-12-10 
Fn>: (3ia)GQ1-50M 



Doar Community Members; 

Welcome lo the new communily health publication of Northwest Medical Conlor (NWMC). As a com- 
munity not-for-prolil hospital. NWMC's mission is lo promoto and support tho health care floods ot tho 
Thiol River Falls area. 

Community Health Advisor will highlight tho communily health resources of Northwast Modical Conlor, 
share the knowledge and experience of our staff, and prevlow Ihc now programs, services and physl-' 
cian choices you will find at Northwest Modical Conlor. 

Our recent research on community atlitudos and expectations shows that residents value Northwest 
Medical Center as an important local assot...bolh as a source ol quality health caro services and as one 
' ol the key elements necessary to maintain a growing and vital Thief River Falls. 

We appreciate your support and confldonce. and wo want to take this opportunity to 'renew our com- 
mitment to you and your health neods. Tho Board of NWMC is committed to the growth of this institu- 
tion as our local health care scene becomes more competitive. 

Wc also heard that you want new services, now programs, more cholcos, and a patlont-oriontcd physi- 
cian team. NWMC and the Allru (Grand Forks) Clinic is actively developing a now toam of physicians ' 
committed to using our extensive community health caro investment to serve the best Interests of Thief 
River Falls, In working closely with NWMC, Iho now Allru (Grand Forks) Clinic will bo making an Impor- 
tant investment and contribution in our communily. Putting you first is nol only NWMC's most important 
job. it's our most Important differonco. 

Watch lor Community Health Advisor each quarter, and expect Information you can use to keep your- 
self and your family healthy and well. Watch hero (or announcomonts of now physicians and services 
where communily health comes llrst... horo at NWMC. 

Wo believe there is a slrong story of common community intorest between our non-prolit hospilal and 
tho long term health, growth and vitality of Thiol Rivor Falls. Wo Invito you lo look to us al NWMC, as 
tho best sourco of information about your hoalth and Iho local services available lo support il. 

Wo'll try to help you understand tho changing health caro environment in our communily. loam about all 
tho new cholcos and resources your communily hospital can provide, and understand tho importance 
of tho many programs and sorvicos that your community hospilal will provide in tho future. This publi- 
cation is for you. Phono Gail Holland al 210-G81-424O to tell us what intorosts you. what you need to 
know lo be healthior, and whal programs and support you neod from Northwesl Modical Center. 



Sincerely, 

yj*~*<. .P. X^f 



Sincoroly. 



Thomas P. Kays 
Board Chairperson 



J&L/t.^A^- 



Richard A. Spyhalski 
Chief Executive Officer 



Daycare Provider 
Workshop Presented by 
Northwest Medical Center 

Daycare providers carry a large responsibil- 
ity to the children ihey care for as well as their 
parents. Their skills ami knowledge concerning 
safety, infections, nutrition and development 
need lo be continuously updated. As a commu- 
nily hospital. Northwest Medical Center in 
Thiol" River Falls recently provided a workshop 
for area daycare providers with information tit 
help iliem continue giving quality child care. 

On Tuesday, December 2. 1997 Northwest 
Medical Center joined together with representa- 
tives from Pennington County Social Services 
and Iiiler-Counly Nursing to present this work- 
shop to daycare providers in the area. 
Presenters at the workshop were Tammy 
Vatthauer, Registered Dietitian from Northwesl 
Medical Center, Sharon Jorde. RN. CIC. 
Infection Control Nurse at Northwest Medical 
Center, Ken Yutrenka, representative from 
Pennington County Social Services and Anita 
Cardinal. RN of Inter-County Nursing. Topics 
covered were: communicable disease prevention 
and infection control, child abuse; identifying 
and reporting, and nutrition and food safety. 

Nearly SO daycare providers from Thief 
River Falls. Oklee, Red Lake Falls, Plummer, 
Newfolden. Warren and Strandquist participated 
in the workshop. In response to information pro- 
vided by Sharon Jorde, RN. regarding Infection 
Control, one participant stated, "I jusl filled my 
soli soap container without washing il out, but 
from now on I will rinse it out or just buy a new 
one". Response was extremely posiiive by par- 
ticipants and Northwest Medical Center looks 
forward to providing more workshops of this 
type to area providers. 

Participants received a certificate providing 
credit for two hours of on-going training 
requirements for licensed day care providers. 



NORTHWEST 

MEDICAL CENTER 

MISSION STATEMENT 

Northwest Medical Center seeks 
to provide high quality, comprehen- 
sive, communily-oriented, physical 
and emotional health care services, 
in a cost-effective manner, to the res- 
idents of northwestern Minnesola. 
Northwesl Medical Center intends to 
achieve this mission by providing 
communily-oriented medical, health 
education, human and social ser- 
vices. Northwest Medical Center 
Intends to pursue cooperative 
endeavors with other health care 
providers while enhancing Its role as 
a regional leader In the provision of 
these services and remaining a 
financially vital health. care organiza- 
tional. 



^M^mM^m 




Cookbook Enthusiasm! 

The first Northwesl Medical Center 
Cookbook was printed in 1994 as a fund-raiser 
for the Northwest Medical Center Foundation. 
The lirsi 1 .000 copies sotd quickly and are_no 
longer available. We are very proud of our first 
effort and pleased that so many people enjoyed 
it- 
Work on Volume II began in June of 1997. 
Could we meel the same goal as our last book - 
1.0(H) recipes'.' We've come very close with 
over 9S0 recipes included in this book. We've 
made every effort to not duplicate recipes. 

Again, profits from this cookbook will go to 
the Northwest Medical Center Foundation 
whose mission is to raise and allocate funds to 
ensure quality, personalized health care in our 



book, but that you may notice the 
name of an employee who may 
have cared lor you or one of 
your family member*. Allbougb 
not all employees al Northwest 
Medical Center are directly 
involved in patient care, we all 
work each day with a focus on 
our patients and the care they 



area. 



Our hop< 

tsing if 



ir hope is lhat you will not only enjoy 
the wonderful recipes found in this cook- 

NWMC Flood 
Stories are Full of 

On the night of Friday, April 18. 1997. staff 
members of NWMC and area volunteers 
learned that they had less than four hours to pre- 
pare a new home for the staff and 122 residents 
of the East Grand Forks Good Samaritan 
Center, which had to be evacuated because of 
the Great Flood of 1997. The Thief River Falls 
community never doubted that it could do the 
task/ The only question was: What to do first? 

To create a make-shift "dorm." volunteers 
went to work in the gymnasium of the 
Northland Community College and the job was 
accomplished well before the first National 
Guard trucks rolled into town at about 10 P.M. 

Sandy Parker. RN, C&NC Supervisor from 
NWMC and Deb Filer. RN, Director of Nursing 
from NCTC met al Northland Community 
College to assist in coordinating preparations. 
Theresa McNcrney. Director of Medical 
Records at NWMC and a volunteer lhat night 
says, "It was amazing. Beds, nicks, medical 
reeords-the National Guard literally moved the 
entire nursing home. We tried to get that some- 
what organized before the actual residents 
arrived." 

"The residents started arriving-ufier mid- 
night " says Gail Holland. Public Relations 
Coordinator for NWMC. "The staff of NWMC 
worked alongside the staff of Good Sam and 
members of the community until about 4 in the 
morning." 

By 8 A.M., things had settled down a bit. 
But just after the residents had eaten breakfast, 
volunteers started pouring in. and the action 
reached a new high. Deb Ernst. Director of 
Social Services for NWMC says, "At the begin- 
ning, ii was so chaotic that we didn't know who 
was a resident and who was a volunteer!" 
According to Holland. "The volunteers never 
stopped coming that weekend. It was fun watch- 
ing all these people come up with ideas on how 
to get organized." 

There was much that needed to be done to 
ensure the well-being of the residents. Nursing 
duties had to be assigned, social activities 



NWMC Volume 11 cook- 
books may be purchased by 
visiting the NWMC Aux- 
iliary Gift Shop on (he 
ground floor of the med- 
ical center or by calling 
Gail Holland at (218) 
681-4240, exl. 210. Cost 
is $10.00. 



Hope 




" A Co/fe, 



arranged and food j 
services coordinat- ;___ 
ed. The Good ~~ '--■■ — _ 
Samaritan staff helped the 
NWMC personnel organize the volun- 
teers. There was only one happy problem: 
There were more volunteers than jobs. 
"People wanted to help so much that even if 
they hadn't signed up to volunteer, they came 
anyway." says Marilyn Wigness, retired 
Director of Nursing at NWMC and Volunteer 
Coordinator of the Good Sam project. 

Wigness adds: "After about two days, the 
enthusiasm waned, so it became our jobs lo gel 
volunteers. The response from people was fan- 
tastic. We rarely got a no. We had short (2 
hour) volunteer segments to help feed residents 
or get them to bed. No mailer what wc asked 
for, people helped." She laughs. "And people 
kept baking for us--there were always cookies!" 
"I learned how giving the people of Thief 
River Falls are," Wigness continues. "When we 
would call people lo work a shift or help in 
some way. help came pouring in. Our private 
joke became, how fast can we get what Good 
Sam needs?' It was both individuals and busi- 
nesses, I couldn't believe how wonderful peo- 
ple were." 

Wigness notes that she received help from 
another source, too. "On one of the more chaot- 
ic days, three or four individuals scheduled to 
volunteer called to cancel, for one reason or the 
other. ' I was miserable, knowing we needed 
these positions filled immediately. But in each 
instance, someone called and volunteered their 
lime and expertise to fill these open slots. 1 
know wilh absolute certainty God's hand was at 
work to help us. There could be no other expla- 
nation." 

"We had volunteers from ages 12 to 70." 
Linda Spyhalski, Volunteer Coordinator, 
explains. "1 was especially impressed with the 
youth. This one young man, about 13 years old. 
came out with his boy scout teader, but later 
came on his own because he said it was so much 






■\ can' 
17 ol. 



can 



v*o |0 



>n» 10 



8 «■«"-„ sea! 



sauce 



kS onin9 



m'«.._ 



s^ssa'^rs-^S 






pood 8 

fun. 
He'd ride his bike 
out and take two shifts back-to- 
back. Then we'd get people who had been 
sandbagging and got blisters on their 
hands, but would walk across the street to see il 
they could help us." 

McNerney says there was no shortage of 
nurses either. "Nurses came from Thief River 
Falls and the surrounding communities, as well 
as nurses and nurse assistants from 
Minneapolis. St. Cloud and Rochester who gave 
up vacation time to come up and help." 

The volunteers were not the only ones who 
performed impressively under such trying cir- 
cumstances. Spyhalski says. "One thing that 
impressed me were the residents. The first 
night some were scared and confused, but it just 
took a very short time before they got over their 
fear." The Good Samaritan residents stayed at 
the college for almost 4 weeks. And NWMC 
was there (he entire time. Linda Spyhalski says. 
"It was a real benefit to know the hospilal was 
behind us. Dan Olson, Associate Administrator 
for NWMC. was out there every day. We knew 
if we really needed something we couldn't find 
in the community, we could call and they would 
bring il over. It wasn't necessarily big things- 
like a laundry cart-but whatever it was, the hos- 
pital helped. If we had a handicapped resident. 

(Continued on Page 6) 



Levin son Creates "Following Through" and 
MotivAider® to Help Others Reach Goals 



Pennington County and NWMC Work 
Together to Treat Children and Their Families 



Have you ever started an exercise program 
hut never got past putting the stationary hike in 
the bedroom? Do you write New Year's resolu- 
tions that seem to lade into oblivion before 
February? Maybe it's not your fault. 

"We humans are poorty designed for follow 
through." says Steve Levinson. PhD. a clinical 

psychologist and director of NWMC's 

Menial Health Division. "Our brains 
include some very advanced equipment 
along with some extremely primitive 
equipment. Unfortunately, the advanced 
and the primitive often work at cross pur- 
poses with each other. The brain is capa- 
ble of producing well thought-out plans-- 
intentions-that map out exactly what we 
should do to get what we need and want 
out of life in the long run. But because the 
brain is also designed to constantly moni- 
tor and react to Ihings around us, we rou- 
tinely get distracted from our plans. We 
get blown off course. It's ironic: First, we 
use the awesome power of the brain to 
decide what we should do. Then the very 
same brain causes you to do something 
else instead. 

"You can wake up one morning and say. 
That's it. I'm going on a diet. I don't like 
the way I look, and I don't like the way I 
feel.' Two hours later when you're con- 
fronted with a fattening, gooey caramel 
j'oll, the same brain that put you on a diet 
says. Let's eat!'" 

Levinson says it's like being a passen- 
ger in a car that's equipped with two steer- 
ing wheels and two drivers that have very 
different ideas of where you should go. 
"The advanced driver thinks things 
through and tries to steer a course (hat's best for 
you in the long-run. Meanwhile, the primitive 
driver steers you towards every distraction 
along the way," he says. 

Levinson's new book. Following Through: 
Whv We Don't. How Wc Can , aims to change 
forever the way people experience and treat 
their own good intentions. To be published in 
1998 by Kensington Publishing Company of 
New York. Levinson's book is co-authored by 



PUBLISHER'S STATEMENT 

Community Hoallh Advisor is published by 
Northwost Modical Center in Thiol Rivor Fall; 
Minnosola. 

Chiot Exocutivo Ollicor - Richard Spyhalski 
Associate Adminisirator - Don Olson 
Diroclor ol Nursing - Jonoll Hudson 
Chiot Financial Ollicor - Thomas Parish 
Diroclor ol Human Resources - Miko Parker 
Nowsloltor Coordinator - Gail Holland 
Wrilor - Robin Silverman 

©1998 Northivosl Modical Corner. 
All Rights Rosorvod. 
For permission to reprint or rauso any ol the 
information in this newsletter, contact Gail 
Holland. Public Relations Coordinator. 
Northwest Modical Center. 120 LaBroo 
Avenue South. Thiol River Falls. MN 56701- 
2819. 1218) G81-424Q, oxt. 210 or. o-mail: 
nwmc tfnwmc.org 



* 



2L_:S3ffiS3B3iS25£2 



Pete Greider. a nationally-Known "peak perfor- 
mance" consultant to businesses, such as the 
Northwestern Mutual Life Insurance Company 
and sports leanis like the Orlando Magic. 

"We believe people have been taking a hum 
rap for years." says Levinson. "Its not really 
their fault that they do such a lousy job of fol- 




Levitison lie describes, tor example, what he 
calls the ■Leading the Horse lo Water" strategy, 
which is especially helpful if you w.mt to start 
an exercise program. "If you insist that you 
musi work out. say. 20 minutes at a crack. 1 
days a week, you may never successfully launch 
your exercise routine." says Levinson. "If. on 
the oilier hand, you require yourself to 
do nothing more than put on your 
exercise clothes and go sit on the seat 
of your exercise bike, and you invite 
yourself to get off at any time that it 
B feels burdensome to be there, you'll 
build a routine that's not worth avoid- 
ing. Eventually, you'll feel. Oh well. 
I'm already here. I might as well just 
start pedaling.'" 

Following Through is an out- 
growth of a device called the 
MotivAider" that Levinson invented 
several years ago to help people fol- 
low through on their intentions. "The 
MotivAider* is a remarkably simple 
electronic device that's designed to 
keep any intention on the front burner 
of your mind," Levinson says. The 
MotivAider'. which is marketed by 
Behavioral Dynamics, Inc., a Thief 



lowing through. Poor 
follow through is the 
result of the mixed-up 
way the human mind is 
designed." 

But Levinson's book 
docs a lot more than 
just get people off the 
hook for failing to fol- 
low through. It goes on 
to teach people meth- 
ods and strategies that 

Levinson and Greider have developed for fol- 
lowing through despite the mind's design prob- 
lems. "The book begins with the premise that 
because having a good intention doesn't auto- 
matically mean you'll follow through on it, you 
have to learn how to follow through manually." 

Levinson ciles an example of an obese New 
England man whose downfall was overeating in 
restaurants. The man decided he should just stay 
out of restaurants altogether. But when he failed 
to follow through on his intention, he devised a 
radical plan. He created and put up "Wanted" 
posters ol' himself all over the area, with the 
promise 'of a S25,00() reward to anyone who 
caught him eating in a restaurant! The man's 
weight loss was as dramatic as his plan: He lost 
over 125 pounds. 

Not all follow -thro ugh strategies involve 
putting pressure on yourself, according to 




good ways people have found to ti 
through invention. He tells (he story of a Texas 
man who used the MotivAider' for spiritual 
purposes, The man wrote. "I used to go to 
church once a week. Now with the Motiv- 
Aider'. I go once every live minutes all day 
long! It's been a wonderful blessing." 

Levinson is passionate about helping people 
follow through on their intentions. And he's 
proud to work at NWMC and to live in north- 
western Minnesota. "To me, rural doesn't mean 
backwards. It means having a chance to create 
and pursue innovative ways of doing things," he 
says. "I feel good about the fact that every day 
experts in my Held from all over the world call 
or wrile to order a product I created right here in 
Thief River Falls." 

To reach U'vinsoit. call Northwest Medical 
Center at {2IH) f^I-4240, ext. 447. 



It's the third night this week that your pn 
teen hasn't come home on time. You've tried 
talking to her and grounding her for a day. 
Instead of getting better, the problem scents to 
be getting worse. You don'l think she's in any 
trouble, hut it looks like some might be headed 
your way if you can't gain her cooperation and 
trust. What do you do now hesides worry? 

Call the Information Line of the new Family 
Preservation Center: (218) 6H.V71MO. "We have 
a telephone information line that parents can 
call to talk with a mental health professional 
free of charge, without entering any system or 
doing any paperwork, to get advice on parent- 
ing." says Terry Demars. Director of the 
Pennington County Family Preservation 
Project. 

The Pathfinder Children's Center, the pro- 
ject's residential facility, is the latest innovation 
in family preservation. It looks and 
functions like a house, but acts as a 
resource center to enhance parenting 
skills and a child's emotional well- 
being. The Center, located at 923 
North Atlantic Avenue in Thief 
River Falls, is a 5300 square foot 
building with six bedrooms (10 
beds). It will include a resource 
room for the community, includ- 
ing internet access and videos, 
magazines and books on parent- 
ing, child development and emo- 
tional disorders. The 
Department of Human Services 
has licensed the treatment cen- 
ter to serve up to 10 children, 
ages birth through 17. There is 
generally little or no charge or 
membership fee to use facili- 
ty. Residents are usually, 
referred to the Center by a 
parent, health-care profes- 
sional, court or police 
department, or other social 
service agency. "The Penn- 
ington County Department of Welfare 
and Human Services needs to approve place- 
ment," Demars says. "Assuming we have an 
opening, we can provide services within min- 
utes or the hour, once a referral has been made. 
We're going to serve these children as quickly as 
we can." 

The Pennington County Family Pres- 
ervation Project, including the Pathfinder 
Children's Center, was made possible through 
the vision and support of the Pennington 
County Welfare Board and, tjie Pennington 
County Family Collaborative, a group of agen- 
cies serving the children of Pennington County. 
"It's very hard to gel kids into most tradi- 
tional treatment centers these days, so by the 
time they get into the centers, the problems are 
large and hard to fix." Demars explains. "We're 
trying to create a center where we can get the 
children treatment early on. white lite problems 
are still fixable. This facility will serve only 
Pennington County children. It will allow us lo 
gel children in earlier." 

The goal is lo prevent major problem:' -'- :| - 
keeping children in need of treati 



home. "The purpose of the facility is to allow 
children, whenever possible, to remain with 
their families." Demars continues. "And when 
it's not possible, lo at least allow them to remain 
in the community. Some of these (other treat- 
ment centers) make an effort to get the family 
involved, but when you have to drive two hours 
or more to have a family session, it doesn't 
work. There will be a significantly better tran- 
sition from this treatment center to life at home 
than there is in other treatment centers, simply 
because this treatment facility is in the commu- 
nity and the children will be able to engage with 
their families on a regular basis." 

For example, in the case of the child who 
continually brakes curfew, one night in the cen- 
ter may be sufficient to fix the problem. "The 
length of treatment depends on the child, hut it 
should be significantly shorter since our project 
is based on a much broader model, including 
home-based counseling, parenting groups 
and activities in the commu- 
nity," Demars 




close lo 



says. "If a 

child comes to us, he or she 
will not only be receiving the services of 
the Children's Center, but the services of the 
Pennington County Family Preservation 
Project." These include anger management 
groups for children; parent support groups; par- 
enting groups, where parents develop specific 
parenting skills; the free telephone info line and 
home-based counseling. In most cases, the ser- 
vices of both the Project and the Center are free 
or of minimal cost to families. Instead, the 
county and grants cover most of the projected 
costs. 

The Center is staffed with mental health- 
care professionals. These include a psycholo- 
gist and a licensed clinical social worker as the 
Center's director. These will enable the Center 
to deal with problems like Attention Deficit 
Disorder (ADD), depression and behavior prob- 
lems. "We have a strong mental health pres- 
ence, and we intend to provide mental health 
treatment for those children who need it." 



Demars says. But the Center won't be taking in 
all deeply troubled children. "We're not plan- 
ning on serving children with violent behavior 
or children with a recent history of sexual 
deviancy." 

Demars notes, "We don'l want to psycholo- 
gize these kids to death. We want more of a 
family kind of atmosphere. We want people 
who want to connect with the kids." Allan and 
Peggy Kuck have been hired as the housepar- 
ents. They're former satellite home parents from 
Thief" River Falls. Peggy and Allan formerly 
had a foster home for children who had been in 
the correctional system. "They're a couple who 
have experience managing children with emo- 
tional difficulties," Demars says, Peggy is 
house parent and coordinator of the treatment 
center. Allan is a houseparent and activity coor- 
dinator. 

Demars says the treatment center's strengths 
lie in its staff, its closeness to home, but most 
importantly, its emphasis on strengthening fam- 
ily ties. "We're going to have a strong emphasis 
on family involvement right from the get go." 
Demars says, "Instead of recreating 
these kids all together, we're 
going to have recreational activi- 
ties with the child and the child's 
family, so that we can help them 
connect with each other." The 
Center is going to emphasize work 
as a means to better self-esteem, 
and plans on developing a business 
that children will staff. 

The Center presently uses a 
strong community volunteer pro- 
gram where kids are helping others. 
"This past summer, it was called 
Gardening for Others,'" Demars 
explains. "Wc had kids who planted, 
weeded, harvested the gardens und dis- 
tributed the food. The intent is to help 
these kids redefine themselves, so 
they're not seen as the community's 
problems, but as givers to the communi- 
ty. And it's working real nice." The treat- 
ment center will have the children in its 
programs helping others in many different 
ways. For example, an elderly person who 
needs help shoveling his sidewalk in order 
to be able to live at home could call the 
Center and a child volunteer might go over and 
do the work. "We're also going to have a strong 
' mentorship program, where kids can connect 
with others from the community," Demars adds. 
Most important of all is the child's self- 
esteem. "A part of the program is going to be 
focused on competency building. We're making 
an assumption: That too much energy, histori- 
cally, has been placed on trying to solve prob- 
lems. And that often the problems are not easi- 
ly solved. Instead, we want to identify the 
child's strengths and the strengths that the fam- 
ily has and put more energy into beefing up the 
strengths rather iltan trying to solve the prob- 
lems. That doesn't mean we won't be doing any 
problem-solving, hut we're going to make sure 
we put at least as much energy into building up 
(Continued on Page 8) 




NWMC Flood Stones are Full of Hope How to Outsmart a Cold or the Flu 

.-._,■ .1 .1... ,i ■.. .;„.-.. irnii'rf hrtmiimi in lini* (III? II eW 



(Continued from Page 3) 
the occupational therapists would bring out a 
special spoon m> that person could feed himself. 
Tlie local law enforcement people were great, 
ton. Thev handled luiuliii^. We needed flash- 
lights, arid iliey [old us in gel what we needed 
am! somehow iliey would he paid fur laler. Bui 
we didn't need to 'come up with finance*: other 
people handled it for us." 

The NWMC Mali and volunteers faced only 
one major problem: fatigue. Witness explains: 
"In the earlv weeks, we wore working 12 and 14 
hours and more. We wore tired, but there were a 
million things to do. so you just try to gel them 
done. I was so lircd. 1 forgot to water plants at 
homo for a whole month, and my English Ivy 
died!" 

"1 found it was hard to leave, almost physi- 
cally impossible to walk out the door." Holland 
agrees. "You just felt like you had a job to do." 

Those jobs often had humorous results. 
When one of the nurses noticed that a man in a 
wheelchair had no shoes. Wigness sprung into 
action. "He wore the same size as my husband, 
so 1 went home and found a pair of Jerry's old 
shoes. But it wasn't long before we got a call 
from someone in the chemistry lab where the 
resident had wheeled himself down there!" 
Another resident commented 



HeartsayerCPRCjass 




that he hail always wanted to go to college, 
although this wasn't how he had hoped to do it. 
McNerney adds: "The members of a loeal 
band. Saddlciramp. played some old time coun- 
try songs. One lady got up with a gentleman and 
started dancing. And then another and another 
followed. To sec the residents actually having 
fun was remarkable." 

Holland tells a more personal story: "I was 
typing some resident labels and found a family 
name. Little did I know lhal this was a relative 
that ! hadn't seen since I was very small. I did- 
n't even know he was in Good Sam, and proba- 
bly helped him in that night they first arrived." 
But caring for the Good Samaritan residents 
wasn't the only humane actions taken by the 
NWMC .staff in April 97. They also opened their 
doors and hearts the night of Blizzard Hannah, 
when power lines were snapped and the city 
was suddenly plunged into darkness and cold. 

"It was the scariest night I've ever had." says 
Linda Welk. "1 remember how dark it was. You 
just knew something bad was going to happen. 
1 got a call at about 1 :30 A.M. to come in." 

Welk credits House Supervisor Jan Nelson. 
RN, with maintaining a sense of order and 
calm. "She really took charge. People were call- 
ing in frightened because the power was out. 
One woman called in whose husband needed 
suctioning regularly, or he would drown in 
his own secretions, and Nelson told him 
calmly, now don't you worry. Take your 
time and get here, and we'll take care of 
you.' And they did." 

"We found hope in watching people 
come in with their sleeping bags and pil- 
lows, and seeing our employees arrive 
and ask. where do you need mc? How 
can I help'.'"' Holland says. 



McNerney sums up both disaster efforts: 
was atna/ed and proud of the community, the 
way everyone pulled together." 

'Holland adds:^a.s proud of NWMC. of 
the fact that our jffminisiration allowed and 
encouraged us to do what we needed to do." 

Do You Need 
Help with Medical 
Billing Questions? 

Sometimes medical bills and the paperwork 
that it involves are overwhelming. Northwest 
Medical Center wants to help you with your 
medical billing questions. 

Beginning in January of 1 *J9H. Barb Housey. 
Patient Account Representative from Northwest 
Medical Center will be at the Heritage Center 
in Tliief River Falls once a month to assist you 
with your medical billing questions. Barb has 
seventeen years of experience in medical billing 
and is sincerely concerned about your ques- 
tions. 

Barb will assist you with alt types of insur- 
ance processing, Medicare, and medical hilling 
questions. Bring your paperwork with yon and 
let her answer your questions. 

Office hours at the Heritage Center will be: • 
the last Wednesday of the month from 12:30 to 
2 p.m. on January 28. February 25. March 25 
and April 29. 

Remember, you can always call or visit the 
Patient Account • Department at Northwest 
Medical Center with your billing questions. 



What's Happening? 



Healthy Living. 



EXPECTANT PARENTS 
, CLASSES 

Couples and single parents welcome! 
Topics: Changes in My Body, Healthy 
Babies, Appetite &. Eating. Exercises. 
Breast & Bottle Feeding, Labor & 

Delivery. Risks of Pregnancy, Delivery 

& Birthing Room Tour. Infant C.P.R., 

Adjusting to a New Arrival. 

Dales: January " through February 3 
April 6 through May 4 
July 7 through August 4 
October 5 through November 2 

Preregistration is required by calling 

(218)681-4240. ext. 446. 

12TH ANNUAL 
MID-WINTER CROSS 
COUNTRY SKI CLINIC 

Dale: Saturday, February 21 
. Sponsored bv: Northwest Medical 
Center. Dakota Clinic. TRF & ' 
Gnordic Gnomes Ski Club 



son who has never been on cross-con nlry skis 
before or for those who have skied, but want 
more formal instruction. Rental ski packages will 
be available for those who do not own their own. 
Contact Gail Holland at (2 1 8) 68 1 -4240, ext. 210 
for more information. 

"FREEDOM FROM 
SMOKING CLINIC" 

This thoroughly researched and highly tested 
program provides'quality information and moti- 
vation to quit and stay quit! Addiction can be 
broken! This seven-week program will be facil- 
itated by the Registered Nurses and Respiratory 
Therapists from Northwest Medical Center in 
Thief River Falls. 



lion sos- 
p.m. at 



This clinic is designed for the per- lion sess 



A "Thinking About Quitting" orientals 
sioti will be held on: January 29 at 7 p 
Northwest Medical Center 

Fee: S30.00 

Interested parties can register for this session or 
obtain further information by phoning Tammy 
Hanson, RRCP at (218) 681-4240 ext. 485. 
Registration and payment accepted after orienta- 
tion session. 



If you get a cold or the flu this season, you 
might be in for a surprise more unpleasant than 
the virus itself: "There is no magic cure," says 
Sharon Jorde. RN. Ilie Infection Control Nurse 
al NWMC. "Many medical experts agree 
antibiotics are not the answer. They don't work 
against the common cold or the flu, both of 
which are caused by viruses. Reserve antibiot- 
ic use only for when you truly need it." 

So what are you supposed lo do when aches. 
sniffles and temps strike? "The worst thing you 
can do if you catch a cold is to go on and push 
yourself, keep taxing yourself. Stay home, get 
adequate rest, eat right, drink fluids. " Jorde sug- 
gests, "If you keep pushing yourself, you're 
likely to see your cold advance lo other infec- 
tions, like sinusitis or bronchitis. If you get run 
down, you become more susceptible to other 
kinds of infections. A cold that advances to 
sinusitis, for instance, can turn a 7-day cold into 
a 21-day ordeal." She adds. "Don't go to work 
or spend times in crowds. And don't send your 
child to school wilh an infection." 

Contrary to popular belief, it is not neces- 
sary lo try lo eliminate the symptoms of a cold 
or the flu, "You don't have to treat a iemp-that's 
your body's way of fighting the virus. But only 
you can decide what's tolerable for you or your 
children," Jorde explains. "There's no need lo 
take aspirin lo eliminate ihe fever, unless the 
fever makes you or your child listless, Use your 
best judgment about what is loo high for you." 

A change in room temperature will make 
your symptoms seem worse, "If you go out in 
the cold, your nose will run. but not because the 
cold is making you worse.'" Jorde says. "Same 
is true if you find yourself sitting in a hot room. 
Your head will stuff up, but it's not the heat 
that's making you sick. It's just your body's way 
of adjusting. So when people say things tike. "1 
caught my cold because I was sitting in a draft,' 
that's not true. Your virus didn't happen there." 

As for other discomforts, Jorde says that in 
most cases, less treatment will yield a faster 
recovery. "If you can get by without taking any- 
thing so your own immune system can develop 
a response, you're better off," Jorde says. "Over 
the counter medicines might relieve your symp- 
toms for a while, but they do nothing to shorten 
the length or severity of the virus." 

But what do you do if you feel a cold com- 
ing on but need to get to work? "Keep your dis- 
tance from others. Colds are not airborne virus- 
es; ihey are transmitted in droplets that only 
travel 2 to 3 feet. Cover your mouth and nose if 
you sneeze or cough. Wash your hands often." 
Jorde recommends. 

You should see a doctor if a cold or the flu 
persists more than 5 days, in spite of adequate 
rest, a good diet and abundant fluid intake. "It 
you're not gelling belter with thai kind of care, 
you probably should see your doctor." Jorde 
suggests. "Or al any lime if you see a change in 
the color of your secretions; if your temp gets 
higher than it has been; if a cough gets real, real 
persistent; or if a sore throat escalates, getting 
worse instead of betler, then call for an appoint- 
menl." , 

The best advice? Prevention. "With regard 
to nursing homes, researchers have shown that 
it's the caregivers and the family who come to 
visit who should truly have the flu shots." Jorde 
says. "You pose a much greater risk to Grandma 



he docs lo you. since you're bringing in 
germs from the outside. So if you are a caregiv- 
er to an elderly person, you should protect your- 
self, and them, by getting a flu shot." 

To prevent infection, try following some til 
the guidelines presented in the accompanying 
box. And gel an annual flu shot. "A new thing 
we're hearing this year is that people who are 
gelling their flu shots on an annual basis are 
slaying healthier overall." Jorde says. "The shot 
is a dead virus--you don't get sick from the vac- 
cine. You might get a sore ami or a little lemp. 
which is normal, since you're trying to trick 
your body inlo believing you've had the vims 
and to build up antibodies against it." Each 
year, the flu shot is made up of what researchers 
believe through their tracking will be the 3 most 
common strains of flu virus coming through the 
Uniled States that year. They also look for the 
strains that are likely to make you the sickest. 
the ones thai would produce the worst conse- 
quences. 

"Because there are between 100 and 2(H) 
different strains of influenza out there, you 
could get a flu shot and still get the flu," Jorde 
explains. "But you won'! be as likely to catch a 
strain that would make you so dreadfully sick. 
And even if your flu shot contains some sub- 
stances that are similar to those you've had in 
the past, you're just that much belter off for get- 



ting the new shot this year" 

Who should get a tin shot? i-veryone. ' ll's 
not just tor Ihe elderly or carcgivers--j| you 
don't want to risk a week in bed. gel the tin 
shoi." Jorde s.iyv "The clinics give them; the 
school nur-.es; the nursing homes; and inler- 
countv nursing otters n at a very minimal 
charge. The Heritage Center is .i flu shot site. 
loo The best time to get a flu shot is between 
early-mid October lo mid-December. It lakes a 
Icw'd.iys for the immunity to build up. so it's 
best to get ihe shot early in ihe season." 

NWMC provides flu vaccinations and edu- 
cation lo all employees and volunieers 
Infection Control education is also presented lo 
the public, including a recent workshop for 
child care providers where the topic of how to 
prevent the spread of ihe common cold and flu 
was discussed. NWMC aho provides Inservice 
workshops lo other caregivers in the region on 
Infection Control issues, 

Jorde belongs to ihe Minnesota. North 
Dakota and National Association for Infection 
Control, and has extensive experience in the 
Infection Control field. Jorde promises. "I will 
sure trv to answer all questions and provide 
inlormaiion. or at least put you in touch with the 
right people to meel vour needs." For more 
information, call Sharon Jorde. RN at CIS) 
681-42-11). 



TOP TEN WAYS TO HELP PREVENT COLDS AND FLUS 

1) Wash your hands. "People say somebody gave me a cold,' but that's not true," Jorde 
says. "You take It yourself. You take it oil the doorknob or put it in your mouth by not 
washing your hands before you eat." When to scrub? After going to the bathroom, 
before you eat, Including snacks, when you come from shopping, school or work. In 
other words, every time before or after you've been around a group of people. 
Anytime you cough or sneeze into your hand. "Otherwise, you'll touch a doorknob or 
a telephone and someone's going to come along behind you and pick up what you 
have," Jorde says. And keep your hands away from your face at all times. "The lin- 
ings of your eyes, nose and mouth are real suseptible lo the cold virus." 

2) Get a flu shot annually. They're for everyone who doesn't want to spend a miser- 
able week in bed, not just caregivers and the elderiy. Check your local newspaper or 
clinic for details of when flu shots will be given. 

3) Get adequate rest. If you can't sleep 7-8 hours every night, take cat naps or rest 
breaks. 

4) Exercise. Keep your body strong and flexible. 

5) Push fluids all through the colds and flu season. The mors cracked and irritated 
your mucus membranes are, the greater your chance of getting sick. Humidifiers are 
good, as is keeping the temp In your house down. 

6) Reduce the amount of dairy products and oily, greasy foods you eat; they 
increase mucus. Add garlic to your diet wherever you can; it appears to lessen the 
severity and duration of a cold. Odor-free capsules are fine In place of the real thing. 

7) Avoid caffeine, as it acts as a stressor on the adrenal glands, which are already work- 
ing hard to fight the cold. 

8) Avoid sugar; it fuels the cold virus, and slows the activity of while blood cells. This 
' includes white bread and baked goods, since the body converts them to sugar. Fruit 

juices are also high in sugar. It's belter to drink water, teas and broths. Get your vit- 
amin C from vegetables like bell peppers, broccoli, tomatoes and leafy greens. 

9) Sterilize your sponges and dlshrags every other day by tossing them In the dish- 
washer on the hottest cycle available. Wet surfaces like these are perfect breeding 
grounds for bacteria and viruses. 

10) Lower your stress. Research has shown that Immune function drops after a peri- 
od of stress, leaving you more susceptible to getting sick. Keep a positive attitude. 
Research has shown that It enhances immune function, even during difficult times. 



Alicia Haviland Takes on ED ^^l^i^center scholarship 



"f know ;i 
.■I, stored 



[Continued from Vm^ I) 
inn ;i ro;ili>tie model for perfection." 

H;ivtl:imJ \c\h some ■iiJl-wa-ndni 
about people win) simple with l-.D. ' 
t-irl with 13 jars of vomit in the clu 
there hecause she doesn't want anyone to know 
she has an catinu ilisonk-r. I know another one 
who shoplifts to'" support her bingini: on almost 
S:i)0 a dnv on food that she then vomits. 
Another who stores rottinu food in the hol- 
low ed-out pilluslcrs ol'hcr canopied hod. 1 have 
a l-1-vcar-old girl who meets with me at 5:30 
AM once a week. She hides from view so that 
she can maintain privacy. She is not prepared to 
acknowledge ED's control. She cries and 
emotes." 

Bingcrs also purge through exercise, 
Haviland notes. But not the healthy, lite-sus- 
taining kind. "You stand for 6 solid months jog- 
ging in place. Why? Because ED says you're 
not worth it. It says. You deserve to die. Don't 
vou stop. Don't vou ever stop.'" 
" Haviland's zeal is giving her a nationwide 
reputation, and people of all ages suffering Irom 
ED call her daily. "One of the most important 
was a call that came at 3 in the morning. A 
young girl was crying and sobbing. I don't 
think I can go on; I heard you can help me.' I 
tried to make contact, to meet her, to pick her 
up, to help somehow, but she hung up." 
Haviland adds. "It makes me tearful, and more 
determined to tight ED. That girl is still out 
there, perhaps alone, struggling to battle ED. I 
will not let them battle alone. 

"I'll never stop, because I know the pain that 
girl is feeling." Haviland says. "She doesn't see 
the sun come up. She doesn't enjoy music like 
you or I do. She doesn't fix her hair or casually 
think about common daily events like the rest of 
us do. She's taken by ED." ED takes its vic- 
tims to a very destructive place. "There is some- 
thing that's not going right in their life." 
Haviland explains. "The food's not the problem; 
it's the manifestation of the problem. Because if 
some unworthy thought comes into your head", 
and if you're vulnerable with your self-esteem 
in question, you jump over the line, and ED is 
just sitting there, waiting to grab you. What you 
have to do is work with the 



Skoglund R etires Att ^ An y^ 



individuals ... Piece IMDUjmUlli: •! ;l M . r^-pr- , -1 R «ipients 

the parts together." 

IJaviland like* 
the Narrative Thera- 
peutic Approach. "It 
lakes the problem 
away from who you 
are." she explains. 
"Instead of saying. 
"You're an anorex- 
ic." it says. "You're 
a human being 
with an eating 
problem. You're 
Susan with a prob- 
lem, not Susan 
THE problem. So 
you talk to your 

person, and you _ 

talk to your prob- A >"ea nursing students are I- m 

lem. For instance, giver, once a yoar b N orZ f m f P t for scholarships which 

when the behavior Pictured above are rho iqoV_ Medical Cnnr.. i. i- L . K - wnicn 

sums spinning out 

of control, you 

say, 1 know that's 

not you speaking 

to me. 1 know 

that's ED. I'm 

going to sit here 

until ED stops 

speaking. I will always, always hear and 




J"«-« a year by Northwest Medta V- V ■ •I?" 1 '* whic " are 
above are the 1997 r „*i Center in Thief River Fni 






more information r-«^'--.- n - D ' recWro f Human «„«:.__.. 



For 



ext 407. 



love you. And I'll be here for you until it goes 
away.' Basically, you have to earn back your 
life, stcp-by-stcp." 

Haviland's message is one of love and sell- 
acceptance. "We're forgetting to love each other. 
We're forgetting to love the beautiful parts of 
ourselves." she says. "At my presentations, I 
give out postcards and ask each person to write 
down one thing they like about themselves. I 
can't begin to tell you what a struggle it is for 
people! The bottom line is that they can't do it. 
They're trained not to say anything nice about 
themselves, to love the beautiful parts of them- 
selves. 

"I once read a story that said that God sent 
his most lovable angels to earth in the form of 
the most unlovable people so we can learn to 
love each other and be less judgmental." she 
rt adds. "The kid 

°f Service with the blue hair; 




the one with the tattoo 

or the pierced everything. It's just their way of 

saying. Please notice me. Please love me.'" 

Haviland. who has an RN. BSN. MSN, is 
employed by Northwest Medical Center. Her 28 
years of nursing experience includes Critical 
Care and Administration at several large med- 
ical centers. Recently. Alicia Haviland present- 
ed her ED program at NWMC's Education 
Days. Haviland's power-packed presentation is 
available to groups of all ages and sizes. Her 
message is that there is help and hope to prevent 
ED's presence or if necessary, to eliminate ED's 
grip. Haviland says she is ready and waiting to 
"love it out of them." To reach her for group 
presentations to discuss an Eating Disorder, or 
for intervention, call Northwest Medical Center 
at (218)681-4240. 

"I really, honestly do care, and I will do 
whatever I can to get you help," she promises. 






Pennington County and 
N WMC Work Together 

(Continued from Page 5) 
the child's strengths." 

To (hat end. each child who comes to the treatment center is 
going to be asked to identify a fairly major goal, something they want 
to accomplish while they are involved with the Family Preservation 
Project. "It's going to be big enough that when they get through with 
it they're going to feel good about themselves," Demurs says. Some 
ideas might be running half a marathon, completing a 30-mile canoe 
trip, or being a cast member of a community theatre project. 
"Whatever it is. it has to fit the child's interests and be significant 
enough that when the child is through with it. he feels good enough 
about him self to notice a difference.'' 

"In the future, we're looking at putting together a therapeutic fos- 
ter care program, looking at the need for specialized day care for fam- 
ilies who have emotionally disturbed children." Dcmars says. "We re 
going to look at any or all services needed to help families function 
better. and our children to remain in the community." 




Ag stories and advertisements 



75 c 



Volume 8, Numbers 



wm 



Prowlers host meet 



PdiUI Cuatomaf 

HULK F1ATE 

ifiiriTci Proton & CCRVVSC 



"'Ttosi&Uve&t "TTtiftttea&tet. 'a. 1R.e$co*t<zl "?teetf^a^ie^ 



324 Main Avenue North, Thief River Falls, MN 56701 



Saturday, January 31, 1998 




AROUND 
THE REGION 

Kathi Carlson 



Homark team 
raises the roof 

Red Lake Falls - Under 
the guidance of Klipping 
Construction of Red Lake 
Fnlls, Homark employees 
raised the roof five feet on the 
entire Homark production 
line, all 550 feet ohhc rail sys- 
tem. 

This will allow Homark to 
build a manufactured home 
with a 3-12 pitched roof and 
90-inch sidewalls in response 
to consumer demand. The 
Gazette 

Quam to write 
book on disasters 

East Grand Forks - 
Jennifer Quam wants 10 talk to 
anyone who has a story to tell 
about the disasters of the past 
year. 

She is currently under con- 
tract with- the City of East 
Grand Forks and has been 
authorized to write a book 
about all of last year's disas- 
ters. She has wen writing 
grants to fund the publication 
which she hopes will pay for 
itself with no cost to the city. 
Proceeds from the book will - 
be donated to the Campbell 
Library. 

Quam was a reporter for 
The Exponent during all of 
1997's disasters and saw first 
hand what impact they hod on 
the community. Her office is at 
the Chamber of Commerce. 
The Exponent 

Riverview hospital 
celebrates 100th 
anniversary 

Crookston - Riverview 
Healthcare Association cele- 
brated its 100th anniversary at 
its annual meeting and mem- 
bership banquet on Monday 
night in a packed banquet 
room at the Northland Inn. 

Riverview's roots date back 
to 1898 when Dr. H. Holte 
established a medical practice 
In Crookston. Crookston Daily 
Times 

Meeting about sex 
offender's prison 
release scheduled 

Oeemn - Made possible by 
the Community Nodficiation 
Act, a public meeting concern- 
ing the release of Elios 
Thompson and his i mention to 
return to White Earth was 
hosted recently by the Becker 
and Mahnomen County 
Sheriffs Departments . 

Thompson was convicted 
of raping a 15-year-old girl in 
July of 1994. only ten days 
after he had been released 
from jail for a previous con- 
viction of criminal sexual con- 
duct. 

Considered a Level Three 
Sex Offender, Thompson's 
likelihood of committing the 
same crime again is very high. 
Tlie Mahnomen Pioneer 

Man d ies In . 
powerline accident 
near Roosevelt 

Roosevelt - Lineman Ross 
Wagner, 22, of Duluth was 
killed when he slipped while 
installing a new powerline 
pole and electrocuted himself 
lost week. The accident hap- 
pened north of Roosevelt. 

Investigotion of the acci- 
dent is being conducted by the 
Occupational Safety and 
Health Administration 

(OSHA). Wagner was an 
employee of Donavon 
Construction Company of St. 
Paul. The Northern Light 

(Condnued On Pnje 2) 




TRF Fire Calls 

1986-1997 




1986 1987 191 



1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 



Fire department responds 
to fewer fire calls in 1997 



Jane Anderson of the Thief River Falls Community Arts Council 
presented its fine arts scholarship to Jordan Goldesberry on 
Wednesday, January 28, at Northland Community and Technical 
College. Photos of other scholarship winners present to receive 
their awards will be published on the Wednesday, February 4 edi- 
tion of The Times. 

Northland awards 
120 scholarships 
totaling $25,400 



Thier River Falls Fire 
Department responded to 10 fewer 
calls last year. In all, tltcy responded 
to 1 53 fire calls, according to the 
annual rcportp resented to the Thief 
River Falls City Council Tuesday. 



(4 from I), and public service 
responses (15 from 5). 

Decreases were observed in 



y27. 



January ! 

Rick Jensen, co-fire chief, 
reported that the calls were very 



were awarded to 1 20 students at 
Northland Community and Tech- 
nical College in Thief River Falls 
Wednesday afternoon. January 28. 

Funds for the scholarships were 
provided by the Hartz Foundation 
($20,800). > Northern .State .Bank 
(S3.000). Rich Lyttle Foundation, 
TRF Education Association. Anita 
Carlson Memorial, Charles Rich- 
ards Law Enforcement. Technical 
College Senate, TRF Community 
Arts Council and John Steidl 
Memorial. 

Northland will award another 
S9.200 in scholarships during the 
spring quarter. 

Students receiving scholarships 
include the following and arc Hartz 
Foundation scholars unless noicd 
differently: 

Argyle — Philip KIopp, automo- 
tive service technology; and Philip 
Kuznia, architectural technology 
(Technical College Student Senate 
Scholarship); 

Badger—Corey Christianson, 
liberal arts and Leslie Winrow. 
licensed practical nursing; 

Bismarck. ND— Eric Wcrlinger, 
aviation maintenance technology; 

Brooks — Kent Bcrgerson, auto 
body collision technology (NSB) 
and Shelly Pcrrcnull, cosmetology; 

Casselton. ND — Rachel Luther, 
liberal arts; 

Cloquet — Kevin Dybvik, avia- 
tion maintenance technology; 

Crookston — Bemadetle Benin 
and Traccy Magsnm, criminal jus- 
lice; Cheryl Brule and Misty Oscth, 
licensed practical nursing; and 
Heather Shclton, legal assistant; 

Detroit Lakes — Kevin Engcseth, 
criminal justice and Daniel Mois, 
broadcasting; 

Duluth — John Decker, aviation 
maintenance technology: 

East Grand Forks— Robert 
Novak, auto body collision technol- 
ogy and Jennifer Smith, liberal arts; 

Erskine— [Catherine Floan. elec- 
tronics technology; 



Fertile — Joy Have re amp, auto- 
motive service technology; and 
Tanya Monson, business; 

Fisher— Roger Bciswenger, 
criminal justice; 

Fountain Hills, AZ— Rachel 
Shaw, licensed practical nursing; 

. Frazec— Roxannc Kline felioi.v 
legal assistant; 

Frontier, ND-^-Stevc Pris, busi- 
ness; 

Gatzke — Jesse Lunscttcr, liberal 
arts; 

Good ridge — Jenny Johnson and 
Crystclle Johnsrud, liberal arts; 
Deanna Kotrba. business; and Leah 
Vjgcn, accounting; 

Grafton, ND — Krislcn Kirkeby, 
liberal arts; 

Grand Forks, ND — Karissa Bye, 
licensed practical nursing; Thomas 
Riegcr and Kristi Storey, architec- 
tural technology; 

Crcenbush— Crystal Foss. 

accounting; 

Crygla — Anthony Holthusen, 
business (John Stcidt Memorial); 
Jennifer Saurdiff, cosmetology; 
Julie Sundberg, business; and 
Christopher Zavoral, liberal arts; 

Karlstad— Linda Kasprowicz, 
business (Rich Lyttle and Hartz 
Foundation); and Ericka Pagnnc, 
licensed practical nursing; 

Kennedy— Heather . Hagen, 
licensed practical nursing; 

Lake Bronson — Erin Anderson, 
cosmetology (NSB); 

Lancaster — Naomi Witlebski, 
liberal arts; 

Mahnomen— Jacnlcne Blue, lib- 
eral arts; and Paula Rcllcr, adminis- 
trative support; 

Mcintosh— David Senn, auto- 
motive service technology (Tech- 
nical College Student Senate): 

Middle River— Brenda Baker. 
administrative support; Travis 
Black, criminal justice; Lorcn 
Scramslod and Chris Sorcnson, lib- 
cm] arts; 

Moorhead — Brad Bauck, archi- 
tectural technology; 

(Continued on Pagc5) 



aid calls and many other responses. 
The dollar loss from these fires was 
about S85H.OOO. Well over half of 
the total was due to the Drcvlow 
building fire, which occurred this 
fall. -- 

The fire department reported 
four injuries and or deaths. Jensen 



...,, tyi 

injuries. One firelighter suffered a 
minor injury — a puncture wound 
caused by stepping an a nail at a fire 
scene. 

According to the statistics pre- 
sented to the council, increases were 
observed Jn false alarm reports. That 
number has steadily increases since 
1994. Lost year they received 37 
false alarm reports. Other increases 
were noted in residential or garage 
fires (16 from 13), trash ordumpstcr 
fires (11 from 2), wood or piled 
material calls (5 from 2), electrical 



Tires (8 from 12). appliance fires (1 1 
from 19), smoke or good intent calls 
(22 from 42). business fires (3 from 
7). spills (9 from 14). 

The last two years, the estimated 
damage loss due to fire has been 
high. In 1996, the total loss was esti- 
mated at near SI million. This year 
it 'was estimated at $858,725. -In 
1995. however, it was $114,150. 
$337,440 in 1994. $362,800 in 
1993. $285,900 in 1992. and 
$328,150 in 1991. 



Firefighters on staff are constant- 
ly updating skills. Firefighter train- 
ing totaled 880 hours last year. Last 
year, they reported 1,000 hours of 
training. 

The fire department responds to 
other emergencies and provides 
assistance or service in other ways 
too. During the ice storm, it assisted 
by chauffeuring people to and from 
shelters.' pumping basements, and 
sump holes until people could get 
their own generators, allowed their 
facility to oc used as a temporary 
shelter, hauled water to livestock, 
and staff also filled sand bags and 



The Thief River Falls Fire participated in safety camp for 



department consists of a small Staff 
of full-time firefighlcrs and a much 
larger group of voluntccrTircfight- 
crs. Due to a retirement and a resig- 
nation the fire department was short 
one full-time man for six months 
and a volunteer for four months. 
Fire Chief David Bjorkman retired 
effective August I, and volunteer 
Gordy Hall resigned effective 
September I . Bjorkman was 
rcplaccilby Barry Fellman and Rick 
Jensen acting as co-chiefs. Mike 
Spears was hired as a full-time fire- 
man effective January 25, 1998. His 
hiring brought the staff up to seven. 
Gordy Hall made a job related move 
to Red Lake Falls and his posidon 
remains unfilled at this time. 



youngsters in the community and 
attended the demolition derby to 
provide assistance in case of fire or 
extrication needs. 

The Thief River Falls Fire dis- 
trict covers 198 square miles. 
. Currently, it is in die second year of 
an eight-year contract with six 
townships surrounding the city: 
Excel, Nordcn, North. Rocksbury, 
Sllverton, and Smiley. The fire 
deportment also has mutual aid con- 
tracts with eight neighboring fire 
department within 40 miles ofThjef 
River Falls including: Crookston, 
Goodridgc, Middle River, 
Ncwfolden. Plummer, Red Lake 
Falls, St. Hilairc and Warren. 



Rydell Refuge Winterfest 
salutes Groundhog's Day 




1st Annual Groundhog Day Winterfest wilt ba held at the Rydell 
National Wildlife Refuge tomorrow, Sunday, Fab. 1 . Activities will 
include sleigh rides, gomes, demonstrations, refreshments and 
door prizes. Rydell refuge Is located three miles west of Erskine 
on US Hwy. 2 and two and one-half miles south on Polk County 
210. 



Milk makes good mix in farm crop diet 

Alfalfa and manure are positive additions to acreage for farm crops 



(This is the ninth in a series of 
Northern Watch stories on the loss 
of dairy farmers and a view toward 
the future of the dairy industry in 
northwest Minnesota.} 

by Marvin Lundln 
■ Northern Watch Editor 
People involved in dairying natu- 
rally want to maximize the profit 
. _.,_. _<■.■.-! "——on the 



attractions for dairying among farm- 




ers who have not traditionally had 
cows on their farm. 

"Most of the investors in Little 
Pine Dairy wanted to get into it for 
what it would do for their land." 
says Terry VanDyke, head herdsman 
for the 1,400-cow dairy located ai 
Perham, midway between Detroit 
Lakes and Wadena on Highway 10. 
There arc seven investors 
involved in Little Pine Dairy, all of 
whom arc landowners in the imme- 
diate area surrounding the dairy 
operation. Land for the dairy was 
purchased from Ron 
Tobkin, the primary 
investor and general 
manager. 

VanDyke. a vet- 
erinarian by profes- 
sion who also has 
experience in animal 
nutrition from a job 
with Purina Mills, in 
one of the " 



Two Acres Of Crop Per Cow 
"It takes a little better than two 
acres of cropland to support a dairy 
cow in this area," he said. "Our 
1,400 cows mean we need the hay 
and other forage crop production 
from about 3.000 acres of land. And 
it also takes an area about that size 
to provide for manure disposal. 

We lest both the s.oil and the 
manure to determine the frequency 
and rate of application when wc 
incorporate the manure into our 
fields." he said. "About half or the 
manure removed from our seven 
million gallon storape pit is piped 
directly to the equipment tilling it 
into the ground. The remainder is 
hauled with tank trailers and applied 
with tillage equipment as well." 

In addition to the manure appli- 
cation for fertilizer, inclusion of 
alfalfa in the crop rotation is also a 
good land use practice. The partners 
in Little Pine Dairy ha^ 



sufficient 



acreage to provide the hay and com 
needed to support the dairy. - 
Land Improvement Attractive 

Ability to improve the land while 
creating a market for diversified 
crops is one of the reasons a number 
of traditional small grain or sugar 
beet farmers arc seriously looking to 
dairy as a profitable investment. 

VanDyke said the amount of time 
required to get into the business was 
ama/.ingly short. Ground was bro- 
ken in September of 1995 and the 
first cows were being milked on 
November 14 of the same year. At 
thai time the dairy was built for 700 
cows and included a double 12 
milking parlor. The barn was sei up 
with six pens of 100 for lactating 
cows and room for 100 dry cows. 

In April of 1997 wotk was start- 
ed on a second 108x510 barn for 
another 700 cows— this one with 
four pens of 150 lactaiing cows each 
(Continued on Page 7) 



by Kathi Carlson 
Northern Watch Reporter 

While the official date of 
Groundhog's Day is February 2, the 
opportunity to celebrate this 
obscure holiday exists on Sunday, 
February 1 at Rydell NaUonal 
Wildlife Refuge near Erskine dur- 
ing the 1st Annual Groundhog's 
Day Winterfest. 

The festivities will begin at 1 
p.m. with horse-drown sleigh rides. 
Games — schmoosh races, a snow 
snake toss and "whnpplt" — will 
begin at 2 p.m. Snows hoc making 
will be among the demonstraUons, 
and there will be a number of inter- 
esting wildlife exhibits on' display. 
The refuge Visitors Center will 
serve as headquarters far activides. 
Birdwatchers, will delight at the 
active and well-stocked "backyard" 
bird feeding area which can be 
viewed from the center. 

Visitors arc welcome to bring 
their cross-country skis, and snow- 
shoeing is encouraged with several' 
pairs of showshoes available for 
people to try the increasingly popu-; 
tar winter activity. 

Hot beverages will be available; 
throughout the afternoon with addi- 
tional refreshments served at 3:30 
p.m. The event is free of charge, 
and door prize drawings will oc 
held throughout the afternoon. 

At 4 p.m. a short program will be 
held to recognize the many volun- 
teers who have assisted with a vari- 
ety of projects at the refuge in the 
— ti._ .. a y- s mnjvnics w jn 

i final door prize 
drawing at 4:ju p.m. 

The event is being co-sponsored 
by the United Slates Fish and 
Wildlife Service (USFWS). Detroit 
Lakes Wetland Management and 
Friends of the Rydell Refuge 
Association, a non-profit organiza- 
tion of volunteers committed to 
promoting and improving the 
refuge. ■ 

Currently under "custodial sta- 
tus," the refuge is not officially 
open to the public. The Detroit 
Lakes Wetland Management 
District administers the refuge as a 
satellite facility, and one full-time 
worker is assigned to 



(Continued on Pace7) 




fur 

•loroinv & Tara Nelson 



Saturday, Fob. 7, 1998 at 9:00 p.m. 
at tho Bost Wostorn - Thiot Rlvor Falls 
.111 Friend* A- Itvlnllvrs InvlHHl 



Papc 2 



NORTHERN WATCH 



Saturday, January 31, 1998 



Saturday, January 31, 1998 



NORTHERN WATCH 



Goodwrench Service 




^cctjenfs Happen- 

But Bringing Your Car To Us Is No Mistake! 

FULL-LINE BODY SHOP 



• Thank You - 



W'c wish to cxlcnd our heart- 
felt thanks to our friends, 
neighbors and relatives for 
their acts or kindness and 
assistance during the illness 
and death of our beloved 
mother and grandmother. 

The family of 
Rosanna Metby 



The Annual Thief River 
Linen Sample Sale 



Lots of swatches, pillows 
and bed linens. 
Thursday Feb. 5 -i-8 p.m. 
Friday Feb. 6 -i-8 p.m. 
Saturday Feb. 7 9-5 p.m. 



Thief River Linen, Inc. 
230 LaBree Ave. South 







HWY. 1 & 59 W. THIEF RIVER FALLS, MN 681-4820 



SUPER IT AN 



FREESJ22.50 



*5 0FF 

FULL 
PERM 



Brecuurmcni 

PAOlHntHEUud 
Color & I HOUSE 
Highlight | MUPBOroCTS 



$ 5 0FF 



MSprtu' N^CoJlWlhAnrOWtOnfit"! 



Wigand Barbers 

Hwy. Otl South Tiller HI 



,. MN obi -a IS* 



J =~c;^_. 


man 

t AROUND 
^THE REGION 

Kathl Carbon 



Tri-County student 
creates Moose 
Mystery game 

Karlstad -Tri-County senior 
Standi Ruuii created n clever 
Moose Myiicry board game Tor 
elementary students. It will also 
be used by Jodi Provost, assis- 
tant manager of the Karlstad 
Wildlife Office of the DNR. 

The game deals with the 
question of what is happening to 
the population, and Mandi is 
going to make copies of the 
game for other local school 
involved in the Moose Mystery 
Challenge. 

Tri-County School has adopt- 
ed three moose, two in the high 



Rhino draws crowd 
In Baudette 

Baudctte • It's not everyday 
that one gets to see a rhinoceros 
herded into a bank, and the feat 
drew more than a little attention 
recently in Baudette. 

The animal, a project of area 
taxidermist John Lind, went on 
display in the lobby of Nomest 
Bonk. 

The main problem encoun- 
tered by the more than half a 
dozen strong men who moved 
the rhino was a mounting that 
was just a tad larger than the 
front door. The Baudtttt Region 



Family & Friends Support 
Group to meet February 2 

Family and Friends Support The meeting is for family mem- 
Group will meet Monday, February bers or friends who provide care and 
2 at 10 a.m. in the community room support to elderly persons. The 
of Summcrficld Apartments in meeting will include a special video 
Warren. on Alzheimer's disease. 




4g( Ifie Cosmetic THat's 

ycosMETtcsA^ MorelfmnACover-l lp. 

^>J I Stmt ttijfcfaflcr I 

J | DtUmjSaikt Anuria ] 

Facials. Glamour Makc-Ovcrs And Color Logic 
Consultations Are Always FREE. 

rATTI L/SOWbKI -MiryKijCoBiiilUnlFoflSYeiri' 

MARY KAY DIRECTOR Thief River Falls, MN 



"DO YOU HAVE BACK PAIN? 
HEADACHES? FREE REPORT REVEALS AN 
AMAZING NEW METHOD THAT CAN 
END YOUR PAIN ONCE AND FOR ALU 
LEARN THE SECRETS YOUR DOCTOR 
HOPES YOU NEVER DISCOVER! TO GET 
YOUR FREE REPORT ENTITLED: 
"SECRETS OF PAIN FREE LIVING", CALL 
1-888-797-4600, 24 HRS., FOR A 
FREE RECORDED MESSAGE. END YOUR 
PAIN TODAY! 



n \ 



WE'RE PLUGGED INTO 
OFF-PEAK ELECTRICITY 



The efficient, clean and affordable way 
to save on your electric heating costs! 




Off-peak electricity is one way your municipal utility helps ensure 

that your electric rates remain stable now and in the future. Your 

municipal utility is a member of the Northern Municipal Power 

Agency - both arc part ofthc Minnkota Power Systems. 

Programs offered: 

Water Heater Rebates 

We offfer a $120 rebate for the Imtallntlon of an energy efficient aff-peak 

electric water heater. The water heater must meet the following i 

standard i : 

a) 4.500 wait dual element system 

b)Tank insulation of R-16 

Financing Programs 
Orr-Pcak Electric Heat 

Up to S8.000 it available at 5"/. interest. Electric heat must be olT-pcak. 

Heat Pump System 

Up to S5,000 is available at TA interest. 

| This temperature li perfect for heal pumps I 



MtUxttti arrfijr a Irrmiif up u/li* ytttn. 

Thief River Falls 
Municipal Utilities 

One of the Minnkota Power Systems 

Phone 681-5816 




MitiTn)cota Power Systems 

working together — 




Thief River Falls JCPenney 

MID-™WINTER« 



upcr s avgf( S ^ I e 



STARTS SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 1ST 



WatcH 



John E>. MatLv.iT 

IHiMnhcr 


W 














Marvin l.undin 

IxllKir 




W 








fur 

•Ipromv & Tara Mstm 



Saturday Fob. 7, 1998 at 9:00 p.m. 
at the Best Western - Thief River Falls 
.1// tYlrml* A- lli'lnilvrs litvltiil 



Page : 



NORTHERN WATCH 



Saturday, January 31, 1998 



Saturday, January 31, 19!»S 



NORTHERN WATCH 



Pane 3 




Goodwrench Service 



/L3fe^-Xi-_ 



J$ccicUnfs fjappen-: 



But Bringing Your Car To Us Is No Mistake! 

FULL-LINE BODY SHOP 



metown GM uc 

NORTHERN MOTORS, INC. 

HWV. t & 59 W. THIEF RIVER FALLS, MN 681-4820 



- Thank You - 



We wish lo extend our heart- 
felt thanks to our friends, 
neighbors and relatives for 
their acts of kindness and 
assistance during the illness 
and death of our beloved 
mother and grandmother. 

The family of 
Rosanna Mclby 



The Annual Thief River 
Ltncn Sample Sale 



Lois of swatches, pillows 
and bed linens. 
Thursday Feb. 5 4-8 p.m 
Friday Feb. 6 4-8 p.m 
Saturday Feb. 7 9-5 p.m 



Thief River Linen, Inc. 
230 LaBrec Ave. South 

Aitlauitt to bux gtimgc in the 

MxxJ District Scrttcu CV'KiT 




SUPERlTAN 



FREES.i22.50 



$ 5 0FF 

FDU. 
PERM 



$5 OFF 

Color & 
Highlight 



BPECUUY FETCH) 

PADLUnCHEILud 

BIOUDE 

MIRFR0M1CI9 



.—.■-■iiim r 



Wigand Barbers 



081-2164 ' 




, BOTH LOCATIONS! 
.HUGEMABKOOIVNSJ 
,,, LOOK FOR THE BIG RED 

SALE TAGS'. 

.,,SAVE10%,20%>.. 

UP TO 50% OFF 
FLOOR SAMPLE ITEMS.' 

. , , FREE DELIVERY.' 



Bin red noon umt 

HI/GE SAVINGS OL 

SLEEPERS 
BEDROOMS 



DINETTES 
> CHAIRS 

LAMPS 

SOFAS 



4NDM0RE'! 
dBEDDIMMOCKS 

fii flooring,,, 
picwres...end 
ublelmshs 




J ==-~il_ 


WtcH 

k AROUND 
^THE REGION 

Kuihl Corlion 



Tri-County student 
creates Moose 
Mystery game 

Karlstad -Tri-County senior 
Mandi Ruud created a clever 
Moose Mystery board game Tor 
elementary students. It will also 
be used by Jodi Provost, assis- 
tant manager of the Karlstad 
Wildlife Office of the DNR. 

The game deals with the 
question of what is happening to 
the population, and Mandi is 
going to moke copies of the 
game for other local school 
mralrcd in the Moose Mysiery 
Challenge. 

Tri-County School has adopt- 
ed three moose, two in the high 



Rhino draws crowd 
in Baudette 

Bnudcttc - It's not everyday 
that one gets to see n rhinoceros 
herded into a bank, and the feat 
drew more than a little attention 
recently in Baudette, 

The animal, a project of area 
taxidermist John Lind. went on 
display In the lobby of Norwesl 
Dank. 

Trie main problem encoun- 
tered by the more than half a 
dozen strong men who motcd 
the rhino was a mounting that 
was just a tad larger than the 
front door. The Baudette Region 



Family & Friends Support 
Group to meet February 2 



Family and Friends Support 
Group will meet Monday, February 
2 at 1(1 a.m. in the community room 
of Summerficld Apartments in 



The meeting is for family mem- 
bers or friends who provide care and 
support to elderly persons. The 
meeting will include a special video 
on Alzheimer's disease. 



Tfie Cosmetic Iftat's 
More Tftan ft Cover-Zip. 



Facials, Glamour Make-Overs And Color Logic 
Consultations Are Always FREE. 

Patti Osowski 

MARY KAY DIRECTOR 



© 681-6750 

ul For 15 Vn 

FolU, MN 



"DO YOU HAVE BACK PAIN? 
HEADACHES? FREE REPORT REVEALS AN 
AMAZING NEW METHOD THAT CAN 
END YOUR PAIN ONCE AND FOR ALU 
LEARN THE SECRETS YOUR DOCTOR 
HOPES YOU NEVER DISCOVER! TO GET 
YOUR FREE REPORT ENTITLED: 
"SECRETS OF PAIN FREE LIVING", CALL 
1-888-797-4600, 24 HRS., FOR A 
FREE RECORDED MESSAGE. END YOUR 
PAIN TODAYI 



WE'RE PLUGGED INTO 




Off-peak electricity is one way your municipal utility helps < 
that your electric rates remain stable now and in the future. Your 
municipal utility is a member of the Northern Municipal Power 
Agency - boih arc part of the Minnkota Power Systems. 

Programs offered: 

Water Heater Rebates 

We oftfer a S1I0 rebate for the Installation of on enerijy elTlilent olT-pc»k 

electric waler heater. The water heater muit meet the following i 

standards: 

.1) 4.500 unit dual clement system 

b)Tank insulation ofR-16 

Financing Programs 
Off-Pcak Electric Heat 

Up to SH.000 is available at 5% interest. Electric heal must be off-peak. 

Heat Pump System 

Up io S5.000 is available at 7% i merest. 



Thlt temperature li perfect for hut pi 



3 



Guaranteed Rate 

Off-Peak rate is below fuel oil & propane prices! 



Thief River Falls 
Municipal Utilities 

One of the Minnkota Power Systems 

Phone 681-5816 




Minnkota Power Systems 

— working together — 




GREG RJSJSENAUER £jjJ>N 



Thief River Falls JCPenney 

MID- ^WINTER* 






WatcH 




Martin l.undln 




Income TAX 
PREPARATION 

WALLACE BENGTSON 
call (218)222-3345 

— Reasonable Fee — 



r * - 1 I! 



Thief River Falls 

481-4511 ^SStjWiWk 

MJ MA Antra Not* mi^h,. IjrJualbiiiMi 




MEADOW MASSAGE 

Will Be Temporary Located At The 

SUPER 8 MOTEL 

THIEF RIVER FALLS. MN 

For An Appointment Gill 
Saturdays Only- 681-6205 



■Quilt Hits 



CLASSES 

Including... 

•Paper Piecing 

• Wilderness Jacket 

•Beginning Hand Piecing 

•Log Cabin Quills 

•Rail Fence 

• Sampler Schoolhouse Block 

of the Month 

•Tall Houses 

•Hooded Jacket 

* Bright Slur Table Runner 

• Basic Sewing 
•Spring Sweatshirt 

•Winning Hands Quilt 

• Amish Quill 

• Bias Binding 

• Double Irish Chain Quilt 
•Beginning Hand Piecing 

Pre-rcgislraibn required. 



Cliis 



niled. 



Stop by for details 

BERNINA'ED 



lOldCultl'lllu 
2lii(VnliT.SIieet West, 



St. .re I rs:M-r Il)i 

|i.Hi.:'[liiit>. 1l):i.ii).-7n.ni. Jt 



S&DfiLV 




f ZERO% 

Finance charge 
'til January 1999 

on all home appliances and electronics over *399" 

Sale prices good January 29-31 




No payments 

No billing 

No accrued finance charge 

No surprises! 




"The store vou k now is now close to home " 



\ Printed on Recycled Paper 
|\ Containing at Least 10% 
fj Fibers from Paper 
Recycled by Consumers 



luirDunoiriQ area. Tno Noitriom Watch li 
puoltttiad In conjunction win Tn« HfflM, 
whtcTi ti published wookty every Tuaiday. 

SUBSCRIPTION RATES 
Pennington. Rod Laka. Maretun. polk and 

Cloarwalo' Cbuntln ..$24.00 Pot Yoai 
An Othor Addieuoi 

With 507 Zip Code S2B00 Per Year 

Elsnwtwio In mo USA ... S4000 Par Year 
All Mnn and Woman In tne 

U.S. Ainwl Forces $35.00 Pel Yaai 

Sludoti! flato, Monms ...SJ0.0O Pof Yo«f 



m Watch's liability lor 



advertisement Is strictly limitod to 

' "*w advert lumen! In any 

subsequent iuuo or tno rotund ol ony 




The Times 

32J Main Avenue North 

P.O. Box 100 

Tliicf River Falls. MN 56701.0100 

Telephone: (21H) 6H1.4J3D 

Fa*:<2IB)6Bl-4455 

e-mail: nwatchW nwalcli.com 

li 1 1 p -Jl w w w. n wa I ch . to m 




ALTERNATE 
DELIVERY 
SYSTEM 



INTENTIONAL DUPLICATE PAGE 



I'afii' 4 



NORTHERN WATCH 



Saturday, January 31, 1998 



Salurday, January 31, 1998 



NORTHERN WATCH 



Page 5 



I 
i 



To everyone who worked on. 
helped wl!h, donnled lo 4 came 
out tor my benefit. Special 
thank* to me Evangelical Free 
Church. Tho Overtones Quartet, 
the businesses who made dona- 
tions & Lutheran Brotherhood 
HW Minn. Branch tfj!39. 



Gov) BLess You All 
Paul B. WoU / 



CONTRACTORS -FARMERS 



20003 to 14,000tf 
UTILITY TRAILER 

10 l» tlittl 

Alr.o CARS ft PICKUPS 

CALL 

"The Trailer Man" 
218-281-4491 

10 MdosNEotCrookSiWiOtim 



Advertising 
Doesn't Cost 

IT PAYS 

® The Times 

WaSH 




CABPETB1G&EB 

Proudly Announces... 

Xlie 
Addition OI 

vbn 

SOUH 

To Our 

~~ Picturc-d Aro Glon Hnugon & Vom Sofhoim, WUllI. 

We Have You And Your Floor Covered! 



< Carpeting • Han/wood Flooring > Ceramic & Wny/ flooring 
• laminate Homing • fast Professional Inflation! 



STAINIvWSTERA 

Hmajwington. ?K™rjt 
T.«:l.CUKT,W LASTS. r C^* 

CARPETBAGGER 

•Elegant floor Covering At 'J^asonaSU Trices 
111 2nd St. West Thief River Falls, MN 218-681-8166 

[Behind Napa, H Qy'RS: Mon. - Fri. 9:30 a.m. - «0 p.m. 




LBAK 



U FRIDAY 



Extended Pick Up Time 

12 NOON - 6:00 P.M. 

MONDAY -FRIDAY 



Otden. flow 7a "piil tyotvt. 
"piteefex. "p(yi 76e. 




LIDEN'S 
LEFSE 

DON'S EASTSIDE • 714 First Street East • Thief River Falls 

"S" 681-1701 




WE ARE NOW ACCEPTING SPACE 

RESERVATIONS FOR THE 6TH ANNUAL 

HOME, SPORT AND FAMILY SHOW! 



*£!!.% 





ffMORU*- 



Saturday & Sunday, 
March 28th & 29th 



FOR MORE INFO. CALL DENISE - 218-681-4450 
The #1 Show In Northwest Minnesota 



—^wmono - 

COOLING ■ HEATINQ 



A Now Dimension In 

High Efflcloncy 

Heating 

rwtnono 

Air Command DO 
Qai Furnace. 

Featuring: 

• Sloinloss stool hoat 
Qxchangor 

• Slain'oss stool rocupotalivo 

• Inducod droll 

• Advnncod solid stnlo ignillon 

• Long lilo Bumors 

■ 25 year timitod warranty 

• Full (oclory lasting 

• Elficiancios ovor 90% 

• Availablo in upllow and 
count ortlow modote 




Gs/ For FrM £jaiw'm 



Rain Care Co. 

John P. Lovly 

Heating/Air Condtming 

Qoodrtdge), MN 378-4641 



soupgoN 

Sherry LaCourakrc 



Compare 

our life 
insurance 

Farm Bureau sells tire 
Insurance. Our company Is 
solid, our product* arc highly 
rated, and our rates are com- 
petitive. Talk to us and you'll 
discover why so many families 
trust us with their Insurance 
needs. 

We look for ways to" 
help your Insurance dollars 
' work harder. It's that slm- 
' pic. And we'll contact you 
at least once a year (o 
make sure your protection 
Is up-to-date. 

So if you're thinking 
about life Insurance, think 
about Farm Bureau Life. 

Living beside you. Working far >»u.' 



JAMES CWIKLA 

3,1LiBrMAv*.N. 

ThWRIw Fill, UN 56701 
681-2288 



MICHAEL 
PETERSON 

JHUBrMAw.N. 

TWal Hl«r Fall. MN S6T01 

681-22S8 



JSS 



Farm aumou tnsuronca 

FarnSuMuUk. 



Today we'll have some rather 
unusual soups «x well ox u couple 
or "old favorite** ones - enjoy. 

This tasty soup can be used us 
u main dish or served as a side 
dish tu some delicious sandwich- 

CAULIFLOWER SOUP 

■2 pounds cauliflower 
I pound potatoes 
3 cups skim milk (or whole), 

healed 
1/2 cup half and half (or cream) 
I teaspoon sail 
Dash of pepper 
I cuncruuions 

Cook cauliflower in boiling 
water with peeled sliced potatoes, 
pepper and sail for 30 minutes. 

Remove about half of the cauli- 
flower and set aside. Drain remain- 
ing cauliflower and potatoes, 
reserving stock, and press through a 
sieve. Combine with heated milk, 
reserved stock, half and half and 
remaining cauliflower nieces. 

Heat for 5-10 minutes and serve 
tapped with croutons. 

This would definitely be a main 
dish meal - serve with crusty 
bread and yum: 
CHICKEN CORN CHOWDER 

2 chicken breasts 

2 cups water 

I cup celery, diced 

1 bay leaf 

2 cups skim milk 
t/2 cup onion, diced 

2 tablespoons margarine 

2 lab Ic spoons flour 

2 cups potatoes, peeled and cut inlo 

1/2 inch cubes 

1 (14 ounce) can cream siylc corn 

1/4 teaspoon salt 

1/8 teaspoon pepper 

Chives or parsley, minced 

(optional) 

Combine chicken, waler, celery 
and bay leaf in lame cooking poi. 
Bring loa boil and simmer, covered, 
until chicken is tender (about 25 
minutes). Remove chicken from 
broth, reserving broth, cool, dice 
and refrigerate. 

Strain broth. Add milk and set 
aside. 

In large saucepan, saute" onions 
and celery in margarine until soft 
but not brown (3-4 minutes). Blend 
in flour. Gradually stir in milk mix- 
ture. 

Add potatoes and simmer until 
tender (15-20 minutes). Slir in 
chicken, corn, salt and pepper. Heal 
through. Garnish with chives or 
parsley. 

Here's another tasty soup - it 
can be served cold as a summer 
soup too: 

GINGER WINTER SQUASH 
* SOUP 

1 1/2 cups yellow split peas 

2 cups winter squash, cooked 

(any variety) 
I teaspoon olive oil 

1 small onion, chopped 

2 tablespoons ginger rool. finely 

diced (or grated) 

3 bay leaves 

I 1/2 teaspoons ground coriander 
1 teaspoon ground cumin . 
1 teaspoon soy sauce 
1/4 teaspoon cayenne, if desired 

4 cups water 

Sort and rinse peas and cook 
wilh bay leaves in water until peas 
arc soft and falling apart. 

Sautf onions ana ginger in oil 
until onion is translucent. Add 
coriander, cumin and cayenne and 



imk fur anolhcr minute < 
Blend <i 



with a hit 



ash sa.ua* 
ni water until smooth. Add this, 
wilh spices and stiy sauce lo peas, 
mining well. Cook on low heat for 
15 minutes in blend flavors. If soup 
is loo thick, add a little water or 
milk and rche;il, hut do nut boil. 

.Serve, sprinkling with any condi- 
ments yuu like, Midi as lemon juice, 
cilaniro, black pepper, toasted 
unsweetened coconut, plain yogurt, 
grated eheddar cheese, or whatever 

This In u simple soup, nothing 
fancy, but the family will love it: 
HAMBURGER SOUP 

I pound ground beef lop round ■■ 

1 (16 ounce) can lomalocs 

3 medium carrots, peeled and 
sliced 

2 medium potatoes, cubed 
1 medium onion, chopped 
1/2 cup celery, chopped 

T cups waler 

3 cubes beef bnuillon 
I 1/2 teaspoons sail 
1/4 icaspoon pepper 

1/4 lenspoon nrcgano, crushed 

1 cup green beans 

Brown hamburger and drain. 
Add remaining ingredients except 
green beans. Bring lo a boil, cover 
and simmer 15 minutes. Add green 
beans and simmer 15 minutes more. 

The kids will luvc this one too - 

and it if so simple to combine 

every thin); early In the day and let 

simmer in the crock pot on low: 

TACOSOUP 

2 pounds ground turkey or beef. 

browned 
1 (lOouncc) can black beans 
I (10 ounce) can pinto beans 
1(10 ounce) can corn, drained 
I (8 ounce) can hominy, drained 
1(10 ounce) cans diced tomatoes 

wilh green chilies 
1 (10 ounce) can water 
I package taco seasoning mix 
1 package ranch dressing mix 

Add above ingredients, in order 
given, lo a crock pot. Simmer on 
medium for 2 to 3 hours, siirring 
occasionally. 

Serve topped with sour cream, 
cheddar cheese und lortilta chips. 

Riverview 

to offer prenatal 

classes in Feb. " 

Riverview Healthcare, Assn. in 
Crooksion will sponsor classes for 
expectant parents in February. 

•The first two sessions, on 
February 3 und 10, will cover such 
prenatal topic as fetal development, 
maternal nutrition and care of the 
newborn. The second two sessions, 
on February 17 and 24, will cover 
breathing and relaxation techniques 
during labor and delivery, coaching 
instructions und care after delivery. 

Area physicians encourage their . 
obstetric patients to attend all four 
classes. Vlushands, coaches and 
other interested persons arc also 
encouraged to attend. 

Labor and delivery nurse-Sue 
Smith, RN will be the course 
instructor. Beginning at 7 p.m., the 
sessions will lost uniil 9:30p.m. and 
will be held in the classroom at 
Riverview, For more information or 
to pre-rcgistcr. call Rivcrvicw's 
obstetrics department at 218-281- 
9300. 




DEATHS 



Mary K. "Mae" 
Teigland, 99 

Bemidji - Mary K. "Mae" 
Teigland, 99, died on Monday, 
January 26, 1998 at the Bctrami 
Nursing Home in Bemidji. 

Funeral services will be held 
today. Saturday, January 31 at 10 
a.m. at the 01 son -Schwartz Funeral 
Home in Bemidji. Visitation will be 
held one hour prior to the service. 
Interment will be al Greenwood 
Cemetery in Bemidji. 

A complete obituary will be pub- 
lished in the next edition of The 
Times. 

Freeman 
Hiaasen, 88 

Thiei River Falls - Freeman 
Hiaasen, 88, died on Monday, 
January 26, 1998 nt Oakland Park 
Nursing Home in Thief River Falls. 

Funeral services were held on 
Thursday. January 29 at 3 p.m. at 
Bethlehem Lutheran Church in 
Newfoldcn. Jnlcrmcni was at Oak 
Grove Cemetery in Newfoldcn. 

A complete obituary will be pub- 
lished in Wednesday's edition of 
77ie Times. 



Grant Vagle, 82 

Thitr River Falls - Grant Vagle, 
82. died on Tuesday. January 27, 
1998 at the CNC Unit of Northwest 
Medical Center in Thief River Fulls. 

Services of celebration and sal- 
vation will be held on Monday, 
February 2. at 7 p.m. at the 
Evangelical Covenant Church in 
Thief River Falls with Reverend 
Merrill Kindoll officiating. Burial 
will be nt Riverside Cemetery in 
Lake Branson. 

Visitation will be on Sunday 
from 5 to 7 p.m. with a 7 p.m. 
iraycr service at Green Funeral 
_fomc in Thier River Falls and for 
one hour prior to services at the 
church on Monday. 

A complete obituary will be pub- 
lished in the next coition of 77ie 
Times. 



nrj 
He 



Frances Lien, 56 

Thief River Falls • Frances 
Lien, 56, died Tuesday, January 27. 
1998 at her home in Thief River 



Northland awards $25,400 
in scholarships Wednesday 



(Continued from Page 1) 

New York Mills — Brian Maison, 
broadcasting; 

Newfoldcn— Rachel Larson 
(Anita Carlson Memorial) and 
Trcvcr Mngner (NSB), both liberal 
arts; 

Nicollet— Jeffrey Kicckcr, avia- 
tion maintenance technology; 

Oklcc — Tracy Bergerson, 

licensed practical nursing; and 
Kclsic Steicer, business; 

Oslo — Scott Kinney, aviation 
maintenance technology (Technical 
College Student Senate); 

Park Rapids— Kelly Dent, mar- 
keting, management and sales; and 
Jcthro Klotz, aviation maintenance 
technology; 

Park River, ND— Trudy Shipley, 
administrative support; 

Red Lake Falls— Harvey Hagl. 
welding technology (NSB); and 
Michael Loncctte, criminal justice; 

Roseau— Kristi Higgins, Paula 
Hovda, Kathcrinc Nelson and 
Angela Vagle. liberal arts: Susan 
.Novotny and Kristi nc Slattcry, 
licensed practical nursing; 

Solo! — Sandra Holmgren, 

licensed practical nursing; and 
Karen Johnson, liberal arts; 

St. Hilaire— Dcbra Holmgren, 
licensed practical nursing (NSB); 
and Cam! Sorcnson. liberal arts; 

Strandquisl— Jeremy Larson, 
_ business; 

Thompson, ND — Ryan 
Gustafson, auto body collision tech- 
nology (Technical College Student 
Senate); 

Thief River Falls— Celeste 
Bjerken, Anthony Bruggcman, Lori 
Joslyn and Jill Sicnbcrg, electronics 
technology; Christopher Bjerken, 
criminal justice (Charles Richards 
Law Enforcement); Nicole Burns 
(NSB), Angela Erickson (NSB). 
Jordan GoTdesberry (TRF Com- 
munity Arts Council Fine Arts), 
Matthew Gustafson (NSB), Lisa 
Hovct (NSB), Melanic Johnson, 
Lisa Odegoard, John W. Olson Jr., 
Jessica Pream and Stacy Tveitcn, all 
liberal arts: 

Also Ross Cleven (NSB) and 
Sarah Mugaos (NSB), business; 
Robby Farbo (NSB) and Malissn 
Lawrence, architectural technology; 
Ellen Groo (NSB), Carrie Lawrence 
(TRF Education Association), Stacy 
Narlock. Sana Nunn and Pamela 
Poppcnhagcn, licensed practical 
nursing; 

Also Rhonda Manderfcld and 
Elisabeth Spilde, legal assistant; 
Peter Mevis and Matthew Rebcrg, 
aviation maintenance technology; 
Brian Smith, auio body collision 
technology; luynac Stanina, regis- 
tered nursing; Teresa Tischcr (NSB) 
and Jeremy Treitlinc (NSB). 
. accounting; 

Viking— Michael Olson. 

accounting; and Micah Ranum. 
business; 



Wadena— -"Mom en Bands, liber- 
al arts; 

Walhalla. ND— Jason Berg, auto 
body collision technology; und 
Amanda Carson, licensed practical 
nursing; 

Warren— Kelly Edgar, legal 
assistant; Brandon Gomowic/. and 
Erika Hcdlund, criminal justice:' 
Nathan Lab inc. marketing, manage- 
ment and sales; and Heather 
Locslie, architectural technology; 

Warroad — Mclunic Everett. 
welding technology; und Arne 
Rantancn. business. 




Dr. Bo Crabo 

Crabo to speak at 
luncheon of 
Swedish society 

Dr. Bo Crabo, a professor at the 
school of veterinary medicine and 
animal science on the St. Paul cam- 
pus of ihc University of Minnesota, 
will be guest speaker at ihc mid- 
winter luncheon of the Agassi/. 
Swedish Heritage Society Tucday. 
February 10, at the University of 
M i n ncso ta — Croo ksui n . 

Cost of the noon Swedish meat- 
ball dinner is S7.25 und registra- 
tions ore due by Thursday. February 
5, to Berneil Nelson. 423 Woodland 
Avenue. #107. Crookston. MN 
56716 or by phone at 218-281- 
2838. 

Apart from his veterinary career, 
he raises beef cattle and Swedish 
Warmblood horses. He is president 
of the Swedish Warmblood Assoc- 
iation in NorthAmerica and will tell 
about this unique breed at the lun- 
cheon. 

Dr. Crabo reportedly has rela- 
tives in Marshall county and has 
hunted there. His wife, Margurcta. 
is lhe .gift shop manager al ihc 
American Swedish Insiiiutc. \ 

Annual . meeting- of-llic. society, 

will lake place April 18 at lhe" 
Heritage Community Center in— 
Thief River Falls. 



Falls. 

Funeral services will be held 
today. Saturday, Jiinu.iry 3 1 al 10:30 
a.m. at Si. Mary's Catholic Church 
in Red Ukc with Reverend i'ai 
Sullivan officiating. Interment will 
be at St. Mary's Catholic Cemetery 
in Red Like. The Cease Family 
Funeral Home of Bemidji is in 
charge of the arrangements. 

A complete obituary will appear 
in the ncxi edition of Tin- 7iWi 

Valda "Val" 
Jorgenson, 60 

Warren - Valda "Val" Jorgen- 
son. 60, died Thursday. January 29, 
1998 at her home in Warren. 

Funeral services will be held on 
Monday. February 2 al 10 a.m. at 
Sts. Peter and Paul Catholic Church 
in Warren. Burial will he al 
Greenwood Cemetery in Warren. 

Visitation will l>c held on Sunday 
at Sts. Peter and Paul Catholic 
Church ufier 5' p.m. with u 7 p.m. 

Braver service. The Quunrud- 
'uBorc Funeral Home is in charge 
of the arrangements. 

A complete obituary will appear 
in Wednesday cdilion of The Tunes. 

Harold Letnes, 84 

HilUboro, ND • Harold Letnes. 
84. died Wednesday. January 28. 
1998 at Hillsboro Medical Center 
Hospital in Hillsb.iro.ND. 

Funeral services will be held 
today. Saturday. January 31 at 3 

£m. at' Our Saviors Lutheran 
hurch in Hillsboro. Burial will lie 
held at Riverside Cemetery in 
Hillsboro. 

A prayer service was held Friday 
evening at 7 p.m. at the Wildeman 
Funeral Home in Hillsboro. 

A complete obituary will appcur 
in the next cdilion of The Times, 

Nona Hillyer, 74 

Fargo, ND - Nona Hillyer, 74. 
died on Wednesday, January 28. 
■ 1998 al her home in Fargo, ND. 

Funeral services will be held 
today, Saturduy, January 31 nt II 
a.m. at First Lutheran Church in 
Fargo. Inurnment will be at 
Greenwood Cemetery in Thief 
River Falls in the spring. 

A complete obituary will appear 
in Wednesday cdilion of The Tunes. 



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Local volunteers are proparing for American Cancer Society's 
Daffodil Days. Daffodils are considered the flower of hope and for 
the American Cancer Society what better way to raise donations 
for the fight against cancer. In the near future, the fresh-cut flow- 
ers will be sold at various locations throughout the county. 
Businesses and employers will be encouraged to make advance 
orders (or distribution to their employees or as gifts to hospitals, 
nursing homes, or retirement communities. Pictured from left are 
members of the local American Cancer Society Unit, Gordon 
Peterson, Lucy Aastand, and Julie Desrocher. 

Ueland serves on task 
force for worker training 



Put Ueland of Newfoldcn is one 
of 25 members on a task force orga- 
nised by the Blandin Foundation of 
Grand Rapids to make recommen- 
dations to ihc Minnesota legislature 
on how worker training can be 
improved in Greater Minnesota. 

Ueland is field office area man- 
ager for the Minnesota Department 
of Economic Security at the 
Workforce Center in Thief River 
Falls. 

The task force report. Worker 
Educuthm in Greater Minnesota: 
The Need for Lifc-Urna Learning, is 
ihc focus of four regional confer- 
ences beginning with one conducted 
in Bemidji January 30. Others are 
scheduled for -February -5 in Alex- 
andria, February 10 in Wonhington 
and February 12 in Owatonna. 

Minnesota business leaders say 
the most pressing issue, they face 
today is the availability of skilled 
workers. The task force was formed 



85% off CRP acres 
offered in state 
accepted by USDA 

More lhan 85 percent of the 
acres offered in the 16th 
Conservation Reserve Program 
(CRP) signup in Minnesota nave 
been accepted, according, to 
Congressman Collin Peterson. 
National acceptance rate for this 
signup was 62 percent. 

More than 450,000 acres in 
Minnesota were accepted, the con- 
gressman said, and land owners 
who offered bids, should receive 
notice soon. 

"Hopefully this is an indication 
that wc arc on the upswing of 
improving CRP for Minnesota," 
Rep. Peterson said. There is still 
more that can be done to improve 
this program, but this is good news 
for Minnesota." 

Pennington 4-H 
Leader's Council 
meets February 2 

Discussion of upcoming events 
und approval of the 1998 budget 
will be topics for the Pennington 
county 4-H leader's council at its 
meeting Monday, February 2, at 8 
p.m. in Ihc courthouse meeting 
room in Thief River Falls. 

All clubs are- asked lo have at 
least one member present to bring 
information bock to the club mem- 
l>crs. 

Feb. 2 meeting on 
LAH/BN program 
in Newfolden 

Put Crummy will be at ihc 
Newfoldcn Community Center at 8 
p.m. on Monday, February 2 to dis- 
cuss the Living at Home/Block 
Nurse program. 

Crummy is the director or the 
Argylc program which has been 
helping seniors since 1992. The 
program is designed to help seniors 
remain in their homes for as long as 
possible using a neighbor helping 



Sharon Bring nt 874-3713. 

Post-polio support 
group to meet 

Post-polio Syndrome Support 
Group will meet Thursday. 

February 5 at 1:30 p.m. in the con- 
ference room of the Heritage 
Community Center in Thief River 
Falls. 



lo make suggestions for solving that 
problem. 

FMS students of 
the week listed 

Students of the week for January 
19-23 at Franklin middle school 
include sixth grader Tanner Harlow, 
seventh graders Alex Thompson, 
Derek Gustafson and Matt Olson 
and eighth graders Aaron Field and 
Adam Knott. 

Polaris declares 
quarterly 18-cent 
per share dividend 

Polaris Industries Inc. has 
(declared an 18 cents per share cash 
dividend payable on or about 
February 16 to shareholders of 
record on February 2. The dividend 
is a 13 percent increase from the 
payment made in the fourth quoner 



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Lincoln choir adds a 
cathedral performance 
to New York City trip 



Lincoln high school concert 
choir from Thief River Falls has 
been successful in securing un 
opportunity to sing at the cathedral 
of Si. John the Divine in New York 
City on May 8. according to Mrs. 
Darcy Reese, vocal music instructor 
at Lincoln and choir director. 

Mrs. Reese said that the choir 
made an audition tape at the 
Assumption Catholic Church in 
Florian and sent it to an audition 
committee at St. John lhe Divine in 
December. She received word last 
week that the committee had select- 
ed Lincoln as one of the cathedral's 
performing choirs for I998. 

"St. John's is ihc major Episcopal 
church in New York City." the 
director said. "Righi now it is the 
second largest cathedral in the 
world, but when work in progress is 
completed it will be inc largest 
cathedral in the world. 

"The students wiJI have a rare. 
fascinating opportunity lo perform 
in a classic Gothic cathedral that is 
still under construction." she added. 
"St. John's has I21.000 square feet 
of area with ceilings that you literal- 
ly have to lip your head way back to 

Lincoln choir's performance will 
be from 1 1 :30 a.m. to noon on May 
8. prior lo a service, and the entire 
community of Thief River Falls has 
been issued an invitation to attend. 

Final fund-raiser for the New 
York City tour will take place 
Salurday, February 7, when the 
choir presents its "Evening of 
Enchantment" candlelight supper at 
the Evangelical Free Church. 

Members of the I998 concert 
choir lour group include the follow- 
ing: 

Kelly Almquist, Ruthie B aimer, 
Eric Barber, Matt Bitzcgaio, Darin 
Bjerkncs, Eric Bjornstad, Jenny 
Brunkhorst. Sunny Carlson, Dan 



Danielson, Paul Dchncrt. Ryan 
Evcnson and Richclle Fit/toff; 

Also Katie Furuscth. Rochelle 
Gilbcrtsou, Beth Goddard. Ann 
Gustafson. Josh Hagen, Sarah 
Hagen. Alissa Halbcrt. Tina Halsa, 
Katie Hnrholl. Wade Haviland. 
Alissa Hays. Paul Hays. Bryanna 
Helgoland, Cody Hempet. Josh 
Hcndrickson, Mama rlotmstrom 
and Tayn Hunt; 

Also Jamilya Ismaylova, Andy 
Janisch, Jamie Kalsnes, Nate Keller, 
Leah Kcnncr. Amber Klinker. Nik 
Kotz, Jessica Krankkaln, Kelly 
Lnngness. Jon Lee, Tiffany Lee, 
Tom IxMoinc, Belle Lcnius, Erica 
McGcary, Dusty Melby, Luke 
Miller. Nic Miller, Beth Nelson and 
Bailey Nordin; 

Also Garrett Novak. Andrea 
Olson. Beth Olson. Jorrod Peterson, 
Jami Pbilim>, Alex Primakov, Lcif 
Spears. Robert Spry. Andrea 
' Stinson, Bridgctie Stock. Jenny 
Sullivan. Jennifer Swanson, Leslie 
Swanson. Jcnnn Tsukichi, Nick 
Tvcitbakk, Brian Unbchaun, Janna 
Unbchaun, Kyle Wold and Ecva 
Young. 

Next meeting of 
Joint lowers board 
on Feb. 3 

Next meeting of (he Multi- 
Events Cultural Center Joint 
Powers board will be held 11:30 
a.m. Tuesday. February 3 at the 
Best Western. Input from the public 
is allowed at meetings or the Joint 
Powers board. 

Items on the agenda include cre- 
ation of an MECC fund, and 
updates of fund development, con- 
struction contracts, and amateur 
sports. 



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Open: 9 a.m. - 6 p.m. Weekdays 
9 a.m. - 5 p.m. Saturday 

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I'lldf (. 



NORTHERN WATCH 



Saturday, January 31, l'J'JS 







WMH 

Thief River Falls, Minnesota 

John P. Mattson, Publisher 

Marvin Lundln, Editor 
David Hill, Associate Editor 



EDITORIAL OPINIONS 

Editorial opinion published under this 
heading is intended to stimulate thinking 
and discussion among our readers. Unless 
specified otherwise, the editorials are writ- 
ten by Editor Marvin Lundln and do not rep- 
resent opinion of other staff members. 
Opinions In items from other. publications 
may not coincide with the editor's ,own 
views but are offered for their general Inter- 



NorthStnr Racing, a snowmobile racing organi- 
zation, is a relatively now organization. Above, 
representatives of the organization display a 
1998 SW-Doo Grand Touring snowmobile and 
ambulance sled. Northstar Ski-Doo Dealers and 
S & J Sports of Greenbush donated the use of 
the snowmobile to the organization. The ambu- 
lance sled also was donated by Orion Ind. of 



Kimball. Orion also makes many other models of 
two sleds. Pictured above are (from left, back 
row) Brad Johnson, Rod Larson, Doug Navratil, 
Justin Knoll, Curt Quesnell, Dorran Hotter, and 
three Grand Forks Club members; (front row, 
from left) a Grand Forks Club member, Jerry 
Larson, Janelle Friedrich, Kim Bollesen, Janet 
WIskow, Darrel Wiskow, and Jerry Erickson. 



LETTERS 



TnThc Hdilor: 

Twite in the last month I have 
rcatl or heard on ilic news thai the 
laborers in our country are gelling 
mure wages than they were getting 
2(1 to 25 scars ago. One of these was 
in an article in the Northern Watch 
and the other was on the national 
news this morning (January 27). 

Whv arc these statements heing 
made?' Is it because there arc so 



that the powers that be think that 
these people won't know that it is 
not the whole truth? 

Back in 1970. as a young person 
with a family. I was working for a 
company in the Twin Cities and was 
making $8.25 per hour. I could buy 
an Oldsmobilc for S6.000 or a small 
car for S2.000 to S2.500. During 
that time. I had a six-hour surgery in 
, the Twin City area which cost 
S3.20O. The surgeon goi $2,000 unil 
the hospital got S 1 .200 and I was in 
the hospital for a week. 

The statcmeni in the paper said. 
"How many people in the labor 
force arc receiving the same wages 
as they were paid in 1980?" The 
statement on the newscast said thai 
the wages in the last year weni up a 
little over three percent, causing 
inflation. 

1 guess it doesn't do much good 
to complain about what is. but il 
docs bother me that everyone wants 
lo blame inflation on ihc laborer 
instead of trying to figure out what 
or who is causing the inflation. In 
1970, my medical insurance was 
paid for 100 percent by ihc employ- 
er and thctc was no deductible. The 
only thing I had to pay for (in the 
hospital) was the TV rent. Today. 
there are people who have no insur- 
ance because they can't afford the 
premium, even though they are 



working full-lime. 

■The laborer has a long way lo go 
lo catch up with the wage he was 
getting in 1970. taking into consid- 
eration ihc inflation thai has already 
wiped out his "living wage." We, ihc 
people, need to keep better 
informed on all areas of concern, 
and do what we can to help improve 
the situation. 

Enough said for now. Thanks for 
the opportunity to give my opinion. 

Sincerely, 

Fayc Suko 

St.Hilairc, Minnesota 

To The Editor: 

It is very interesting to read all of 
the opinions on the wolf situation. 
In the letter by Ginny Yingling of 
ihc Sierra Club, published January 
17,. she states "nowhere in North 
America, in all our history, has there 
been a single wolf attack on a 
human." - 

In the July. 1997 issue of 
Header's Digest ihcre is a "Drama 
' Real Life" story entitled Night of 



of a wolf attack on a sleep- 
ing ll-ycar-old child camping in 
Ontario. This wotf repeatedly 
charged at Ihc boy and his mother 
when ihc father irictt to chase it 
away. 

While this was an extremely rare 
incident and lhai particular wolf was 
caught and killed, an altack by a 
wolf has occurred, and people 
should not be led to belie vcother- 
wise. 

Sincerely. 

Connie Hagcn 

Plummcr, Minnesota 

To The Editor 

This letter is in response lo 

Ginny Yingling's guest editorial 

published in the Jan. 17. 1998 



Northern Watch. 

Tingling states (hat fear nor facts 
guide wolf debate. She also says 
thai, "nowhere in North America, in 
all our history, has there been a sin- 
gle wolf attack on a human." 

The fact is, Ginny, you didn't do 
your homework, very well before 
writing to the Northern Watch. The 
following article was taken from the 
January 3. 1907. issue of the 13 
Towns newspaper at Fosston. MN. 

(Editor's Note: Attached was a 

Khotocopy of a newspaper article 
caded WOLVES KILL BOY.) 
The article reads as follows: 

"Fergus Falls Journal: Sheriff 
Atbcrtson has relumed from a trip to 
Sebeka. where he went to serve 
some papers, and- states that reports 
are cuncnl iherc of a ghastly 
tragedy that had just occurred in the 
timbered country eighteen miles lo 
the eastward of the village. Children 
of that vicinity have very consider- 
able distances. to go to and from 
school and ordinarily several of 
them go together. In this instance a 
boy of eight had been kept after 
school Tor a short time, and his com- 
panions went on. leaving him to 
come home atone. He failed to 
arrive, and as darkness came on. his 
father took a lantern and started out 
in search of him. He had gone some 
distance when he heard' ihc growl- 
ing or wolves in a clump of timber 
not for away, and going in the direc- 
tion from which the sound came, 
was horrified to sec the mangled 
remains of his little boy wilh two 
large wolves standing over them. 
The child was dead and partially 
devoured." 

Sincerely, 

Lynn Vennes 

Fosston. Minnesota 



Beef herd management meetings start Tuesday 



Five area meetings on beef herd 
management have been scheduled 
by ihc University of Minnesota 
Extension Service in northwestern 
Minnesota beginning Tuesday, 
February 3. 

"The beef industry is looking 
heller than it has in quite awhile," 
notes Howard Person. Pennington 
county extension educator. "This 
has been encouraging to producers, 
but it is no reason to decrease the 
emphasis on management. These 
meetings will lie covering many dif- 
ferent aspects and options for beef 
producers.'' 

Topics to be covered at the meet- 
ings include "Managing Annual 
Cow Costs." "Beef Record Manage- 
ment Programs," "Backgrounding 
and Stoekcr Cattle Scenarios." 
"Hull-less Oais as a Feed Ingredient 
in Beef Rations" and "The Beef 

MCC financial 
aid workshop 
on February 4 

Annual financial aid workshop 
for Marshall County Central high' 
school seniors and their parents has 
been scheduled for Wednesday. . 
February 4. at 7 p.m. in the MCC 
library in Ncwfolden. 

According to Floyd Olson. MCC 
school counselor, the workshop will 
allow paicnts n> learn about the var- 
ious sources of financial aid and 
how to. complete the application 
forms required by federal and state 
agencies. 

The Free Application for Federal 
Student Aid (1-AFSA) will be Ihc 
primary document for gelling feder- 
al and slate financial aid. Olson 
said. A financial aid director will be 
available to present information on 
,,lt pn.grams 



Home Sludy Course." 

Meeting schedule is as follows: 

Tuesday, February 3 — 1:30 p.m. 
at the Java Cafe in Lancaster, 

Wednesday. February 4—9:30 
a.m. at the Community Center in 
Plummcr and 1:30 p.m. at ihc 
Community Center in Middle River, 

Thursday, February 5 — 9:30 a.m. 
at the museum room'in Warroad and 
1:30 p.m. in Baudcttc (contact Lake 
of the Woods extension office at 



218-634-1511 for location). 

"These meetings will cover 
information for producers at all 
stages in the beef industry," Person 
• said. The information may also be 
interesting for grain producers to 
look at as an option for diversifica- 
tion." 

Questions may be directed to 
Troy Salzer, Roseau county exten- 
sion educator, ot 218-463-1052 or 1- 
800-450-1052. 



Proposed Legislation 
Should Stir The Waters 

Bills have been introduced in the Minnesota 
Senate that should generate a good deal of com- 
ment in the next few weeks. Two of ihc bills are 
revisions, one of which would create a license sys- 
tem for taking of limber wolves and the other 
would increase compensation for livestock losses 
to timber wolves from $400 to 5600. 

Also introduced is a new bill which would 
transfer the powers and duties of the 
Commissioner of Natural Resources (DNR) to a 
board of natural resources created by the bill. The 
board would consist of ihc Commissioner of 
Natural Resources as chairman and eight members 
appointed by the Governor, by and with the advice 
and consent of the Senate. 

Under the proposed legislation, the board 
would include no officer or employee of the stale 
or federal government except the commissioner, 
only two members ai one lime who arc officials or 
employees of a municipality or any governmental 
subdivision, not less lhan three farmers actually 
residing on a farm and engaged in agriculture and 
not more than three members from the metropoli- 
tan area. 

The bill is sure to bring about some active dis- 
cussion, but we would think it unlikely lo get very 
serious consideration by the legislature as a whole. 
Il would be a radical departure from the estab- 
lished and existing system of departments and 
commissioners and will be strongly opposed by the 
bureaucracy, which would see creation of any such 
board as a threat to iheir own territory. 

The bill may have some effect, however, in 
creating an awareness among all legislators of 
some of the disputes and deep discontent in the 
rural population with the DNR. As such, il may 
grease the skids for passage of other issues helpful 
lo niral Minnesota. _ 

Sen. LeRoy Slumpf of Thief River Falls has 
drafted the bill to create a timber wolf hunting sea- 
son once the wolf is removed from the threatened 
list under the federal Endangered Species Act. 
Among other things, his bill calls for a S3 non- 
refundable application fee, a S150 license fee, 
potential for up to four persons per license, a S25 
guide's license (docs not permit personal taking of 
a wolf), resale of licenses by qualified livestock 
owners obtaining such licenses, baiting, and sale of 
legally taken and tagged hides. 

If the intent is lo reduce the population of 
wolves to the approximate number goal of the 
1 992 recovery plan for ihc eastern timber wolf, we 
question the effectiveness of a hunting season in 
accomplishing that end. A relatively small number 
of license holders in ihe large expanse of die wolf 
range for a restricted period of time puts the odds 
decidedly in favor of the wolf. Unless the season 
would coincide with the deer season, when thou- 
sands of hunters arc afield and wolves move about 
as their territory is invaded, we expect few wolves 
would be taken by hunters. We see trapping as the 
most effective way to control wolf numbers in spe- 
cific population areas, and that on a nearly year- 
round basis. 

Regarding compensation for livestock losses, 
placing a restriction on the value of animals lost to 
wolves is unfair, whether it is S400 or $600 or any 
other figure. That portion of ihc law should be 



excluded and the term fair market value allowed to 
remain as a determination of compensation — so 
long us ihc wolf is afforded any protection by law. 
A livestock owner should not be penalized because 
wolves select a $1,500 registered cow instead of a 
crossbred calf. 

In the total scheme of things in the state bud- 
get, as we have said before, ihc prompt payment of 
Ml damages for wolf depredation is a pittance, To 
the producers who sustain die losses, however, the 
value is great. Why incur more ill will, dissatisfac- 
tion and discontent? Cut the red tape and pay for 
the losses— in full, on time. 

It will be interesting to sec how these ideas in 
bill form are received in the legislature. The 1998 
session could be a stormy one. 

Deaf Candidate Seeks 
Republican Nomination 

It musl be with a great deal of courage that 
Cathy Bolcor has announced her candidacy for the 
Republican endorsement for U.S. Congress from 
the Seventh District. Like other newspapers in ihe 
district, we have received u number of letters in 
support of her candidacy — most of ihcm likely 
solicited by Bolcar or her committee. 

We do not publish letters in support of candi- 
dates in our public opinion columns, but we nole 
the support. Bolcar is deaf — a condition she has 
not only called attention to in announcement of her 
candidacy but has made a focal point of her cam- 
paign. Each support letier we have received has 
mentioned that disability. 

During her campaign Bolcar will have lo 
demonstrate that she is the best candidale for the 
endorsement, not because of being deaf but in spite 
of it. She may well show thai her personal experi- 
ence of living with this handicap has given her 
knowledge and'insight that would make her a good 
representative of the people. , __ 

A letter from Russell Pudas, president of the 
St. Cloud Area Deaf Club, stales that "mainstream 
hearing people don't understand the conflicts and 
politics thai dominate ihc deaf community. When 
we arc small children decisions are made for us 
regarding attending deaf schools (Faribault), pub- 
lic schools, the use of hearing aids, how much 
speech training we need and if it will even be suc- 
cessful. 

"Our parents deal with us being left behind, 
teasing from peers about our voices or hearing aids 
or using sign language. Our parents deal with our 
ear infections, balance problems, and acting out in 
frustration over why we arc not 'normal.' 
Sometimes deaf kids have been known to flush 
S2.000 hearing aids down the toilet, and fight their , 
speech teachers because they sec no point in trying 
to talk clearly when they can't hear their own 
voice." 

Not knowing much of Bolcar's qualifications 
to serve in Congress, we are impressed with her 
effort to show how it is possible for someone with 
a major communicalion difficulty to handle the . 
responsibilities of such office. She will Ifavc to 
persuade delegates that she is not a single issue 
candidale but capable of multi-interest representa- 
tion. It is a big challenge, but for someone who is 
accustomed to meeting challenge it should not be 
insurmountable. We look forward to seeing how 
the situation plays out. 



Honor banquet at Crookston Feb. 28 



Sixtieth annual honor banquet 
(formerly called Valley Farmer and 
Homcmakcr banquet) sponsored by 
the Minnesota Red River Valley 
Development Association is sched- 
uled for Saturday. February 28, at 
12 noon in Sahtstrom Conference 
Center on the campus of ihe Univer- 
sity of Minnesota — Crookston. 

Individuals from 14 northwest 
Minnesola counties will be honored 
as Valley Farmers and Homcmakers 
for ihc good example ihcy have set 
wiih their family life, community 
service, farming or agribusiness 



operations and efforts to conserve 
natural resources. 

The Daggett family of Frazcc 
will be honored as "Builders of Ihe 
Valley" and the 10th annual 
Northwest Minnesota Youih award 
wilt also be presented to an out- 
standing high tchool or college age. 
leader from a community in ihe 14 



Tickets at S10 per person arc 
available from Patti Malmc, North- 
west Experiment Station, 2900 
University Avenue. Crookston MN 
56716, phone 218-281-8602. 



POLICIES 



Letter* Tb The Editor: The suuTof the Northern 
Watch encourages written responses to editorial com- 
ment or letter* with original thoughts or ideas of gen- 
eral Interest. Letten should be intended for publica- 
tion in Northern Watch exclusively; letters sent to 
multiple publications will generally not be accepted. 
Right is reserved to edit letters for length and clarity 
and to reject letters deemed to be promotional in 
nature or in poor taste. 

. Letters Most Be Signed: All letters .must be 
signed and contain an address or phone number of (he 
writer so authenticity can be verified. Signatures 
nnut appear on letters published. The itaff believes 



that there Is greater credibility in letters signed in pnnt 
and will not withhold names of writers from publica- 
tion.. ■ 

Responses Invited: Letters critical of irtdivldu- 
■is or other entities may be shown to those Individu- 
als or represcniailves of those entities in advance or 
publication with an invitation by newspaper staff for 
response in the same issue u the original letter, 

Correction*: If an error Is made In news or 
advertising publication, the staff encourages readers 
to call it to our Immediate attention by. calling 681- 
4450. We will attempt to correct the error or clarify 
the misunderstanding in the next issue. 



LETTERS 



Unemployment in region drops 



Rate of unemployment in Region 
I declined by 1.3 percent to 4.0 per- 
cent in November from 5,3 percent 
ihc same month a year ago, accord- 
ing to information published by the 
Minnesota Department of 
Economic Security. 

Every county in the region 
showed a drop in the jobless rate, 
from .3 percent in Norman county 
lo 3.2 percent in Marshall county. 
Similarly, every county except 
Norman and Polk had an increase in 
unemployment from October to 
November. 

In the annual comparison, 
Kittson county was down 2.5 per- 



cent from 5.8 to 3.3, Marshall down 
-3.2 percent from 10.8 to 7.6. 
Norman down .3 percent from 4.9 
to 4.6: Pennington, down .6 from 
4.3 to 3.7; Polk, down .8 percent 
from 4.2 to 3.4, Red Lake, down 2.5 
percent from 9.3 lo 6.8; and Roseau, 
down 1.2 from 4.4 to 3. 

From October to November, 
Kittson was up from 3.0 lo 3.3, 
Marshall up from '6.0 lo 7.6, 
Norman down from 4.9 to 4,6, 
Pennington up from 3.2 lo 3.7. Polk 
down from 3.7 lo 3.4, Red Lake up 
from 5.9 to 6.8 and Roseau up from 
3.0 lo 3.2. 



To The Editor: 

This past December a man went 
to buy gas ai Co-op Oil in Middle 
River, where he collapsed unrespon- 
sive. Fortunately for this man. 
Filmorc McDridc was on the scene. 
Mr. McDridc has completed a com- 
munity CPR class. He promptly and 
properly started CPR and continued 
until the ambulance arrived. 

Tri-County Emergency Medical 
Services responded with an ambu- 
lance equipped with nn automatic 
defibrillator. This automatic defib- 
rillator had been purchased through 
fund-raising activities of the Middle 
River American Legion and the 
Middle River Jayeecs. 

Using this equipment the ambu- 
lance crew was able lo establish a 



normal heart rhythm. The nalicnt 
was ihcn transported to Thief River 
Falls and subsequently transferred 
to Dakota Clinic in Fargo. ND. 
where he received an implanted 
auiomatic defibrillator. He was sub- 
sequently discharged from the hos- 

Although we frequently read of 
impressive medical advances such 
as the implanted automatic defibril- 
lator, ill is man's life was saved 
through community action. The 
presence of an individual such us 
Filmorc McDridc— trained in when 
and how to initiate CPR— pro- 
longed life long enough for the 
ambulance to arrive. The fact that 
community organizations had 
equipped this ambulance with the 



necessary lifesaving equipment was 
then responsible lor restoring his 
heart rhylhm. 

This type of episode shoujd 
encourage all those not trained in 
CPR to enroll in a CPR class. One 
never knows when a family member 
or community member may need 
ihis lifesaving activity, The next 
lime we arc approached by a com- 
munity organization such as the 
Middle River American Legion or 
Ihc Middle River Jayeecs lo support 
a fund-raising cveni. let's all 
remember that they use these funds 
to provide lifesaving equipment to 
benefit us all. 

Sincerely, 

JimLangland, MD 

Thief River Falls 



Siiiurcliiy, Jimuury 31, 1998 



NORTHERN WATCH 



PllRC 7 



Milk makes good mix in farm crop diet 

Alfalfa and manure are positive additions to acreage for farm crops 



(Continued from I'agc I) 
and a separate area for dry cows. 
The milking parlor was expanded to 
a double 20 system and Ihe herd 
expansion has been nearly complet- 
ed with about 1,1 00 cows now being 
milked at the rate of 140 to 150 per 
hour. 

22 Full-Time Employees 

The dairy has 22 full-time 
employees and was privately 
financed by the investors without 
other corporate or cooperative 
input. 

Somewhat as an off-shool or 
Linlc Pine Dairy, Ron Tobkin and 
his partner Jim I -often have formed 
Dairy Management Services (DMS) 
which will soon have offices in 
i'crham. DMS will provide exper- 
tise for building and managing sim- 
ilar dairy operations— one of which 
is currently under construction in 
Iowa. Plans are to centralize the 
records of the separate operations to 
gain the advantage of a wider pool 
of information. 

In building the milking herd. 
Little Pine Dairy has attempted to 
brine in " ni y ""' calf heifers, and 
those from n single location us much 



"US! 



liblc. 



'When you add older cows from 
other herds, yon can bring in u lot of 
problems and invite a lot of poten- 
tial trouble," he said. "We contract 
the raising of heifer calves from our 
own herd that we want to keep as 
replacements. We sell the bull 
calves to farmers raising dairy 
steers." 
Fchr Family Charts New Waters 

Tobkin had dairy in his farming 
background from a number of years 
ago. For ihc Fehr family at Morris. 
however, ihe decision to go into 
dairying was charting new waters — 
although ihcy had a good idea of 
how to handle a boat. Their live- 
stock expertise had been in feeding 
beef cattle. 

When they decided to gel iheir 
feel wet, however, it wasn't one toe 
at a time. Rivervicw Dairy was 
started in September or 1995 with 
800 head and now is Ihc largest 
dairy in the state with 1,800 cows, 
1,450 of which arc currently milk- 
ing. 

"We had been finishing beef cat- 
tle for quite a few years as pan of 



our total fanning operation." said 
Diane Fchr, who operates the farm 
with her husband Lloyd, their three 
sons and a daughter. The eldest son, 
Gary, had the greatest iniciest in 
dairy and, along with Lloyd, heads 
that part of the business. The 
youngest son, Bradley, has responsi- 
bility for crops but also works with 
Ihc dairy operation. 

The middle son. Randy, helps 
oversee the beef operation which 
finishes about 2,000 animals per 
year. Daughter Julie helped plan the 
dairy and she and her husband Dlair 
Mcl/gcr of Rock Rapids. IA, arc 
pan owners in the family corpora- 
tion. Also in the corporation is 
Lloyd and Diane's nephew, Kurt 
Dominick, who docs the accounting 
work. 
Concerned About Moratorium 

Diane Fchr said the permitting 

Process from the Minnesota 
ollution Control Agency (MPCA) 
was not a particular problem except 
for the amount of time required to 
get Ihc permit. And since the family 
controls about 4.500 acres around 
ihe dairy hrm location, there were 
virtually no complaints from near 
neighbors about the dairy plans. A 
current political concern, however, 
is Attorney General Hubert (Skip) 
Humphrey's proposal for a morato- 
rium on fccdlot expansion in the 
state. 

Rivervicw Dairy raises its own 
corn for forage but buys ihc hay il 
needs. Facilities include two free- 
stall holding bams 688x144 in size 
and a double 24 milking parlor 
which permits milking 48 cows at a 
lime. There is ample room for 
manure application on family- 
owned acreage near Ihc dairy. 

The dairy employs a herdsman 
and has a lotal of 30 employees, 
including five pan-lime. There is no 
milk processing plant in the imme- 
diate area, so the two semi-trailer 
loads of milk picked up at the farm 
each day go to market in Milbank, 
SD. 

Rco$on$ For ExpnnSionS 

Expansion of dairy herds is often 
done to provide enough income to 
permit dairy farms lo remain in the 
family as a younger generation 
becomes involved and eventually 
operation. 



Rydell Refuge Winterfest 
salutes Groundhog's Day 



(Continued from Page I) 
Friends Ass'n. has made many 
improvements and provided numer- 
ous programs for the public at the 
fledgling refuge that isn't "official- 
ly" open. In 1996 volunteers con- 
tributed 5.438 hours lo help refuge 
operations. 

Mosl of the volunteers ore local 
residents. When Grand Forks busi- 
nessman Leonard Rydell accumu- 
lated the 2.120 acres that is now 
Rydell National Wildlife Refuge he 

KLirchased many smaller larms. 
lany of today's volunteers have 
historic ties lo the property and fond 
memories of growing up in the area. 

In 1992 the Richard King Mellon 
Foundation purchased Ihc land from 
Rydell and then donated it to the 
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. As 
private property, the area was man- 
aged as a private gumc refuge and 
commercial fish form. 

Today's "custodial status" of ihe 
refuge is pending the completion of 
a comprehensive management plan. 
The plan is nearly ready, and upon 
its approval, the refuge will qualify 
for additional staff which will allow 
il lo be open to the public on a more 
regular basis. Currently, the Visitors 
Center is manned by volunteers and 
open Sunday afternoons from I to 4 
n,m. in the winter with slightly 
longer hours during the summer 
. months. 

The refuge was established lo 
protect its habitat and wildlife diver- 
sity, encourage waterfowl and 
migratory bird production, provide 
wildlife oriented recreation and pro- 
1 mote environmental education. 

The Rydell Refuge is located in 
the transitional /one between the 
flat Red River Valley floodplain to 
the west and and rolling- forest and 
lake country to the cast — a mosaic 
of wetlands, mixed stands of hard- 
wood trees, conifer plantations, 
grass meadows and cropland. The 
combination of habitats provides for 
a diversity and abundance of water- 
fowl and wildlife, Over 190 species 
of songbirds have been identified at 
ihc refuge. Timbcrwolvcs and black 
bear have also been sighted. 

The cooperation between federal, 
slate and local organizations, along 
with a hosl of volunteers, has 
allowed wonderful things to happen 
there — all with Mule or no money. 

The Rydell pool house has been 
transformed into n visitor center 
through donations, volunteers and 
assistance from USFWS staff. The 
swimming pool was filled with con- 
crete and the new floor was carpet- 
ed. Floor to ceiling windows sur- 
round ihe huge room .enabling visi- 
tors to enjoy the picturesque out- 
doors, particularly ihe bird feeding 
area in the "backyard." The former 



Rydell home nearby will become 
the Refuge Headquarters. Swan 
Lake and Golden Pond, two of the 
refuge's nine lakes, arc visible from 
these buildings. 

In addition to continuing ihc 
many naturalist programs at the 
refuge, ihe Friends Ass'n. has plans 
lo plant protective shrubbery around 
ihc backyard bird feeding area and 
devctop a demonstration area there, 
develop new trails, provide benches 
and other amenities along ihc trails, 
improve directional and interpretive 
signs, repair existing and build new 
overlooks of natural areas, extend 
the hours that the refuge is open to 
the public and more. 

Any organization or individual 
looking for a volunteer project will 
be welcomed with open arms. The 
refuge abounds with opportunities 
for Scout projects and Eagle Scout 
candidates. 

Closed to regular hunters, the 
refuge permits special deer hunts for 
youth and disabled persons. Last 
year, a lotal of40 12- to 15-year-old 
youth hunters with firearm safety 
certificates were able to hunt during 
two seasons — 25 during Ihc 4A 
season and 15 during the 4B season. 
A special hunt for hunters with dis- 
abilities was also held. 

In its last legislative session, the 
Minnesota Legislature recognized 
the accomplishments of this unique 
partnership between the government 
and private citizens' and organiza- 
tions and allocated $200,000 to 
assist in developing what could be 
the only truly accessible refuge in 
the country. 

The funding will develop seven 



miles of accessible hard-surface 
trails with overlooks, upgrade and 
make accessible Ihc deck behind the 
headquarters, cons true I a boardwalk 
on Sundew bog, and enhance the 
acccssiblity of the visitors center. 
The center will have belter speak- 
er/listening devices and additional 
rest rooms. The lighting in Ihe 
building has already been improved. 
The outside will be landscaped and 
have interpretive areas. The parking 
area and driveway will be paved. 

Wayne Gocken, secretary of the 
1 1-member board of directors of the 
Friends of ihe Rydell Refuge 
Association, stated that the Rydell 
Refuge is probably the busiest cus- 
todial stalus refuge in ihc country — 
an example of the great things that 
can be accomplished by dedicated 
volunteers. For more information 
about the association. Gocken can 
be reached at (218) 574-2622. 

Even in the dead of winter the 
area is beautiful, the dark green pine 
a handsome contrast against the 
sparkling white snow, the air filled 
wilh the song of ihc hardy birds that 
dare lo brave the cold. 

The I st Annual Groundhog's Day 
Winterfest tomorrow is the perfect 
opportunity for the young and old 
alike to celebrate the season. The 
weatherman is for casting mild tem- 
peratures with a chance of snow — 
a perfect winter day. 

According to tradiiion, if ihc 
groundhog sees his shadow on 
Monday, he will return lo his hole 
for another six weeks of winter. 
Only six more weeks? Who would 
complain? 



©, 



WINNIPEG GAMING 
OVERNIGHT 



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compiled from the 

; Management 

_, farms with an 

cows averaged prof- 

of §229 per cow and lotal dairy 
cow profit of S5.404. Those with an 
average of 41.3 cows had profil per 
cow of S392 and total dairy cow 
profit of $16,199 and those wilh an 
average of'58.9 cows had average 
profit per cow of $471 and dairy 
cow profil averaging $27,765. 

According to ihe records. 13 
herds with 201 to 300 cows (an 
average of 238.9 cows for the 13 
herds) had an average net profit per 
cow of S508 and dairy cow profit of 
$121,459. The five producers with 
more than 300 cows averaged herd 
si/e of 335. showed a net profit per 
cow of S45H and an average dairy 
cow profit of $153,605, 

Il is acknowledged thai 1996 was 
one of the best price years for dairy- 
ing in recent years — and projections 
indicate it won't be matched for at 
leavl the ncxi six or eight years into 
ihc future. 

Cost Control Important 

Young dairymen are finding suc- 
cess in dairying by finding ways to 
control costs outside iheir own oper- 
ations. In one meeting of area dairy- 
men the costs of hoof trimming 
were discussed. It was determined 
ihe average cost was $10 per cow. 
Dairymen in the room had about 
5,000 cows. They cooperated in hir- 
ing Jheir own hoof trimmer to work 
on everyone's herd for $30,000 a 
year, paid for some of his health 
insurance, and still saved S3 per 
cow. 

They keep their bams full of pro- 
ducing cows, negotiate for the best 
prices, call other farmers in 
Minnesota and other states to com- 
pare and formulate buying strate- 
gics, treat employees as an invest- 
ment rather than an expense, spe- 
cialize in given dairy areas, treat 
manure as nn asset, seek lo improve 
production management, keep cows 
healthy instead of treating problems 
and take the emotion out of decision 
making. 

(Next week: A took at how 
Manitoba's dairy quota system 
keeps small dairy forms profitable.) 



1h 




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COMMUNITY 

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6:00 P.M.-10:00 P.M. 

THIEF RIVER FALLS, 

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Page 8 



NORTHERN WATCH 



Saturday, January 31, 1998 



Saturday, January 31, 1998 



NORTHERN WATCH 



Pane 9 



TRF SPORTS 



j 
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■onat, 11.30 »m 

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Tuesday, Feb. 3 

■ Moekay - LMS ■! Bemky (A/0), (LB p.m 

W«dn**day,F«b.4 

■ Baikotbal - NCTC women al North 
Dakota Stan Conog* o( Science. S 30 p nv; 
NCTC man a! Noun Oakota SUia Cc"eg« °* 
Science. 730 pm. 



Tburaday, Fab. 5 

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id Grand Forks, 5pm 

■ Wrottlmg • IH3 v» Emt Grand Fork* 

° Friday, Fab. 6 



■ Daman 



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Fergus Fam 

M p m . NCTC 
;NCTCmonvi 



Saturday, Fob. 7 

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Crookston, MN 



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Sal. 9:00 A.M. • 4 P.M. « Sun. Noon-4:00 P.M. 



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Thief River Falls, MN S6701 

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Member SIPC 




DAVE CLAUSEN 





Panthers' numbers 
produce dual meet 
swim win over TRF 

Numbers added up lo a Park 
Rapids victory Tuesday in a boys 
high school dual swim meet against 
Thief River Falls al ilie Franklin 
Middle School pool. There were 
more Panthers than Prowlers. lead- 
ing to a 109-73 victory for the viii- 

"Wc knew ahead of lime ihc 
score would he lopsided because 
Ihcy have more numbers," 
explained Thief River Falls coach 
Brian Olson. "But the meet was 
competitive from beginning to end. 
There were a lot of really close 
races. Ii was a lot of fun." 

The Prowlers don't have a diver. 
but they placed first or second 10 of 
the II swimming events, pointed 
out Olson. The Kids we have are 
doing everything they can," he said. 
They swam extremely well." 

A young Thief River Falls team 
was led by sophomore Zach Olson, 
who won both the 200 and 500 



Tony Flatchar of tho Prowlers (right) was tied up Tuesday's Section 8A high school hockey game 200 freestyle relay team that' also 

by Crookston detenseman Jim Montague In at the Huck Olson Memorial Ctvlc Center. Thief •—>■■■>-* -— *-<=- " ■— 

front of Pirates goalie Joe Reese during River Falls won 2-1 in overt/me. 



Prowlers win 2-1 in overtime 



He admitted il was his first high 
school hockey game of the year. But 
it didn't take long for the fan to rec- 
ognize what Thief River Falls head 
coach Scott Bcrgtand has been say- 
ing all year. "They're not that bad," 
said the observer. I saw their record. 
and I didn't cxpccilhcm toplay this 
well. They skate hard. They just 
don't have the goal -scorers. " 

Those are the exact points 
Bcrgtand has been selling since Ihc 
season began in late November, 
Tuesday, the Prowlers were reward- 
ed for their efforts, with the hard 
work producing a 2-1 overtime vic- 
tory over Crookston. 

ft was jusl the third win in 17 
starts for the Prowlers. Things 
haven't been a whole lot belter for 
the Pirates, who are 4-13 and have 
lost six overtime games this winter. 

This came al a critical time," 
said Bcrgtand. "We needed a win." 

For the longest lime, it didn't 
appear either side would come out 
of it with a victory. Missed opportu- 



nities, along with strong goaltcnd- 
ing by both Thief River halls sopho- 
more Mike Dowers and Crookston 
junior Joe Reese, resulted in 2 1/2 
periods or scoreless hockey. 

The stalemate was shattered 
•when Crookston sophomore Nate 
Yeagcr found himself in the right 
place at the right time. Lefi standing 
alone in front of the net, Yeagcr 
spun around in lime to corral a 
rebound and put a backhand past 
Dowers at 6:43 of the final period. 

Thier River Falls didn't get on the 
scoreboard until the 11:24 mark 
when Wade Chiodofamc up with a 
bursi of speed on the right wing, got ' 
a step on the defenscman and blast- 
ed a high, hard shot into the far 
upper corner or the net. 

That was ihe big goal," noted 
Bcrglnnd. "We played hard. We had 
lots of chances. We could have had 
eight goats." 

While the Prowlers might have 
had the better chaneds to score 
throughout regulation time, the 



Pirates came alive in overtime. 
Dowers, though, met the challenge, 
and Thief River Falls came out the 
winner when Kyle Anderson scored 
with just 50 seconds left in Ihc 
eight-minute extra session. 

Moments earlier Anderson was in 
alone on Reese, but couldn't con- 
vert. Given a second chance, the 
Thief River Falls senior forward 
charged down ihc right side and 
pushed Ihc puck into the net to snap 
the Prowlers' six-game losing 
stfeak. 

Reese finished with 38 saves. 
. Dowers wound up with 32. 

Scoring 

Flrtt period - none. 

Second parlod • none. 

Third parlod - Crookston. Nils Yeogor 
(Ryan lOevon). 6*3; TRF. Wado ChtoOo 
Enc Rowland). 1124. 

OvarUma • TRF. Kylo Andorton (Chlodo), 
7:10. 

Goalie saves ■ THF, Mike Dowers 10-B- 
5-6-32: Crookston, Joe Roo*o 12-15-6- 
3-38. 



Early Moorhead lead stands up 

I Spuds beat Thief River Falls girls 54-46 



Moorhead burned a Thief River 
Falls first quarter 7onc, then held off • 
the Prowlers' comeback attempts 
Tuesday to pick up a 54-46 girls 
high school basketball win. 

The Spuds ted 21-10 after eight 
minutes. The Prowlers stayed with- 
in 29-22 at halftime and cut the dif- 
ference lo 37-35 by the end of the 
third quarter. But they were never 
able to pull even and fell to 5- 10 for 
the year. 

"We started with a zone, and ihey 
shot the ball real well," explained 
Thief River Falls coach Jeff Loc, 
pointing to the Spuds* lO-for-16 first 
quarter shooting - all from ihc oui- 

Lumberjacks 1 first 
quarter burst nets 
win over Prowlers 

Bcmidji jumped out to a 22-8 
first quaner lead nnd rolled to a 67- 
45 boys high school basketball win 
over Thief River Falls Tuesday. 

The Prowlers were up 6-4 early, 
but the Lumberjacks finished the 
quarter with an 18-2 run and their 
lead was never threatened the rest 
of the way. Il was 33-16 at halftime 
and 48-29 through ihree quarters. 

Keith Salschcider scored II of 
his game-high 17 points during ihat 
first quarter Bcmidji run. He was 
joined in double figures by team- 
mate Chris Fairchild with 12 points 
and Ihe Prowlers' Jeremy Swanson 
with 1 1 . 

It was the second win over ihc 
Prowlers ihis winter for the 
Lumberjacks, who won by a 76-57 
margin back on Dec. 1 8. It was also 
just the second home game of the 
year for the 9-5 Bcmidji squad. The 
loss dropped Thief River Falls to 1- 



side. "We switched lo a man-to-man 
in ihe second quarter and played 
right wiih them. 

A balanced Moorhead offense 
was led by Beth Gilyard wiih 13 
points. The Prowlers went to Nicole 
Kopari, who finished with a game- 
high 24 points. 

The Spuds cooled off after iheir 
first quarter blitz, shooting 37 per- 
cent for the game (19/52). They 
were I4-for-22 at ihe free ihrow 
line, with nine, of those 14 free 
throw points coming in the fourth 
quarter. 

"We put them at the line too many 
times," noted Loc. 



Thief River Falls shot 49 percent 
from the floor, but they put up only 
39 shots (hitting 19). The Prowlers 
made 8 of 9 free throw attempts. 
They were out-rebounded 28-19 and 
had more turnovers, 18-13. 

1* 2 3 4 T 

TNolHivorFalU ..10 12 13 11 " 40 

Moorhood 21 B 6 17 64 

TRF - Tayo Hunt 4, Laura FoBatt 2. 
Rachel Mathson 0. Amber KHnkor C. Nicola 
Kopart 24, Sam Jensen 2. Staph Lench 2. 

Moorhead - Brianno England B. Andrea 
Shogron 10, Betty Chaiflen 9, Stacy Von Da 
Lou 8, Jama Abraham 3, Amy Lagreld 1. AH 
Nick 2, Both Glryord 13. 



Mustangs top Bears 
with balanced attack 



Angic Chervcslod wasn't in the 
line-up, so it took a collective effort 
by her Red Lake County Central 
teammates lo produce a 54-39 girls 
high school basketball win over 
Clearbrook-Gonvick Tuesday at 
Oklce. 

Chcrvesiad, the Mustangs' lead- 
ing scorer and rebounder, missed 
the game because of back problems. 
In her absence, Jcnni Morinville 
scored 16 points and grabbed 10 
rebounds, Sylvia Hilccman netted 
13 points and Tracy Roslen added 
11 as Red Lake County Centra! 
improved to 9-5. 

It was good to sec ihe balanced 
scoring, especially with Angic miss- 
ing." said Red Lake County Central 
coach Rick Koivisto. 

The two teams played to a 15-15 
first quarter tic. The Mustangs went 
ahead 32-28 at halftime ana had a 
42-34 third quarter advantage. 



Misty Olson scored 12 points lo 
lead the Bears, who lost an early- 
season 62-30 decision to ihe 
Mustangs. 

Red Lake County Central shot 37 
percent from the field (20/54) and 
made 11 of 22 free throws. 
Clearbrook-Gonvick shot only 30 
percent from ihc floor (14/52) and 
went 9-for-14 at the line. The 
Mustangs finished with a 33-23 
rebounu advantage. The Bears had 
more turnovers, 24-19. 

1 2 3 4 T 

Cioarbrook-Gonvk*....t5 13 



.15 IT 10 1 



C-G - Slacy Eek 10, Kim Olaori 2, MoOy 
EeK4, Cryatal Skeim 10, Laura Toaolwn 1, 
Misty Oleon 12. 

RLCC - Erlka VotMo»on 3. Jonnl 
Morlnvltle 10. Katie CrHelll 5. Sylvia 
Hligeman 13, Franco* HUgomon B, Tracy 
Roaian 11, 



uomioti ■" ■■ ••> •» ' 

TRF- Jeremy Swanson It, Caaey Slijon. 
4. M&o Johnson 3. Kylo Watorwonh u, 
Cody Huscnke 2. Justin Walsoth 8. Mtchaol 
Moms 8. CoOln Schalor I. Aaron Hendricks 

Bomkfll - Paul Winoo 4. Chni Faifchiid 
12, Paul ColUoan 8, Mike Fogelion 2. Dan 
Sacfcen 5. Keith Salacheldat 17, Jacob 
Sand 8, Chad Thorn pion 2, Joromy 
McOonakJ 3. Tim Neleon 0. 

Moorhead JV 76-17 
winner against TRF 

Moorhead ran a fast break from 
beginning to end Tuesday en route 
to a one-sided 76-17 girls junior 
varsity high school basketball win 
over thief River Falls. 

Thier RivcrFalls, down 13-5. 34- 
9 and 58-15 at ihc quarters, was led 
by Rachel Malhson wiih 7 points. 



Wolverines beat KCN 



Goodridge/Grygla-Gaizke turned 
back an upset bid by Kittson County 
to win a 59-50 girls high school bas- 
ketball game played Monday at 
Lancaster. 

It was the second win for the 9-6 
Wolverines over the Cougars this 
winter, but a far cry from the 64-30 
blow-out in ihc earlier meeting. 

"They (Cougars) played real 
well." noted Goodridge/Grygla- 
Gaizke coach Mike Gast. "They 
showed a huge improvement since 
ihc last time wc played them." 

The Wolverines held narrow 
quarter leads of 16-10, 28-24 and 
37-36. ' . „ 

A 15-point game by Angic Gast 
and 12 from Kalhryn Stanley helped 
the Wolverines offset a game-high 



23-point performance by the 
Cougars' Kcndra Hunter. 

Goodridgc/Grygla-Gatzkc was 
22-for-61 from the field (36 per- 
cent) and l5-for-20 at the free throw 
line. Kittson County North went 13- 
for-45 from the floor (29 percent) 
and 23-for-33 at the line. "The 
Wolverines finished with a 34-27 
rebound advantage. 

1 2 3 4 T 

Ooodrtdpe/Q-G tO 12 22 60 

Kmson Co. North 10 14 12 14 60 

Q/Q-0 - Jenny Nelson 8, Teuaha 
Thomas 4, Dana Wlaaih B. Jonnleca 
Qalaohar 3. Kalhryn Stanley 12, Anglo 
Oast 15, LortHagenO. 

KCN • Dawn Peloiaon 0. Kayla 
S|o»uand 7, Shail Whltloek 0, Kendra 
Hunlor 23, Sarah Peterson 5. 



id sophomores Rory Hovcn and 
Sam Kczar. 

Kczar added a win in the 50 
freestyle. 

The Prowlers arc 1-5 in dual 
meet competition. 

Park Rapid* 108, TRF 73 

200 medloy relay • I. PR (Dann Rice, 
Jake Do bile ck, Cnrls Peterson, Scon 
Droughion). 2:05.40: 2. TRF (Nate 
Browning, Qaoa Carlton, Andy Hudson, 
Cody Sorvhj), 2:28.38. 

200 Iroeilyla ■ 1. Zeeh Olson. TRF, 
1:58.48; 2. Rory Hovan, TRF, 2:07.00: 3. 
Chrta Sioovon*. PH, 2:12.62: 4. Anthony 
Parol. PR, 2:18.01; 5. Man Ciociok, PR. 
234.74. 

200 I.M. - 1. Jake Deblieck. PR. 2:25.80: 
2. Colm Browning. TRF, 2:35.89; 3. Clay 
Ebemart. PR. 2:39.82: 4. Cnns Petorton, , 
PR. 2:58.0 1: 5. Andy Hudson, TRF. 3:03.32. 

50 troosrylo - 1. Sam Keiar. TRF, 25.70; 

2. Scott Broughton. PR. 25.94; 3. Josh 
Winter. PR. 28.90; 4. Cody Sonrtg, TRF. 
28.98; 6. Gabe Carlson. TRF. 30.17. 

Diving - t. Dann RW, PR. 114.10; 2. 
Nate Haraha, PR. 103.60. 

100 butlortly - I. Anthony Poror, PR. 
1:08.64; 2. Clay Eborhart, PR. 1:13.47: 3. 
Gobo Carlson. TRF, 1:36.44. 

100 freestyle - 1. Nate Harsha, PR, 
57.65: 2. Sam Keiar, TRF. 57.79; 3. Chris 
Sleeve na, PR, 59.80: 4. Nathan Browning. 
TRF. 1:04.68; 6. Josh Wmter, PR. 1:08.20. 

500 freestyle • l.'Zeeh Olson, TRF, 
5:19.53; 2. Rory Hoven, TRF. 5:54.50; 3. 
Man Cieeiok. PR. 6:03.67; 4. Cody So<v(g, 
TRF, 8:33.76; 5. Kovln Richmond, PR, 
6:52.18. ■ " 

200 Iroeslyle relay - 1. TRF (Colin 
Browning, Rory Hoven, Sam Keiar, Zach 
Olson), 1:4438; 2. PR (Scott Broughton, 
Anthony Parol. Chris Sleevons, Nate 
Harsha), 1:44 JO; 3. PR (Joan Winter, Kevin 
Richmond, Chrta Peterson, Matt Ciaerok), 
2:08.92, ■■.,■ , . 

100 backstroke • 1. Darin Rico, PR. 
1:08.52; 2. Nathan Browning. TRF, 1:15.74: 

3. Scon Broughton, PR, 1:16.00; 4. Bryfln 
Sonrig. TRF. 133.06. 

100 broaatstroko • I.Jake DeoHock. PR, 
1:09.04: 2. Colin Browning, TRF, 1:20.38; 3. 
Kyi* Larson, PR. 124.00; 4. Chris Sleovens, 
PR, 129.80: 6. Andy Hudton, TRF. 133.08. 

400 Iroaaiyie relay - 1. PR (Nato Harsha. 
Ctirla Sleevona, Anthony Poroi: Jeke 
Dobtlock). 3:58.93: 2. TRF (Sam Keiar, Rory 
Hovon, Colin Browning. Zoch Olson). 
4:03.89; 3. PR (Clay Ebemart. Kyle Larson, 
Mali Czociok. Darin Rice), 4:3120. 
TnFJVPIacaa 

50 freestyle - 1. Bryan Sorvtg. 3389; 2. 
Noel Poiel, 38.03: 3. Abe Loo. 38.5B. 

100 freestyle - 1. Neel Patol, 1:2220; 2. 
Abe Lea, 125.00. 



Goodridge knocks 
down free throws, 
tops Sacred Heart 

Goodridge came up with five 
late-game free throws to insure a 
57-53 boys high school basketball 
win over East Grand Forks Sacred 
Heart Tuesday at Alvarado. 

The Huskies opened the game 
with a 19-11 first quarter lead and 
had o 37-25 halftime cushion. The 
Eagles stormed back, however, to 
go in front 45-44 at the end of the 
third quarter. 

"Wc played an excellent first 
half," reported Goodridge coach 
Eric Mickclson. They played a 
couple of different zone defenses, 
and wc attacked it really well. Wc 
did a nice job moving the ball 
around." 

The roles were reversed in the 
second half, according to 
Mickclson. "We were a little flat on 
defense, and Ihcy started to attack 
us," he explained. 

Down one with about a minutc- 
and-n>half to play, the Huskies 
faced disaster when they were hit 
with intentional foul call and a tech- 
nical foul on the same play. That 
gave iHe Eagles four free throws, 
and allowed them to maintain pos- 
session of the ball. But they missed 
three of the four free throws, and 
then had the in -bounds pass picked 
off. 

Two free throws apiece by Nicky 
Kotrba and Ben Hanson, along witn 
a single free throw by Jared 
Eidclbcs, helped the Huskies pull 
out the win down the stretch, 
improving their record to 7-8. They 
were I0-for-14 at the line for the 
game, compared to a I-for-6 show- 
ing by the Eagles. 



Ooodrlogo.... 



i I 2 3 



...10 1 



7 13 57 



EOF SacrotrHoari ... 

OocdrWga - Ben Hanson 17, Jared 
EkJotbea 1 0. Nick Kot/Ca 5. Jim School 1 3. 
Trovta School 8. 

EOFSH • Aaron Orogolro 10, Ertck Noll 
15, Bon Horkon 12, Paul Stlnar 10. Jon 
Kotrba 2. Joo Zavoral 2. 




Zach Olson won both the 200 and 500 freestyle races for the 
Prowlers during Tuesday's Thief River Palls vs. Park Raptdi boys 
high school swim meet at tho Franklin Middle School pool. Olson, 
shown here In the 200, also anchored a first place 200 freestyle 
relay team. 

High school wrestling meet... 

Prowlers play host 
to Northwest Quad 

Host Thief River Falls tost to 
Crookston 67-3, Red Lake County 
Central 57-19 and Warren- 
Alvarado-Oslo 39-31 Tuesday in 

Ihc Prowlers' Northwest 

Quadrangular high school wrestling 
meet. 



Iroppcd I 
ordtoO-l 



Match fleaulta 

■ Team standings -Crookston 3-0, Red 
Lake County Central 2-1, Warmn-AJvaraoo- 
Oiki 1-2. Thief River Falls 0-3. 

■ Match rosuM - Crookston 67, Thiol 
River Falls 3: Crookston 40, Red Lake 
County Central 24; Crookston 61. Warren- 
Arvarado-Oslo 12; Red Lake County Central 
57, Thief River Falls 19; Rod Lako County 
Central 59. Warren -Alva ratJO-Olto B: 
Warren- AWa rado-Oslo 39, Thief River Falls 
31. 

Crookston 87, TRF 3 
103 - Man Lessard (Crookston) dec Oeau 
Abrahamson 0-7: 112 • Juitin Laiurd 
(Crookston) pinned Ryan Poissanl I.Ofl; 119 
■ Crookston by forfeit; 1 1S - Crookston by tw- 
leii: 130 - Crookston by torloit: 135 • 
Crookston by lorfeii; 140 - David Persia 
(Crookston) pinned Philip Hormanaon 1:09; 
145 ■ Dusty Coauotlo iCrookalon) plnnod 
Josh Hagen :15; 152 - Josh Stinson (TRF) 



doc. Adam Hanson 5-1: 150- Jason Persia 
(Crookston) dec. Jeremy Houska 15-2:171 - 
Jared Sennas (Crookston) pinned Bob Struu 
:3l: 189 - Hoatn Lanetot (Crookston) pinned 
Cody Crapeau 4:40: hwi - Joy Walace 
(Crookston) plnnod Robert Spry 1:05. 
RLCC 57, TRF IB 

1 03 - Beau Abrahamson (TRF) by lorteit; 
111 - Cotton Determan (RLCC) pinned Ryan 
Poutant 125: 119 - RLCC by forfeit; 135 - 
RLCC by fortelt; 130 • RLCC by toftoll; 13S • 
RLCC by forfeit; 140 ■ Brad Delerman 
(RLCQ ptnnod PhUm Hormanaon :33; 145 • 
Brenl Nelson (RLCC) doc Josh Hagen B-0; 
1 52 - Kyle Jenson (RLCC) dec. Josh Stinson 
8-1; 1*0 - Jeremy Houska (TRF) pinned 

Adam Kooabtnski 5:45; "* ""'-- '' 

(RLCC) doc Bob Strut! __ ...... 

McMullen (RLCC) pinned Cody Crspeau 
2:38: hwt • Robert Spry (TRF) pinned Ryan 
Olson 329. 

W-A-O 3D, TRF 31 

103 ■ Baau Abrahamson (TRF) pinned 
Craig Carrier 1 35: 1 1 2 - Aaron KnoB (W-A- 
O) pinned Ryan Poissanl :«3; 119 - W-A-O 
bylortfjtt 125 -W-A-O by lorteit: 130- W-A- 
O by forfeit: 135 - W-A-O by lorteit; 140 - 
Philip Hermanaon (TRF) dec. Aaron Noaumg 
15-5: 145 - Josh Hagen (TRF) dec Marshall 
Westberg 9-7; 162 - Josh SHnson (TRF) 
pinned Jacob Anderson 3:14; 160 ■ Josh 
Sanders (W-A-O) dec Jeremy Houske 8-3: 
171 • TRF by forloi!; 189 -TRFby lortoit; hwt 
- Mike Taus (W-A-O) pinned Robert Spry 
1:45. 



Fergus Falls whips 
shorthanded NCTC 



ranked men's bxsketbatl team i 
Minnesota Community College 
Conference polls, handed Northland 
a 121-84 Northern Division loss 
Monday. . 

The Pioneers, who have just one 
win to their credit and were huge 
underdogs to start with, faced an 
even biggest challenge by going on 
Ihc roau without leading scorer 
Chaka Alt. The 6-4 freshman for- 
ward/center missed Ihc game 
because of an ankle injury. 

Another Northland starter, 
Melvin Whitney Jr., and reserve 
Arthur Hamilton were also absent 
when the team bus left Thief River 
Falls. 

Fergus Falls played to form in 
racking up a 61-31 halftime lead. 

They're a great team," said 
Northland coach Ted Krizc. 
"They're heads nnd shoulders above 
us, especially without alt of our 



Wiih the outcome decided, the 
second half played out a tittle more 
even. "We played a lot belter in the 
second hair," noted Krizc. "We just 
told ihcm to go out and play baste t- 



ip- ball and not worry about the rest of 



Dwight Goodwin picked up part 
of the slack for the Pioneers by scor- 



figure scorers, but, Fergus Falls had 
seven, led by Andy Lerberg with 21 
points. 

Northland shot 36 percent from 
the field (26/73) and was a busy 27- 
for-34 at the free throw line. Fergus 
Falls shot SO percent from the floor 
(46/92) and added to to the free 
Ihrow parade with an ]8-for-28 
night at the line. The 14-0 Spartans 
out-rebounded the 1-14 Pioneers 
61-39. Northland topped the 
turnover charts 24-15. 



:, Nic 

Thompson 11. Dwkjhi Goodwin 25, Josh 
Whltloek 15, Grant Skiblekl 16, Jeremy 
Larson 3. Sean Bmgoaman 10. 
* FF - Andy Lerberg 21, Nato Grove 11, 
Tommy Crutman 10, Bob SehUemen 3, 
Chits Femhcfli It, Man Davie E, Johnny 
Reoao B. Andy Swedberg B, Jason Retzlafl 
11, Nick Retilafl B. Jtai ScNMman 15, 
Ctierioa Rutherford to. 



Strong RLF defense 
nets win over RLCC 



Poor shooting continues to 
plague the Red Lake County 
Central boys high school basketball 
team, with the Mustangs struggling 
through a 33 percent night from the 
field Tuesday in a 53-46 loss at Red 
Lake Falls. 

Low shooting percentage has 
become a common occurrence for 
the Mustangs during a seven-game 
losing streak that has dropped them 
10 3-11. 

"Wc didn't shoot very well, but 
some orthat credit should go to Red 
Lake Falls," explained Red Lake 
County Central coach Chris 
McLean. "They did a good job 
defensively. They play aggressive 
man-to-man defense." 

The Eagles were up 14-9 at ihe 



■ end of the first quarter, 28-20 at 
halftime and 39-32 heading into the 
final eight minuics. 

Mark Lorcnson came up with a 
29-point game for the Mustangs. 
Eric Hoppcrstad led the Eagles with 
17 points. 

Red Lake County Central was 9- 

for-13 at the free ihrow line, where 

Red Lake Falls made 12 of 20. The 

Eagles had more turnovers, 18-11. 

fiarbl 

1 2 3 4 T 

RLCC -9 11 12 14 « 

Rod Lake Falls _....14 14 11 14 53 

RLCC - Mark Lbrenson 20, Nick Waktal 

3, Matt BJoiWIo 2. Danny Paymonl 5. Cdo 

Mlcketson 1, Man Hruby 6. 

RLF - Chrta Swondra 3, Jesse Adeknan 

8, Eric Hopperstad 17, Tony Caaaavan 7, 

Joslah Hoofer 0, Danny Gagner 7. Steve 

Ulrlch2. 



Third quarter run 
produces victory 
for B/G-MR boys 

Bad ger/Grccnhush- Middle River 
turned a narrow two-point halftime 
edge into a 26-puint third quarter 
spread Tuesday, propelling the 
Galon past Kittson County North 
81-50 in a boys high school basket- 
ball game played al Lancaster. 

"Wc made some offensive adjust- 
ments at halftime." explained 
Badgcr/Grecnbush-Middlc River 
coach Eldon Sparhy. whose 
led only 9-7 and 25-23 at the first 
two quarter slops. "Wc weren't 
attacking in the first half, and wc 
weren't shooting very well. In Ihc 
third quarter wc started taking the 
ball lo the basket and all of a sudden 
things started to lake off." 

The 33-noini third quarter pro- 
vided the Gators with a 5H-32 cush- 
ion as Ihcy improved their record to 
11-3. 

Badger/Grcenbush-Middlc River 
shooters were busy with a 30-for-73 
night from the field (41 percent) 
and a l5-for-23 free throw game. 
Kittson County North was 17-for- 
59 from ihc floor (29 percent) and 
J3-for-2l al the line. 

I 2 3 4 T 

Q/Q-Mkldlo River -.0 10 33 23 B1 

Kmson Co. North 7 to 9 IB 50 

B/Q-MR - Jeremy Vacurn 0. Shano 
N Olson 12. Adam Holmes to. Dory! 
Wockonfuss 23. Brel Beniow a. Andy 
Schenkey S. Richard Wockonfuss 8, Brian 
WiDielml 2. Chauncey Hanson 3, Andy 
GM*eke2. 

KCN - Matt Nordki 6. Krte Hokanwn 13. 
Mike Clow 2, Adam Wllebskl 7. Mike 
Peterson 1, Jeremy Hostrup 10. Conrad 
Olaonoskl2. 

BemidjI boys handle 
TRF In JV basketball 

Bcmidji beat Thief River Falls 
59-39 Tuesday in boys junior varsi- 
ty high school basketball. 

Zach Bosh scored 12 points and 
Collin Schafcr had 10 for a Thier 
River Falts team (hat struggled 
through a 7-for-29 game at the free 
throw line and missed six bonus 
opportunities. 

Bemtdji had quarter leads of 13- 
4, 28-21 and 36-29. 

TRF hockey JV team 
falls 4-3 in overtime 

Thief River Falls junior varsity- 
high school hockey team losL/ils 
; second straight 4-3 overtime game 
rTuesday,-this-one-io-GrooI«Uffl»iit ' 
the Huck Olson Memorial Civic 
Center. ■ • ■ - • :'r 

" Andy JaniscH scored all three 
Thief River Falls goals, providing a 
2-0 first period lead and a 3-2 scc- 
ondperiod edge. 

Thief River Falls out-scored 
Crookston 35-16. Melissa Clark 
was in goat for the host team. 

TRF Northwest Quad 
includes JV matches 

Junior varsity competition pre- 
ceded the varsity matches in 
Tuesday's Thier River Falls 
Northwest Quadrangular high 
school wrestling meet that also fea- 
tured Red Lake County Central. 
Crookston and Wnrrcn-AIvarado- 
Oslo. 

TRF JV Results 

Chrli Bergeron (TRF) doc. Tommy 
Crummy (W-A-O) 6-5: Chart lo Magnell 
(RLCC) pinned M&o Strut* (TRF) :5B; Colo 
Bomlor (RLCC) pinned Nate Lahron (TRF) 
1:53: Chris Nebon (RLCC) pinned Mike 
Larson 2:54; Jemmy vacura (Crooksion) 
plnnod Josh Manlson: Jeremy Anderson 
(TRF) dec Lucas BktrWlo (RLCC) 84: Ryan 
Potenaudo (Crookston) doc. Jeremy Dan 2- 



(Crookston) plnnod Mark Larson (TRF) 23S: 
Ty Lahren (TRF) dec. Demk Gegner (RLCC) 
3-0; Jeremy Uan (TRF) pinned Vincent 
Goniala (Crooksion) :40. 



MCC girls lose lead, 
game against Storm 



Stcphcn-Argytc fell behind at the 
start, but emerged with a 5 1-37 girls 
high school basketball win over 
Marshall County Central Tuesday at 
Newfolden. 

The visitors trailed 10-5 at the 
end or the first quarter and were 
down 22-21 at halftime before turn- 
ing things around in the third quar- 
ter to go ahead 40-29. 

Early foul trouble for Kristi Kilen 
put the Nordics' season-long scoring 
leader on ihc bench, opening the 
door for the Storm, pointed out 
Marshall County Central coach 
Alice Dahl. 

Marshall County Central was 13- 
for-44 from the field (30 percent) 
and 8-for-I3 at the free throw line. 



The Nordics were out-rebounded 
34-28, and although they turned the 
ball over onlyl3 times, those mis- 
lakes hurl. 'They scored off our 
turnovers," noted Dahl. 

Stephcri-Argylc went 17-for-48 
from the floor {35 percent) and 
made 11 of 20 free throws while 
turning it over 10 times. 

The loss t'ropped the Nordics to 
1-14 

■*•**■■ 

1 2 3 4 T 

GT*nKAn.Am4A ._„G Ifl 1p H 51 

._10 12 7 8 37 



S-A • Angle Jenson 1, Amy Kumia 15, 
Amber Grabowska 8. Sarah Kuinla 5, Emily 
Berooron 14. Abbey Bergeron 10. 

MCC - KritU Kllon fi, Tiffany Bring 0. 
Emlry Kragnesa 3, Mikl Wetemonh 14, 




— - 1 AREA SPORTS] — 

Red Lako County Central 

■ Saturday, Jan. 31 - boys basketball at 
Ftsherdimax, 

■ Monday. Feb. 2 - girls baskolbatl at 
FUhor/CUmax. 

1 Tuesday, Feb. 3 • boys baskolbatl al 



J Thursday. Fob. 5 - girls basketball o 1 . 
Wm-E-Mac 

■ Friday, Fob. -.boys basketball vs. 
Clearbrook-Gonvick (al Okloo). 

■ Saturday, Feb. 7 - girls baskolbatl oi 
Crookston. jjj 

Qoodridgo 

■ Tuesday, Feb. 3 • boy* basketball vs. 
Red Lake County Central. 

■ Saturday, Feb. 7 - boys basketball vs. 

Gryglft-Gatxito 

■ Tuesday, Fob. 3 - boys boskoibaa v«. 
Red Lake Fans. 

■ Friday, Feb. 8 - boys baskotban vs. 
Badge r/Greenbush-Mlddlo Rlvor. 

Qoodrtdge/QryBtB-Gatzko 

■ Saturday, Jon. 31 • git* baskoibolt vs. 
Warmed (ol Qoodridgo). 

■ Monday, Fob. 2 - girls basketball at 

■ Thursday. Fob. 5 - girls basketball vi- 
Trt-County fat Grygia). 

Bac"gerJGreefibuat>Mlddlo Rlvor 

■ Saturday, Jan. 31 - boy* basketball vs. 
Lake ol tho Woods. 

B Monday, Fob. 2 - glri* basketball at 
Marshall County Central. 

■ Tuesday, Fob. 3 - boys baskotbail nl 

■ Thursday. Feb. 5 - girts basketball vt. 
Kfttson Control. 

■ Friday. Feb. • boys baskolball at 
Grygia-Gauko. 

■ Saturday. Fob. 7 - boys baskolbatl vs 
Rod Lake (at Grand Forka Shoot-Oul). 

Marshall County Central 

■ Monday. Feb. 2 - gil* basketball vi 
Badger/Groonbuih-MkJdio River. 

■ Tuo»day. Fob. 3 - girls batl""*"" «' 
East Grand Forks Saeroo Haon. 

■ Thursday. Feb. 5 - girl* bas 
Lake ol tho Wood*. 

■ FOdey, Fab. 6 • boys baskoioaii a 



.YMEHTS TIL 
,Y l, 1998 



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between choice and select on a 700# carcass. 

There scorns to bo little doub! thai carcass quality will bo very 
important in Iho year ahead. 




m IWi^k^W 



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ROUTE 3, RED LAKE FALLS 
253-2306 Allor 6 P.M. 



'WEST FARGO LIVESTOCK MARKET 
CENTRAL LIVESTOCK 

Dakota '■ Largoi! Volumo Uveitock Market 
'Auctions: Tubs. & Wed. * 9 A.M. 
^^^B| LABELED BEEF ORDER 
Can For Details CLA FEED PROGRAM 

Cat For Detail 

| SPECIAL FEEDER SALE: Every Wed. 

Doug KHen* 218-681-7563 
West Fargo Livestock Market • 1-800-733-4620 



CATTLEMEN 



Buy 2-50 Lb. Bags Off Milk 
Replacer And Receive 

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ATTENTION, FARMERS! 



For Competitive Grain Market Prices, Call 

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/Plummer - 21 8-465-4275 

• New Crop Contracts 

• Delayed Pricing 

• Adequate Storage 

• On-Farm Pick Up 

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Home Phone: 218-698-4293 




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1 980 JD 7720 

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1981 JD 7720 RWD 



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'83 JD 8850 

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'95 JD 8970 1,500 Hrs. 

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'89 JD 4555 MFWD 

'92 JD 4455 MFWD 

TILLAGE 

JD 230 25' DISK 

JD 960 44' CULTIVATOR 

JD 3100 PLOWS - 

12 BOTTOMS 

JD 3600 8-BTM. PLOW 

JD 650 26' DISK 

JD 650 30' DISK 

JD 980 441/2 CULTIVATOR 



WESTERN IMPLEMENT 

HAILOCK, MINNESOTA PHONE: 218-843-3637 




Milk marketing order reform 
proposal gets cold reception 



An HOO-page document referred 
id ;i\ the Prurxv.eil Rule for Federal 
Milk Marketing Order Reform ha', 
met wiili ;i cnld rcL-cpliiin from both 
sides lit" Ihc Minnesota Cnnpies- 
■.ion.il delegation. 

Seventh District Congressman 
Collin Peterson (DFL) called it a 
"watered-down version of dairy 
reform" while Minnesota Senator 
Rod Grams (GOP) labeled it simply 
"disappointing." 

As reported in ihc Northern 
Watch Saturday, a summary of the 
proposal was received here from 
Congressman Peterson's office on 
Friday. 

In releases dates Friday. Sen. 
Grams and Rep. Peterson provided 
ihcir reactions to the proposal. 

"The new proposal offers two 
options: one that essentially majn- 
lains ihc status quo and another that 
starts to create a more even playing 
field across the country." Rep. 
Peterson said. 

"Secretary of Agriculture Dan 
Glickman appears to be moving in 
the direction of reform, however, 

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V rud LJyi» fah», mh 



I Ik- it arc Mill many mixed signals in 
Ins proposal. An option supported 
by ihc Upper Midwest was not 
included." 

Another provision of the docu- 
ment was consolidation of the cur- 
rent 33 federal milk marketing 
orders into 11 orders, but Peterson 
said the new Upper Midwest order 
shows very little change. 

The dairy reform proposal was 
issued in response to a call from 
Congress 10 reform the 60-year-old 
milk marketing system. 

"USDA had the opportunity to 
provide greater equity to the Upper 
Midwest w'iih the order consolida- 
tion." Rep. Peterson said. "It failed 
K.doso/' 

Sen. Grams immediately wrote a 
letter to Secretary Glickman to 
express is disappointment over the 
proposal which he said falls short of 
addressing concerns that he and 
Minnesota dairy producers have 
expressed to Secretary Glickman in 
ihc months preceding the report's 
release. 

"I am writing to express my great 



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posed" rule for federal dairy reform 
as mandated under the I996 Farm 
Dill." Sen. Grams wrote. "The 
options presented arc particularly 
discouraging given your personal 
comments in support of substantial 



iscd rule 



dairy reform. The propo: 
lacks any substantive reform. 

"The livelihoods of Minnesota 
dairy farmers are at stake," he con- 
tinued. "On their behalf, and on 
behalf of their families and commu- 
nities. I again express my great dis- 
appointment in this half-hearted 
attempt at reform of antiquated 
dairy policy. This government can 
— and must — do better by its farm- 

Upon sending the letter, Sen. 
Grams said the government should 
not be picking winners and losers as 
it docs in the report and he believes 
the proposal is based on politics and 
not on fairness. He said he will con- 
sult with Minnesota dairy producers 
and members of the Upper Midwest 
Dairy Coalition prior to determining 
how best to respond legislatively to 
the report. 

"Although it is still unclear 
which direction USDA will take," 
Congressman Peterson added, "I 
will continue to push for real 
reform. Minnesota's dairy industry 
has been devastated by the status 
quo— wc cannot continue to do 
nothing." 

Context For Reform 

In Ihc general overview, USDA 
stated the following: 

U.S. agriculture is transitioning 
to a more market-oriented sector, 
free from traditional government 
involvement typified by price and 
income support programs. This tran- 
sition was continued by the 1996 
form bill, which mandated the grad- 
ual phase-out of traditional price 
and income support programs, 
including the dairy price support 
program that has existed for 60 
years, in which the federal govern- 
ment supported milk prices by offer- 
ing to purchase butter, cheese and 
nonfat dry milk at certain specified 
prices. 

The Federal Mitk Marketing 
Order (FMMO) program is being 
restructured to be consistent with 
this trend toward a market-oriented 
dairy sector in which dairy farmers 
respond to market signals. However, 
the FMMO program retains its basic 
purpose — to provide for orderly 
market conditions in which milk is 
marketed so that producers have an 
assurance of stable markets, and 
adequate supplies of milk ore avail- 
able for consumers. 

Federal milk marketing orders 
will continue to establish minimum 
prices that regulated handlers must 
pay to producers for milk based on 
its end use. The FMMO program 
also will continue to recognize the 
higher costs of supplying milk for 
fluid use, including the costs of 
transporting milk and the costs asso- 
ciated with balancing supplies and 
use within each market! 
What's In The Proposed Rule? 

The proposed rule covers all 
aspects of the FMMO program and 
contains provisions dealing with 
consolidation of marketing orders, 



classified pricing, basic formula 
price (BFP) and classification and 
identical provisions. 

As noicd above, the 33 federal 
marketing orders would be consoli- 
dated into 1 1 orders. 

Under classified pricing, the pro- 
posed rule suggests changes to the 
level and manner in which milk is 
priced according to its use. The 
summary states that for milk in the 
highest-valued, fluid use (Class I), 
two pricing options are presented 
for consideration. Both options rec- 
ognize a location value of milk- 
that is, milk is cosily to transport 
and therefore its value will differ by 
location. 

Option I A is a set of Class I 
prices that vary by location (called a 
'price surface"), and closely reflects 
the current price surface, but makes 
adjustments for recent changes in 
economic conditions. 

Option ID is more market-ori- 
ented, still providing minimum 
prices for higher valued fluid use, 
while relying more on ihc market lo 
generate higher prices when needed 
to attract sufficient milk to markets. 
Three methods of transitioning to 
option ID arc offered: a graduate 
phase-in to lower Class I differen- 
tials with no transition assistance; 
transition assistance that "bumps 
up" Class I differentials initially to 
offset any loss in cash receipts due 
lo the decline in Class I differen- 
tials; and transition assistance that 
initially "bumps up" the Class 1 dif- 
ferentials even more, while still 
phasing toward a more market -ori- 
ented price surface over a five-year 
period. 

Basic Formula Price (BFP) 

The current BFP has gradually 
become less representative of com- 
petitive conditions for milk for man- 
ufacturing over time, The current 
DFP is Based on the Minnesota- 
Wisconsin price for unregulated 
Grade B (manufacturing-grade) 
milk, which is dwindling as a share 
of all mitk produced in those states 
and nationally, and a product formu- 
la updated to reflect current compet- 
itive conditions for manufactured 
products. 

The . proposed rule suggests 
replacing the BFP with a Class III 
pnee based on multiple component 
pricing, which continues, but par- 
tially decoupages, the tic between 
the price of milk used in fluid prod- 
ucts and the price of milk used in 
manufactured products. The pro- 
posed Class I price mover, which is 
a six-month moving average of 
manufacturing milk prices, willpro- 
vidc additional stability to the Class 
I market, the summary says. 

Following publication of the pro- 
posed rule, the public will have 60 
days to provide written comment. 
Following the comment period, a 
final rule will be published, taking 
into account all sub mi tied materials 
from interested panics. Then, a ref- 
erendum will be held to determine 
approval for each new milk market- 
ing order by at least two-thirds or 
the producers in each new order. 

The summary did not provide an 
address where the written commenLs 
may be submitted. 



Average farmland sales 
price increases in 1997 



Average sales price of Minnesota 
farmland went up again in 1997, 
according to the annual study made 
by the University of Minnesota. 

The 1997 study of 1,643 sales 
showed a median price of S916 per 
acre of farmland, compared to $901 
in 1996 and only S759 in 1995. 

"The buying enthusiasm I report- 
ed a year ago seems unchecked," 
says Steve Taff, a public policy 
economist with the university. 

"Most 1997 sales were for 
parcels of 160 acres of less. Hardly 
anyone buys whole farms any 
morc,"Taff said. "Most transactions 
are for pieces of farms, and pur- 
chasers arc not new farmers, but 
neighbors rounding out existing 
operations." 

Some of the high prices can't be 
supported by conventional fanning 
income from the parcels them- 
selves, Taff odds. But many fanners 
and lenders say these prices make 
sense from a whole-form perspec- 
tive. 

"As long as farms continue to be 
cannibalized by neighbors to round 
out their land base, there will be 
higher prices," Taff says. 

Some high farmland prices have 
little to do with production poten- 
tial. But Taff says that as long as 
residential development pressures at 
the edge of big and small towns 
remain unchecked by effective land 
use policies, there will be upward 
pressure on farmland for conversion 
into residential use. 

"And as long as people arc pre- 
pared to buy forms lo retire on. 
enjoy on weekends, hunt on or sim- 
ply enjoy the pleasures of owner- 



ship, there will be upwardpressure 
on prices," he continues. "The pro- 
duction component seems to be los- 
ing its prominence — even in tradi- 
tional farming areas — to the finan- 
cial, locational and speculative 
components." 

Taff says use of farmland price 
data needs scrutiny. "Is 'agricultural 
land' really a separate market?" he 
asks "Possibly we should shift 
toward analysis of a single 'land' 
market in rural areas, one that oper- 
ates independently af intended use, 
whether it be crops, recreation, tim- 
ber or speculation," 

The study is reported in die fall, 
1997, issue of the Minnesota 
Agricultural Economist, published 
by the University of Minnesota 
Extension Service. Free single 
copies of ihc publication ore avail- 
able from the Waitc Library, 
Department of Applied Economics, 
1994 Buford Avenue, St. Paul. MN 
55 108-6040, phone 6 12-625- 1 705. 

Taff is a faculty member of the 
university's College of Agricultural. 
Food and Environmental Sciences. 



According to the University of 
Minnesota Dairy Initiatives 
newsletter, Tim on J Amy Leonard 
of Young America have increased 
the production of their 50-cow 
dairy herd to a rolling herd aver- 
age of 27,003 pounds of milk, 
1,150 pounds of butterfat and 861 
pounds of protein through several 
herd practice changes, including 
use of BST. Despite the increases, 
the herd is seventh in the state in 
per -cow production. 



Siiturdu}, Junuiiry 31, 1998 



NORTHERN WATCH 



PflRC 11 



Census of Agriculture 
deadline is February 2 



Forms providing information for 
the 1997 Census of Agriculture arc 
due for return by February 2, 199B, 
according to the National Agricul- 
tural Statistics Service of the United 
States Department of Agriculture. 

Report forms were mailed in late 
December to the nation's farmers to 
collect data for the 1997 calendar 
year. The census includes as a farm 
every place from which 51.000 or 
more of agricultural products were 
produced and sold, or normally 
would have been sold, during the 
census year. 

Many of the questions ore similar 
to those asked in the 1992 census. 
Data will be collected from all farm- 
ers on land use and ownership, crop 
acreage and quantities harvested, 
numbers of livestock and poultry. 
value of crops and livestock sold 
and operator characteristics. New 
items include area and value of cut 
Christmas trees harvested, acres or 
maple trees tapped and number of 
taps. 

Report forms sent to 25 percent 
of farmers include additional ques- 
tions on production expenses, fertil- 
izer and chemicals, machinery and 
equipment, market value of land 
and buildings, and income from 
farm-related sources. The report 
forms arc tailored by region to make 
them less burdensome on respon- 
denLs. 

The Ag Statistics Service said 
that the report forms were devel- 
oped by using advice from farmers, 
form organizations, agricultural uni- 
versities, members of the Census 
Advisory Committee on Agriculture 
Statistics and state and federal agen- 



Comnilation of census informa- 
tion will provide a statistical portrait 
of U.S. agriculture at the county, 
state and national levels, showing in 
detail how farmers stand today, 
compared with five years ago. 

"The picture will focus on key 
information," states Michael Hunst, 
state statistician with the Minnesota 
Agricultural Statistics Service, 
"including the number of farms, 
farm size, operator characteristics, 
crop and livestock production, agri- 
cultural products sales and produc- 
tion expenses of farmers and ranch- 
Data reported by individual farm 
operators in ihc census is held con- 
fidential by law. The same law 
requiring a census of agriculture 
also forbids revealing information 
about individuals. Data is summa- 
rized to prevent identification of 
individual farms. Statistical results 
ore analyzed and made available in 
printed and electronic form. 

Farmers can do several things to 
make this census an effective tool to 
help chart the future, Hunst said. 
They can return Ihcir census forms 
and make sure the information is 
complete, accurate and timely. They 
can also use the statistics to plan 
practical improvements in U.S. agri- 
culture. 

Some examples ofhow census of 
agriculture numbers provide practi- 
cal information to improve farm 
operations and agribusinesses arc as 
follows: 

• Form organizations, Congress 
and state and local governments 
have information on which lo pi; 



programs to help farm operators get 
ihc most for their investments. 

• Farm machinery manufacturers 
more effectively target their indus- 
tries to where they arc needed by 
using county and state statistics, 
resulting in economic benefit for 
farm operators. 

• Seed and fertilizer producers 
can compare yields and other infor- 
mation to help operators do ihc most 
effective job. 

• Irrigation specialists, water 
resource developers and irrigation 
equipment manufacturers can learn 
much from census data and convert 
that knowledge into practical advice 
for farm operators. 

• State and national lawmakers 
can determine where to allocate 
funds that will benefit agricultural 
producers. 

• Farm broadcasters and agricul- 
tural editors can convey census 
results to their audiences, and use 
the "data to help focus their stories 
on important areas of agriculture. 

• Researchers and legislators can 
use county-level data to define 
problem areas and help farmers 
recover from outbreaks or disease 
and pests. 

•The information is used for 
evaluating programs affecting agri- 
cultural production. 

The census of agricultutrc is the 
only source of uniform, comprehen- 
sive agicultural data tabulated for 
every county in Ihc nation, 

"Formers represent a major sec- 
tor of the nation's economy," Hunst 
added. "America counts on agricul- 
ture." 



Half-cent boost sought 
in. wheat checkoff rate 



and one-half cents per bushel is 
being endorsed by the Minnesota 
Wheat Research and Promotion 
Council and the Minnesota Associa- 
tion of Wheat Growers, according to 
articles in Prairie Grains, jointly 

Eublishcd by Minnesota and South 
lokota wheat growers, Minnesota 
barley growers and North Dakota 
grain growers organizations. 

Minnesota established its wheat 
research and promotion' council in 
1977 when producers approved Ihc 
council in a statewide referendum. 
The checkoff rate of one cent per 
bushel was established at that time 
to support council activities and the 
rate has remained constant for the 
past 20 years. 

Cliff Keller of Fergus Falls, who 
chairs the Minnesota Wheat 
Research and Promotion Council, 
points out that in 1977 Minnesota 
harvested 3.327 million acres of 
wheat with on average yield of 39.6 
bushels per acre. In 1997 only 2.-165 
million acres were harvested in the 



1997 of 78.9 million bushels com- 
pares with total production in 1977 
of 131.9 million Whs Is. 

As recently as 1992 the state pro- 
duced nearly 140 million bushels of 
wheat when average yields on 2.8 
million acres were year 50 bushels 
per acre. Since then, infestations of 
disease — particularly sco b— have 
taken a severe toll on the state's 
wheat crop, ...and on the resulting 
checkoff funds which arc tied to 
production. 

As Keller notes, the reduction in 



checkoff fund receipts comes at a 
time when additional money is 
needed to support research on scab 
and disease resistant varieties. 

Tim Du fault of Crookston, presi- 
dent of Ihc Minnesota Association 
or Wheat Growers, said his organi- 
zation supports the wheat council's 
decision to seek a checkoff increase. 
A resolution adopted by the associa- 
tion states: 

"The MAWG supports an 
increase in the state's wheat check- 
off to help improve wheat profits 
through increased research, wheat 
customer service and market devel- 
opment. Priorities under an 
increased checkoff would include 
scab research and funding a state 
wheat breeder." 

Dufoult said that the state organi- 
zations have been successful in 
attracting scab research funds from 
ihc state legislature and U.S. 
Department of Agriculture, but the 



key question legislators ask is: 
"What are you doing to fund the 
problem?" 

Dufault said that "the fact that 
producers are committing more of 
their own money through the check- 
off to research is the lynch pin in, 
leveraging state and federal toxpay-i 
er dollars." 

He also noted that the checkoff 
dollars that 18 wheat-producing 
states use to fund U. S. Wheat 
Associates, the U.S. wheat indus- 
try's export market development 
organization, is matched by the 
Foreign Ag Service of USDA. 

"As farmers," wheat council 
chairman Keller says, "we can't 
expect to grow and sell a wheat crop 
if we don't invest sufficiently in fer- 
tilizer, fuel, pesticides, land and 
machinery. How can we grow and 
sell wheat if we don't invest suffi- 
ciently to meet the significant chal- 
lenges facing our industry?" 



Wheat Council recognized 



Minnesota Wheat Research and 
Promotion Council was recognized 
by the American Cancer Society of 
Minnesota in appreciation of the 
partnership the two organizations 
nave in promoting a high fiber diet. 

Wheat bran and whole grains 
have high insoluble fiber, which 
plays an important role in Ihc diges- 
tive system. Research indicates a 
high fiber diet can be helpful in pre- 
venting certain cancers, such as 
colon and breast cancer. 

"The Minnesota Wheat Council 
provides the funding for booth fees 
at county fairs and health fairs and 



the American Cancer Society, pro- 
vides the volunteers who not only 
emphasize good nutrition and high 
fiber, but also help promote the con- 
sumption of wheat products," says 
Patty Swanson of Hallock, immedi- 
ate past chair of the ACS Minnesota 
division. 

"Including our volunteers and 
the people we reach in the booths, 
we are educating about 100,000 

Pile a year about wheat and a 
thy diet," Swanson said. "That 
means over Ihc last five years, by 
working together, we've reached 
about a half million people." 



TIMED RELEASE : 

QLF 



4 



QUALITY LIQUID FEED 
SELECT 40 

-WA*r* Qua tit y Comes First- 



20% OFF Delivery Fees 



(Just say you read this ad.) 
777/s oiler expires February 28, 199S. 

We Also Offer TRAIL HAND Livestock Equipment I 
CALVING PENS And MOREII 
FARMER'S UNION 

CountR y StoRe 

>V CENEX (5*ffl YOUR FEED & HARDWARE I 

*gfUNDOLAKES|g;t|§] OUTLET STORE 

201 South Main Avo. Roseau, MN 56751 > 218-463-1805 I 




TRACTORS 



f^sjWMverfeai^^^ 



17S Allls w/Loader 

HMMFw/Loader 
5230 Deirtz w/Loader 
DX 160 Delta AWD 
895 Versatile Fresh O.H. 
850 Versatile Rebuilt Eng. 
1586I.H.C. 
WD-45AIIIS 



COMBINES 



8820 JD 

860MF4WD 

TR- 70 New Holland 

760 MF ' 

750 MF 

N - 7 Gleaner 



NHSON EQUIPMENT, INC. 

930H*y59N«th 

Tlucl Rwr Follj. MN 56701 

218-681-1997 




Comfort 
Challenge! 




We ore so confident that you'll love our John Deete Boots, we'll give 
you a poil of John Deere socks [S3 value] FREE Just for trying 
them on! 'Stm0 on anj pair nl Jahn Bests barns. 



JOHN DEERE 



NOT BOOTS. EQUIPMENT. 




68 1 -2608 • 1 -SOO-B 1 1 -B7B9 
209 LABREE A VE. i\l. thief' niVEFt falls, mn 



£c<ut<wut 




FARMERS orf"* 9 

Now you can have the same quality 
grain temperature monitoring equip- 
ment commercial elevators use. With 
yourTSGC Farm-Temp™ Series 
you have all the vital information 
necessary (or drying, conditioning, 
blending, and storing grain in your 
own bin.. .and you save money! 

O FEATURES 

•Instant and accurate temperature with LCD digital display 
• Solid-state circuits lor long reliable service 
- Hand-held, lightweight, and convenient tc 




7 



important reasons why farmers 
need to use temperature 
monitoring... 



GRAIN TEMPERATURE 
MONITORING SYSTEMS 



%% 



1. Defects hot spots for safe long-term storage of grains. 

2. Eliminates unnecessary turning. 

3. Detection of insect activity. 

4. Detection of mold growth. 

5. Cumulative history of comparative readings for accurate Interpretation of 
any change or treatment of storage grain. 

6. If fumigation is necessary, a temperature monitoring system informs you 
of the results. 

7. Elimination of wasted energy due to overrunning aeration fans, and 
monitoring of the aeration system for most efficient use. 




i&HZEBiUUUi; 



niiW.IM^J.J.HllMJU^m^li'.IJ'lWff 






I'llRC 12 




NORTHERN WATCH 



Saturday, January 31, 1998 



Saturday, January 31, 1998 



NORTHERN WATCH 



Page 13 



Miscellaneous 



DOWN UNDER II 
CUSTOMERS!! 



Bonus: Buy 1 Book For Rag, 
Price-Get 1 Book For 50c 

Sony For Th. bKonva'ilancB 
BIS Krtant **«• "- TW.t Km rati* 



Situation Wanted 



YOUR INDEPENDENT 
HERBAUFE DISTRIBUTOR 

mmmasau 

218-597-2774 



FOR SALE- Plnnks. 



BM0'-12 - -' 
10 B tfuitSO 
2SJ-293G. F1HC 



FOH SALE- Epson pnnlor. cot si 



c.iiicai-aiiO. trap 



CAS AND WOODDURNING FIRE- 
PLACES and Stoves Many brands avail- 
able. HEATN-GLO. KOZY HEAT, 
EARTH STOVE, NAPOLEON. MAJES- 
TIC. VERMONT CASTING. Also, maso- 
n.iry lircploeos. woodo.1 furnaces. Gun/' 
.intnod LOWEST PRICES Financing. 1. 
8 00-446-4 043 Mahnomen G7tlc 



S. 698-4222. 



SERIOUS COLLECTOR buying old Oil 
nnd gns and auto. signs. Old ql.-S qt. and 
gallon and 5-gallon oil cans and o>l bot- 
1105. go* pump globos. old hand crank 
gas pumps. Sorvico station air dispens- 
urs. Also old sorvico station caps and 
badgas nnd otnor gas ami o>i momorabi. 
La. Pay cash! 1-800-465-8440. P4IIOp 
FOLTZ BUILDINGS. Your poll home 
building oKperti. Insulolod snops/garog- 
os. commercial/industrial, machinery 
slorngo, horse/cattle bams. Call 1-800- 
255-9981. F IStte 



NEED 
CASH? 

Home Loans 

▼ All Credit Welcome 

▼ Ca*h For Any Reason 

▼ Home Purchase 

▼ Debt Consolidation 
T CD Or Balloon Payoff 

▼ Self Employed 

▼ Prior Bankruptcy 
T 125% Equity Loons 

Call 

CAPITOL BROKERS 
701-775-9807 or 
1-800-791-7126 



FOR SALE- 30 apnng.ng Holstoin heil- 
ins. st.iu diving Fob 15th. voccinatod 
Uol-cod and TWO tod A1 and hull brod' 
Klopp Dmry. 210-43G2527. I1t9p 



LUJII0RSE8ALEI 



■ Noxt Salo: S a t.. Feb. 21 

Catalog Salo & Regular Monihly Salo 

(Catalog Deadline 2/1/98) 

Tnck; II A.M.; Horsos; 2 P.M. 

Consignment doadlmo lor Stallion 

Service Auction is Feb. S; 

to bo held Sua, March 1 it 11 P.M. 

Safea Htld 1 milt msi of 

VemMt, UN on Hwy. 10. 

Ron Sundby-21 8-445-5849 



Household Goods 



RICK'S APPLIANCE 


A 


H-Viini:ipni«Kt 

ADHMkCurutrn) 
Tin* k 1 jhor 


txttrr AnboritH 
Smkt tM Mou 
Mi)or Uriah 


For Stnrk* CWI: 

681-2263 or 1-800-360-2263 

'■if'jn'<-ix£.\-eSi-.\-# 



FOR SALE 




Trac Machine 
218-674-4219 



•THE TIMES has aluminum shouts (or 
all your small repairs. Thoy aro 23i35 
and cost only 45 cents Men. Call 681- 

4450 lor moro information. 

TO GET a world ot products catalog, 
send £4 payable to World ot Products. 
PO Box 104. Rod Lako Falls, MN 5S7S0. 
P6t14p 



COLLECTORS- WE sbil have a low cop- 
ies of Tho Tlmos Conlonnlal edition avail- 
able, 51.00 per copy. Tho Tlmos. 324 
Main Aw. N„ Thiol Rlvof FoJIj, MN 
56701. 34tJo 



FOR SALE- Ladlos small Arctic Cot 
snowmiblo sulL oxotlont condition, phono 

218-435-1722. ISp 

ALL STEEL buildings. Order now to - 
freeze your bast pitce lor spring/summor 
projocts. Shops, storage, commercial, 
strolghtwalls or quonsots 40x50, 60x80, 
70x150. Others. Promlaro Buildings. Far- 

QO 1-800-827-8835. F3t13c 

FOR SALE- Sharpening oquiproont, cor- 
"bldo blades. C*-40*, flempor, router, 
shaper bits, holessw, stool blades, hand 
saw and rotoothor, sartors. Jointer, 
pianos, knives, 222-3635. P4H0p 
QUALITY REBUILT ENGINES Storting 
at $795. 12 month/12.000 rnilo warranty - 
w/oxdi. en robuildablo coro. Installations 
and towing available. Don's Mochlno 
Shop,Fosston,MN,B0u-44B-15t8. 17tlc 
FOH SALE- Soga Solum. 2 eontrotlors. 
memory cortrtdgo and 6 gomos lor S200, 
Good condition. Instructions included, 

Cftll fiBR-nifU PJrQrt ' 



BANKRUPTCY 



Chapter 7: $300 



DIVORCE 



Uncontested: $250 

OMDAHIUW OFFICE 
1-800-450-6040 



Livestock 



Call 666-3104. P4l9p 



FOR SALE- Electrtc motors. 1/4-h.p. to 
7-1/2 h.p. Soo us tor all your oloctrtc mo- 
tor noods. Root Supply. Call 681-2850. 




FOR SALE- 1 anUquo brass, swing-arm 
Root lamp and 1 antique brass labia lamp 
($130.00 lor both), 1 women's bloc* 
loathor jackot (S75.00); 1 woman's emer- 
ald groon loathor facKot ($75.00) and 1 
women's turquolso suodo jocko I with 
matching akin (S9Q.O0). All In oxcollont 
condition. Coll 216-762-3551. P4Mip 
FOR SALE- Mini donui mochlno with 
Stand, etalntoss stool sinks, Coko cooler, 
Easy glider, troodmlll Body By Joke, fil- 
ing cabinet, mlcrowavo, TV. TV stand. 
World Book oncyciopodlos. call 683- 

7200. 2t10p 

ELIMINATE HIQH HEATING costs with a 
Slalnloss Stool outdoor woodbumlng fur- 
noco. Hoots multiple buildings. Big sav- 
ings on oatty ordan. Financing available. 
GUARANTEED LOWEST PRICES. 1- 
600-440-4043, Mahnomen. 50tle 



WINDSHIELD REPAIR- Stone chips, 
small brooks, opptox. 10% roptacomont 
cost. Most insurance compunios walvo 
deductible. For Iroo ooHmates call 681- 
4233, Anderson Wlndshlold Repair. 

NM2-Btfc 

PAYING CASH* Wanted by sortous col- 
lector, all types ol old advertising signs, 
Coco-Cola, Popsl, boor, auto., gas and 
oil. soft drink and aD othor typos ot signs, 
anyquantlryl 1-600-236-7708. P4H0p 
INTEL P166 MUX, now. 32MB ram. 2.1 
GB hard drivo, BxCD. 33.6 modom. 
sound, 107 Ergo keyboard, mouse, 
Windows 195 plus $300 Iroo soltwaro, 
$680.00 Includes delivery. Call 612-306- 
2339 and loovo mossago anyUmo. 



THURS., FEB. IlTH 
11:00 A.M. 



THURS., FEB. 19TH 
11:00 A.M. 



THURS., FEB. I6TH 
11:00 A.M. 



^yoystHHifwTaiu 


Jj^j'-Wlfj 


TT7M. 



SAT., FEB. 14TH 
l:oo P.M. 

AlonB With Thii Sale 

■ 3" ANNUAL CHAKOUIS 

, BUU>SALE , 



For More Information Call 
Market Phone: 218-694-3701 

FAX: 218-694-3700 
Highway 2 West. Bagley. MN 



Situation Wanted 

AVAILABLE FOR wookly doonlng Jobs' 
Very ottidentl Roloioneosl 683-7258 

loavo mossoge. P4tnp 

PIANO TUNINO and top quality ropair. 
Call Diano at 681-8170. Schoduimg no 

■ lor Fobruary. PF4t15p 

MONDAY/TUESDAY/FRIDAY, 9 n.m 
6:30 p.m. Northland Shoo Ropair. 607 81 
SI. E. PFI2t9p 



FOR SALE- Appro ximotoly twonty shoop 
duo to lamb nnd ol March. Call 681-8669 

nllor 6:00 or wookonds. 2t9p 

FOR SALE- Ewos, roody to lamb. 218- 

204-6697. 211 Op 

CHARALOIS BULLS, good soloctlon 
Irom low birth woighl yoartinos lo proven 
hord sires. Will soman lost and koop bulls 
until mid April. Enckson Charolois. 425- 

7535. PF6M9p 

CUSTOM-MADE BALE rings and cattto 
gates, mado Irom Mnch tubing. Call otter 

G. 222-3542. PF4l9p 

FOR SALE- One Holsloln springing hoil- 
or; ono HcJsloin cow coming with 2nd 
call, both !o calvo soon, call 681-2615. 
211 Op 



FOR SALE- 25 Horeford cows, brod 1 
Angus bull, duo stoning March 1st 
S850.00/oaeh. Also, *88 Ford F-250 4x4, 
4-spood. 460. low milos, good Dros, 681- 

2-108. P4t9p 

PUREBRED YEARLING Simmentol 
bu'ls. oicollonl EPO's. Some solid red, 
easy calving. Roasonable prlco. 210- 

681-8336 evenings. PF4t13p 

BULL SALE- NordJund Stock Farm. 
Cloarbroc* and Dohlko Red Angus. Ba- 

S-oy. wilt auction 45 Red and Block Angus 
immontal bulls on Saturday, March 7. at 
Cloorbrook. Coll 218-776-3655 or 218- 

694-6727 lor catalogs. PF7tl7p 

WANT TO Buy- Boel cows to call in Apni 
and May. No culls, must be reasonable 
pricod. call 218-449-4171. F4I15C 



FOR SALE I 

PUREBRED BULLS;! 

' Sons 01 Al Trait Loaders ;: 

In Milk And Growth. 

: B.W. From 80 Lbs. To : : 

; tOO Lbs. Excellent W.W. ; '; 

Pick Your Bulls Early 

CALL 
VERBOuTCHAROLAIS :> 
1-218-294-6582; | 



FOR SALE- Throo 9-wook-old mole 
puroWed Chocoiato Lab puppies. Con- 
tact Jolt ol Ert's. 681-4627 or at home 

681-7062. 3111c 

TO GIVE Away Puppios. to a good form 
home, used to being outside, call 523- 

3075. ItOf 

FOR SALE- Baby Cocka toils, hand fod. 
very lomo. $75.00; Lovo Birds, brooding 
ago. $30.00, coll 064-5202. P4112p 
GIVE AWAY- Adult black Lab spayed fo- 
molo. country dog. vory Irlondly, lovos 
playing ualch, 218-253-2878. 
NEED A homo for o 3-yoar old Lab/Coliio 
cross and 1-yoor-old orango lobby col, 
both vary nice, would like lo stay togolh- 
or. dog Is neuiored. Call 681-81 70. nop 
TO GIVE Away- A rabbit, soft and friend- 
ly, to a good homo, 681-2381 days or 

681-6667 overlings. 2t9c 

FOR SALE- AKC registered Puiobrod 
Ooldon Rotrlovor puppies, St25.00, 
avallablo 1-25-98. Call evenings, 218- 

762-5935. PBHOp 

FOR SALE- American Eskimo puppy, 
malo. U.K.C. roglstorod, $175.00. Can 
681-4257 evenings, 6Q1-B018 days. 

F4ttlc 

FOR SALE- AKC malo yollow Lab pup- 
pios. $125 oach. All shots. Call 218-745- 
5824, Angus. MN. P4t0p 



ATVs/Motorcycles 



WANTED FOR ports- 1082 Honda 70 3- 
wtloolor tor parts. Phono 218681-1133 
or 218G81-G039 and loavo a mossago 
lorOary. 72Ho 

1BB5 POLAniS Scrambler, excoiloni 
condilion. now brakes, cprockots, II- 
conjo. $500,00 in cms and urns plus lac- 
lory sol. Wotl maintained. Call 210-380- 
1140. posslblo dolrvory, tra p 

FOR SALE- 1 995 Dixon 2TR 4421 mow- 
or. 13.(1 p . 42* cul. oicollonl shape, ask- 
ing S1.000.00/obo; 1005 Polaris Magnum 
425 2x4 ATV, 4.000 milos. gun coso end 
blade, asking S2,00O.00/obo, 218-281- 
3747. IIQp , 

'02 YAMAHA Virago 020 motorcyclo, has 
o faring, radio, englno oil coolor, 24.500 
miles, spring spociul S1.O5O.00. DAS 
Solos, 1-800-253-2u09or210-253-2040. 

Sporting Goods 

GUN SHOW- Fobruary 14 and 15, Satur- 
day. 9-0, Sunday 10-4. Grafton Armory, 
Grafton, North Dakota. Buy, soil or trodo. 
Also, reloading su ppllos and coins, 
FOR SALE- Sold oak Nordic Trac Pro 
ski moehino. liko now, hardly used, paid 
S650.00. soli for $400.00, call oflor 7:00 

p.m„ 463-1050. 1t9p ' 

FOR SALE- TradiDonal snowshoas and 
bindings. Sovotal stylos and alios, call 

Piano ot 681-8170. PF4U5p 

GUN SHOW- South Forko Plaio Pavi- 
lion, Saturday. Fobruary 21, 8-6. Sunday, 
February 22. 9-4. Buy, sell or trade. 701- 
2B4-7412. P4l12p 



SPRING CANOE Solo- Savo 20% on 

your pro paid Old Town canoe ordor. Call 
Diono 661-8170. PF4HSp 



Roal Estate 



IF YOU'RE looking lor r 

house in the S40's. you luivo lo seo this 
ono. Everything now. kltchon, both, fur- 
nace, rool. doors, carpol. paint, etc., 112 

N. Knoele, 681-07BT. 3tlc 

LOTS FOR Salo- lOO^OO' on Rainy 
fllvor al Baudolto, MN. Coll 701-775- 

7815. I70tlo . 

FOR SALE- 3-bodroom, 2-bath. 1,348 
sq. (1. romblor. located qulot NE sldo ol 
town overlooking the river, 24x36 garage. 
Can 681-5480, no nnswar loovo mes- 
sage. PF4M1p 

Lawn & Garden 



36" RIDING lowr 
only 2-years old, n 
69n-4401. HOp 



Situation Wanted 



FOR ALL YOUR 

Repair Needs 

■ Chain S*wi * Snowmotjlfli 
• Sww, Dkwmii • Ouiboudj 

• InboaiUi & I O Olivgl • All SmM Enffnol 

* L4wn Moww) & fldden 

NCRM'S rCE"PAIR 

• Mtf S 4 SfflVTCf • SKI-DOO SHCHW0B1U S 
1X7 H.Dululh ThhtRlrtrFtllt 

O01-334S 



Real Estate 



JACOBSON'S 

SNOW REMOVAL 



• Sldowalks 
ii jSSP * PoiWng Lois 

rras5Ci|3>, • Drivoways 
"^©Ja^ftyV • Fartnyarcls 

Pieoso Con. Wo Wanl Your Businoss. 
Coll 681-15^1 otk For Adam 
or 661-1106 ask for CurUi 



Machinery 



|^i THEO MAR ft 
Qy KENNELS VS* 

GRADUATE OF WE ACADEMY OF DOB 
BROOMtHB. ST. PETEBS8UH8. Fl 

Two Qwwi • Lowe *re 0«fla asva» Fgi Your Ht 

* Otco eieve Ma r)n i m Dn 

■ Htl Innrog • [v. ThIi Vd Ami awn CMnrq 

■0D*3ngr«CWCi«n«'Pa-»Tri En«a 

Call ForAnAppolntmtnl 
218-443-3575 

tout*' to UM taw Ol tfHi Ami Tin On Hwj » 
LIUHUKOnCsFU 111 



BAGLEY LIVESTOCK 

EXCHANGE, INC. 

Bagley. IVIN 

Minnesota's Newest 

\<uiu- 1 >/ -ill.-:!:! . I;„ wit :\Ui'k« 
SALES EVERY THURSDAY 



Cattle Sales 

NttdalldassrsDlEkttCahTs. Holiltln 
Sttto. YailinR lint Sims 4 Hclfen. Slock 
Coio. Fal CalUe. 5LiUKlitcr Co»-s & Dull). 

• COMPUTERIZED RING SCALE 

• CAT-WALK 

• DRIVE-THRU UNLOADING 
•FULL-SERVICE CAFE 

CATTLE QMLX.ON THURSDAY 



SPECIAL FEEDER 



FOR SALE- Throo 10' J.D. 9350 drills, BT 
spacing with markers and Kuhn trans- 
port Also. 1976 IH 106Q with factory cab. 
duals. 6,030 hours, 1 -year-old Loon 700 
hoavy-Oucy motor, 218-773-8160. 419c 
CENEX DRILL fill, holds 220 bushels ol 
seed and 8 tons fortlllzor, oxcollont condl- 
tion. 706-5346. PF41Mp 
FOR SALE- (80 J.D. tractor with tondor 
and 3-pt.. 170 J.D. tractor with singlo hy- 
draulic, both aro wide front row crop. 
Wonlod- 2.8 V-6 motor for '85 Bronco II. 
218-478-2704 attar 7:00 p.m. PF4t9p 
FOR SALE • Alio Laval Agrt TMR mlxor 
wooon, Klopp Dairy. 218-436-2527. 1»9p 
FOR SALE- 800-gaJ. Surge bulk tank. 
200-ft. 2* stainless stool pipa lino. 7.5 
horse vacuum pump. 8 units, universal 
milkers. Klopp Dairy,- 216-436-2527, 

I1t9p 

FOR SALE- Patt bom doonor. 200-fI„ 
used vary llttJo. Klopp Dairy, 218-436- 

2527. I»9p 

FOR SALE- 2 Borito 1080 C. 1989 and 
1093, low hours, both oxcollont condition; 
'84 treo farmer C-5 cable eklddor, recon- 
ditioned; A usQd 18.4x34 tiros; now 
15x19.5 Bobcat liros. Logging equip- 
ment ropair spodalliing in iroo formor 
end Bobcat ports, sorvico, pickup and do- 
livery available. Call Don Thomas, 218- 

243-2250, P4t12p 

FOR SALE- 1974 Muosoy Forrjuson 31 
Industrial tractor, frosh overhaul, llvo 
p.t.o., 3-polnl and romolo hydraulics. 
good Uros, good condJUon. 253-2312. 

PF4I11P 

FOR SALE- 4-1/2 yard Ashland Hold 
scraper, oxcollonl condition, 681-4028. 

PF4111C | 

NEW BELARUS larm tractors. 3I-h.p„ 
$7.000: 81-h.p.. 4WO. cab. $16,000; 100- 
h.p. 4WD, cab, $20,000, Loaders, 
$3,500. Now and used porta roadity avail- 
able. Lyfo BroBand Tractors. Inc., Ersklno, 
MN, 218-687-2781 days, 218-687-3126 

ovonlngs. PF4t11p 

640 J.O. log sklddor, now transmission, 4 
extra tiros, $22,000, 218-222-3553. 
PF4t11p 

Household Goods 



■ 1749 FOR Salo- 12.5 aero commoricol 
property on Hwy «S9. complolo with 
shop/garogo/otflco and 3-4 bedroom 
home. Sollio Roalty. Fosston, MN 56542. 
218-435-1525. Equal Housing Opportun- 
Ity. Itflc 



HOUSE FOR Sola- 1-1/2 olory, 2 bod- 
rooms, 2 lull baths, living room, dining 
room, kitchen appliances go with, singlo 
garage, loncod-in yard. In tno $30s. 781- 
2666. P4t1lp 



Business Opportunities 

INCREDIBLE HOME basod businassll 
No mooDngs. no soiling and no products 
to slockt MuKJ-btllion dollar ortomatlve 
hsalth Industry) Uabeilovabia IlloUmo In- 
come potentlaJI Imaglno yoursoll ratlrod 
within 2 yoarsl Receive your amazing 
tapa Tho Missing Unk* lo modom hoalth, 
call 218-388-2091 or 1-800-572-9685. 

Auctions 



WANT TO BUY- Shetland pony stud, 40- 
45 Inchos. black or bay. 843-3699 Hal- 
lock, MN. IF2ll1p 

Hay, Feed and Seed 

FIRST, 2ND and 3rd crop alfalfa, big 
round bales. Also, whoaL barley straw, 

449-3945. PF411Sp 

SEED FOR Sale- Certified A.C. Barrio. 
Qrandln and other wheat variollos. 
Sovoral varieties ol oats and barley. 
Good germs, cloanod and dolrvored In 
somi load lob or will spilt load bo two on 
neighbors. Also, canola and flax sood 
evaUablo. Previous solos in most areas, 
compotltvo prtcos. Ploaso call Go raid 
Frloson. 204-822-3633, Mordan, MB. 
Can. lino answer ploaso loavo mosoago. 

PF16t35p 

FOR SALE- Small and largo round bolos 
lood hay and mixed. 1.600* and 1.200*. 

222-3790. PF4t9p 

FOR SALE- Certlfiod standor bartoy. cor- 
tilled 2375, Sharp, Vordo and fluss 
whoaL Call 218-874-3713. PBHOp 
FOR SALE-Alfolla or alfalta mixed hay, 
small/big squares, round. Excoiloni 
horso, del ry or boel quail tltos. Also, straw, 

21B-6ai-402B, P4I8C 

FOR SALE- 275 small round bales grass 
hoy. no rain and 118 largo round bolos 
grass hay. locatod 8 milos north and 2- 
1/4 easlolOkieo. 681-6263. 3t9p 
FARMERS- II you havo hay For solo ad- 
vortlso It In Die Northern Watch. Pooplo 
aro looking to buy. Tho Timos/Northom 
Welch. 324 Main Avo. North, Thiol Rrvor 
Falls. MN 56701, 681-4450. 8tto 



240 BIO round bolos ol second crop al- 
falfa grass hay. Been lasted. Also, '91 
Grand Marquis LS Morcury car. Contact 
Ambrose Booudoln ol 218-798-5283. 
FOR SALE- Mixed hoy, 1 25 rotaMvo food 
valuo. no rain, call Paul at 218-681-6898. 

IP6111P 



LAKESHORE HOME FOR SALE BY WANTED- Good Items for St. Hilalro LI- 
OWNER- At Sandy Shoros oast ol Long ons conslonmont auction March 14-15, 
=• 4-yoor-old. 3-bodroom, 2-bath, yr- ' ' * —-- «" "™ "»- 



Ihe Red Lako Falls, Si Hilalro, Brooks a 
wost ot Plummor aroaa. WUI pay cash. 
Call Northland Form Solos, 681-6038. 



Notices 



mmnsmEm 

160 Acres, 140 Tillable. NE ol 



OMee $295/Acreage. 



915 Acies. Moslly Tillable. 
1 Year Led On CRP, Stiandqulsl 
Area. 



WANTED: Farmland - 

I have a serious client who 
wants lo buy good farmland in 
the Red Lake Falls, St. Hilalre, 
Brooks, or west ol Plummet 
areas. Will pay cash. 



160 Acres CRP Plummet Area. 



320 Actes. 263 Tillable. Old 

Bldg. Sile. 

Good Land, Only 56 Acres of 

CRP. Kralka Bridge Area. 

$79,900 



Many Olhets To Choose From 
Up To 1,000 Acres. 




DON'S 

307 1ST ST. E., THF 

Aero4» Fmm Pmnlngton Squarm 

aat-nuRiiui- ii tMfHnti oosnrvtLWOi 

mi AM.-tlML<M30M<CLOaDUt t SUM. 

SEWING & VACUUMS 

Bolos & Sorvico • NEW a USED 

681-8664 



FOR SALE- Bookcaso, kitchen tablo and 
chairs, sawing cabinet, mauve lined 
drapos. phono 661-6881. It9p 



SEWING MACHINE 
REPAIR in your home or 
bring to Narvcrud Cleaners. 

Phone Earl at 

964-5763 or 681-3441 



FOR SALE- First and second cutting al- 
falta hay, round bales, 210-786-5711 or 

706-5422. PF4t9p 

FOR SALE- Round bolos ol 1st 2nd cut- 
ting alloJia and round bolos grass hay lor 
cotdo or horses: IH 9' field alcklo mowor. 

210-782-2629. PF4I17p 

FOR SALE- 2nd cutting alfalfa, squoro 
bolos, protlon 18.0, lood valuo ol 144, 
218-386-2690. PF4t0p 

Farm Miscellaneous 

KWIK KLEEN grain doanors lor ronL 
Clean your grain lor seed or boforo soil- 
ing, 698-4222. FOKc 

Lost & Found 

LOST: SMALL light tan dog, vory friend- 
ly. Last seen January 10, 3 milos north of 
Nowfoldon on Co. RrJ. 8 woaring a rod 
collar. II you havo onylnformauon ploaso 
coll 874-6681. 1101 



MATCHING LOVESEAT and hldo-n-bod 
sola, blue, oxcollonl condilion. $150.00; 
Qua on -alio walorbod, $50.00; oval wood 
cocktail tablo, $75.00; squaro wood cock- 
tail tablo, 4 glass Inserts, $125.00: 253- ' 

2678. P4l12p 

GE WASHER, dryer, S400.00; booo lor 
large scroon TV, glass doors, holds VCR 
and tapes, SIOO.OO; 210-681-3616. 



YOU CAM BEAT AW EGG; 
YOU CAN BEAT A DRUM; 



M.. 

YOU CANT B EAT OUR DEALS! 

Sum's Ccrpet Vtsrthm 

Bagley » (218)694-6161 



LOSTt Small, Lt Tan Dog. 
Vory Friendly. Last Soon Jan. 19, 
3 Ml las N. ot Nowfoldon on Co. 
Fid. B. Woaring. a Rod Collar. II 
You Havo Inlormollon, Ploaso 
Coll 874-6881. ;£>:g> i$>lp 



Trailers 



FOR SALE- 8-1/2x24-fL Tlmborwotf on- 
dosed traitor, used once. 218-478-3374. 

PF4tSp 



RECREATIONAL LAND for saJo- 40 acr- 
es and 80 acres locatod In Marshall 
County. NW ol Thiol Rrvor Fans, MN, 
noar Slrundqirial. 40 acros pricod al 
S4.000.00 or bosl olfer. 00 acros pricod el 
$12,000.00 or bost oftor. To buy or soil 
(arms, contact Pholps Form Solos. PO 
Box 501, Bralnord, MN 56401. Phono 

21 8-820-1 821, 419c 

FOR SALE- 2-bodroom homo, doublo 
garago, now 3-soason porch, now tur- 
naeo. NW TRF location, good starter 
homo or alco rotlromont homo, room for 
family room or 3rd bedroom in basemen!, 
yard loncod. Call 874-7845 or 425-7878. 
FOR SALE- 140 acres ol hunting land 
nortboasl ol Gryglo. Call 294-6607. 
FOR SALE- 20 acros 8 milos south, 1 
mllo wost ol Arctic, 08x170 dairy bam, 
70x75 Hanson silo looting shod, Well) 
troos.Callownor,21S-681-3B4a. 70ttc 
1S72 MOBILE homo. 4.4 acros. 3.5 milos 
north ol Rod Lako Falls. Call ovonlngs. 

218-253-4360. P4l10p 

FOR SALE- Excoiloni building stla. 
120x186, on blacktop road, dty water 
and sewer, i block from Oakland Park, 

$11,000. Coll 681-3040. F8t20p 

HAVE CASH buyers lor land with now or 
oxlondod CRP contracts. For oato- 180 
acros In section 25, Kratxa Township. 
Ponnlnglon County, $50,000; 160 acros 
In section 16. Roinor Township, Ponning- 
ton County, $40,000: 40 ocroa with old 
l!xor-up buildings, In soctlon 7, Lambert 
Township, Rod Lako County, $20,000; 
400 ocres In Huss Township. Roseau 
County. $200 por aero (will dJvtdo,. Norm 
Anderson Realty, 1002 East Groonwood, 
Thiol Rlvor Falls. MN 56701. phono 216- 
681-2320. lax 218-601-0409. Soiling 
terms In NW Minnesota alnca 1P69. 
FOR SALE by owno'- Nicoly romodolod 
3-bodroom. 2-boBi homo, finished boso- 
ment. 3 types ot hoot, loncod-ln back 
yard with deck, singlo car detached ga- 
rago. Close lo downtown, nice neighbor- 
hood, upper SCO's. 681-4933. 3tlc 



NOTICE 

Pennington County Dopartmont ol Wal- 
laro and Human Sorvteoo has boon chc- 
son to rocolvo S7.024 lo oupplomonl 
omorgancy food and shollor programs in 
tho aroa. A local board will dotormino how 
Iho funds awarded to Pennington County 
aro lo bo distributed among tho emergen- 
cy food and shelter programs run by local 
sorvico organizations In tho area. Organ- 
izations chosen to rocolvo lunds must 1 ) 
bo non-profiL 2) haVo an accounting sys- 
tom and conduct an annual audi. 3) 
procUco nondiscrimination, 4} have dem- 
onstrated tho capability lo deliver emer- 
gency food and/or shollor programs and 
5) II tnoy aro a prlvoto voluntary organiza- 
tion, thoy must have a voluntary board. 
Qualifying organizations aro urgod lo op- 
ply. Deadllno for application is Fobruary 
10, 1898. Further Iniormolfon on tho pto- 

fram may be obtained by contacting 
hyllls Schmldl, Ponnlnglon County 
DopL ot Welfare and Human Sarvlcoa. 
PO Box 340. Thiol River Falls, MN 

56701,681-2860. 1t9c 

NOTICE NEW SOLUM TOWNSHIP 
Tho Board ol Audit for Now Solum town- 
ship will moot Fobruaiy 10. 1998 at 7:30 
p.m. at the township shop. Tho monthly 
mooting will follow at 8:00 p.m. 

JIN K. Han, dork 

PUBUC NOTICE 

Tho board ol audit (or Sllvorton township 

will bo hold Monday, Fobruary 18, 1998 

at tho home ot Unnoo Engo at 7:00 p.m. 

Mark Hanson, dark 

Custom Services 

ACKER BODY SHOP- Frame atraightan- 
Ing, collision, glass, touch-up, 14 years 
oxpoiionco, Insurance ostlmatos wot- 
como. From Roseau: 6 miles wast, 1/4 

mllo south. 463-5099. F3t(c 

PLANNING YOUR wedding? Spring and 
summer dates stll avallablo. packagos 
start at $299, Custom CroaBono Photog- 
rophy, 651-6162. P4t10p 



Card of Thanks 

THANK YOU 
Wo wish to oxpress our doopost gratitude 
to all our Irionas and rolativoo at tho un- 
timely death ol my husband, our stop-la- 
ther, grand (othor and brother, Laveme 
Klonk. Thank you lor all tho boaullful 
flowois, plants, lood brought to tho 
house, cards and momorlols. Also tho 
many visits and phono colls. Thanks to 
tho Mloalo Rrvor ambulanco craw lor tholr 
prompt oltonilon. To Qroon funeral 
Homo, ospodally Erling and Gorula for 
tholr counoous help and also the pail- 
boarors. Spodal thonko to Rov. Curtis 
Anderson for conducting the service ond 
Rov. Sloven Sporloy lor his comlortlng 
words. Also to Cothy ond Corrlno Erick- 
son lor tho booutitul music. To Rlngbo 
Homemakers dub lor tho dolicloua lunch, 
[hanks. We Injfy approclato your kind 
words and doeds. May God richly bless 
each ono ol you. 

Semico Klonk 

Cindy, Dolo and Molanlo Biarkllo 

Susan. Larry Torkolson ond lamlry 

CoDoon Kersson and lamlly 

Melissa and Shawn Chlnn 

Lambert and Nancy Klonk ond families 



■ THANK VOU 

I wish lo thank tho staff' at Northwosi 
Medical Cenior (or tholr care tho lost two 
Bmos I ww a potion!. An those who visit- 
ed, sen! cards, apodal visits and card 
from Our Saviour's church Irlondsr iilso 
Pastor Olson lor his visits. Dr. Pal si lor 
his cars. God bioss you all 

Maynord Motsknosa 



Help Wanted 



Help Wonted - Part-time 

Clark/Doll Helper 

Apply ot 



Htuy 1 ond Hujij 59 UJ, TRF 



AVON S8-S1B/HR., no door-lo-door. 
quick cash, fun and roloxing, 1-800-736- 

0168lnd/sls/rep. P4t9p 

FULL- OR part-time hotp wonlod. wal- 
Iressos. bartondora and fry cooks, call 

608-4608. Otfc 

PLANT SUPERVISOR- Full-tlmo. 
rosponsibllltlos indudo: lull operation ol 
assembly tine, scheduling trucks, in von- 

■ -idplantmalfitonanco.Candl- 

and highly 
ntmonl call 
1 or 1-800- 

REM-SILS, INC. Is accepting applica- 
tions for a port-timo position working with 
an Individual with developmental disabili- 
ties In their home and within Iho com- 
munity. Cunont neods Indudo an Individ- 
ual to work 8-hours a wook In Thiol Rlvor 
Falls. Must meet eligibility requirements 
and provkJo own transportation. Contact 
Jonttu, REM-Rosoou, Inc. 216-463-1031 
(or moro InlormotJon/oppllcotlon. EOE. 
4112c 



[Hia DRIVERS 
, - l - , WANTED 



Earn up lo $8.00 or 

more per hour. Must bo 1 6 years oW, have 

reliable car, drivers ficense & insurance, 

(100 hiring Bonus after 90 days. 

Apply within at 

313 3rd Street East, 

Thief River Falls. 



disturbed children and tholr families. Pro- 
far candidato with masters dogree In be- 
havioral sctonces or bocholora dogroa 
and exporlonco. Sand 'resume and lottor 
ol application lo: Tony Do Mars. North- 
west Medical Center, 120 LaBrooAvo. S., 
Thief Rlvor FoUs, MN 56701. (218) 683- 

7180. EOE. 2t0c 

HELP WANTED- Full-tlmo omptoyoo on 
a grain and sugar boat farm. Musi pos- 
sess machine operation skills and soma 
mochanlcal ability. Wages dapondanl on 
exporlonco. Konnody, MN, 218-674- 
4438, PF4t15p 



JIMMBMBimi 



The Talent Bank Is an electronic 
Job rcjumc that employers and 
private employment agencies con 
access. They can review your 
quail (lea lions - education, skills, 
:k history - In relationship to 
their Job opening], IF Interested, 
employers wtO contact you directly 
CaP (or more Information. 



AFEW OF THE JOBS MKABIEf 



♦ WAREHOUSE WORKER- 

Permanent FuJf-time, 
S6.50porhr..StHi[aire. 
(MN5552606) 

♦ CERTIFIED NURSING 
ASSISTANT - PermanenL 
Full-time, S7.10 per hr„ Thief 
River Falls. (MN1134038) 

♦ JEWELRY SALES -Perm., 
FuK-timo, $6.00 per hr., Thief 
River ralB. (MN6960204) 




130tHlBriw»y1E.' Thlot Hlvtf Fill! 

218-681-0909 



REGISTERED NURSE- Rlvorvlow 
Hoalthcaro Association has a position 
open for on RN. lo be the Chargo Nurse 
for Die PM shift (including ovory other 
woakand) al Hillcrasl Nursing Homo, 
Previous supervisory experience and 
LTC oiporianco proforrod. Won gal you 
Started wttti a compoUUvo salary and oll- 
glbla bene lits, II Intoroslod. contact; Rlv- 
orvlow Healthcoro Association, Human 
Resources Dapi,, 323 S, Minnesota, 
Crookslon. MN 56710. 218-281-9415. 
Fax 218-281-0222. E-Mail: londorsOrlv- 
orviowhoatth.org. EOE. F2t9c 



Holp Wontod 



ACCOUNTING CLERK needed lo start 
Immodlaloly. Computerized A/P and A/R 
ontrtes along wlrh other misc. duties. 
Compular and accounting oxporionco 
holpful. Full-tlmo position with complolo 
bonotlts packogo avallablo. Please sand 
rosumo to: 02942. C/O Tho Tlmos. PO 
Box 100. Thiol Rlvor Falls. MN 50701. 

410c 

DRIVERS AND owner/operators wonlod 
to pull my bailors or yours lor a small but 
growing local Irucklng company. Excol- 
lont pay with possiblo bonollts, loaso pur- 
chaso program avallablo, new oqulpmont 
with cwnor/oporator spoca. and stand up 
sloops rs, pulling hoppers 48 atates and 
regionally. Must havo a minimum of 1- 
yoor ol verifiable driving oxporionco and 
currsnl CDL Ploaso call Erie at 218-437- 

6548, PF4113p . 

HELP WANTED- Full-tlmo dolrvory per- 
son. Applications avallablo at Hall's Flor- 

01,661-1940. 2t0c 

UNIVERSAL SCREENPRINT Is looking 
tor a prinlor to do multi-color work on 
caps, laekets, shirts, etc.. Mon.-Frl. 
dayshltt, hoBday-vocatJon pay, health In- 
surance. Send application to PO Box 
501, TRF. MN. Equal Opportunity Em- 
ployer. 419c 



''evAw/ir" 

PART-TIME 
FRONT DESK ft 
HOUSEKEEPING 

POSITIONS AVAILABLE!! 

Looking for hardworking, honost. 
reliable pooplo. 

Soo us lor oxcollonl wages! 
Apph/ in poison al tho front desk 

ortf. No phono calls pioasQll 

1586 HWY. 59 SE 
THIEF RIVER FALLS, MN 



FURNISHED 
ROOMS 

FOR RENT 
681-2845 



- and 2-bod- 
r. Call 661-4609. 101tfc 



CARETAKER COUPLE- Minneapolis 
aroa. GltBoman Management Corpora. 
Hon is o wen -established and roputablo 
firm thai specializes in tho monagomonl 
ot condominium and lownrxxno associa- 
tions. Wo sook a couplo to work and re- 
sldo In an upper-brackot condominium 
building locatod In Iho Minneapolis aroa. 
Duties Indudo cleaning and Mghl main- 
tenance ol public aroos and llmTtod man- 
ogomonl rosponsibilltfos. This is an own- 
or-occuplod building so thoro Is no loos- 
ing, cleaning or painting ol units. No pots. 
Ample wookonds ond ovonlngs off duty. 
Soml-roSrod/rotirod couples ore encour- 
aged to apply. Wo otter an oxcoDont sal- 
ary, health and lllo insurance lovoly one- 
bedroom condominium unit hoalod park- 
ing, paid uVllUas and lelephono. 401K, 
paid vocation ond permanonl position. 
CeJIAndyGlttloman.612-831-2505. 1t9c 



2-BEDROOM FULLY furnished apart- 
ment in Rod Lako Falls. Includes all furni- 
ture, TV, wash or/dry or. ulonslls and 
linens, available Immodiitoly. deposit re- 
quired, eaJIJohn SoUiolm, 253.2121 days 

ot 253-2071 evenings. 4111c 

HOUSE FOR ronl- Small ono-bodroorri, 
Indudo s utuitiesmeal, nol phono-cable, 
doposll. no pals, $350.00, 601-4018. 
P5l11p 

' FOR RENT * 
2 BEDROOM 
APARTMENT 



" 5 99l 



SPECIAL FOR 
1ST MONTH'S RENT 
I-TEAR LEASE REflOlRB) 



LOCAL FIRM SEEKING 
FULL-TIME SECRETARY 



TVpfigEMW-HIn 
PAB0XOI,H«FI»BIBUS,l«IIT»l 
Rnum, Hut B, StixriM By Mi. (th 



COUNTRY ACRES 
APARTMENTS 

Tinzr Rrvcit Paua, MN 

U218) 681-3370^ 

ERSKINE SUMMERRELO Placo, two- 
bodroom, two bathroom apartment avail- 
able, amenltlos Indudo washer/dryer, ml- 
crowavo oven, dlshwashar, garbage dis- 
posal and air eondltionor. hoot paid by 
managemonL Garago avallablo. Call 1- 
600-504-6093 lor moro Inlormollon 
and/or privalo tour. 7tfc 



ASPHALT PAVING company hiring: 
screed man, truck drivers, equipment op- 
erators, taborora. Bono fits Indudo 401k 
and hoalth Insuranco. E.O.E. 218-281- 

5101. 7iBc 

EXPERIENCED INDIVIDUAL wanted to 
manago Insuranco agency and bank 
branch. Must havo curront liconso lo In- 
dudo Sort os 0, 3-5 years oxporionco re- 
quired. Salary and bona lits ara common- 
surata with oxperlenco. Ploaso send ro- 
sumo and salary roqulromonts to Red 
Lako County State Bank, PO Box 280, 
Red Lako Foils, MN S6750. F2t8c 



300 SQ. FT. OFFICE 

AND 
600 SQ. FT. OFFICE 

m ujtmns m pais! 
m mo, Fxeewmt 

U*S£ AMD DEPOSIT!! 

200 Barzen Ave. N, TRF 

681-2038 or 

681-1973 



TWO SMALL SI 

lion, 112 ond 1 
4B57, filfc ■ 



I the Held. Candldalo must bo a sail- 
startor. Call Jerry or John lor an appoint' 
mont, 1-218-745-4121 or 1-800-887- 
4121. FOtfc 



HELP WANTED: INSURANCE 
SALES ASSISTANT. 

Licensed In property/cisuilty and lite and 
fiulth dMfred, but will train tho right person, 
Sand fitonn In HMt, e/n Tbs TJnit, 324 
Mllo Aw. H„ Thill Rhrar Fills, fctt 6*701 



MACHINIST 

Lucas Aerospace Cargo Syatoms- 
Jamoston has Immodlalo rull-Umo open- 
ings lor trained Machinists to fill Iho woo- 
kend shifts: (6:00 a.m.-6:00 p.m.-6:00 
a.m.), Friday through Sunday. Both shifts 
work 36 hours and aro paid lor 40 hours, 
Those prolassionals will perform sotups, 
monitor cutter soquoncea and make 
leeoVspeed adjustments to obtain optimal 
routing soquoncos. Quallfiod condidatos 
must oe high school graduates with a 
minimum ot 1 your oxporionco. Two year 
tochnlcal school graduates aro proforrod, 
as wo'l as experienced machinist. 
Wo offor a competiBvo compansatlon 
packogo and an oxcollont benefits plan 
with relocation atlowaneo. 
Sond resume or roquost uppllcaDon to: 
Lucas Aorospaca Cargo Systoms, Hu- 
man Rosourcoa DopL, 2604 Highway 20 
North. Jomoslown, ND 58401, Phono 
701-252-6250. tax 701-251-1040. EOE. 
1t0p 



QUIET, LARGE 3-bodroom main floor 
apartmont, nicoly docoraied. no pels, do- 
poslt/rolororKos/loaso. 681-2663. 

P4l10p 

NEWLV REMODELED 2-bodroom lur- 
nishod mobtlo homa/ontry, no pats.'do- 
posit, reforoncoo, loaso required. 681- 
2863. P4t0p 



STORAGE UNITS 
FOR RENT IN TRF 



218-681-1861 



FOR RENT- Mobllo homo. 2-betfrooms, 
romodolod, vary nice, 681-1658. 681- 

B033. PfltlSp ' 

SPACIOUS TWO-BEDROOM apart- 
ments. Ooan and neat, now carpet and 
paint, dish wash ors, garbago disposal, 
ofl-stroot parking, hoat paid, avallablo im- 
modlaloty. coll 681-4054, If no answer 

loovo a mossago. 76ttc 

FOR RENT- 3-bodroom apartmenl w/ga- 
rago. $440/month, avallablo Jan. 15: 2- ' 
bedroom apartmont. $405/month, avall- 
ablo Jan. 1. Both apartments In newer 
quiet 8-plox. Also avallablo. smaller 3- 
bedroom houso w/garago, $350/monih 
plus utintlos, avallablo Jan. 1, no pets, 
totoroncos and deposit required. Call 
681-4478, 8 o.m.-o p.m. 105tte 



^gJ-l-HLJt-irP 



OFF-SET PRESSMAN 

Fu*4in» position In a rnooom-ooulppod prhi 
ihop. Knoaiadga ot sheet-led onset printing 

""' TYPESETTER 

Parl-Bma position. Typesetting straight copy 
for newteaper pubfcatons snd also work In 
the produetJon ares Ola print shop. OurdAod 
applcanl should be able to typo 40 worat a 
minute, and have adequate tooting and 
grammar sbtity. Mutt be wiling lolake a typ- 
hgandipealnglasL 

Poakiana bdudei various other duOaa 
Irtvoh^lnlMprtxIuglonolpuUkationa. 
5ltar(M . ^ _.. — 



Apply At- 

The Times 

324 Main Ave. N. • ThkJl River Fala, MN 

(218) 681-4450 



OFFICE FOR RENT 



Professional Building, parking at 
door. Available January 1, 1998. 
Call 681-1635 • 9 ajL-5p.ni. 



MEDICAL- Port-tlmo homo health alda 
position available to work with tho oldorty 
ond disabled in tholr homos. CMA. HHA 
or NA oxporionco prolorrod but nol ro- 
qulrod. Applicants may apply in person at 
Pino to Prairie Homo Hoalth Can) & Hos- 
plco in Karlstad or call Suslo at 436-4683. 
EOE. F2111C 

For Rent . 

STORAGE, BOATS, CARS, RV'S, etc.. 
Roosonoblo rates, you Insutol 661-8803, 

loavo mossago. Otfc 

FOR RENT- Throo -bod room mobllo 
homo In TRF, avallablo Fob. loL call 449- 

4331. P4l10p 

2-BEDROOM MOBILE homo/onlry, 
$250.00 plus utilltlos, no pets, doposit 
rotoronces, loaso requirod. 681-28S3. 
FOR RENT- 3-bedroom homo with singlo 
garage, $400.00/mo.. doposit and roior- 

oncos roqulrod. 681-7776. 1t9p 

TWO-BEDROOM APARTMENT, oil- 
stroot parking. Doposlt/rotoroncos ro- 
qulrod. $300.00 includes utilltlos. No 
pets. C81-6797. Bite 



QREENBUSH SUMMERF1ELD Placo 
has a ono-bedroom handicapped acces- 
sible apartment avallablo. Prtvato en- 
trance, cottogo-styto unit with oeroonod- 
In porch, Indudos dishwasher, wash- 
er/aryor, mlcrowavrxovon, garbago dis- 
posal, air eondltionor, hoal paid. Call 1- 

800-5O4-60B3 today. Trie 

LAND FOR rant on bldsiflJOcrop acros, 
avallablo wlma 3-year (faso. Also, an ad- 
ditional 114 acros avallablo wtth a 1-yoar 
loose. SI/2 ot Soc-1, Cornstock Strip, 
302 crop acros, 3-yoar lease; NE1/4 ol 
Sec. 12. Cornstock Strip, 157 crop acres. 
3-yoar loaso; NW 1/4 ol Soc. 18. Numo- 
dohl, 151 crop acros, 3-yoar loaso: 
NE1/4 ol Soc. S, Viking Strip. .114 crop 
acros, 1-year loaso. Doodllno forbids Is 
Fob, 10, 1098. Sond bids lo Duano R. 
Swonson, RR 1 Box 40. Viking, MN 
567B0. Phono 218-745-4910 or Robert 
E. Swonson. 1023 N. 7th Stroot. Warren, 
MN 56762. Phono 218-745-5578. Crop 
basoa aro avallablo al Marshall Co. 
ASCS office. Tho ownars reserve tho 
right to re|oct any and all bids. F3t9p 
SUHUERRELD PLACE ol Thlot Rlvor 
Falls has 1- and 2-bodroom apartments 
available ol tho senior community on oast 
ninth strooL Must bo ago 55 or ovor. 
Hooted underground parking, olovalor, 
MXTimunlty rooms. Amenltias Indudo air 
condltlonMig, washer/dryer. cDshwashor, 
.garbago disposal. Heat paid. Call 216. 
661-5194. 4111c 



FOR RENT- Mobile homo, 2bodroom, 1- 
1/2 bam, (no pots). Counirysldo Park. 
6BMB5BorG81-B033. P4IOp/P4t10p 
FOR RENT- Dasomonl orTidoncy. opart - 
ment, all utilities paid, complolo I y fur- 
nished, closo lo downtown, avallablo 
Fub. 1st. 661-3520 days, 001-5908 ovon- 

Ings. ItOp 

LAND FOR Rent- 60 tillable acros. 
NE1/4 ol Section 20 Smiloy township. 
218-773-0767 before 8 a.m. or aftor 8 

pm 4112c 

APARTMENTS FOR rent In Okloo, roo- 
my, 1- and 2. bedroom, earplug-Ins, laun- 
dry and satoiiiio available, good rote rone - 

os,796-4G62. 10011c 

ONE-, TWO- or throo-bodroom oport- 
monts. brand now, for ronl at spodal win- 

lor rolos, 253-4352. IQOtlc 

OFFICE SPACE lor rant, downtown aroa, 
681-2381 days. 681-6667 ovoninos. 
ONE MONTH lent Iroo with ono-yoor 
lease. Ono-bodroom, two-bodroom 
apartmenl. call 681-8723 or 681-5308. 
2-BEDROOM APARTMENT, heal and 
water paid, tridgo and stovo includod, 
very doon and qulel building. Call 081- 

3898 alter 5 p.m. 4tfc 

APARTMENTS FOR Rent- Tho now 6- 
piox In Karlstad has a two-bedroom and a 
ono-bedroom apartment lor ronL Heal is 
Induded In Iho ronL plus a one-car go- 
rugol Groat location! Closo lo downtown 

school! For Inlormatlon. contact Wayne 
Ruud al the Karlstad City Office. 218- 
436-2178. Avallablo February 1. 1008. 
RETAIL/COMMERCIAL SPACE lor rent, 
uptown location, 1,700 sq. It plus stor- 
age area, heat and water paid, call 681- 

3045. 64t1c 

FOH RENT- 2-bodroom apartmont, patio, 
garbago disposal and kltchon oppllancos 
Induded, Hoal and water paid, otf-sbool 
parking with pfug-lns. Call 681-1535. Bttc 
SUMMERF1ELD PLACE- Now In Thlot 
Rlvor Falls. Boautllul spadous sonior 
apartmont. 55», ono, ono plus den and 
two bedrooms starting al $545. Washer 
and dryer, balcony, call onuy syolom, 
heat paid by managemonL hoalod under- 
ground parking avallablo. Call lor a prt- 
vato tour, 1-800-504-6093. 215 Ninth 
Stroot East. Thiol Rlvor Falls, Minnesota. 
FOR RENT- Mobllo home, 2-bodroom, 
(no pots), S270rmonth. 661-1858, 681- 

9033. P4t5p/P4t9p 

SUMMERRELO PLACE ol Thiol River 
Fols has 2- and 3-bodroom apartments 
avallablo in tho multi-lamlry townhousas 
on Wostvtow Avonuo. Amenities Indudo 
washor/dryor, dlshwashar, mlcrowavo, 
garbage disposal, and air conditioning. 
Hoat paid. Garago avallablo. Call 218- 

661-5194. 4111c 

FOR RENT- Two 2-bodroom trailers, 1- 
14x60 with washor/dryor, $325.00; 1- 
1 4x70, $300.00 plus deposit, rot oroncos. 
No pots, 681-7712 after 5 or loavo mos- 

sogos. P4H2p 

SUMMERRELO PUCE ol Nowfoldon 
has a two-bodroonvTwo-bath apartmont 
avallablo. Privalo ontranco, ocroonod-ln 
porch, air eondltionor. washer/dryer, dish- 
washer ond moro. Heat paid by tho mon- 
ogomom. Cell 1-800-504-6003 lor moro 

IniormaBon and/or lour. F102tlc 

TWO CHARMING two-bedroom apart- 
ments, avallablo now, ample parking, 
$350 plus deposit and $325 plus utilities 
and deposit no pots, 681-3718 or 680- 
2864. 7tfc 

Mobile Homes 

PRICE REDUCEDII 14x70 Artcraft Clas- 
sic mobllo homo with custom cablnots. 
vaulted ceilings and central air. A root 
bargain and all sal up in a local court, 
$17,000. Stan Gibson Roalty, 218-681- 

4087. ItflC 

FOR SALE- 14x70 Holly Park mobllo 
homo noods minor work. Can owner 

21B-S81-384B. 7BtJc . 

FOR SALE- 14x70 3-bodroom mobllo 
homo on 100'x200' lol on Rainy Rlvor al 
Baudotto,MN.Call701-775-78l5. I70tfo 



QUALTTY HOUSING 
'AFFOHDABIUTY ^ 

ON THE SPOT RNANCINQ^ 



iCv. 




••/ of Qrand Fork* 
1801 N. Washington St 
Opart 10-5 p.m. Mon.-Sat 



Wanted to Buy 

COLLECTOR PAYING cash (or old olot 
machinos, ooda pop machines, old pea- 
nut and gum machlnos and ]ukaboxao, 1- 

600-236-7708. P4110p 

WANT TO buy- A sllppor/boudolr uphol- 
storod chair. Color not ImportanL Call 
BB1-4805 and loavo mossago. P4t11c 

Wanted to Rent 



WANTED TO RENT: 
FARM LAND 



in trf area for 1998 and 
beyond. 218-280-2081 



Daycare 



DAYCARE HAS openings for tuil-limo 
Intani/pro-schootore, hours 5:30-4:30. 

CaM 661-1043. P4l10p 

LOOKING FOR someone to como Into 
my homo ond coro for my 2 chlldron. 
ages 2 and 0. Would bo part-Omo o- J 



OFFICE SPACE 
FOR RENT 

302 Third St. East 
Thief River Falls, MN 

Call 218-436-2121 

Ask For GwenI 



LICENSED CHILD coro oponJngs lor Inf- 
ants up, 5 a-m. to 3:45 p.m. Call 681- 

6716. P4ll1p 

DAYCARE OPENINGS. All egos. Food 
program. Proschool oducatlon. Big play 
aroa. Foncodyard. 681-5063. 2Bc 
WILL DO daycare In my homo. Win ottor 
odoquato mools, on ages, call anytime, 

681-7698. P4l12p 

WILL PROVIDE daycare in my homo. 
Wotcoming an ages. Hove roforoncos 
artdl'mdopendable,68i-2650. P4t10p 



. — __ — — m CUT Q UT AND SAVE m — — — — — . 

Call 964-5237 For... 

READY MIX CONCRETE, SAND & GRAVEL 

We Have Heated Ready Mix For 

Year Around Jobs. 

k Far Saturday Dilivsry 01 flaady Mu, Can Friday 
| RADIO DISPATCHED TRUCKS 

■j NO JOO TOO BIO OH TOO SUAUI 

I Comcrete Inc. 

concrete INC. St. Hilalro, MN 



FOR SAI.E ON BIOS 

Th« Parmars Union OH Co. tlr* wBrshoua* building and property 
la being otlersd tor ul* on blda. 6O'x120' Strand atool bldg., approx. 
225' of frontage road on HWY'8 60 A 1 W., T. R. Falls, MN, legally 



daeer10*d •■: 

Lot S. Block 2 of Nopar'a Second Addlllor 
Pennington County, Parcel ID* 35-83-fl 12-ao. 

To ••• property c ....-.-.. _^.. -__ 



to Thief River Folia, 



David Klrkaby, Form»r» Union Oil Co., E. 
_ 8. Atlantic, T. R. Falla, MN, E0701, 210-681-3312. 

Written blda muat b* aubmlttad lo Bather Law Office, 311 Main 
Ava. N„ T. R. Falla, MN, D6701. 218-601-8830, prior lo Noon, 
W*dn«aday.F«bruary4, 1008. 

Sailer raaervea right to reject all orfera/blde. Sala aubjact 10 board 
approval. 

PROPERTY SOLD "AS IS." 



COORDINATOR OF JOB-SHADOWING 
EXPERIENCES 

Short-time, part-time, position opon at Marshall County Central High 
School to assist with coordinating studont placement in job-shadow- 
ing experiences February-March 199B. Position includes transporting 
students. Person musl have valid driver's license, excellent driving 
record, and ability to work with students. Interested persons should 
contact the High School Office at 874-7225 by February 2. 

retyxisgarxtkublfyr! 



POSITION AVAILABLE: 

The Housing and Redevelopment Authority for the 
City of Thief River Falls is seeking an Executive 
Director. This position includes the management of 
Skylite Apartments. Job descriptions may be 
obtained at the Minnesota Job Service Office at 1 301 
Hwy. 1 East, Thief River Falls, MN 56701. Resumes 
will be accepted until 12:00 noon, Friday, Feb. 6 
1998. Equal Opportunity Employer. 




Through 
'THE TIMES 

' resumes.nwatch.com 

httpt/Avww.nwatch.com • Email: nwatch@nwatch.com 

IThe Times «\\Ma«: 



5ft?& Commercial Print Shop 



iro available in School District #564, Thiol Rlvor 

CLEANERS 

LOCATION: To bo assigned 

EFFECTIVE: Immedlatoly 

HOURS: 3 hours/day shift or 8 hours/day shift 

DUTIES: Sweep, mop, wet-wash, duslrpdish, coBoct/storoAfisposo 

rofusa, onsuro building socurlfy and othor miscellaneous tasks which 

loll within the scope of this |ob tide). 

SALARY: $6.28 par hour aitor probationary period with a pay Incanttvo 

at year end as par negotiated contract 

REQUIREMENTS: Position requires standing and walking for most ol 
tho work shltl and also may Involve hoavy lifting. Must submit to a 
criminal history background chock. *•* 

Apptlcettona may be obtained In person or by writing to the Paracrine! Department, 
230 LaBree Ave. South. Thiol River Falla. Minnesota SOTOI. Application* will be 
accepted until 440 p-m, Friday, February 0, 1Ma, or until fined. 



Tho Thiol Rlvor Falls School Dlatrict Is In nood ol "on-eutr oub- 
elitutos In tho following aroos:: 

TEACHERS I$70/DAY1 
EDUCATIONAL ASSISTANTS 

FOOD SERVICE 

ADMINISTRATIVE SUPPORT 

CLEANERS 

BUS DRIVERS 

For additional inlormatlon or application materials please contact 
Becky Rogatla, Personnel Manager at 218-681-8711. 
Tow Hiwv Fee* PuMe ScfVWt obM not aWertatfiaM on Ola oaaiio/raoa, eotof.nasonai 
ongln. tat. rafloteni M^eriMitBfylnineoirploynlontortfiopnxtoonottcnica*.' 



ENTRY LEVEL HIGHWAY 
TECHNICIAN POSITIONS 



$22,446/ $31 ,842 

Applications will be accepted until further notice for Highway 
Technician positions with tho Minnosota Dopartmont of 
Transportation. Current vacancios ara in Thief River Falls. 
Duties include entry lovot technical work in highway engineer- 
ing/civil technology, rouline drafting and mapping, field Inspec- 
tions, testing and reporting on construction materials and sur- 
veying. Physical examination is required prior to confirmation of 
appointment. To apply call (612) 582-1212 and ask for the 
Highway Technician Application and Skills Questionnaire. 
Submit applications and skills questionnaire to: 
Department ot Transportation - Metro Division, 1500 West 
County Road B2, Rosovltle, MN 55113. 




I 



l\il>v 14 



"YOU BEND 'EM - WE MEND 'EM n 

■WE RE EQUIPPED TO 

REPAIR ANYTHING FROM 

FRAMES TO WINDSHIELDS" 

GIVE US A CALL 

681-3952 

FREE ESTIMATES 

NORTHWEST AUTO BODY 

THIEF RIVER falls 




iTTOfliETSU'PLY 



hwy IS 59 WEST 



r ati»"Ho ri hot! " 




199SGMCJIMMYSLT4X4 

1996 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE 

UflEDD 
1995 CHEVY EXT. CAB <WD 
1995 CHEVY 4X4 HEGUUR CAB 
1994 GMCEXT. CAB 4WD 
1994 MAZDA EXT. CAB 2WD 
1994 GMC PICKUP 2WD 
1993 GEO TRACKER 4WD 
1993 GMC JIMMY 4X4 
1991 CHEVY SILVERADO 2WD 
1991 FORD EXPLORER 
1999 FORD RANGER EXT. CAB 

2WD 
1987 FORD 2WD 
1986 CHEVY 4WD 
1977 CHEVY «4 
1985 CHEVY CONVERSION VAN 

G-20 



CARS 

1996 PONTIAC GRAND AM 
1996 DODGE AVENGER 
1986 PONTIAC BONNEVILLE 

1995 OLDS. CUTLASS SUPREME 
4-DR. 

1996 DODGE INTREPID 
1995 BUICK PARK AVENUE 
1995 FORD CONTOUR 

1995 CHEVY CAMAROT-TOPS 
1994 PONTIAC BONNEVILLE 
1993 CHEVY LUMINA2-DR. 
1993 CHRYSLER NEW YORKER 
1992 PONTIAC GRAND PRIX 4-DR. 
1989 FORD MUSTANG 
198B OLDS. DELTA 88 



ANDERSON 
S 

Frauds Anderson -681-3600 TW OO 
3rd St & Horace Av». Thlrf River F«H»,MW. 




NORTHERN WATCH 



Saturday, January 31, 1997 



Saturday, January 31, 1998 



PaRC 15 



1 USED 
EXT. CABS 




1996 Ch8V. Ext Cab 4x4 Silv., 305. V-8, AT., Running Board*. IBJMO Ml, IndflO Blu», 
1996 Chav. Ext Cab 4x4 SHv, xs. v-a. at. Cast, s co. lomm. 53,ooo ml, 

EiwaMGiMn. 
1996 Ch«V. Ext Cab 4x4 Sllv., 305. V* AT.. K»yKm B*y. LatW, IBJJOO Ml, Whlto. 
1995 ChoV. Ext Cab 4x4 SIlV., 305. V-8, AT.. Runrioj BottrrJj. Ltodod, *9JXMUL, 

EiMtald Grwi. 
1995 ChOV. Ext Cab 4x4 Sllv., 350. V-8. AT., Ahjm. WNwU. Loafed. 47.000 Ml.. 

1 994 Chev. Ext Cab 4x4 Sik, 350. V* AT.. Budwl Smb. Z-71. 47.000 ML, Toal 

1994 ChoV. Ext Cab 4x2 SitV., AT.. BuekoU. Alum. Whwli. 90.000 ML. Rod 

1995 Ford Ext Cab 4x4 XLT, 351. va. at., Cwtwn Paw, lmAkJ. 42.000 Ml, bl**. 
1 993 Ford Ext Cab 4x4 XLT, 302. V-8. AT, Alum. Whoeb, Loo*d. 43.000 ML, S4vw. 
1993 ChOV. Ext Cab 4x4 Sllv., V* S-Spd. Loadod, 90.000 ML, LL Blua. 

1993 Chev. Ext Cab 4x4 Sllv., 350. At, High mom, Whta. 

1992 GMC Ext Cab 4x4 SLE, W. S-Spd.. FfcwotoM Toppor, 66.000 ML, Rod. 

1991 ChOV. Ext Cab 4x2 Sllv., V-8. 5-Spi.THI.Cfiiw.A/C. 66.000 ML. Blue 


USED 
REG. CABS 


^^ 


1 996 Cha v. Reg, Cab 4x4 SHv., 350, v-a, AT, Cam, a CD, 4.1,000 ML, Emerald Oiooa 
1995 Chev. Reg. Cab 4x4 Sllv., 350, V-8, At, Grand Prix ConwWon. 41,000 ML, 
Star. 

1992 Chev. Reg. Cab 4x4 Sllv., v-e. 5-Spd,. th, Crub*. ts.000 ml. Biuc/Siwr. 
1990 Chev. Reg. cW4x2 Sllv., v-6. S-Spd., Tin. Cniu. 112.000 ML, Whtta. 
1990 Chev. Reg. Cab 4x2 Sllv., 350. v-a. 5-Spd., TO. Crufaw. ecooo ml, BtacWHod. 
1 990 Ford F-1 50 Reg. Cab 4x2, 302. v-8, s-spd. BS.000 ml. Mnoon. 
1965 thev. Reg. Cab 4x2, v*. at,, bm. 


USED SMALL 
PICKUPS 


=^«r 


1996 Chev. S-10 Ext Cab, 4-Cyl, AT. TO, CniL«.AC. 25.000 W,Autumm»ood. 
1996 Chev. S-10 Ext Cab, 4-cy.s-Spd., to. Cniw. a«, 24.000 ml. TbsL 

1995 ChOV. S-10 Reg. Cab, «yi„ 5-Spd.. Alum. WNhjU.M;, 53,000 ML, Puff*. 

1993 Chev. S-10 Reg. Cab, v-6, s-Spd.. 4S.ooo ml. bin*. 
1991 FordRangerXLT,4^yi,5-spd, 32.000 Mi, Rod. 


USED BLAZERS 
& VANS 


wF&Hf 


1997 Chev. AatTO AWD Van, Dual Poww Scab, a-Paaungw, Raw AC. 23.000 Ml.. 

Maroon 1 BolgA. 
1995 Chev. Blazer 4-0r. 4x4, P. S«aL Loaded. 46,000 Mi, Teal. 
1995 Chev. Lumlna APV Van, Powoi Door. CD. Roar AC, 37.000 Mi.. Emerald 

G'DotVSdVof. 
1S95 GMC Jimmy 4-Dr. 4x4, C9.000 m. . Maroon. 
1995 Chev. Blazer 4-Dr. 4x4, p. s«aL 56,ooo m>, DiaA. 
1995 Dodge Grand Caravan, Roar Ave, 8ut*ot». 7-Pasj. 52j»0 ml. Dk. Bim. 
1995 Chev. Blazer 4-Dr. 4x4 LT, Leasur im, CD. P. Saal Loadad. 58.000 ML, Black. 
1994 Chev. Lumina APV Van, Raw *X. 72,000 Mi.. Teal, 
1993 Chev. Astro Ext B-Praa. Van, N(* Tin. b7.oco mi.. Kuo. 


THIBERT'S 

RKI) I.AKK FALLS. MN 

1-800-247-CHEV (2438) 



UOVINO- Musi Mil. 1804 Treckar bo*!. 

17-fl.. CO h.p„ Marlrwr motor. Uv* waa. 
mnrtno bamwd rwJIo. 861-4570. P4t1lp 

Snowmobiles 



NICE 1V96 indy Trail, tourtng. 2-up.alac- 
trie atart. ravaraa, 000 miles (3.500, 
Drool atanar iM; 1983 Trail. Indapao* 
ant front suapanaion. SBOO.OO. 218-674- 
2200 Of 21B-MT-4M8 ait 22. 1t9p 
MUST SEUL- 1»7 ZR 440. excellent 
coodittoa 050 rrtlas, tt.BOO/o.b.o.. 68.1- 
2194. P4t11p 



CALL US FOR 
CLEArWUT PRICE* ON 

1998's, 199rs AND /UJ. OTHER 
USEDSNOWUOBILESI 

/(ISO 
EVEMDAY 
LOW 
FfUCESII 






Hamm's BaVAlal 

Wajrra>n.jyWl^60-aefl^a9g7. 



FOR SALE- 1907 Polaris 440 XC, 2.000 
miles, •xcaltant condition, aaklng 
S4,000.00/ab.o. Call 681-3176 waa- 

kends, B7tfe 

USED FAMILY Sleds- 17 Puma, 2-up, 
$2,409.00: -97 Puma Daluw. $2,648.00; 
■06 JOfl. $2,000.00: "97 Jag. $2,009.00; 
■07 Jarj Deluxe. $3,299.00; 96 J*0 UC, 
12.409.00; "06 cougar, $2,400.00; "07 ZL 
440. $3,099.00; "97 Panthac 550 Dttuxa, 
t3.BOO.00: RV Sport*, Inc.. TRF. MN 

21B-6aM007. 1t9c 

U3ED TWO-UP dads- "07 Puma. 2-ta>, 
S2.499.00; *97 Baarcsrt 340, S2.490.00; 
97 Pantrwr 550 Daluxa, S3.69S.00: *03 
Pantera, $2^99.00: IM Pantara, 
S2.499.00: 'OB Pantsta, $3,590,00: -06 
Baarcat 440. $3,600.00: t*tm *97 Bear- 
cat 440, S3.990.00; VT Baarcat W/T B50, 
S4.S99.0O; RV Spom. Inc., TRF. MN 

2ia-6ai-1O07. Itflc 

MIOH PERFORIUHCE Sleds- 17 ZPTT 

600, S4.ooo.oo: -07 znr boo, $4,000.00: 

•07 ZOT 800, S4W0.0O; Naw "07 ZRT 
800. $5,000.00; "08 ZR 600, cart, Damo, 
S4.5O0.OO; "08 ZR 500, damo, 
S4J00.00; -98 ZR 800 EF1, XC, oamo, 
$5,000.00; RV Sport*. Ire, TRF. MN 
218-681-1007. 1t9c 



ItOc 



FOR SALE- 1001 Arctic 530 EXT, 

SJ.2O0.OO; 1093 Arctic 580 Z.781-2B20. 

P4I12P 

1003 EXT 580Z, 2,000 mMa on ratouKI 

angina and dutcheat, call aflw 11 bjil or 

laava massaga, 881-5452, aaklng 

S2.100. P4tt0p 

FOR SALE- 1006 Arcso Cat .Cougar. 
1.400 mUaa, excaoant oondBlon. hdudaa 
cover, 21 8-294-6597. PF5H3p 

1093 ARCTIC Cat Lynx, <rune great. 
$1^S0.00.callfl98-*40t 1t9p 

1094 ZR 440. racatit oveffiauf, new carb 
■Udaa and CDI box, tooka and runa graat. 
oaJdng S2.000, 210-874-8711. P4t10p 



BIG 



COMPLETE MACHINE SHOP 

• Vain Griodaxj 'Prosn 
•Borioe Ttfflog 

• Cmk GHnjdtas • Bnb Dromi 
•Botm • Much Mom 
Hwy.09W. 681-2223 T.R. FaPa 



FOR SALE- 1969 Chevy 4x4 t/2-Ion. V- 
6. 4-apaod. lock-out buba, loppar, Sl.500 
or make an oflar, ottor 6:00. 681-1637, 
PF4I13P 

1093 CHEVY S-10 Blazer 4i4 LT. loadod. 
66,000 milaa. Coil lat American Bank. 

oak tor Ed. 745-4411, BStfc 

-B5 MERCURY Marqula, 2-tono, V-6. 
157,000 mllea. S800 or bos! oflar, 081- 
1626afiar7p.m. P4ti2c 

1094 FORD Tempo QL. 4-door, 4*y1in- 
d»r. 75.000 mllaa, now tiros, vory good 
condition, roaacnabla, DLR, 681-8690. 



>B3 CHEVY 4x4. V-6, 4.3L. 5-apaod, 
fll^OO mllea. fsaJ, axcaJlani coodJBon, 
SI3.80O. 681-1626 nnar7p.m. P4H2e 



USED EXT/ZR modala-W EXT. $2299; 
•95 EXT, rev.. $2,799,00; W ZR 580 . 
ER. rav.. S2.709.00: *96 ZR 580, carb.. 
$2,709.00; "M 2R 580. EFI. ETT. 
- $3,399.00: -07 ZR 580, $3,999.00; -08 
ZR 600, carb., $4,500.00; RV Sporta. 
Inc.. TRF, MN21B-681-1007. 1t0c 
97 ZR 580, 700 mllaa. must tall. 
SS.200.00/obo, 681-7712 aftarB or leave 

maaaarje. P<n2p |_ 

1007 ARCTIC Cat ZRT 000, 144 Studs. 
B-in, carbldaa. axcallent condition, 
S4.700AJi>.0., 681-8182. P4MOp 
FOR SALE- 1994 Polana XLT wflhptpaa; 
1990 Polaris 500. CaJ 218-478-2774. 

PF4»1p ' ■ 

1993 POLARIS XLT Special, recanfly 
over-hauled, excellent condition, 
S2£00.00. phone 218-964-6530 even- 
lnoaof0iB-841-1119day«.2t10p 
1904 COUOAR; 1995 Cougar, vary 
good condition, 681-6078. P4112p 
1094 LONO track Indy Sport, axcaaant 
condWon, 1 ,800 irltw. aaldng S2.60O.0O. 
218-782-3108aiter6JOp.m. P8114p 
WANT TO Buy 340-440 tan cooled an- 



FOR SALE- 1968 Fort F-150, 302. 5- 
apead, 4x4, 3^00. Can 378-4162 or 378- 

4340. P4t9p 

1087 DOOOE Power Rom 250 von. 360 
angina, auto., cnise. air. ahelvos built. 
Ideal (or electrician or plumbor. vory . 
clean, no mat, 218-281-4081 otter 6 p.m. 

IBp 

*01 FORO Explorer, 4-door, 4.0 V-6. at.. 
B.C, rjlt, cniae and mora, whlto w/rad In- 
terior, tinted wlndowa, 4x4, apeclal 
$7250. DAS SalOS. 1-800-253-2000 or 

218-253-2940. 1t9p 

FOR SALE- 1974 Grnn Torino Sport, ono 
owner, good condition. 218-437-8486 al- 

Mrlpm PF4H1p 

1084 CADILLAC Eldorado, loaded. Boso 
ayrnpheny atarao. $1,100; 1982 Eacort. 
aunroof. stereo, $1,100. both oro front 
wheel drtve; 1 984 Pontlac atotion wagon. 
eight passangar, $800, all havo oxcoliont 
bodlaa, njn and start groat, phono 681- 

6340. P4t10p 

FOR SALE- 1992 Grand Prix, good con- 
dition, $4,000.00 or bait ottor. coll 430- 

2815. Ifflp : 

*88 PONTIAC 6000, 4-door. 2.B V-6, tilt. 
cnise. o-c. whlto w/blua Iniorlor, aaJo 
priced $1,350. D&S Soloi, 1-800-253- 
2009or21B-253-204O. 1t9p 
1070 FORD pk*up. 4x4. 300 6-cy).. 4- 
spaed, lock-outs, dual tanks, ending roar 
wmoow.AM/FM (000,781-2845. Ifflp 
1903 OLDS. Bravado, block .with goW 
' leather Interior, oxcoliont ahapo. loadod, 
power easts, wlndowa and tocka, asking 
H2.efl5.00/obo, call 681-2018, Isavo 
- i during the day. P4H2p 



1091 BUICK LaSabra. 4-door. 3800 V-6. 
mad. blua whn Uua Interior, tin. crUse, 
power windows and locks, apecial 
$4250. MS Salaa. 1-800-253-2009 or 
218-253-2940. 1t9p 



"RISK AUTO INSURANCE" 



1-800-994-0753 



Automobiles 



THINK SPRING- Liko now 1990 CnvnNoi 
Z-24, rod. 2-door, 15,000 milaa. 2.4 Mot. 

S1t.gQ0.00, 874-4113. PF4l15p 

FOR SALE- 1076 Morcury Cougar XR7, 
a c. 351 , aicollont condiUon, ono ownoi. 
218-437-6040 Ottor 6:00 p.m. PF4111p 

*$% SPECIALS ^ 
'^'of the WEEK 



M 1MI BUICK CEHTUHY UHITED 

HMFOBDRMWEH. Kll.BM. 

Pn«5.Td.C0PJfl-,t8,«S 

H» JEtP OMND CHEROKEE LIUHED, 



iwpowncs»mro. »rix<< em urn 
urn 

IffifflifjaiBW, If. liW lMin«i. 

imMMMBIIE . Smite. MilaM 
If. \>m IlkMnMH SMOO 

twssms 
soma. 
tothaHsuHmuuim. 

!f IWlttWrnrt/. $7,955 

IM9 C<MLUC FlEnWOOD BROUCHMI. 



IWF08DRB. Mi**.toft S3,4!5 

imc«Evrca!nin.nw»iaii,7ii 



AUTOS FOR SALE 



■97 POHTIAC GRAND PRIX 
■97 MERCURY TRACER 
■96 CHEVY S-10 EXT. CAB 

FIARE SIOE 
"96 CHEVY CAVALIER. 4-DH. 
'Si CHEVY LUJUIHA 
'95 TOYOTA COROLLA 

'95 OODGE CARAVAN 

'94 CHEVY EXT. CAB 

'93 DODGE DAKOTA 

'92 JEEP CHEROKEE 4X1 

'91 DODGE SPIRIT 

'90 FORD AEROSTAR CARGO VAN 

'88 CHEVY 4X4 . 

'87 CHEVY BLAZER S-10 4X4 

'92 BUICK REGAL, V-6 

■90 BUICK PARK AVENUE 

'89 OLDSMOBILE SUPREME 

'IS CHEVY ASTRO 



Emery's auto sales 

218-681-4478 



'87 JEEP Woponoor Umltad. 4-door. 4.0 
V-8. 4x4. loadod w/op lions, dmk 
WitoAluo Intortor, now tiros, best buy. 
$4,750, DAS Snloa, 1-600-253-2009 or 

21B-2S3-2940. ItBp 

FOR SALE- -68 Bulck Contury. 
$1,200.00; '88 Plymouth Sundnnco, 
$1,000.00: '85 Cavollor, $400.00, call 

874-8155 attor 5.-30, ItOp 

05 JEEP Grand Chorokoo Laraodo. 4- 
ooor, 4x4; 6-cyl„ whlto with gray Iniorlor, 
Iota ol options, book vnluo $18,400. 
smart buy $14,450. D1S Solos. 1-800- 
253-2000 or 21B-253-204Q. 1t9p 
1W5 CHEVY S-10 4-whool-drlvo Btruor. 
has command start. Coll 218-745-40B7 
ottor 3 p.m. 88tfo _> 



76 FORO LOGGING TRUCK 

AND UAHY JJOHE ARRIVING DAILY! 



Baker's Auto 
Parts & Sales 

1-800-569-4192 
218-964-5321 

1MlEattlltniitln,1lT.3I5witi.SLHilaT.W 



FOU SALE- 1083 Chovy 1/2-ton 4x4. V- 
8, automatic, now tiros, now ana tanks. 
Iroiloiing pocknno. Ilbornlnss toppor. 
noods transmission work. 125,000 mlloo, 

6B1-J570ol1or5:00, P4H2p 

1980 FORD F-250 4x4. $1,050, good 
runnor birt rusty. B' libornloss toppor. liko 
now, S300. BB1-8425 doys or 523-4491 



AUTOS FOR SALE 



'88 FORD TAURUS WAGON 
'87 CADILLAC BROUGHAM 



'85 GMC PICKUP 



Hwy. 59 N* T.R. Falls 
681-3960 V681-7Z71 "SA» 



'92 CADIL1AC Reotwood FWD, 4.0. V- 
8, oold w/un looOior Intortor. vory nlco 
cor ol Oman buy prtco SG.45O.0O. D1S 
Solon. 1.S00.253-2009 Of 218-2532040. 



AUTO HOSPHAL 

Ji-iuTi Hugs* 

ALITO & TRUCK REPAIR 
ENGINE TRANS. OVERHAUL 

681-4629 

KWY. 1 * SB W. TJ1. FALLS. WH 



FOR 8ALE- 1083 Chov. pickup. 2WD, 
305, cnJaa. AM/FM storoo coasotto. now 
iHotnts, battery and oxhaust, $850.00 
tlrm. Can 745-5142 altorBp.m. F2111P 
1tM2 DOOOE Spirit, 4-door, 4-cylIndor. 
automatic, moat cottons, vory good con- 

OlBon. DLR. flBI-BBOO. 1t0p 

FOR SALE- 1BB8 S-10 Btaior, 4x4, V-8. 
auto., Air, at), crOlaa, caasatto, nlco body, 
runs good, Wgh mUoa, $2.785,0011881- 

7778. 2t9p' ; 

FOR SALE- 1089 Chov, Astro van, 4.3 
•ngEno, 87.000 maos, vory cloan condl* 
Bon,$5,B00.00.2ia^ai-105e. P4t0p 
1084 CHEVY 1/2-lon 4x4, a.t, V-8, 305. 
cniaa. 88,000 mHos, 218-253-2367 oftoi 
8*0. P4t10p 



FOR SALE- 4x2 ChOV., 1884, Suburban, 
fun power, soots 9. oxcoliont condition. 

881-2000. 10211c 

FOH SALE- 1089 Plymouth vbyogor SE. 
7-pasaonflor. 2.5 turbo, roar hoot, air, tit. 
ciulso, vory good condition, call 

ovonlnpa. 681-5307. F2t11p 

FOR SALE- 1893 Dodgo Caravan, air, 
cruise. Bit, AM-FM cassotto. powor wind- 
ows and doora, vory doan. Call 681-8018 
days, 681-4257 evening*. F4illc 



4X4 '88 Ford Ranger, V-O.'booutllul black 
truck. $4,905; '88 Bronco 4x4, V-6, over- 
hauled, now tiros, blue end sltvor, sharp. 
$2,995; '07 Polaris XCF, 700 miles, now 
studs, cnibldos, mint. S3.100. Musi sell, 

708-4542. 2t10p ' 

FOR SALE- 1905 Chovrolot Slrvorado 
oxt cab. 4x4, loadod. 49,000 mlloa, ask- 
ing $18,500/Obo: 1D70 Plymouth QTX, 
original 440. auto, transmission, excel- 
lent condition, asking $7,900.00, 218- 

281-3747. ItOp 

19B5 FOBD F-150 XLT, crulso, automel- 
Ic avordrlvo, motor has low mllos, 21B- 
208-4460 ovonlngs. F21t1p 



DEWAYNE'S 

Used Cars, Trucks, & Auto Parts 

VhONE: %6S^a7?i3 

HOURS! Uon. Dtru rrL e un. lo « pjiw 



'96 CHEV. Lumina. 4-door sedan, block 
w/burgandy Interior, V-6, nicety oqulppod, 
58,500 mllos. below book, $11,450. OSS 
Solos, 1-800-253-2000 or 218-253-2940. 
FOR SALE- 1080 Chov, 1-ton 4x4, four- 
door, 454, auto., Slrvorado, days 681- 
6611. P4111p 



-i l ».iiumimmn.»iinTg» 



08 FOfd 4x4 Ext C4* 

B^'OwiivSuburban LT,»— .mm. 
gTchavyEIaMr, u M .*-w*^,« 
07 olds Bnvada,»*MM»«.teiM>.co 
oVOriavy T«hc*. h«™.m«i- 
Sfffchiivy Or. Prix Con. 4x4, «.— 
oTchSvyS^EEac LT, mi 




MOTORS 

aMItlllUBtWIIMi 

OS Bulck Pork Avanua.owMM.Mi 
B7 Pontlac Bonneville SE, j--.» i—*.^ 

67 Cadillac Davllle,m.vi.>«.uM.>> 
eTBulck LaSabra, 




Oo^Cbavy T«hc« LT.»*.-f^...i....ii*. 

St^n*^Bl««f LT,.-™-.— 

im— im»«.w*i * ' *"-" 

OS Dodgai Dakota 4x4 Ext Cab,MH,M, 

g^CMC 8LT Blazer,** .*« — — — . 

5s*cTravy Suburban LT.iam.co.i-*-***' 

ISiTpo , n5oxjTnmaport.o--v »»»••••• 
oTF^Saw' Tramport 3800. <>«,»—. 
57 r5MC%x4^xL™C*b7Sll 



LARGE NUMBER OF 
NEW TRADE-INS 



67 chivyblazor LT 2dr, ■«,>*.« *>— . »r 
McTiavyAxTExL CabSllvorado,n-.v«i,. 
94QMC 4x4 ElL Cab, m.vi.mo.»» 1— 
0TOMC Suburban. * 






VPOMTIAC OLDSMOBILE 
■ Diiif«ir 



1-800-237-4407 



BUICK 



90 pontlac 
IxToTSa BS Raoency. «™. v» .. Ml ». 
gTpontlacSunblrd OT,«— .*• -■.«-, 
D5 OWa Aurora, »x««i»..M,»i..i;» 
SoVonllac Grand Prix. n-.v* «.■.«-.— 
04 Cadillac Oevllle, *-,«»*■■.» 
5Tb ^t^WReg^Eme. mm, « «. h— « 
ftTBuIck Rogal.i«t»rv>"— ■.■.■». 
gToida.'cutJaaa SU ■«■—-.►-—« 
■Uo'Ma'ea'FLoflency Tourlnrj Sedan, 
MChavyBoratta QT,w«, -,—«.-«. 
82 Pontlac Grand Prix 2dTw J ."h— .. 
ETKijick Park Avonua. !*-.« *^-. u 
gTcSlllac Dovlllo.«-.w-.— .— . 



Cavalier, ND • (701) 265-8336 



1 1 998 CHEVY/GMC 3 rd DOOR EXT CAB 4x4 

1,^^^ • 350 V-fl/Automatic • Air Conditioning 
H^B^ijjjj^^^ • Tilt Wheel & Cruise Control • Stereo Cassette 
Q|^| ^^^^bjjjj^^ " f'ower Door Locks/Windows • Much More! 


r^BrXJjWii 1 rqy 


^ 


Christian 

•^^■/Wl oi"o r^'^ 


■ ONE LOW LEASE PAYMENT 


Months Payment Due at Lcatc 


24 »256 ,a b"vH:'i~?~ :s 


MSRP $28,007.25 


iillg^ I -800-531 -6 166 2| 




^fenf^i v 



Used- Car 

UQUIDATI 




1997 DODGE STRATUS 



s 1 3,600 



1996 PLYMOUTH NEON 

HHIiw UnM, Mr, «yl. Dull Air Bigt, 

»»»• s 1 1,500 



. 1997 CHRYSLER LHS , 

I Loaded, Ltillw, And InflnHy Sound Syttom 



1995 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN 

LE. Ocdge s Top-OI-Thc-Linr' 

s 20,800 



1997 DODGE INTREPID 

Ouii Air B.igs. Bench Se.if 

s 1 4,995 



1996 CHRYSLER TOWN & 
COUpYLXI 

|c»Kr , »$25,600 



1997 DODGE RAM CLUB CAB 
4X4. LARAMIE SLT 

St s 26,995 



1996 CHRYSLER TOWN & 

COUNTRY LXI 
jioptau $0C QQR 

Stindird EquId. faJiiltlu 



1997 DODGE INTREPID 

V-6. Auto.. Full Pe.vct 

s 1 4,995 



1934 DODGE RAM 1500 4X4 

UnmliSLTH'Aulo. 

l.* $ 1 3,500 



1 1995 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE 
LAREDO 4X4- 
«!*, Auto, $g-| QQK 



1995 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE 
LAREDO 4X4 

SX s 21,995 

1995 FORD ESCORT WAGON ■H33IEIS5EHI 1995 DODGE DAKOTA CLUB 
LX ■UUlSklEajt&H CAB 4X2 

iCyl.Aui Onl, SQ Cflfl I I^UnHlIUTfl I V« luo.SU SH O 00^ 

2J.M0F.r,. x7,QUU m|JJX|^]2£*i^H I ^11 I J,33J 

I 1995 CHRYSLER CONCORDE 

Local One Owner. H,00 lli. 

S1/1QQC 



s 1 4,995 



1994 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN 

PowwWndoM SE 
llixkt/ltmn - . 
Ful>fo«r 



1994 FORD AEROSTAR VAN 
XLT 

YM6i»ip(»d s "| 1.995 



s 1 995 



s 6,995 



1995 FORD F-150 CLUB CAB 
4X4 XLT 

FfceralmTcwxS^ Q QQfj 



1994 DODGE RAM 4X2 

LARAMIE SLT 

.1 am. Bid SI 4 QQC 

Lin«. 2U0O Ui. I^,^^W* 

1993 PLYMOUTH GRAND 

VOYAGER SE 
vs.A.io. SO QQC 

1-P,m. Se.iting 0,«7\/vJ 

1993 CHRYSLER TOWNS HMIIMMi'llllMiyHmiii 1993 DODGE DAKOTA CLUB 

country mrggmsgsSlmM cab le 4x4 

,XU S 1 0,900 ILVBSBEH s 1 1,800 

1992 DODGE SPIRIT 4-DR. 



1993 DODGE DAKOTA 
CLUB CAB 4X4 

m»u. $ 1 3.995 1 



1993 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE 

UMITED 
»j.«tio,o««»i5-lT» QQR 



s 5,450 



1988 PONTIAC SUNBIRD 

J*,«yL,Au1o. 



1992 FORD AEROSTAR XLT 



1991 FORD EXPLORER 4X4 XLT 



s 995 



s 9,500 



s 9,995 



1991 DODGE W-150 4X4 

JieH+Sp"**"B0l,0aiy 54,000 lit 

s 1 0,995 



Need A Neiv Or Used Car 



Call One 
Of Us! 

WESTSIDE MOTORS 

j~3J Dodge njmouIR UWX^UA OotlgcTmhs OFT.R.F., INC. 

r^-lj CSS^ EaglO *■«■»:■. S.l.-.s uwl l-ti>fnr; - X,4**U, Ifc»-.s ll th-ii,;! 

J..- J -*«lilir»- wii-w.irliuiii-s.i-inii/wr-1-iil.. iiii.l..rs 

' ' it 218-681-4303 Thief River Fi "" 




ALL VEHICLES INSIDE!!! 



NO REASONABLE OFFER REFUSED! 



'95 FORD CONTOUR 
4-DR. 

.1-Cyl.. Auto.. 

Nicely Equip. *8, 495 



'92 6MC SUBURBAN 
4X4 

350, Auto., 1 Ownor 

1 Owner HI. »1 6,495 



'94 CHEVY 1/2-TON 
EXT. CAB"4X4 

350. Auto. 

1 Owner *17, 995 



'95 MERCURY! 

vilugeb:van 

-,v-6. Auto., One Ownop ' 
Leaded <1 3,995 



96 CHEV. S-10 PICKUP 

. 4-Cyl„ S-Spd., Cass., i 
,LS pko-. Alum, wneols, 
Tonnaau Covor .-■.'■ 

16,000 hi. ^9,495^- 



'94 BUICK PARK AVE. 
4-DH. 

V-G. Loathur 
Londcd '13,495 



95 OLDS. CUTLASS 
f— SUPRcME-4;-DR: -- 

' . VT6/Auto:JiL0cally'.OOT10Cl 

loaded »9,995 



'94 BUICK CENTURY 
4-DR. 

v-G. Auto.. Lo.idod 
Locally Owned *7, 995 



'95 CHEVY 1/2-TON 
EXT. CAB 4X4 

.Graphic P.tlnt 

.One Owner s 1 8,995 



■90 PLYMOUTH 
ACCLAIM 4-DR. 

4-cyl.. Auto: 

Onr Pries *1 : j995 



'94 PONTIAC 
BONNEVILLE 4-DR. 

■v-G. Lonued; l!Aathor 

1 Owner '12,950 



'96 CHEVY CORSICA '95 OLDS. REGENCY 

4-DR. 4-DR. 

:oly Equlppod 1 Ownar ■ 

Our Price s 7, 995 OreatFrlco '15,995 



'94 CHEVY LUMINA 
EURO 4-DR. • 

v-e. Auto., Loaded . 
One Owner '9,950 



'85 CHEV. 1/2-TON 
PICKUP 

99.000 Ml. 

1 Owner '3,495 



'96 CHEVY BLAZER 
4-BR. 

V-6. Auto. . 

LoaJed '19,950 



'95 CHEVY TAHOE 
. 4-DR. 4X4 

350. Auto.. Ono Owner 

REDUCED TO '23, 50Q 



'87 DODGE DAKOTA 
4X4 

V-G. Auto. 

Mice '5,950 



94 MERCURY SABLE 
4-DR. GS 

V-6, Auto., Loadad 

Locally Owned '8,395 



2-'97 CHEVY LUMINA 
4-DR. 

V-G. Auto.. Loadod 

Your Cholce...'1 2,995 



96 PONTIAC GRAND 
S WAM2-DH.I 

□tiqci 4, Auto'. 

uattwi '10,495 



'94 CHEV. BLAZER 
4-DR. LT 

v-o. 1 Ownor 
Loaded '14,995 



'95 CHEVY 1/2-TON 
; EXT. CAB 4X4 

350, Loaded . 

One Owner '18,495 



'95 PONTIAC GRAND 
AM 2-DR. 

4-Cyl...Autu.. Brlijlit Rod 

Our Price '9,495 



"98 PONTIAC GRAND 
TV AM 4-DH. 

' ' -r^ 1 .. Auto.. A/C 

our.Pit" -10,495 



'96 DODGE EXT. CAB 
4X4 

318. Auto.. 32.000 Ml. ; - 

Leaded '20,950 



'95 BUICK PARK AVE. 
4-DR. 

V-6. 1 Ownor 

Loaded s 1 5,995 



• OISIE DAYDNOr"* 



Your Hometown GM Dealer 



wmm 



Hwy. 1&59W. Thief River F^lls, MN 681-4820 




Prvfits up, sales down 



75 c 



Volume 8. Number 6 



V T" T NORTHE RN | "W ~^"~ 



324 Main Avenue North, Thief River Falls, MN 56701 



■■ Jiu-ksl 



Saturday, February 7, 1998 j 




AROUND 
THE REGION 

Knlhi Carlson 



derby r 



Roseau native 
finalist in bake-off 

Roseau - Roseau native 
Hazel Nutc of Tncomn, WA is 
one of 100 finalists competing 
for a SI million prize in 
Pillsbury's "Quick and Easy 
Bake-off." The televised con- 
test will be held on February 
24 and hosted' by Jeopardy s 
Alex Trcbcc. 

Nute is one of 100 finalists 
chosen from over 20,000 
entries, The contest is divided 
into four categories — simple 
side dishes, main dishes, appe- 
tizers and quick and cosy 
treats — with 25 finalists in 
each group. Nutc's recipe, for 
a side dish made with Green 
Giant Vegetables, will remain 
a secret until after the winner 
is announced. Roseau Times- 
Region 

After two year 
absence fishing 
returns 

Cancelled for 
the lost two years due to 
weather conditions, the ice 
fishing derby sponsored by the 
Fosston Area Sportsman Club 
■rtlMwam.io Cross;Lake on 
Sunday, February 8. 

In addition to prizes for 
fishing results, there will "be 
ticket drawings for cash prizes 
and items donated by area 
businesses. 

Proceeds from the derby will 
be used for the numerous con- 
servation projects of the club. 
The Thirteen Towns 

Water tower 
construction ,, 
begins in Erskine 

Ersklne - Construction of 
the new 250,000 gallon water 
tower in Erslcine was sched- 
uled to begin this week by 
Caldwell Tank Co. Firs! work 
to be completed will be the 
setting of the footings for the 
lower. Vie Erskine Echo 

Baudette company 
builds floating 
track vans 

Warroad - M & C 

Fabrication of Baudette con- 
structed two positive floata- 
tion track vans now in use on 
Lake of the Woods. 

Each new von weighs 7,340 

faunas and can safely keep 
1,600 pounds afloat. There 
arc no cords to pull or switch- 
es to flip. A specially-designed 
foam blown into the floors, 
benches and wails of the vans. 
Mark LaValla and Chad 
Beckel of M & C Fabrication 
look the body off an old track 
van and constructed a new 
body for it. The black UPS 
truck-looking vehicles can 
carry up to 12 people, one and 
one-half limes as many as the 
older converted street vans. 
Warroad Pioneer 

Clearwater saves 
for new facility 

Baglcy • Clearwater 
County is building a new S4.3 
million jail and addition to the 
courthouse the old fashioned 
way — by budgeting and sav- 
ing for it. 

One of the poorest counties 
in the stale, Clearwater Coun- 
ty needs to replace the run- 
down jail the county bought 
from the City of Bagley in 
1905, but instead of asking the 
tax payers to pay for it with n 
bonding issue, the county has 
been saving and budgeting for 
it since about 1994. 

Construction began in May 
of 1997, and the jail is expect- 
ed to open this summer. 77ic 

(Continued On Page 2) 




Area man charged |g 
in double accident 



A Ncwfoldcn man fates drunk 
driving charges after his vehicle 
crashed into un accident scene on 
Highway I Friday. January .10. 

According lo the Minnesota 
Stale i'airol. Tawnya I'anek had 
been involved in a single vehicle 
accident about four miles west of 
Thief River Kails on Highway I at 
about 11:19 p.m. January 30. 
According lo information released 
and reported in The Times, Punck 
was driving past a shclierbcll, hit 
and icy patch, her vehicle skidded 
and rolled, and she was ejected from 
the vehicle. 

As Panek was lying in the middle 
of the roadway a vehicle driven by 
Dean Engen crashed into ihc acci- 
dent scene. 

In formal ion about lhal accident 
was not released until recently 
bccau.se of an ongoing investiga- 
tion. According lo the information, 
Brandon Yoney of Argylc, who was 
driving a 1991 Ponliac Grand Am, 
came upon the accident scene, and 
noticed a woman (Panek) lying on 
the road waving at him, Yoney 
pulled to Ihc side of ihc road, but 
not entirely off the road, to assist 
Panek. He then noticed another 
vehicle approaching the accident 
scene and flashed his lights at the 



pickup continued into ihc accident 
scene, glanced off the Punck vehi- 



cle, hit the Yoney vehicle, and 
ended up in the ditch. Yoney then 
noticed that the woman (Panek) was 
lying face down in the dilch. und 
presumed she had been struck by 
ihc pickup. 

Upon arriving at the scene. Stale 
Patrol identified the driver of the 

Kckup as Dean Engen, 21. of 
cwfoldcn. although bngen denied 
thai he was the driver. Yoney, Engen 
and passengers in those vehicles 
were not injured. 

Panek was tuken lo Northwest 
Medical Center in Thief River Falls 
and then transferred to Altru 
Hospital in Grand Forks. As of 
Friday, February 6, Panek was listed 
in satisfactory condition at Altru 
Hospital 'in Grand Forks. 

Pennington County District 
Court records show that Engen 
appeared in court on Monday and 
has been charged with criminal 
vehicular operation resulting in 
great bodily harm, enhanced gross 
misdemeanor driving while intoxi- 
cated, and driving without insur- 
ance. He was released on personal 
recognizance. 

According to court records, 
Engen has two prior DWI convic- 
tions, one in 1993 and one in 1994. 
He stands charged in this case with 
"enhanced driving while intoxicat- 
ed", a new violation recently adopt- 
ed by the Legislature, which impos- 
-cs a tougher sentence. 




Three police officers from the Thief River Foils 
Police Department were honored by the Klwanls 
Club of Thief River Falls recently. The three offi- 
cers were credited for saving the lives of a num- 
ber of people during an apartment fire in down- 
town Thief River Falls on September 21. Each of 
the officers. Investigator Tim Miller, Officer 



Teresa Mattlson, and Officer Brent Monroe, 
received a plaque, and an award from the AAL of 
Trinity Lutheran Church. Pictured from left are: 
Don Jorstad, division 12 district Lt. Governor for 
Kiwanls, Officer Teresa Mattlson, Investigator 
Tim Miller, Officer Brent Monroe, and Lea 
Vlgness, Kiwanls. 



Officers honored for 
bravery during fire 




During a banquet Tuesday. 
February 3, three police officers 
from Thier River Falls received spe- 
cial recognition for risking their 
lives to save others during a fire 
Scplcmbcr2l. I997. 

The Thief River Falls police 
deportment, fire department and 
ambulance service were honored at 
the banquet. Kiwanis Club and AAL 
of Thief River Falls singled out 
Officers Brent Monroe, Teresa 
Mattison and Investigator Tim 
^filler for special recognition after 
J.lhey risked their lives to.savc others 
''during the September^ I-.1997 fire 



at Ihc Drevlow building in down- 
town Thief River Falls. The three 
officers entered the burning build- 
ing, awakened a number of people 
who were sleeping at the time, and 
guided them through thick smoke lo 
safety. 

Accounts of the event were, read 
to a crowd of friends and relatives 
gathered at the Best Western. Thief 
River Falls Mayor Mark Borshcim 
said he was very proud of the offi- 
cers who clearly went beyond the 
call of duty. Police Chief Ken 
Froschhciscr thanked his depart- 
ment;- the fire- ; department, and 



ambulance service and then said he 
was proud lo have the opportunity 
to work with these three officers and 
command them. 

Adeline Parnow of AAL at 
Trinity Lutheran Church presented 
the three officers with special 
grants. She explained that every 
year they get a grant to recognize 
someone who has performed out- 
standing service to the community. 
This year, she said, they decided to 
give the grant to these three officers. 
(Thf/olTiccrs have donated the grant 
toHnc DARE program.) 

{Continued on Page 12) 



Lincoln bands perform 
concert Monday night 



ty: M. . 

War" will be presented by Lincoln of the concert with Armed Forces 
high school bands us the theme for Salute, arranged by Bob Lowdcn, a 



Tom Morrissey is president of Scribe-Rite Steel, Inc. of Gatzke. 
The welding and machining business is housed In the former 
school building where Tom and-two employees build adjustable, 
ergonomic work tables used primarily in industry. 

Shop table gains 
wide acceptance 



their winter concert Monday, 
February 9, at 7:30 p.m. in the high 
school auditorium. There is no 
admission fee. 

Under the direction of Bruce 
Felt, Lincoln's jazz band, concert 
band and wind ensemble will be 
featured in songs with military and 
patriotic significance. 

"All of these pieces portray not 
only the Strang spirit that bonds sol- 
diers and their country, but also the 
pain, fear and confusion of war," 



by Knthl Carlson 
Northern Watch Reporter 
During our visit, Tom Morrissey 
used the word "really" a lot us he 
described what he docs as "really 
fun." how he feels about what's hap- 
pening as "really exciting" and his 
outlook as "really optimistic." 



Inc.), n welding and machining 
operation located in the former 
school building in Gatzke. 

The major product of the busi- 
ness is a table used, for the most 
pan, as a work station in manufac- 
turing facilities. 

The ergonomic table is 
adjustable, a crank adjusting the 
height between 30 and 42 inches. It 
includes an air manifold with con- 
nections for five different air tools. 
An optional, adjustable overhead 
attachment will accomodate a four- 
foot flourcsccnt light and five addi- 
tional air tools. "The white plastic 
tablclop utilizes available light very 
well ," says Tom. The tabic is also 
i available with a metal tablclop for 
welding. 

The table's design is simple. 
Trailer jacks arc used for the legs, 
and the mechanism is driven by n 
bicycle chain. 

Some of the components of the 
table arc built by Hanson 
Manufacturing of Lancaster and 
Metal Magic of Middle River. Other 
pans and the nuts and holts come 
out of Grand Forks. The majority of 
the metal is from the Twin Cities. 
and the tablciops arc delivered from 
Fargo. 

The price of the tabic' starts at 
$500. and it is available to individu- 
als as well as industry. 

Polaris engineer Phil Johnson is 
crcdiicd wiih the original concept. 
Johnson owns Intercept Industries 



in Roseau which manufactures 
components far Polaris and mounts 
tires on the company's ATV's, 

Morrissey says he took Johnson's 
design and "cleaned it up and made 
it producible." He has been making 
Ihc tables since 1992 and in July of 
1995, incorporated and moved his 
business into the school building in 
Gatzke. 

It was Tom's original intent to 
(Continued on back page) 



and we 

lore this night of 



very woflhw 
invite everyi 

celebration and remembrance. 
• Opening the concert will be the 
jazz band playing Blue Train which 
features soloists Kyle Rokkc. Jim 
Lehrcr, Lesley Ihle and Kristinc 
Koop. The second song, Traces, is a 
trombone solo with band accompa- 
niment wiih Jim Lehrcr as soloist. 
Final selection will be Rhythm Me 
Tliis with solos by Brad Dckkcrs 
and Tyler Stinson. 



medley of Army, Navy, Marine, Air 
Force und Coast Guard songs per- 
formed with patriotic spirit. This 
will be followed by March of the 
Belgian Paratroopers, written by 
Pierre Lecmans and arranged by 
Charles A. Wiley and Where Never 
Lark or Eagle Flew by James 
Curnow, based on a poem by John 
Gillespie Magcc Jr. 

Spitfire by James Barnes will 
open the wind ensemble portion of 
the concert. It begins with a fanfare 
style opening and develops into 
almost a ballad. Esprit de Corps by 
Robert Jugcr presents a group spint 
which is an evident theme of the 
armed forces. The final number, 
Symphony til: In Memoriam 
Dresden by Daniel Bukvich, is on 
unconventional piece based on Ihc 
Ijmbing of Dresden, Germany, 
which Felt said is sure to move the 
audience. 

Members of the concert band and 
wind ensemble arc Ihc following 
with names of members of those 



bands who participate in the jazz 
band printed in bold type: 
Concert Band 

Flute — Tana Bachand, Angie 
Johnson, Jennifer Koch, Ncal Pate), 
Amy Rominski, Ashlyn Stratton, 
Carolyn Walralh and Carissa 
Hcndrickson; 

Bassoon — Jenny Klavcn; 

Clarinet — Yvonne Asp, Amy 
Christcnson, Tiffany Frank, Theresa 
Gaffancy, Katy Hook and Lisa 
Joppru; 

Bass Clarinet — George Haj: 

Alto Saxophone — Diana Hof- 
stud, Kristin Muzzy, Carissa Place k, 
Stephanie Sculihorp and Amanda 
Strut/: 

Tenor Saxophone— Melissa 
Adamson and Chad Bomcman; 

Baritone Saxophone— Matt 
Bcilo; 

Trumpet — Josh Gryskiewicz, 
Chad Halvorsdn, Erika Hudson, 
Marsha Lubitz, Kara Mosbcck, John 
Schwartz. Nate Sorvig and Amber 
Stockford; 

Horn — Dedc Dally and Josh 
Lampc; 

(Continued on Page 5) 



Manitoba dairymen use quota system 

Farmer organization handles all milk purchases and sales in the province 



(This is the 1 0th in a series of 
Northern Watch stories on the loss 
of dairy farmers and a view toward 
ihc future of the dairy industry in 
nonhwest Minnesota.) 

by Marvin Lund in 
Northern Watch Editor 

Established by the Province of 
Manitoba in 1974, Manitoba Milk 
Producers (MMP) is a dairy farmer 
organization which handles the pur- 
chase of milk from all dairy farmers 
and sales lo all processors in Ihc 
province. This control has brought 
stability lo the industry, enabled 
dairy farmers to negotiate price and 
permitted profitable dairy forming 
and processing to exist throughout 
Manitoba. 

Presently the MMP represents 




768 dairy farms which produce 
about 23 million liters of milk with 
a value of S12.5 to S13 million 
Canadian dollars per month. (One 
liter equals 1.056 quarts.) The milk 
is sold to the 12 processors in the 

Sravincc with 18 haulers contracted 
y the MMP to pick up milk at the 
farm every oilier day and transport it 
lo the processors. 

Board Collects, Distributes 
Each monlh the MMP collects 
for sales to processors and distrib- 
utes the returns to the producers on 
a pool basis. All producers share 
equally in the proceeds from all 
markets— both fluid and industri- 
al— and producers arc paid accord- 
ing to the amount of milk each has 
marketed. 

Manitoba Milk 
Producers is operat- 
ed by a nine-mem- 
ber board, with one 
member elected for 
a three-year term 
from each of the 
nine districts in the 
province. The pre- 
sent chairman is 
Neil Van P,ysscl of 



Oak Bank. Manitoba, representing 
District 6. All board members must 
be dairymen who arc active produc- 
ers in their districts. There arc two 
or three days a month when the 
board meets to set policy, hear 
reports of marketing activity and 
review quotas. 

Purposes Of The Board 
According lo information pro- 
vided by Jim Wade, who has been 
general manager of MMP since 
1987, the purpose for establishing 
the board has been and remains: 

• To obtain fair and equitable 
prices for milk; 

• To develop and maintain an 
orderly marketing strategy; 

• To encourage a consistent sup- 
ply of high quality milk; 

• To maintain an adequate adver- 
tising and promotion program; and 

•To act on behalf of all milk pro- 
ducers with respect to the public. 
Quota System A Key 

The quota system is a key lo the 
program and is based on the domes- 
tic market. Wade said lhal 90 per- 
cent of the production of Manitoba's 
dairy farmers goes into the domestic 
market. Of the total, about 39